THE NEW ADVENTURES OF CHARLIE CHAN starring J Carrol Naish (1957)

39 stories were made-
1 Your Money or your Wife
2 Secret of the Sea
3 The Lost Face
4 Blind Man's Bluff
10 The Rajput Ruby
11 Final Curtain
12 Death at High Tide
13 Circle of Fear
14 Exhibit in Wax
20 The Noble Art of Murder
21 Three Men on a Raft
22 No Holiday for Murder
23 No Future for Frederick
24 Safe Deposit
30 The Invalid
31 Man in the Wall
32 Something Old Something New
33 Man with 100 Faces
34 Point of no Return
5 The Great Salvos
6 The Counterfeiters
7 Death of a Don
8 Charlie's Highland Fling
9 The Patient in Room 21
15 Backfire
16 Patron of the Arts
17 Hamlet in Flames
18 Dateline- Execution
19 The Sweater
25 Voodoo Death
26 The Expatriate
27 Airport Murder Case
28 Hand of Hera Dass
29 Chippendale Racket
35 A Bowl by Cellini
36 Without Fear
37 Kidnap
38 Rhyme or Treason
39 Three for One
This was rather a stodgy series, illumined by the obviously barbed comments between the great detective and his Number One Son, who usually puts his foot into it. Barry Chan appears in 25 of the stories: Nos. 4 to 13, 15 to 17, 20, 22, 24 to 33.
After stories 1 to 5 had been filmed in USA in March 1957, production moved to England, J Carrol Naish travelling to Britain from New York at the start of April 1957.
Some limited location shooting was done in other European countries in which stories were set: France: Story 6 (Paris) and 12, Brussels: 16, 20 and 22, Amsterdam: 19, Rome: 27, 35 and 37, Venice: 33 and 34.

Best episode: #33 Man with 100 Faces. Alan Wheatley said that this was one of his favourite roles.
Dud episode: #2 Secret of the Sea- though nearly all the American-made stories are poor.

Best moments are Charlie Chan's pithy sayings. Here's one from
#31 "Always most necessary to learn facts before fiction, sometimes fly might be in ointment."
Here's my complete list.

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Pithy comments by the great Charlie Chan, as uttered in this series.
The number before each quote indicates the programme in which the saying was given.

1- "Even the frightened fawn is aware of the hunter that seeks its life."
1- "When heart is full of tears, there's no room for understanding."
2- "If one hibiscus bloom in a field withers and dies, it could be accidental weakness, but not when more than one is affected."
2- "Love is like a blacksmith's hammer- it can shape the white hot steel of emotion for both good and evil."
2- "Pleasant memory like the scent of jasmine- remains long after one has departed the scene."
2- "Detection, and the making of good coffee, sometimes requires the same ingredient- the proper amount of heat to bring about the desired result."
2- "When a man reaches age of serenity, comfort comes from within."
2- "A beautiful woman is like a delicate flower that adds color to the most drab occasion."
3- "Ten years to an innocent man is like ten lifetimes."
3- "When a shepherd discovers three of his flock slaughtered, he usually looks for the wolf."
3- "When a tree is weighted down with the snows of adversity, who is there to say when the limb will break?"
3- "Not even the sound of a thousand children's voices can replace the sight of one smudge of dirt on a little rosy cheek."
3- "Only a fool enters the darkness of a bear's cave without at least the illumination of a tiny candle."
3- "Even strongest tree needs support in a violent storm."
3- "A boulder of suspicion cannot stop an avalanche of justice."
3- "Only a fool enters the darkness of a bear's cave without at least the illumination of a tiny candle."
4- "Sometimes pity like precious pearl, dissolves in wine of truth."
4- "A simple rock sometimes conceals a valuable vein of gold."
5- "When door of mind is unlocked, strangers bearing rich gifts are often visitor."
5- "The patient man accomplishes much, for the impatient man there is never time enough" (inscribed on Charlie's watch).
6- "Silence often speaks louder than words."
6- "Detectives like busmen must also have holiday."
7 "Hungry man never gets handout from minding other people's business."
7- "Very few people have natural appetite for eating crow."
7- "Hot heads never go cold, just get more hot."
7- "Fading flower no longer attracts bee."
8- "Man can be without vice, but never without temptation."
8- "In business of crime detection, mind like umbrella- only functions when open."
9- "Mutual alibi like teacup, does not always hold water."
9- "Like broken Ming vase, uneasy conscience very difficult to mend."
9- "Like small boy encountering vicious dragon, I shall be very careful."
10- "Old romance like cat, sometimes has nine lives."
10- "First sign of age, when man cannot tie shoe from standing position."
10- "Secret romance like dead ant in pepperpot- very often difficult to detect."
11- "Very wise man said Study of Nature much more important than Study of Fingerprints."
11- "The obvious and the truth are rarely identical."
11- "Like lingering scent of violets, you have given much pleasure."
11 - "If you are not sailor, do not use boathook."
11- "After death, man gives up everything he holds."
12- "Hungry man never quarrels with cook."
13- "Patience like sleeping flower, cultivate same and it will reward you handsomely"
13- "Ways of woman in love were never born in cradle of life."
13- "One does not solve crime by committing another."
14- "One hour's conversation with superior person better than many year's study."
14- "Small but high storey buildings rise from gradual accumulation of small bricks."
14- "Knowledge is the only medicine to cure itch of curiosity."
15- "One pinch of aristocracy added to small mind, makes fat head."
15- "Stimulation of brain by intriguing problem is much more interesting than banker's draft"
16- "In contemplation of eternal beauty, one catches glimpse of eternal truth."
16- "Small acorn of today grows into towering tree of tomorrow."
16- "Arrival of good fortune is like return of long delayed ship- one hardly dares think it is not a mirage."
16- "A sheep herder is always suspicious of strange sheep, because under sheepskin might be wolf."
16 - "When harsh wind smashes egg of nightingale to ground, many beautiful songs die for ever."
17- "Impatience is a disease of the young, can only be cured by old age."
17- "Like retired firehorse who smells smoke, I cannot resist the lure of police hq."
18- "Credulity, unlike elastic, cannot stretch."
18- "Subway like ancient Chinese puzzle."
18- "Even smallest drop of rain gives hope to parched flower."
18- "Jealousy destroys all reason."
18- "Woman gives birth to child on small island. There's no birth certficate to prove same, nevertheless mother is convinced of child's existence."
19- "Loss of a loved one is difficult even for strongest shoulders."
19- "Old Chinese saying, Never argue while looking in mouth of tiger."
19- "Things of beauty, lovely ladies included, are joy for ever."
20- "Impatience is sometimes like a large stone in pathway- can trip you up."
20- "Words in jest often lead to misunderstanding."
21- "Patience can find smallest needle in largest haystack."
21- "When trap is well baited, no need for hunter to spring same."
21- "Being publisher is like man living on top of volcano, never know when eruption is going to take place."
22- "Two birds on branch sing sweetly, but another changes melody to discord."
22- "Anger very bad for the digestion."
23- "Truth, even when hidden at bottom of well, must be pursued until revealed."
23- "Most lovely ladies do not take life, they give it to mankind."
24- "If traffic becomes puzzlingly heavy, sometimes indirect route leads more quickly to destination."
24- "Clever placement of bait by fisherman often lands large juicy mackerel."
24- "Sometimes youthful heart is closed book to adult mind."
24- "Beyond face of anger is often face of fear."
25- "Ancient saying: never bet on unsure thing."
25- "A loyal friend is like rare white jade from ancient Honsu period, both are beyond price."
25 - "A cup of good tea on arising is almost preferable to handful of emeralds."
25 - "Like ageing spinster, I am getting too old to blush becomingly."
25 - "Never bet on unsure thing."
26- "Like finding real chicken in cafeteria coup, your confession is most surprising."
26- "Beautiful woman becomes a thousandfold more beautiful when she wears jewel of kindness."
27- "When client wants trap set for another, sometimes get caught by same himself"
27- "Obvious answer is not always solution to crime."
28- "Man is optimistic creature who forever expects tap on door to foretell arrival of beauty."
29- "Coincidence, which is occasionally very pleasant as a dish, is not palatable as a steady diet."
30- "Anger so soon after lunch very bad for indigestion."
30- "Best way to catch fish is not to disturb water."
31- "Man in iron suit no good for dancing- cannot get feet off ground"
31- "Truth cures many things, it's very possible truth could also cure all ills of world."
31- "Old oriental detective loves challenge of the impossible."
32- "Rarely does one hear roar of lion come out of mouse's throat."
32- "In moments of peril, even small mouse will bite."
32- "Politeness like old wine, improves many occasions."
33- "Man who sees dawn, sees beauty; but man who sees sunset, survives the day."
34- "Reputation like small bottle, cast into sea, should reach such distant shores."
34- "Sometimes mask of simplicity hides face of fathomless mystery."
37- "When you are hunting tiger, it is not wise to bring down a jackal, because this might warn larger beast who seeks safety in jungle."
37- "Bigger the oath, greater the liar."
39- "When two and two equals five, then it is logical to suspect that one has been added."
39- "Tide of good fortunes change when least expected."
(I couldn't find any good Chan sayings in #35, #36 or #38)
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Secret of the Sea
Charlie Chan is in San Pedro. "Something big" is destined to happen on the Honolulu Star, reports an informer, who is shot dead.
Charlie investigates the murder of this man, a steward on the ship. Thus we find Charlie bound for a "calm, uneventful voyage," at least that's what Captain Paul Carnovan promises him. But there are plenty of suspicious characters of course, the clumsy steward who has replaced the dead man, Ed Barker radio signaller, as well as the incompetent chief engineer Johnny Flynn. One of the other rare passengers is Doris, wife of the captain, and much younger than him. Oddly she wears high heels on board.
When the engine seizes up 200 miles out to sea, and the crew cannot find the cause, it's Chan who points out the source of the trouble, "loaded with dirt." Flynn is sent for to get a piece of the captain's mind but he's found "extremely dead." The captain has no choice but radio for help, which is soon forthcoming from a ship out of Acapulco commanded by Arturo Ramirez. It's an expensive operation, with the salvage bill coming to $150,000.
So has Carnovan colluded with Ramirez to share this absurdly large fee? Maybe not, as Lt Kovacs and Chan arrive in the nick of time to prevent Carnovan from shooting Ramirez! Their dispute is over the attractive Doris, has she been two-timing? "He didn't do anything," Doris promises her husband as he bursts into tears. Asks Ramirez, "tell me what's going on. I don't get any of this." That goes for me too.
Charlie "straightens" him, though not me, out, expounding his theory of collusion between Ramirez and someone on the Honolulu Star. But if it wasn't Cpt Carnovan, who was it?
A gun persuades Charlie to search no further. But some exceptionally clumsy feinting from Chan incredibly enables him to snatch the dangerous gun and arrest the accomplice. "You explain things very well." Allegedly
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The Lost Face
This is an unpleasant opening, clumsily executed, as a woman has acid thrown at her in her San Fernando Valley home, while outside a little girl plays ball. She sees the attacker leave.
The LA police warn Charlie Chan that "prosperous" Dan Randolph is "too dangerous" a man to investigate. Randolph is an attorney who specialises in getting villains released on bail, later they mysteriously get bumped off.
His latest atrocity is the one seen at the beginning. The wife of crime reporter Zac has had acid thrown in her face, she is likely to lose her sight.
Jack Hart is identified as the attacker by the child, and he's one of Randolph's "boys." His lawyer is urging his release and the perceptive Charlie proposes that Hart choose between leaving the police station with Randolph, or stay in custody. Hart chooses bail.
Zac decides to take the law into his own hands and give the evil Randolph his due. "I didn't hit him that hard," he tells the cops, but Randolph has been killed! Zac's in a spot, and "I don't have a Dan Randolph to get me off."
Charlie is paid by the friendly neighbourhood barman to do a Randolph for Zac. He succeeds and now races to prevent the inevitable "imminent departure from this world" of Jack Hart. He achieves this by the unusual method of accusing Hart of murdering Randolph, and exposing his own paymaster of being another of Randolph's hatchet men.
At least that payment comes in useful for an eye operation to restore Zac's wife's sight
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The Counterfeiters

Pan Am Flight 654 from New York lands at London Airport with distinguished passenger Charlie Chan, accompanied by No1 Son Barry, for the first of their European based adventures. (It had been stated Charlie was flying to Madrid in the previous story, but who cares?)

Greeting him is Inspector Duff (Patrick Holt, later in the series to be transformed into Rupert Davies) who wants Charlie to investigate the theft of a French currency plate from a venerable London firm of banknote engravers. The pompous manager of the firm, Sir John (John Loder) tells Charlie how a courier had produced documents which later proved to be forged, and carried off the 5,000 franc plate. Forged notes will soon be causing a crisis in France! "Wow, what a natural!" exclaims No1 Son. Charlie translates for his British hosts.
Speeding to Paris, Charlie shows the police the forged papers which are identified as the work of Spanish Roy, a valuable member of the orange Circuit resistance during the war, trained to be a forger. "The man's a genius," admits Inspector Chauvet.
No1 Son tries to find Roy at a cafe where he's quickly relieved of his passport. "I'm looking for Spanish Roy, he's a shoemaker," explains Barry, not realising he is, by chance, addressing the very man. Later Barry realises his blunder, when Roy responds to Charlie's invitation to talk. But as they talk a bullet flies through the window, aimed at Spanish Roy. Luckily a pocket chess set saves his life, but the incident seems to decide him not to talk after all. Though Roy is arrested Charlie secures his release, but this favour still won't budge him "I'm still not talking." Charlie surmises Roy forged the documents for a friend, an old resistance leader, perhaps. Michel is the name, but Roy won't reveal his real identity.
However he changes his mind later and as Charlie is not there, hands Barry an envelope with Michel's real name. In absence of honourable dad, Barry hands it to Sir John. We all know who he really is, of course. All except Barry that is. "We know who's behind the gang," No1 Son naively informs Sir John, who scribbles a note for No1 Son to take to police, and there Barry is arrested.
At the old underground headquarters Charlie comes face to face with Michel. Why did you do it? asks Charlie. Sir John explains he wanted to pit his wits against the best, ie Chan. But his ex-colleagues are disiilusioned with such behaviour and mete out their own very summary justice.
Charlie returns Spanish Roy's chess set to him

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Death of a Don

No1 Son is studying at the famous Stratford University (perhaps for a degree in The Olympics?!), and has made friends with music student Derek Robinson (Francis Matthews). Derek is at loggerheads with his professor Dr Don Welman (John Bailey) who scorns the young man's soulful compositions, "you call that music!" He "lacks talent" and writes "undisciplined drivel," in other words Dr Welman doesn't go for avant garde stuff at all. Goaded, poor Derek responds to the stinging remarks, "you're dead, washed up, living in the past, there's nothing in the future for people like you, except death." Armed with such a line, we await the inevitable murder.
Derek is rusticated for such rudeness. When introduced to Charlie, the wise advice is "apologise." Derek attempts to do so, when he catches up with Welman who's at a show I'm In a Dancing Mood at the Palace Theatre. Musical director is Jack Pearson (William Franklyn) and Janet Rushton (Betty McDowall) is his leading lady. She's Dr Welman's ex-wife. He's come to seek a reconciliation, but she tells him, "it's no use." The show must go on anyway. It appears to be a mixture of ballet, not to Charlie's taste, and music of the nations.
During the interval Welman offers to resign from his post if she will come back to him. While No1 Son and honourable dad enjoy some frenzied dancing to bongo drums, Derek goes backstage to apologise to Welman. But he stumbles over his enemy, stabbed to death.
"Murder, call the police!" shouts a stagehand, and the show doesn't go on any more.
Of course Derek is chief suspect, though Charlie points out to the dim inspector that Janet Rushton might also have a motive, as does Jack Pearson, who seems smitten with Janet, although he had been conducting the orchesta at the time of the killing.
The murder weapon cannot be found. According to forensic evidence, it must have been a round object about the thickness of a pencil. "Everything now quite clear," pronounces Charlie.
It is to Barry too, for in Janet's dressing room he thinks he has found the weapon, a hat pin. So we know that eliminates her! "Case already closed," Charlie informs No1 Son bluntly.
For Charlie is now moving in to corner the killer during the next performance of the show. He had spotted what had been overlooked. Barry does redeem himself by felling the fleeing murderer.
Thus Derek is reinstated at the university and Charlie bids farewell to No1 Son, who is to continue his studies. Barry remembers dad's birthday is coming up, so shouts to Charlie's departing taxi, asking him what he'd like. Bongos, comes back the wise answer.
One of the better stories, I liked the banter twixt Charlie and his hopeful son. Maybe, in view of the final scene, this was once intended to be Barry's final appearance in the series?

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The Patient in Room 17
I like this well constructed story, partly because of its strong cast.

Dr Paul Liggat (Peter Dyneley) was convicted in 1947 in Canada for a mercy killing. Ten years later under the name of Michael Winstead he's working as a top surgeon at the Mercy Hospital London where No1 Son is enjoying being treated by Nurse Elizabeth Vernon (Honor Blackman). Charlie is there too, to see Chief Surgeon George Morley and Sir Edward Pomeroy, Chairman of the Board of Directors (Raymond Francis). Morley has received an anonymous letter about Winstead's past, plus a press cutting of the trial in Ottawa of a Dr Liggat. "It does look like Dr Winstead," gasps Barry.
Charlie promises to do "humble best" and find if Liggat and Winstead are one and the same. His starting point is the accusing letter, which however is stolen from Barry's room that night. A concussed Barry ends up in hospital again, with more pleasant treatment from Elizabeth Vernon. Recovered, Barry is sent by dad to Ottawa to get the dope on the case first hand. When he returns, he brings with him Anne Gerald, the victim's private nurse.
"I've never seen him before," is her observation. But though he's been vindicated, Winstead admits the truth. "I shall leave at once," he adds, even though he claims he never killed his Canadian patient.
Privately afterwards, Charlie is curious why Miss Gerald had failed to identify him. Charlie believes it was she who performed the mercy killing, even though she doesn't admit as much.
She then talks to Liggat: "I'd do anything to undo it," she tells him. She agrees to confess to the truth, but inevitably before Charlie can talk to her she's been silenced, a knife in her back. However she is still breathing, and Dr Winstead tends her.
Charlie discusses developments with Sir Edward, who is however unwell with acute ileitis. Morley is about to operate, but Charlie recommends postponement as Morley has already tried to kill Anne.
"You're mad," is all Sir Edward can reply with a groan, but it is enough to solve the case for the inscrutable Charlie.
The unseen Inspector Duff is on the case. With her dying breath, Anne Gerald has at least least cleared Winstead.
But it's Charlie who solves her murder when he revisits Sir Edward, lying on the operating trolley. He tells the patient he has arranged for Winstead to operate. But Sir Edward raves that he does not want to be treated by a murderer. In his delirium he confesses it was he who had sent the anonymous letter, for he loves Elizabeth Vernon, and was jealous of rival Winstead. How he got off his sick bed to murder Miss Gerald is never revealed!
But he has now admitted all. Ironically Charlie tells him in a last sad line, "Mr Morley will perform operation. He will save your life for the hangman."

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Death at High Tide
Nazi war criminal Karl Brettner has excaped prison. As he's the only man alive who knows the exact location where the SS Patrick was sunk by his men during the war, it's important he's found before he gets away with the cargo of ten million dollars worth of gold bullion. Charlie's employed by insurance broker Frank Wells to recover the treasure.
Le Bon Maranne is an inn near Bordeaux run by Henri and his wife Marie (Lisa Daniely), she never leaves the place, grieving for her parents who had been killed by the Gestapo. Here Charlie stays with No 1 Son, at his most Barryish, the only other guest being an American, John Robey (Peter Dyneley), who was the only survivor from the SS Patrick, and who owed his life to Henri's prompt action.
It's a wild and stormy night and while dad sleeps, No1 Son watches, on the lookout for Brettner. Inevitably he falls asleep, and misses an important conversation between Robey, Henri and the shadowy Brettner about how to retrieve the gold all this opposed by Marie.
Next day, they meet Jakob, who's after Brettner also. He claims he has lost his job because of Brettner's escape.
On the beach, Brettner is found dead, clutching a gold bar! According to Henri, Brettner had first killed John Robey in a quarrel over sharing the loot, and Henri now offers to help Charlie and Barry. The police conclude that Robey was the killer. Now it's time for No1's theory, gold oxidises unless polished, but when kept underwater it should turn black, but the bar Brettner was holding was not black. Charlie beams at Barry's unaccustomed astuteness.
Next night, as Barry sleeps, Charlie discovers Robey tied up in the cellar of the inn. A fight, and Charlie faces the murderer with the facts. The hiding place of the gold is revealed
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Circle of Fear
"It's no use... I can't cut the diamond," jeweller Emil van Boorman protests. It's the largest stone to have come from a Nigerian mine in the past fifty years. Charlie Chan, holidaying at the Archway Hotel London, is asked to recover this diamond which has been stolen.
Inspector Duff has already arrested the belligerent Bert Conway (Michael Balfour, uncredited) for attacking the diamond cutter, but Bert claims he "had nothing to do with it," the robbery that is, adding that he's being framed by Franz Webber (Arnold Marle), assistant to van Boorman.
However Emil's wife (Patricia Burke) has identified Bert as the attacker of her husband, so the Duffer's case seems pretty cut and dried. Mrs van Boorman's son Joe Hawkins (Ian Whittaker, not credited) attends college in Amsterdam. Her doctor, Dr Laird (Leonard Sachs) stops Charlie questioning her when she gets worked up. It's clear he's in love with her. He does tell Charlie he'd been treating Emil for nerves, with a tranquilizer.
Barry, who is under instructions to watch and learn, takes things into his own hands, searching the doctor's files. He finds details of Emil's prescription, only to be discovered, as per usual. The doctor phones complaining to Charlie. He counters Dr Laird's charges against No1 Son, with the information that analysis of Emil's pills show they are not tranquilizers, but stimulants.
"That doctor's mixed up somewhere in it, I know it," Barry tells dad later. Though he also has to admit, "I don't get any of this."
Webber is also being prescribed tablets, and they are stimulants! It seems the war had taken its toll on him. Also Conway, who has been released, has vowed to get his own back on Webber. Charlie and No1 Son stop him. There and then, Charlie exposes a wartime collaborator and persuades Duff to arrest the real thief.
"I knew it was him all the time," declares wise No1 Son
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Patron of the Arts
Charlie Chan is admiring the paintings at the Brussels museum, "a temple of beauty," though No1 Son is drawn to the more contemporary beauty of Monica (Adrienne Corri). She's the wife of artist Paul Breton (Maurice Kaufmann), and pitying their financial plight, Charlie buys the couple a slap up meal meal.
Paul has been forced to sell one of his paintings very cheaply to dealer Francois Duval (Lloyd Lamble). Paul is in the traditional state of an artist, unrecognised in his own lifetime. But his "untimely death" would surely increase the value of his paintings, or as Duval puts it, "if something very sad were to happen, his pictures would certainly increase highly in value." Another artist, Baldini, had recently committed suicide, allegedly, and this is the background to an evil scheme.
Duval's assistant Andre has run up huge debts at Renaud's gambling joint. There's something about art collector Renaud that makes Charlie distrust him. With good reason, for he has forced Andre to break into Paul's studio and shoot him, to effect his posthumous glory plan. But he bungles for Paul is only grazed in his shoulder. Charlie senses another attempt will be made, but he should have also been more concerned about his own safety!
Outside Renaud's casino stands Barry's brand new sports car. No1 Son proudly prepares to start it up, but it's been tampered with and only Charlie's quick thinking saves them, "if you had started car, we would now be paying premature visit to honourable ancestors."
After a failed attempt to push Paul under a bus, Renaud asks Paul to sell some pictures, but really also to finish him off. But Andre has rebelled and is threatening "I will shoot Paul Breton with your gun," he tells Renaud, "then I will shoot you." They struggle and Renaud is killed just as Paul enters, "in a moment I will make you immortal," announces Andre. But Charlie walks up, "excuse unexpected visit," he explains to Paul, "but in digging up tree, one must start with roots."
Duval is arrested too, as Charlie ends with a line from Shakespeare
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Three Men on a Raft

Memory of Terror by Tony Hathaway (Raymond Huntley) is being launched at a bookshop, with the author signing copies. Charlie who says he's on his way to Paris, is at the shop to purchase a rare edition of Don Quixote, when he notices a young lad point a gun at Hathaway, "loaded gun and angry boy very bad companions." Ronnie Ramsden is so worked up because he believes the writer has slandered his late father. Though Charlie prevents him shooting, Ronnie runs away straight into the path of a car.
At the Mercy Hospital he seems to have lost the will to live, so Charlie promises Norma his mother (Maxine Audley) that he will look into Hathaway's allegations in his book- these are that Captain Ramsden acted like a coward when he, Hathaway and a Chinese steward had been marooned for many days on a raft.
McDowall, Hathaway's publisher takes Charlie to the India Docks to meet this servant, but it's too late, for from Mrs Dawkins the landlady they learn he "kicked the bucket" six months ago. Later however, the wily Charlie obtains a notebook belonging to this Chinese and uses it as a bluff. Disguised as the Chinaman's uncle, he tells Hathaway this notebook is a quite different account of events on that raft. (That's certainly no lie, for it's actually a cookery book written in Chinese.) Hathaway produces 100 for the book. Charlie declines.
Then Norma Ramsden has a surprising request to Charlie, "I want you to drop the case." She's very uncommunicative only warning "the truth might be as great a shock for Ronnie as that book of Hathaway's."
At the India Docks, after being attacked unsuccessfully en route, the 'uncle' waits results with Mrs Dawkins his witness, "very difficult to know how many flies this fly paper will catch." The "first gent" offers 200- it's Hathaway, improving his earlier price. Then it's Norma, it's clear she used to be a little too friendly with our author! They start arguing over how Captain Ramsden was killed on that raft as McDowall enters, to "stop my client making a fool of himself." The last to come is Sir Arthur Ruggles, Norma's new fiance (Ernest Clark), who also offers cash.
"Great heavens- it's Charlie Chan!" For Chan has now removed his disguise and is able to force Hathaway to sign a prepared statement that Memory Of Terror is not fact at all, but pure fiction. Charlie then reveals the feared volume is but a cook book, "but like empty gun, brought out the truth."
On Waterloo Bridge, the recovered Ronnie thanks Charlie and hands him his agreed fee of 3, though with sleight of hand, the beneficient oriental returns it to the boy's pocket. The grateful Ronnie promises to supply some more clients for "a pretty good detective"

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No Future for Frederick
Only a short role, sorry to say, for Derrick de Marney as a theatrical impresario and ladies' man, who is warned by a palmist that he "has many enemies... you have no future."
Also in this distinguished cast is Hugh Williams as Inspector Marlowe who has offered to introduce Charlie Chan to this "idol of the London theatre." But backstage, there are opening night jitters as the overbearing Frederick berates "incompetent fool" Beck the stage manager. Margaret Archer, his leading lady and ex-lover, also receives his acid tongue: "I could kill you for that." Peter Vane is angry because his "big scene" in Act Two has been cut since Frederick finds it "dull." Even long serving dresser Bendall is in trouble, for Frederick hasn't any of his tablets, and Bendall is sent to the chemist as a matter of urgency. "You enjoy crucifying people, he's told."
So when Frederick's body is found in his dressing room, it's hardly a surprise. Everyone had a "desire" to kill him, notes Charlie, though most curious, is the weird make-up that the corpse has been daubed with. There Charlie reconstructs the crime alone, but then oddly agrees with Dr Moore that death was a result of a heart attack. The inspector breathes a sigh of relief, commenting to Charlie "it's not often a case of murder turns out to be a case of natural death."
But Charlie is still sure it's murder, and learns that Frederick's pills contain digitalis, a heart stimulant. But another bottle has a lethal dosage prescribed. As Inspector Marlowe stands by uselessly, Charlie explains the killer's motive. It involves a lot of 'supposing,' based on the fact that Mrs Stella Moore was yet another of Frederick's lovers. She too had been cast aside, "he deserved to die."
A bemused inspector listens as Charlie explains how he solved the case
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Voodoo Death
Rich Joseph Temple is receiving his morning shave from servant Bartou. Branding him "a sullen brute" while he wields a cut throat razor is asking for trouble! But why is Bartou collecting his master's hair clippings? Voodoo- "filthy nonsense!"
Ann Temple (Ann Sears) is at loggerheads with her father over her intended, Michael Ross, whom Mr Temple unpleasantly brands "a fortune hunting parasite."
It's a weekend house party, others of the "mixed bag" of guests being Payne, who has just discovered a rich uranium mine in Honduras, and Temple's nephew, Harry Carr, Payne's assistant. Temple undertakes to purchase Payne's share in the mine and donate it to Harry.
To the assembled group, which also includes Charlie Chan and No1 Son, Michael Ross announces his engagement to Ann. Temple's grim response is that he will be consulting his lawyer in the morning to cut her out of his will. We are hardly surprised therefore when Temple is found with a fractured skull next morn.
Murder "with the usual blunt instrument," declares the police inspector (Trevor Reid, on top form). It's "an open and shut case," he confidently declares, as Bartou had been "pushed too far." Barry concurs, "the inspector has got the case sewn up." And indeed he must have, for Bartou himself confesses, "My magic killed him."
But so many changes of mind by the bewildered inspector are a joy to behold, as Charlie explains that this Bartou has voodoo death fetishes in his room, and that's what he means by his words. So the "dejected" inspector has to admit his "bubble" has burst.
No1 Son however has his own theory. He had heard Michael Ross argung with Temple the previous night, though Michael claims, "the man was alive when I left him."
The solution lies in a cablegram that Temple had recently received, "the mine faked." "Notes Barry, "there's your motive, pop." And the inspector eagerly snatches at this latest idea, "he's our man all right."
But Charlie also wants to question "wildcat" Ann, who clearly never liked her father. The inspector follows this new tack happily, "could be the type to hit you over the head as soon as look at you."
So many suspects, they're all guilty! Charlie summons them all at midnight in a dramatic finale. Bartou's "art of finding the guilty one by voodoo" is Charlie's method for flushing out the killer. Lights are switched off. Drums roll. Bartou enters, in a costume enough to frighten anyone. This forces the confession, "he always despised me." Concludes our hapless policeman, not for the first time, "yes he's our man all right."
The guilty one is arrested and Bartou is thanked, Charlie presenting him with a recording of voodoo

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Airport Murder Case

Outside a railway station in Rome, off the train from Paris where she had been buying furs, a girl is shot dead. "I need your help," Charlie is asked by Dino Rienzi (Raymond Young) to find the killer of his ex-girl friend American singer Joan March.
Charlie is really here on holiday, so Barry enthusiastically takes on the case, Charlie with his old fashioned methods, agreeing to assist!
No1 Son's first job, using the skills learned from Prof Soderheim, is to question Charlie's old friend Inspector Galvani. He confidently tells his dad, "I'll let him make the arrest after I solve the case!" Galvani is currently rather busy getting "nowhere fast" on a case of a leakage of information from a top secret reactor plant, but listens patiently to Barry.
Charlie, meanwhile, is at the Arcadian Club where Miss March sang. He learns Rienzi had been in love with Joan, but had recently fallen for a "rich and very beautiful" American widow Carol Vane (Kay Callard). This Carol admits she's hoping to marry Dino soon. She'd never met this Joan.
Dino confirms all this, and admits he had been still seeing Joan, but then his chat with Charlie is interrupted by Galvani, Barry in tow. They are searching for Dino's gun. "This gun has been fired very recently." He's arrested. "I didn't do it," protests No1 Son's client.
Charlie notes there are no prints on the gun, whilst conceding "you have a very good case, inspector." But he isn't convinced, and questions Carol again. She admits she did know Joan, who had tried to warn her off Dino, who, she claimed, was only after her for her money. But it seems Carol didn't care Dino was penniless.
Joan's source of wealth seems the key to the case. She hadn't earned that much at the "crummy club," so what was the source of her income? She had quipped about finding her fortune in a "lobster" and it so happens she had a friend who was a fisherman, and he just happens to fish off the shores near the reactor plant. Clearly blackmail.
At 2am Charlie breaks into the Arcadian Club and finds the ejected cartridge from the murder weapon (why it was there who knows?). Lobsters are there in plenty too, for it's the headquarters of a gang of spies. Joan had stumbled on the secret and had been blackmailing the owner. Charlie fights the traitors and handcuffs them. "The case is over." I don't think Barry quite solved that one.

Note: The title Airport Murder Case is clearly wrong, as we see Joan at the start emerging from a train station. However as the episode title is not seen on screen, perhaps this title was given to the story later by some ignorant assistant
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The Invalid
A well written story directed by Don Chaffey, with a strong cast.

"You've had this coming for a long time!" shouts a girl as she shoots Charlie Chan himself. Chan collapses writhing on the ground. But he's only acting in a film, in which he is technical adviser. "You should be in front of the camera," congratulates the director Pietro Pinero (Robert Arden).
He is one admirer of the girl, the star Sybil Adams (Joan Rice), her other "lovesick rival" being producer Howard Richards (Basil Dignam). It's the latter who asks Charlie to find Sybil, when she suddenly runs away.
In her dressing room, No1 Son finds a bouquet of flowers from Pinero, and constructs his elaborate theory to prove he is behind it. Then he is distracted by her see through negligee, while Charlie pores over an advertisement for an invalid carriage. Some questions from the shop selling such aids, and he learns one Don McGruder (Philip Friend) of Ivy Cottage Lovat Green has just been bought one, DAP726.
With Barry posing in a wheelchair, Charlie approaches Don. "If you have come here to snoop..." Don warns, holding one of his many rifles. But Charlie is only inquiring after invalid carriages, though Barry's imposture is soon revealed, when a gunshot makes him jump clean out of his chair. But they soon find Sybil there, she's secretly married Don, secretly because "who'd be interested in a star who was tied to a wreck like me?" No, in the public eye, "love and wheelchairs don't go together."
Someone shoots at Don, but misses. "Could be attempted murder," pronounces Charlie, rather obviously. So Inspector Duff is phoned. He questions everyone and from the housekeeper Mrs Frost, who obviously despises Don, we learn that Don had once been a fine actor, but was paralysed after rescuing Sybil from a fire, "he uses his paralysis as a whip."
Filming recommences, Sybil rehearses a scene with Cary Norton (William Lucas). Her prop gun fails to make any noise, so the watching Don mends the bent firing pin. Scene 30 take 2. This time the gun with the blank goes off, however the bullet is real! Pinero is hit in the shoulder.
Charlie evolves a plan, persuading Sybil to start a row on the set, and storm off. Charlie then produces a friend's lucrative film contract for Don and Sybil in which he could reprise his most celebrated role as a Mandarin, but Don has to decline since he cannot walk.
"If only I could," he repeats. He tries but doesn't quite stay on his feet. Sybil tells Don she's suing for divorce so she can take up the contract, and Cary puts himself forward.
"You can't," claims Mrs Frost, for she had watched Cary earlier shooting at Don. She had kept silent as she hates Don. Motive: Cary is yet another admirer of Sybil.
But all this charade was part of Charlie's plan, so there's a happy ending as a desperate Don really attempts to walk again. Crumbs, he does!
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Something Old Something New
A sneak thief enters a bedroom in Regina Apartments. As he pockets a wad of cash, he overhears a woman shouting "I'm going to stop it, if it's the last thing I do." Then she screams. Scared, the thief dashes away, straight into the arms of a bobby.
Charlie is first on the scene of the murdered woman, as he was coming to see this Helen Crane with his report on John Bolton. Her husband Robert (John Salew) is out at a restaurant, celebrating the engagement of Julie (Brenda Hogan), his daughter from his first marriage.
Inspector Duff is convinced the thief Pete Wilson known as 'Second Storey Pete' (Patrick Troughton) is the killer. Pete protests he "would never hurt a fly... honest that's me!"
His story is enough to convince "big shot" Charlie of his innocence, and Charlie promises to take on the case. Poor Pete looks triumphantly at the Duffer and says "what a relief to know there are some real brains on the job!"
Robert Crane is to hand over his many shares in Crane Cosmetics to his daughter when she gets married. The long serving housekeeper, Alice Gardner, is "almost glad" Mrs Crane is dead, for she was an evil woman who was enamoured of money.
The murder weapon is found, a pair of scissors. Dr Pearson is No1 Son's "bet for the murderer." For this John Bolton Charlie had been investigating, is Pearson's legal father, but he is now in Broadmoor for murdering his wife. Mrs Crane didn't know this fact, although Denis Pearson had told his dark secret to Julie and her dad. But Charlie knows Barry is wrong- as usual. However he is still searching for motive.
About to go on trial, Pete Wilson escapes by bashing Constable Brown on the head, then seeks refuge under Charlie's bed. He asks Charlie to shield him. Chan introduces Pete to the Cranes. "What are you trying to do Mr Chan?"
It's a slight subterfuge on Charlie's part, for he explains Pete had heard the killer speaking to Helen Crane. "It was 'er, guvnor," Pete announces, dramatically pointing his finger at Julie. She looks shocked.
"I know he's a liar," declares Alice, who now confesses. Helen Crane had been going to denounce the engagement. "I couldn't stand by and let that woman spoil her life," explains the loyal Alice.
Charlie apologises for his ruse. "Charlie Chan succeeds again," sighs the Duffer

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Man of A 100 Faces

"That guy could not fool me for one minute," boasts No1 Son to dad and Inspector Rietti, who are watching the stage act of that master of disguise, Pietro Monti (Alan Wheatley), known as The Man of a Hundred Faces. But look, here comes Pietro wandering around the audience dressed as an old flower seller, to prove Barry wrong. Yes, it's back to the books for poor No1 Son, and a thorough reread of the textbook of Wolfgang Sodorheim. "No astute student of criminology can possibly be fooled by a disguise, no matter how clever it is."
Nearly 70,000,000 lire-worth of jewels have just been stolen by Vincente Donati (Eric Pohlmann) with the help of this same Monti, wearing his crooked face.
But next day, Charlie and Barry meet Pietro again, disguised as the gondolier escorting our tourists round Venice. He asks Charlie for help, he claims he's being forced to use his mastery of disguise by the villainous Donati to commit robberies, because his brother Vittorio had been found out by Vincente, passing forged cheques.
Charlie takes on the case and, in a district of "very doubtful appeal," offers Donati 15,000 dollars for a share in his export business. Donati accepts but seems suspicious of Charlie's motives. And even No1 Son can see Donati wouldn't agree a partnership with a famous detective, "unless he has something up his sleeve." So Barry expects honourable dad to be "bumped off," though not so dramatically as he thinks with a bullet, but in the food, as a waiter at the Hotel de Medici brings them their lunch. Yes, it's Pietro Monti as usual, now as a balding waiter, who warns the pair that Donati is going to rob the Count de Venci tomorrow at 10.30am of his $200,000 painting Virgin and Child. Adds Monti: "I shall be disguised as a curator."
Then Donati phones Charlie who feigns poisoning. Whilst Donati gloats at the other end of the line, Barry panics, until he realises it's all an act.
Donati thus believing Charlie is safely off the scene, arrives at the Count's palace with a curator in tow. Charlie and Inspector Rietti are waiting and all are arrested, except for the curator.
But Charlie exposes the deeper plot. This painting is a fake, it's part of Monti's plan to get the rest of his gang arrested, whilst he clears off with the genuine painting. The Count is horrified to find his painting has been switched and helps the search for the curator who has disappeared. But there's one last ingenious twist, the count is actually Monti in disguise and Charlie is now able to clear the case up. But, asks No1 Son, how on earth did Charlie spot his disguise? Charlie refers back to the immortal Sodorheim

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Without Fear
In July 1950, a patient of Dr Alfred Black (David Langton) is unceremoniously run over by a truck outside his Harley Street consulting rooms. The accident we are shown, is extremely unconvincing.
On to June 1957, this woman Margaret Holmes (Jane Griffiths), is now called Ann Meadows, engaged to Richard Stanton (Dermot Walsh), a travel agent. By a stroke of good fortune, Charlie Chan happens to be at Stanton's shop, buying a plane ticket to Paris, when Ann comes in, with her sister-in-law Cecilia who tells a shocked Richard and Charlie that Ann-Margaret has just found her memory of the past returning when she witnessed an accident in Charing Cross Road. In 1950 she'd been married to "bad" Anthony whose wild ways had already caused sister Cecilia to end up in a wheelchair. Even though Margaret had been expecting their child, she was now contemplating divorce. Dr Black is later able to fill Charlie in on the fact that police believe Margaret poisoned Anthony before he was killed in a car crash. She'd used an overdose of Cecilia's tablets, but as she had contracted amnesia, she could not be prosecuted. Instead she had been confined to a sanatorium, from where, three years ago she'd disappeared.
At Scotland Yard, Inspector Duff discusses the accident Margaret had witnessed outside Dr Black's rooms. But her name does not appear on the list of eyewitness, though Ann Meadows does. Proof that she had lost her memory before her husband had been poisoned. Their theorising is interrupted by a phone call from Richard, saying he's just got home to find Margaret there, she's been shot!
By another stroke of luck, she's OK. But how did she get into his house, as she had no key now? One key however is lying on the floor. Richard explains how they'd first met three years ago. "It was almost as if she was walking in her sleep," he recounts, on the day that she knocked at his door here. "Who lived here before you?" the perceptive Chan interposes. It was by an amazing coincidence, Norse Joyce Gibbs, who had allegedly been Anthony Holmes' "Lotus Bud," as she's called in his letters to her. This Nurse Gibbs, one time nurse to Cecilia, she's the one Ann had come here today to see.
"I begin to see daylight," claims Charlie, though Inspector Duff clearly doesn't. So where is Nurse Gibbs? The case is really solved not by any Chan magic, but when Ann-Margaret's memory returns. She remembers her first visit to what is now Richard Stanton's home: "she stood there.... and he stood there.... I've come to finish it....." It all comes back to her.
Back in Harley Street, Charlie is able to show some of his old brilliance, whilst his baffled audience listen incredulous. "This is absurd." The key is significant: "what are you trying to prove, Charlie?" asks the bemused Duff. "You were Lotus Bud," announces Charlie dramatically.
Finally Charlie congratulates Richard and Ann on their forthcoming wedding, to end this pleasing story, even though Charlie never utters even one of his pithy sayings

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