Dinosaur TV CRIME/ ADVENTURE
Here are some surviving programmes with my reviews
Sherlock Holmes Fabian of the Yard The Big Man Third Man Zero One Scotland Yard Edgar Wallace . . Studio Series
Colonel March Martin Kane Dial 999 International Detective Crime Club The Pursuers Mark Saber Man from Interpol The Cheaters
Charlie Chan The Invisible Man 4 Just Men Interpol Calling Danger Man African Patrol Stryker of the Yard Inspector Morley 1960's Filmed Series

. . . . . . . A contemporary review by BE of the No Hiding Place story
7.3 A Menace to the Public
"A woman is strangled in a public park." The three Yard detectives are "aided by the police of Hillesden who think they know who did it. Lockhart disagrees with them and as usual he is right. Raymond Francis as Chief Superintendent is the top detective, beating most of his television colleagues by the length of a street. I like seeing Lockhart... Johnny Briggs and Michael McStay are excellent support... The reviewer singles out from this cast, David Lodge as Bill Jarvis, "who seemed to be the only friend the suspected man had... just as good was Hazel Hughes who played the part of his wife. Denys Graham, who played George Green, the suspected strangler, wore a look of the downtrodden throughout... the released suspect was to the public mind very guilty, and so persecution followed of a kind that seemed exaggerated beyond belief. Writer Malcolm Hulke pinpointed the hatred of the public for Green, by showing a coloured man being given a bedsit when Green was refused." He concludes, "I got an impression that the No Hiding Place team are going in for a bit of agony that has been so much a part of Z Cars. I certainly hope they aren't"

How many series of the hour long No Hiding Place were there? Answer
To Main menu

.

.

.

.

Stryker of The Yard
These were cinema second features made by Republic at Nettlefold Studios in 1953/4. The star was Clifford Evans who played Chief Inspector Robert Stryker, and his assistant was the genial George Woodbridge. Narrator was ex policeman Tom Fallon, who went on to be adviser on Dial 999. ITV bought the films and screened them in the 1960's.

My review of
The Case of The Black Falcon

Details of the thirteen 35 minute stories:
1 The Case of The Studio Payroll (Cinema release date, with #2, Jan 18th 1954)- with Jack Watling and Susan Stephen. An unpremeditated crime on the part of a young man who takes £10,000.
2 The Case of Uncle Henry- with Elliot Makeham, Edwin Richfield and Desmond Llewelyn. The story of an old man whose good heart leads him to steal cash to help others.
3 The Case of Canary Jones- A nightclub singer is found dead in her apartment.
4 The Case of Gracie Budd- The sad tale of seventeen year old blonde and petite Gracie, a typical juvenile delinquent whose parents were killed in the war. With no loving hands to guide her, the lure of easy money leads her into bad company.
5 The Case of Soho Red- with Sebastian Cabot and Esma Cannon. Stryker investigates The Kataro Marriage Bureau in London. Kathy O'Hara, a lovely orphaned Irish girl, had answered one of their advertisements. The boss had embarked on an evil plan, after reading her letter which gave her complete financial details.
6 The Case of The Burnt Alibi- with Joss Ambler, John Chandos and Avis Scott. Written by Lester Powell. Directed by Arthur Crabtree. An explosion in a deserted barn- and Stryker finds the charred remains of an unidentified man.
7 The Case of the Two Brothers- (Cinema release, 1954 with #8 as 'Companions in Crime.') with Maurice Kaufmann and Kenneth Haigh. Also in cast- Gaylord Cavallaro, Ian Fleming, Jack Lambert, Fred Griffiths, Russell Napier, Billie Whitelaw, Christine Silver, Patrick Jordan, Gillian Lutyens, Cyril Chamberlain. Arnold helps his young brother to find a job with a haulage company. But John Kendall (KH) soon realises the company is just a cover for a more sinister business, and he is framed for the murder of his employer. Sentenced to prison for ten years, he escapes from a working party on the moors, determined to bring the killer to justice
8 The Case of The Black Falcon- with Tim Turner, Dorothy Alison, David Perrin, Guy Deghy, Elliot Makeham and Philo Hauser. A tale of smuggled diamonds.
9 The Case of the Bogus Count- with Elwyn Brooke-Jones, and Anthony Newley as singer Gerry Barnes, who gets a job at a crooked night club. Stryker exposes a racket involving burglars.
10 The Case of The Express Delivery- with Sandra Dorne, a bad time girl who leads astray a once reliable mechanic Wally Ross.
11 The Case of Diamond Annie- with Hugh Moxey, and Marjorie Rhodes in the title role. Also with Vida Hope, Harold Lang and Peter Swanwick. Inspector Susan Bond starts work as a shoplifter in order to help Stryker catch Diamond Annie who runs a junk shop, where stolen goods are bought and sold
12 The Case of the Pearl Payroll- with Mary Merrall, Joan Newell and Russell Waters. Written by Lester Powell. Directed by Arthur Crabtree. Stryker chases a gang of bank robbers- and the final showdown comes in a lonely warehouse....
13 The Case of the Second Shot- with Irene Handl. To pay for his wife's medical treatment, Joe turns to crime.
Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Black Falcon
Interpol requests the help of Scotland Yard in tracing diamond smuggler Gustave Clement, who has eluded police after a chase.
A hulking man (Guy Deghy) approaches the owner of The Black Falcon boat, Philip Marsden (Tim Turner), who is short of money. That night Marsden makes for France leaving behind his worried wife Sheila and small son, who live near the River Thames.
At the rendezvous, a rowing boat brings Clement and his purse of diamonds to The Black Falcon. Having safely returned up the Thames, however, the crook does not hand the diamonds over to his boss, Sandford (Eliot Makeham). It's the double cross.
Inspector Stryker is pursuing his inquiries over the diamonds. Having interviewed Sandford in his wheelchair, he talks to Marsden, who does admit he had recently crossed the Channel. Yes, he had given a lift to someone, but he didn't know the man's identity. As he searches the boat, Stryker opens a cupboard, and out pops Clement's corpse! Marsden panics and runs away.
Stryker questions Mrs Marsden in her home. When he's gone, she takes some food to her husband who is hiding in a boatshed. Then she boards The Black Falcon and removes the purse of diamonds that Clement had secreted. Sandford's henchman however is watching her, and demands the diamonds. She runs off.
So the Marsden's son is taken captive, that's too much for Marsden and he fights with the crook boathooks flying everywhere, boats overturned. The struggle moves dangerously on to a bridge over a weir in the river. The watching Sandford shoots. But he hits his own man!
Stryker moves in to arrest Sandford, who neatly leaps from his wheelchair, out of his upper storey window. The story ends with some comedy from Sergeant Hawker (George Woodbridge) attempting to ride a very wobbly old bicycle
Stryker of the Yard Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fabian of the Yard (made in 1954 and 1955)
with Bruce Seton as "one of England's greatest detectives." Remarks one character of him: "I never saw such a single-minded man in all my days."

4 Bombs in Piccadilly 11 Nell Gwynn's Tear 19 The Executioner 24 Robbery in the Museum 37 Moral Murder

An archive in Canada holds prints of many of this series, and it really is past time for some enterprising business to release it on to dvd. It's no masterpiece, but it does have the distinction of being the first British made filmed crime series shown in Britain.

The book Fabian of the Yard, published in 1955, described cases of the great Fabian, though it's unclear whether all cases described in this, were ever filmed. At the end of each episode, the real Inspector Robert Fabian adds an epilogue to provide a touch of authenticity.

The series was made by independent producer Charles Wick, and shown on BBC Television, starting in 1954.
A splendid five minute tribute to the series was shown in C4's TV Heaven in the 1990s, with Shaw Taylor linking clips from the series, included were scenes from 26 Hand of Terror, and 29 The Jade Blade.

Here are cast lists and synopses of many of the stories.
Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

FABIAN OF THE YARD - Episode Details (incomplete)
For the cast lists and synopses, I am extremely indebted to Jean-Claude Michel who has gathered this data.
The series was screened on the BBC in 1954-6, with episodes repeated later in the decade.
Fabian of the Yard
This is a cinema compilation (Bombs in Piccadilly, The Actress and the Kidnap, Death on the Portsmouth Road).
Handcuffs, London
This was a second compilation of three stories, one of which was Nell Gwynn's Tear.

1 The Extra Bullet (Saturday November 13th 1954 8.45pm, first repeated Monday April 4th 1955, 3pm)
A murderer made the mistake of firing an extra bullet at the time of the crime, providing Fabian with a clue to a double murder. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Michael Kelly (sergeant) Donald Eccles (ballistics expert) Gordon Bell (police surgeon) Jane Barrett (Mona Proudly) Melissa Stribling (Vera Proudly) Michael Alexander (Arthur Carlton) Isabel Dean (Mrs. Regis) Elsie Wagstaff (Mrs. Wilkins)
2 The Unwanted Man (Nov 20th 1054)
A gypsy provides a clue to the year-old murder of an unrecognisable corpse found in the Thames. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergeant) Frank Sieman (police superintendant) Philip Lennard (forgery expert) Jack Melford (wood expert) Ursula Howells (Ellie Stafford) David Oxley (Dan Stafford) Gwen Bacon (Aunt Bess)
3 The Skeleton in the Closet aka The Skeleton in the Cupboard
The discovery of a skeleton walled up in a closet brings to light a murder that may have been committed a century ago. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Genine Grahame (Rose Pool) Sylvia Marriott (Mollie Boldero) Peter Dyneley (Captain Pool) Edmund Willard (Colonel Ledbetter) Ewen Solon (Elstead) Allan Jeayes (Hagben) Gordon Bell (pathologist)
4 Bombs in Piccadilly (this was one of the pilots that were made)
London is terrorized by a gang of fanatical bombers. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Ann Hanlip (Policewoman Wetherby) Richard Pearson (Sergeant MacKenzie) Jack Crowley (Paxton, first terrorist) James Raglan (Assistant Commissioner) Reg Hearne (Charlie)
5 Death on the Portsmouth Road aka The Wrotham Hill Murder
A lorry driver strangles a hitchhiker.
6 The Actress and the Kidnap Racket aka The Snatch Racket aka Four A.M. Phone Call (Dec 18th 1954)
Unless £250 in notes are left in a telephone directory, Benny threatens to kidnap the son of an actress. He collects the cash from a kiosk and speeds away in a taxi, not knowing Fabian is hiding in it. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Sarah Churchill (the actress) Victor Maddern (Chick) Margaret Boyd (Nanny)
7 Against the Evidence (Saturday Jan 8th 1955, 8.15pm)
A necklace is stolen from a jewellery shop and an innocent customer is accused of the crime. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Richard Warner (detective sergeant) Peter Copley (Brownlove and Audley) Stuart Saunders (Heathrow) Betty Cooper (Mrs. Brownlove) Wilfred Caithness (Dr. Cardwell) Nicolas Tannar (Pinkley) Toke Townley (Popes) James Thomason (Minlane) Philip Lennard (forgery expert)
8 Murder in Soho aka The Antiquis Murder
Fabian tracks down three hoodlums who run down a motorcyclist Alec de Antqiuis who had attempted to stop them as they fled from their jewel robbery. They shoot him, but they leave behind a raincoat, which Fabian is able to trace back to them. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Ian Whittaker (Cox) Lew Harris (Coker) Eric Corrie (Turner) and Graham Ashley (Spicer)
9 The Brides of Fire aka Brides of the Fire
Three women have died in allegedly accidental fires. They all had the same husband. Now he is courting another lady. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Stephen Vercoe (Robert Morley) Shirley Cooklin (Peggy Drayton) Michael Shepley (Mr. Thrale) Arnold Diamond (Inspector Kelson) Sheila Burrell (Helen Russell) Hugh Munroe (Andrews) Cicely Paget-Bowman (Mrs. Dove) Lillemor Knudsen (Lois Russell)
10 The Troubled Wife
A bank manager claims he shot a burglar in self-defence but his wife tells a different story. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (Detective Sergeant Sims - or Wyatt ?) Trevor Reid (George Hubble, the bank manager) Sylvia Marriott (Kate Hubble) Betty MacDowell (Sara Milne) Gordon Bell (pathologist) Victor Adams (policeman) Michael Kelly (detective sergeant)
11 Nell Gwynn's Tear
Scotland Yard is called to investigate a report that a famous diamond on exhibition is a fake. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Isabel Dean (Doris Tedford) Kathleen Byron (Janet Tedford) Alexander Gauge (Bardwell) Noel Howlett (Jeremiah Rugeley) Jack Melford (expert)
12 The Vanishing Cat (rpt Nov 14th 1955, 4.15pm)
A newspaper ad is used to recruit a cat burglar into a crime syndicate. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Jean Ireland (Monica Ridley) Tim Turner (James Ridley) Ruth Gower (robbed woman) Robert Sydney (Yard expert)
13 Written in the Dust
A psychopathic housemaid responsible for many murders has gone to London - to buy poison for her next victims. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Edwin Richfield (sergeant) Noel Dyson (Cora) Mary Kenton (Mrs. Apsley) Margaret McCourt (Ellen) John Boxer (micrologist) Patrick Boxill (Mr. Throgget) Helen Hurst (chemist's assistant) Charles Mortimer (Mr. Wimpole)
14 The Purple Mouse
Fabian investigates the case of a wealthy dowager who was committed to a mental institution - for seeing a non-existent mouse. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (detective sergeant) Colette Wilde (Lily Ransome) Cecily Paget-Bowman (Tessa Oakman) Seymour Green (Dr. Horn) Gladys Boot (Mrs. Ransome) Roy Dean (Eddie Carmen) Max Brimmell (pathologist)
15 The King's Hat
A rare coin provides the only clue to a mysterious archer's attacks on tourists visiting a 15th-century castle. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Dorinda Stevens (Lady Edith Garvam) Derek Aylward (Sir Michael Garvam) Michael Craig (Roger Garvam) Alexander Gauge (Nicholas Bardwell) C. Denier Warren (Robert Meekers) Noel Howlett (Jeremiah Rugeley) Jack Melford (expert) Charles Lepper (Edmund Burrows) Ian Fleming (Sir Digby Button)
16 Little Girl
An unknown woman's face powder is the only clue to a private secretary's murder. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Gillian Maude (Rita) Peter Stanwick (Vale) Arthur Howard (Trew) Mary Jones (Ruth) Gordon Morrison (Baines)
17 The Coward
Did a young student try to commit suicide by poison or is she the victim of attempted murder? Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Barry Lowe (Andy Wagner) Jill Raymond (Frieda Barnes) Anthony Rea (Ed Seddon) Ann Stephens (Sylvia Parker) Betty Cooper (Mrs. Wagner) John Boxer (pathologist) Paul Daneman (doctor)
18 Lost Boy
Fabian investigates the Edwardians, a gang of juvenile delinquents on a rampage. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Ian Whittaker (Ginger) Sheldon Allen (Nobby)
19 The Executioner (Wednesday April 6th 1955, 8.15pm, rpt Apr 23rd 1956)
London is terrified by a mysterious killer who murders people in their bathtubs. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (detective sergeant) Peter Swannick (Mr. Porter) Elspet Gray (Marian Courtland) Noel Howlett (vicar) William Abney (Jim Keyes) Tottie Truman Taylor (Miss Langley, schoolmistress) Marjorie Rhodes (Mrs. Boody) Geoffrey Denys (doctor) Peter Cellier (uncredited, as an expert at the Yard)
20 The Poison Machine (rpt Mar 26th 1956, 7.30pm)
In London, poison-pen letters drive one man to insanity and another to attempted murder. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Patricia Driscoll (Agatha) Richard Gale (Peter Lancefort) Brenda Hogan (Deborah) John Salew (Mr. Pontifex) Nicolas Tannar (Mr. Kinney) Alan Rolfe (police superintendent) Jack Melford (typewriter expert)
21 The Golden Peacock
A young dock worker is suspected of murdering a beautiful French dancer. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Kieron Moore (dock worker) Pascale (French dancer) John Gabriel (night-club owner) June Rodney (girl) Martin Boddey (police surgeon) Basil Lord, and Wensley Pithey
22 The Lover's Knot
Love letters may be the death of a salesman - who's suspected of murdering his wife. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergeant) Thomas Heathcote (Selby) Shelagh Fraser (Emma Horton) Jessica Dunning (Mrs. Addison) Douglas Muir (doctor) Larry Cross (Fleddon) Jennifer Browne (waitress) John Boxer (laboratory expert) Martin Boddey (graphologist) George Woodbrige (supervisor)
23 The Man from Blackpool
Victims of a gambling syndicate are taught the virtue of silence - by acid-throwing teachers. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Elspet Gray (Lady Jane Shaw) Alexander Gauge (Harry Disbrow) John Trevor (Hon. Victor Leggett) John Orchard (Big Fred)
24 Robbery in the Museum
Fabian searches for a poor young poet who has stolen jewels from a London museum. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Ian Sampson (superintendent Forbes) Emris Leyshon (Masters) Josephine Griffin (Mrs. Masters) Charles Lloyd Pack (Prof. Wynn Jones, the curator) John Stuart (Jarvis) Jacqueline Con (child) Menhardt Mauer (Dutchy) Charles Wade (Nick)
25 Deadly Pocket Handkerchief
Police seek a thief who chloroforms and robs women on the streets of London. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Richard Pearson (MacKenzie) Dagmar Wynter (Susan) Fanny Carby (Mary) Brian Haines (Quailes)
26 Hand of Terror (Wednesday May 28th 1955, 7.45pm, rpt Aug 17th 1955)
A politician's fear of scandal prevents him from taking action when his wife is kidnapped by an escaped convict. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Colette Wilde (Cynthia Barker) Arthur Young (Mr. Barker) Michael Craig (Ted Enfield) Patrick Westwood (Larry Redman) James Gilbert (expert) Betty Cooper (Mrs. Barker) Allan Jones (Reedy) Christina Forrest (BOAC clerk) Jessica Cairns (maid)
27 Pinpoint Signature
Five men are suspected of terrorizing an actress. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Jean Ireland (Edna Kent) Madge Brindley (Mrs. Daisy) Maurice Kaufman (Jerry Strong) Allen Sheldon (Arthur Flagg) Harry Fine (Bill Beckford) Jack Melford (expert) Max Brimmell (psychiatrist)
28 Innocent Victims (June 8th 1955, 8.15pm)
Fabian investigates the involvement of two teachers in a theft that seems to be an inside job. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Dorothy Allison (Mary Walton) Arthur Howard (Jim Graham) Philip Ray (Dr. Walton) Joan Newell (Mrs. Mortlake) Robert Sandford (Peter) Victor Wood (expert)
29 The Jade Blade
The mysterious death of a young Chinese man is linked to an ancient law that sometimes justifies murder. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Reginald Hearne (detective sergeant) Alan Tilvern (Sen Shan) Betty MacDowall (Mary Soong) Martin Boddey (Fat Harry) Wanda Balcon (Lotus Yung) Charles Mortimer (Professor Hughes)
30 April Fool (June 22nd 1955, 7.45pm)
Four people are implicated in a puzzling April fool joke - the near- fatal shooting of a man. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Betty McDowall (Angela Hollis) Garard Green (Major Randall) Jean Wilkinson (Barbara James) William Mervyn (Ronald James) Marjorie Rhodes (Mrs. Flinge) Gaylord Cavallaro (Jack Hollis) Jack Melford (ballistics expert) Elaine Dundy (chorus girl)
31 No Alibi (the series returned after a break with this story on Saturday Nov 12th 1955 3.45pm. Repeated Fri March 8th 1957, 3.15pm)
The murder of a fashion model is linked to a man with a good alibi - he is serving a prison sentence. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Robert Raglan (det sgt Wyatt) Sylvia Marriott (Mary Sedney) Tim Turner (Bill Jaggers) Myrtle Reed (Miss Janes) Patrick Connor (Madden) James Raglan (prison governor) John Boxer (pathologist) Dermot McMahon (Dalton)
32 Escort for Death aka Escort to Death (rpt Sept 6th 1956)
Three people are marked for death when one of them discovers a state secret in a foreign embassy's code room. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Colette Wilde (Silvara) Gerard Heinz (ambassador) Alan Tilvern (Carlac) Cecile Chevreau (Teresa) Kenneth Edwards (Carter)
33 The Sixth Dagger (Nov 26th 1955)
The works of Shakespeare are linked to five mysterious stabbings - all committed with the same dagger. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergeant) James Drake (city sergeant) Avice Landone (Amanda Malloy) Kenneth Griffiths (Heywood) Michael McKeog (student) Roddy Hughes (pawnbroker) Jack Melford (metal expert) Lloyd Lamble (Dr. Brighton) Martin Boddey (graphologist) Max Brimmell (psychiatrist)
34 The Ribbon Trap (Tues Jan 17th 1956, 9.30pm)
Fabian pursues an elusive gang of railway freight-yard thieves. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergent) George Woodbridge (supervisor) Valerie Jene (Julie) Patrick Jordan (Sandy Evans) Marjorie Stewart (Mrs. Manners) Margot Van Der Burgh (Madame Amata) Frederick Piper (railway foreman) John Witty (map expert)
35 Cocktail Girl (Mon Jan 30th 1956, 7.30pm)
Fabian defends a prominent businessman accused of murder. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergeant) Kathleen Byron (Helen Kervan) Ewan Roberts (Galney) Wensley Pithey (Jerry Watson) Conrad Phillips (Raynel) Jack Melford (wood expert) Frank Forsyth (museum custodian)
36 The Masterpiece (Tues Feb 6th 1956, 7.30pm)
Scotland Yard sets a trap for a master counterfeiter-turned- kidnapper. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Philip Dale (detective sergeant) Anna Turner (Kitty Penley) Antoinette Cellier (Magda) Ivan Craig (Bateman) John Cazabon (chemist) Patrick MacJordan, Frank Forsyth (museum custodian) John Witty (map expert) John Boxer (laboratory expert) George Woodbridge (supervisor) David Yates (radio operator)

Synopses of other stories.
No transmission dates on the BBC, it is possible that they may have been screened as alternatives to the scheduled programme.
37 Moral Murder aka Blackmail
A rich businessman, a candidate for Parliament, confides to Fabian that he is being blackmailed. He is becoming desperate. Fabian lays a trap for the blackmailer in the lounge of an hotel. The brain behind the crime turns out to be an actor. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Tod Slaughter (Palmer) Hugh Latimer (Mitchell) Richard Pearson (MacKenzie) Marjorie Stewart (Mrs. Mitchell) Harry Lane (Lester) Al Burnett (Club Manager)
38 The Witches of Wednesday
Superstitious villagers are led to believe that a doctor's housekeeper is a witch. Cast: Bruce Seton (Fabian) Renee Goddard (Trudi) John Boxer (Lomas) Keith Davies (Reg) Daphne Maddox (Sybil) Gladys Boot (Miss Isles)
39 One Way of Learning the Charleston
Fabian arrests a dancing instructor who robs the wallets of his clients.
40 The Black Butterfly
A nightclub singer is murdered. Her sister identifies the killer from a picture in the Scotland Yard files.
41 The Beer Bottle Murder
A thief in a hotel leaves a suitcase full of beer bottles, a sufficient clue for Fabian to catch him.
42 Marita and the Count
The daughter of an American millionaire elopes with a foreign count, but Fabian stops the wedding.when he proves he is a con man.
43 Celluloid Alf
Fabian tracks down a series of thefts in Chelsea flats to the commissionaire.

The final two episodes on this list were found in a 2005 archive. They may be alternative titles. One other unknown story was in this archive: 44 The Samba Case.

That is a list of 44 stories. As five pilots were made, a series of 39 films is quite likely a number- but this is informed speculation.

To Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


Bombs in Piccadilly

At times this pilot is almost a silent film, with reliance on narration rather overdone.
It begins with Inspector Fabian at Pepper's Bottle Room being presented with a medal by 'the boys.' This story explains why.

Outside a cigar shop in Piccadilly Circus, a terrorist plants some sticks of dynamite. There's an explosion and Fabian and his assistant Sergeant MacKenzie are soon sifting through the debris. In the rubble Fabian uncovers a parcel "ready to go off now." Gingerly he puts it down, and with a bystander Charlie happily at his elbow, the inspector defuses the bomb himself. But more bombs follow and some explode, twenty innocent people injured.
A phone call from fanatics demands World Peace or perversely London will face more bombs. Fabian gets a lucky break when he spots a known terrorist Carl Paxton in the street, and the man is followed, past a playground with young children, before Paxton senses he's being followed and manages to shake Fabian off.
A nark, Frankie (probably uncredited Robert Raglan) informs the police that Paxton's men have been meeting in a stable in Hoxton. Police swoop on the building in Nunnery Lane, but the terrorists have cleared out. However in a smouldering fire, Fabian pulls out a charred piece of paper, which is sent to the lab.
Another tip leads him to a bombed out house. "I'll kill to stop war," is how Paxton explains his misguided philosophy to Fabian. Again Paxton eludes the police.
The charred paper shows Harry's Cafe is the meeting place for the gang. PC Wetherby ("I can look after myself"- Ann Haslip sic) goes undercover to the cramped cafe in Soho to keep an eye on Harry (Howard Lang, not credited). There she is picked up by the bombers and learns some useful secrets, which she can then phone through to Fabian.
Unarmed police raid the addresses she has provided, and the villains are chased along a canal. They leap on a barge and there's a punchup on board the moving boat. Several splash into the water of course, though Paxton escapes, Fabian in hot pursuit, tackling him on a steep railway embankment.
At the conclusion Bob Fabian tells us his medal was inscribed "for bravery." The late King gave him a medal too

To Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


The Executioner

A bobby on the beat just misses spotting the Bath Tub Murderer (Peter Swannick), who has just executed his fifth murder in eighteen days, that of Andrew Haggerty.
What’s his motive? “Even a psycho has to have a motive.” Until Fabian and his assistant (Robert Raglan) can work that one out, the police are at a dead end.
Now we move to Jim and Marian (Elspet Gray). She was a friend of Andrew’s when they had been children. This is the link between all the murders. But the killer, Mr Porter, is confident he won’t be caught, as he confides to his late son Robert. He tells the photo of his boy that he now has only one to trace and then kill, Marian Courtland. And there in the parish magazine are details of her forthcoming wedding to James Keyes.
Fabian is getting warm as he questions teacher Miss Langley. She remembers the victims, and one of their friends Bobby Porter. Fabian even questions Bobby’s father, not yet suspecting him. Porter tells the detective that his son is currently working in Brazil.
Next, to the church, where the chatty vicar (Noel Howlett) recalls all the murdered people had years ago been involved in a tragedy whilst on a Sunday School picnic, during which a young lad was accidentally drowned. His name? Robert Porter. His father had, quite unfairly, held the youngsters to blame.
Along a dark street, The Executioner walks towards his victim’s rooms. “Robert’s giving a party,” he tells Marian. “You left Robert to die in the river.” He knocks her down. Then switches on the bath water. Just as he is dragging her into the bath, Fabian arrives. The two struggle, and just in time, Marian is saved from being The Executioner’s final victim.
Bob Fabian himself rounds off the story, reminding us that it was routine police work that solved this crime.
Note- appearing uncredited as an expert (‘Peter’) at the Yard, is Peter Cellier

To Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Robbery in the Museum
Arising, Dracula-like, at dead of night from a coffin in the Egyptian Room of the Warwick Museum, a thief helps himself to uncut diamonds on display. “A very tired and frightened man,” poet Ken Masters (Emrys Leyshon) catches the bus home where his wife (Josephine Griffin) and young daughter Jane, penniless, await his return.
Fabian and his assistant Sgt Jim Jarvis (John Stone) work out “this joker did not break in.” Thus suspicion falls on members of staff, much to the disgust of the owner Wynn-Jones (a nice comedy cameo from Charles Lloyd Pack). The hiding place used, the sarcophagus, yields a clue- a piece of tweed fibre from an old coat. “You better find the owner,” is the rather obvious order Fabian is given by his superior, who tries some detective work of his own, not at all cleverly.
Fabian questions all the gem cutters in London without success until an informer Nick tells of a barmy fellow who spouts poetry, and who wears a rough tweed jacket.
To Bayswater, where Fabian poses as an unemployed person, where he spots his man at the Unemployment Exchange. Having learned where he lives, Fabian turns into a building inspector to search Masters’ house. “My heart went out to Mrs Masters and the child,” when he sees the squalour in which they have to live. In the toilet cistern he finds the stones.
When did you last have a square meal?” he asks. He obliges by providing the family with a nice meal in a very chummy way.
Concludes the real Fabian “He wasn’t a criminal at heart.” His sentence was a light one.

Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Moral Murder
Made in 1954. Script: Max Kester. Director: Alfred Travers.

The first scene shows a man attempting to jump in front of a tube train. He is Walter Mitchell, a prospective MP.
In the dingy Stork Room, as an American singer renders the famous number from Pagliacci, Mitchell downs another drink, and is introduced to Robert Fabian. "I was a fool," he admits. He is being blackmailed and has to make his next payment at 4pm tomorrow.
Fabian suggests Mitchell changes the venue to the Imperial Palace Hotel, where he will deploy men to keep watch in the restaurant. After rehearsing what they will do, they watch and wait.
Enter the blackmailer, demanding £100. Fabian pounces. The man is an actor, John Palmer (Tod Slaughter) and is surprisingly calm under arrest. He is obviously merely a messenger boy for the real blackmailer.
This villain is tracked down. The star of a theatre production named Lester Davenport, After a struggle, he gets away from Fabian, "come back, the curtain's going up!" Along wet streets, past Trafagar Square and finally into Fabian's clutches.
Fabian himself informs us that Mitchell was known as Mr X at the trial, thus preserving his anonymity.

In the Fabian of the Yard book, this case is simply titled Blackmail. This story follows the general plot though some licence is taken with the detail. For instance in the book, Lester's arrest is in Bournemouth

To Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Nell Gwynn's Tear
At an exhibition of Royal and Historic Jewels at Pym Art Galleries, a visitor denounces the star attraction, Nell Gwynn's Tear, once presented by King Charles to Nell herself, as a fake.
She claims to possess the original, purchased from a Jeremiah Rugeley (Noel Howlett). The woman is Janet Tedford (Kathleen Byron), who lives with her sister Doris (Isabel Dean), who is a girl friend of Nicholas Bardwell (Alexander Gauge), who had authenticated the diamond as genuine when their late father had purchased it many years ago. Though Bardwell is an expert, he claims he hasn't seen this "exquisite" diamond since 1930, and anyway "it's too well known for agents to attempt to sell imitations under the counter."
Doris complains to Inspector Fabian about Bardwell, and entrusts him with her diamond, which is examined by an expert (Jack Melford). He declares it a fake, even though he values it at £10,000.
Fabian can see the sisters are trying "to take Bardwell to the cleaners," and Bardwell and Rugeley deny ever being involved with the sale of a fake. But in the latter's shop, Sgt Wyatt (Robert Raglan) finds machinery that will create forgeries: "a windfall for us," he smiles. It is indeed, for Bardwell's fingerprints are found on one fake, and that's the cue for Bardwell to disappear, having succumbed to blackmail from Janet and Doris, to buy back the fake diamond.
However he sends a message that he will meet Fabian at his solicitor's, but gets nervy and runs off. Fabian gives chase and Bardwell takes refuge on a Thames pleasure cruise, but at Tower Pier, the "biggest art forger of modern times" is arrested: "the things of beauty that meant so much to him could never be his again"
To
Fabian menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


To
Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

Adventures of the Big Man (1956)
starring Wayne Morris as Bill Pierce, a detective attached to a large London store.
Pamela Thomas played Bill's secretary Sheila in several stories.

This series was the new production from the makers of Fabian of the Yard (Charles Wick), but it proved to be an utter flop. Wayne Morris in the lead role might have US-appeal, but he was hardly a charismatic star.

16 stories were filmed and screened by BBC Television: 1 The Bomb (May 7th 1956), 2 The Amazon Bandit, 3 Baby Sitter, 4 The Runaways , 5 The Magenta Box, 6 Secret Enemy, 7 Rich Girl (June 26th 1956, 7.30pm), 8 The Gun Runners, 9 Say Hello (July 9th 1956), 10 Lady Killer (July 30th 1956), 11 The Thief (Aug 13th 1956), 12 The Door of Gold (Aug 20th 1956), 13 Edge of Darkness (Sept 3rd 1956), 14 The Frightened Angels (Sept 17th 1956), 15 The Accomplice (Sept 24th 1956), 16 The Smugglers (Oct 2nd 1956).

My review of a surviving story:
3 Baby Sitter (May 21st 1956, BBC). Directed by Charles Saunders.
Man With Hammer Attacks Housewife are the headlines after Mrs Alice Judson is knocked unconscious by an intruder. Jane Ramsden (Margaret McGrath), a buyer in the Infants department had been babysitting nearby for her sister Lois, and she notices the man. After newspaper publicity she gets scared she might be "silenced" and her fears are compounded when she's phoned at home and warned "you talk too much. If you don't learn to keep your mouth shut, you're not going to be around very long." But her boyfriend Harry (a young Nicholas Parsons) advises her not to start "imagining" things! But who could blame her for these fears when she receives a written note- I'm Watching You.
Bill Pierce is concerned for the store's valued employee and arranges a police tail for her. He and Inspector Gregg (John Harvey) visit Mr Albert Judson who's worried that he himself has no alibi for the time of the attack. Yet suspicion seems to fall on their handyman Fred Hall (Laurence James) who has done various odd jobs for the family in the past.
Now we meet Hall. His wife Doris (Helen Christie) suspects he's been up to something as he's in the money. He's been writing forged cheques, stolen from Mrs Judson, one of which Doris unwisely gets cashed at the store. Seeing the net closing after a visit from Bill, they realise there's only one thing to do, "leave town."
With Mrs Judson now dead, Bill chases after Fred Hall in an exciting chase in which Fred temporarily eludes capture by jumping on a number 14 bus. But Bill follows by taxi straight to Jane's room. Fred's sworn to silence her ("if it's the last thing I ever do...") but just as he's about to throttle the poor babysitter, Bill leaps to her rescue
Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

The Third Man with Michael Rennie as Harry Lime
The Beeb's most prolific, most awful filmed series. Jonathan Harris as Lime's right hand man Brad, was the only redeeming feature. Note * means an American made story

1* Confessions of an Honest Man
2* A Question of Price
3* Hollywood Incident
4* Death of an Overlord
5* Sparks from a Dead Fire
6* Trouble at Drill Hall
7* The Man Who Died Twice
8* The Angry Young Man
9* Dark Island
10* The Girl Who Didn't Know
11* The Third Medallion
12* Castle in Spain
14* Listen to the Sound of a Witch
16* A Pocketful of Sin
17* How To Buy a Country
18* As the Twig is Bent
19* Broken Strings
21 The Best Policy
22 One Kind Word
23 Three Dancing Turtles
26 Barcelona Passage
27 Collectors Item
29 High Finance
30 Toys of the Dead
31 The Man with Two Left Hands
32 The Man Who Wouldn't Talk
35 Experiment with Money
36 Harry Lime and the King
39 Death in Small Installments
40 A Question of Libel
41* Mishka
42* Cross of Candos
43* Happy Birthday
44* Queen of the Nile
45* Calculated Risk
47* >Diamond in the Rough
48 King's Ransom
49 Hamburg Shakedown
50 Unexpected Mr Lime
52 Portrait of Harry Lime
53* Man in Power
54* Meeting of the Board
55* Hansel and Son
56* Act of Atonement
57* Ghost Town
58* The Gold Napoleons
60 The Way of McEagle
61* Who Killed Harry Lime?
62 A Question in Ice
63 I.O.U.
64 Crisis in Crocodiles
65* Judas Goat
66 A Little Knowledge
67* Day of the Bullfighter
69* The Big Kill
70* The Frame Up
71 House of Bon Bons
73* The Luck of Harry Lime
74 The Trial of Harry Lime
76/7 Members Only (last story)

It's incredible that despite this series of 39 films of "mid Atlantic nothingness" proving a flop, a second series of 38 films was also made. A contemporary account was spot on, when it claimed, "Michael Rennie walks through these films like a man in a trance. He hardly permits himself to smile, he hardly opens his mouth to talk, and the only bit of action he allows himself to make is when he dodges a bullet.The trap the makers have fallen into is they haven't made up their minds whether their lead is a hero or villain. He is not black, he is not white. You cannot hate him. You cannot like him." Personally, I quickly got sick of him.
Some films were made in America, others in Britain. The first British series was made at Shepperton. The shooting of these first British films was dogged by union disputes. After an enthusiastic reception marking the start of shooting of the British films at the Dorchester on 18th June 1959, production finally commenced on 6th July only for NATKE to stage a one day strike on 20th July, and ETU two days later. An overtime ban added to the acrimonious dispute. After various changes in personnel and working practices, shooting began in earnest in late August. The second series of British films saw production move to AB Elstree Studios. Producer Felix Jackson optimistically stated, "we hope the series will bring back the lost art of story telling." All that The Third Man did was to curtail what became the lost art of these joint US/UK ventures. Never again, in the black and white era were the two countries to embark on a joint tv venture.
Footnote- 1958 publicity suggested originally James Mason was to have played Harry Lime. I don't think it's recorded why he didn't do the series, though he was a very wise man.
Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Zero One
Starring Nigel Patrick as Alan Garnett, head of airport security. Bill Smith played Garnett's assistant, Jimmy Delaney, and Katya Douglas was Maya his secretary.
Garnett's car: Daimler 3251HP

The official blurb described this BBC series thus: "Activities of International Airline Crime Detection." Anyway, we consider this the BBC's best effort to imitate ITV! By recruiting ITC personnel such as Aida Young, perhaps that is not surprising! However, in 1961 commercial TV had moved to the hour long format, in effect making this 1962 made series obsolete. It ended up as 'competition' for Coronation Street, not a recipe for success! Its ignominy was complete when it extraordinarily was shown for a short period in the Children's slot at 5.25pm on Saturdays. The final stories were only first screened in summer 1965. Sad that such an ambitious series has been so seriously neglected.

26 stories have appeared on 2 dvd reissues, including The Liar with Margaret Rutherford, unfortunately (for some of us) only with a German soundtrack.
These German language episodes in Volume 1 are: 2 Glidepath 3 The Liar 4 The Contender 7 Fly Away Peter 9 The Marriage Broker 10 Gunpoint to Shannon 11 Million Dollar Lift 13 Deadly Angels 14 Everybody's Uncle 15 The Good Old Days 22 The Creators 31 The Switch 39 Excess Baggage.
Volume 2 contains: 6 The Bovard Affair, 8 Return Trip, 16 The Man Who Waited, 17 Danger on Cloud Seven, 18 Downdraft, 21 And Maya makes Three, 27 Key Witness, 28 Hurricane, 32 Triple Cross, 33 Delayed Reaction, 35 A Case of Charity, 36 And One To Go, 38 The Body
My brief reviews

These are the four episodes (in English!) that I have-
8 Return Trip 13 Deadly Angels 23 Ghost Strip 38 The Body

Picture: from a film print of #8

Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Zero One- some brief reviews

2 Glidepath -General Keen (Andrew Faulds) is planning to overthrow the President of Lapata by nobbling his plane which is flying to London. Unfortunately security in the shape of Sharif (Edwin Richfield) and Jimmy, fail to spot mechanics changing the pressure in one of the tyres. Even though Keen is arrested when the air compressor explodes at the airport, he is confident the plane will never be able to land. Police Chief Karri (Joseph Furst) can't persuade him to help, though the villain's sidekick Prof Damah eventually does. Garnett makes emergency preparations, Masra the asisstant pilot cracks up, but Cpt Cargan (George Baker) bravely lands the aircraft on one wheel

3 The Liar - The young wife of teacher David Clandon (Robert Flemying) dies on board an Atlantic night flight. Another passenger, Mrs Pendenny (Margaret Rutherford) informs Garnett in no uncertain terms that Clandon murdered her. Her friends at a house for retired ladies tell him that she is well known for her tall stories. But the newspapers publish her accusations and Clandon gets some nasty ribbing from his pupils, "Old Clandon is a Murderer." Garnett takes the old lady on board the plane to reconstruct what she says she witnessed, and it is she who has to do the confessing... at first

4 The Contender - Paddy Farrell (Kieron Moore) is flying by BOAC from LA to London with his girlfriend Miriam to compete in a World Championship title fight. When an explosive device is found on the plane, Garnett gives Farrell protection from all the numerous suspicious characters on board, including an uncredited Anthony Booth. Garnett chats up Jill (Delphi Lawrence), a journalist on the Empire magazine. At a stopover, Garnett phones Maya to ask her to check out the passengers. But Shaffer has pointed a gun at the boxer, and taken him out of the airport. Luckily Jill has spotted him and warns Garnett. By way of thanks, Farrell grants her an interview. But Maya has tipped Garnett off that Jill is a phoney, so her pen with a poisoned tip never harms Farrell, since Garnett intervenes. Later, Maya visits her boss in hospital, while Farrell's fight is screened on tv

6 The Bovard Affair - Francie (Virginia Maskell) causes an Amalgamated World Freight van to get a puncture- it is carrying an Impressionist painting worth £300,000 by Paul Bovard. It is bound for the Wentworth Museum in New York, and Garnett personally escorts it there. However a crook (Eric Pohlmann) has already switched the painting. Noyes (Wensley Pithey) of the art gallery declares it a fake. So Garnett investigates, starting with the driver of the van (Harry Locke). He recognises Francie, girl friend of John Cameron, a penniless artist (Richard Pasco). Her face is also on advertising hoardings as The Sunglow Girl, so Garnett easily traces her. She runs away from an art class and dashes off with Cameron to Paris, with another forgery. But they are stopped at the airport, and a simple ruse by Garnett elicits a confession. But Garnett does purchase one of Cameron's paintings

7 Fly Away Peter- Passengers emerging off the Chicago flight include unaccompanied young Peter Firth, but nobody is here to greet him. After explaining to him the rules of cricket, Garnett takes him to his mother, Eileen (Lana Morris), who has remarried. Unwelcome, Peter runs away, reaching London Zoo, before jumping an airport bus. It's dark now, as he chats with a passenger from Chicago (Francis Matthews, uncredited), before stupidly running on to the runway. Jimmy Delaney saves him from himself, and then happily accepted by his mother, Garnett treats them to a cricket match at Lords

9 The Marriage Broker - Tina (Andree Melly) has flown in to Athens to meet her fiance George Kadopolis, but though George turns up to meet her, the man she is expecting to marry, the man whose picture she had been sent, is actually his brother Pedros. Garnett has to sort it all out with Mama Kadopolis a formidable opponent. Miss Smith (Lois Maxwell) is introduced to the real George and soon they are hitting it off. But Mama's approval, or lack of it, is the key problem. Finally the worm turns, and George puts his foot down and it ends happily if not as expected

10 Gunpoint to Shannon - Garnett just happens to be on a flight where I Am Being Kidnapped is scrawled on the toilet mirror, He has to work out who wrote it. Perhaps young Michael with his stepmother, or the flighty Jinx travelling with Rikki 'Sugarboy' Jourdan, or is it Mowbray the Australian prankster (Charles Tingwell)? Or Zapotsky and Hafner from Berlin, or any of the others? Garnett gets Jinx to feign drunkenness and when the plane lands Garnett arrests Mario. This his companion Mrs Glomy (Bessie Love) finds hilarious, though the ending isn't quite so amusing for her

11 Million Dollar Lift- Vance has been released from the US State Pen, met by his pal Ziggy in a flash auto. Destination England, where Garnett recognises him and details Jimmy to tail him. He meets Miss Kelly a teacher (Jane Hylton), and Jimmy overhears plans for a robbery, the prize, a million! He joins the gang. In a Rolls, they drive to the airport dressed as pilots and board a Pan Am plane. Hijack. Jimmy attempts to prevent it, but is knocked out. When the crooks land, it's straight into the arms of the law. Note Vance and Ziggy return in The Body

14 Everybody's Uncle- Valentina flies into Rome with her baby, but runs away when a man attacks her. Later in hospital she dies. She leaves behind a broken doll, which leads Garnett to an adoption racket run by nice Uncle George (Joseph Tomelty) who runs a children's home. Jimmy poses with a fake wife seeking to adopt, they hand George the cash and he is arrested

15 The Good Old Days - A suspicious character on a flight attempts to jump out of the door. He's a juggler. Once landed, Bill Delaney questions him, then visits his digs, where a crowd of minor theatricals live, landlady Miss Clara Daly, once "the most amazing act." They are dominated by the raucous voice of a rotund opera singer, all unemployed, refusing to bow the knee to the new televisual menace. Maurice (Miles Malleson) says he knows nothing of any £10,000 flight insurance fraud. Garnett poses as an escapologist in order to stay at the digs, and in the cellar he gets Maurice a little tiddly, revealing quite a bit. Before them all, being urged to show his act to them, Garnett produces a suitcase containing the tools of his trade. He handcuffs Maurice to Nero, The Strongest Man Since Samson, then spirits away the key. Bill shows up with the police, and Clara amazingly shows up from inside Garnett's case

16 The Man Who Waited- Jimmy Delaney follows Brodick (Eddie Byrne) from Miami Airport to Lisbon, on to Rome, Cairo, and finally Gaboro, a small airport. Here, it is Jimmy that the local official (Warren Mitchell) wants to arrest, leaving Brodick, a known professional assassin, the opportunity to work out the lie of the land. Jimmy is vouched for, and meets the local sheik (James Villeirs), Garnett joining them, flying out with Langford (Alan Gifford) and his wife (Zena Walker). Arriving at Gaboro airport, Brodick fires his long distance rifle at Langford. But Brodick is arrested, and Langford unscathed

17 Danger on Cloud Seven- Howard K Hodgson of New York shoots himself in his office. Jimmy Delaney and Baker of NY Air Security question his widow. He had been on an air trip organised by The Count (Ferdy Mayne), so Garnett joins the next chartered flight of The Count's, talking to passengers who include actor Steve Hunt (Paul Carpenter), Hope (Adrienne Corri), and McHale (Howard Marion-Crawford), and among others the uncredited Arthur Lowe. Garnett suffers poisoning, Hope kindly helps him recover. After a sword fight, Garnett exposes the Count's racket

18 Downdraft (a rough synopsis) Dunk's small Selkirk Airways plane crashes into the sea, but he is rescued. Garnett is in Vancouver to decide if the firm deserve being awarded a licence, so he questions the employees of the business, but Jo (Jeannie Carson) has briefed them well. She puts Garnett up for the night and takes him country dancing where he pushes Dunk into a pool of mud. Next morning, she takes him up to show him the route of the plane that crashed, and they put up in a remote shack, where he pretends to make love to her. The jealous Dunk interrupts their fun, and Garnett finally elicits the truth

21 And Maya makes Three - Why has Air India hostess Veena Singh been murdered in her Calcutta hotel room? Garnett's secretary Maya volunteers to act as decoy, and to his and Jimmy's amusement takes a crash course in being a stewardess. But she gets her own back by spilling coffee in Jimmy's lap. On her first flight, passengers include Hanwell (Jack Watling) and Mrs Sykes (Nora Nicholson), but when you see Paul Stassino is the co-pilot, you surely need look no further. Maya checks into her hotel, closely watched by Garnett. Naturally all three of the above act suspiciously, but only one tries to strangle Maya

22 The Creators- Film starlet Didi (Nadja Regin) is introduced to us in a bath of frothy bubbles. Her scene is interrupted by a phone call warning she won't make 25. Jimmy has the pleasurable task of visiting her on the film set of Castle in the Clouds. The director (Alan Tilvern) doesn't impress him, even if she does. It seems like some publicity stunt, but she goes to impress Garnett, and he agrees to accompany her on the eve of her 25th birthday on the flight to Vienna. On the way over, while worry is driving her to drink, he reads the script. They reach Vienna safely, but Garnett has worked out the significance of the number 25, and joins the group on the set , and watches for an awfully long time. The scene with the cocktail mixer sees Garnett spring into action, dramatically stopping shooting and chucking the mixer to the man out to destroy her (Peter Dyneley)

27 Key Witness - Antonio Sporinza (David Bauer) has been flown to England as a key witness. But as his daughter Angela returns from school, she is kidnapped, and Sporinza sees her being taken on to another plane. The flight is delayed. A plane spotter (Pip Rolls) confirms that the girl is on the Glasgow flight, so Garnett, posing as a photographer's model, leaps on board to rescue Angela

28 Hurricane - Jimmy Delaney has to cut short his holiday on a tropical isle when Hurricane Hilda strikes. At Carriacou Airport, there is panic to board the sole plane, Taggart (Gordon Tanner) tries bribing Jimmy, and many other passengers assail him. The plane is made as light as possible by removing all the seats, then comes the choice of who can join the flight, Taggart's method is to use a gun. Finally the plane takes off and Jimmy, presumably the hurricane has suddenly ceased, resumes his holiday with more than a passing ressemblance to John 'Danger Man' Drake

31 The Switch- Alex (William Lucas) has nicked the Goriot diamond in Paris and has smuggled it into London, unfortunately accidentally leaving it in Garnett's office! One of his gang, Jenkins (Alfred Burke) fails to retrieve it, so Alex phones Garnett who is at home in bed. His doctor has told him to take it easy as his blood pressure is too high. Alex asks Garnett to go to a dance studio with his coat. Dora, Alex's girl friend teaches Garnett to do the cha-cha, before running off with his coat. But though they thought it was, the diamond isn't in there. Jenkins returns the coat, then leads Garnett a merry dance as he tries to shake him off tailing him- all the clambering can't be good for Garnett's heart. Luckily when Garnett catches up with the gang, Jimmy shows up to prevent his boss' demise. The final scene has the doctor declaring Garnett's blood pressure is, incredibly, back to normal!

32 Triple Cross - Three wise oriental sheiks arrive at London Airport, where they are shadowed by two villains Hakim (Ferdy Mayne) and Suleman Bay (Warren Mitchell). They book into a swish country hotel, and a fortune in jewellery is stashed in the safe. Posing as tv engineers, the two baddies nick the gems. In Garnett's office they are apprehended and the property returned to Sheik Abdul Pasha. But Garnett, with a touch of humour, has a job sorting out just who does own them

33 Delayed Reaction - Big Ben is chiming 5pm as a man falls from a fourth storey window, down on to a pavement. An opportunist thief steals the dead man's briefcase, but is arrested. In the case is evidence that a passenger on the plane to Athens has been poisoned, but which one of the eight on board? Garnett despatches Jimmy Delaney to Brussels Airport to liaise with agent Andre Bouchard. Miss Baker the stewardess introduces Jimmy to the possible victims: Mrs Andrews, Mrs Gates (Sarah Lawson), Saunders (Nigel Green), Mr and Mrs Williams, Rev Salomon, Betty, and Muller. Numerous red herrings distract Jimmy who finally gets to the poor poisoned one. A doctor treats her, while Jimmy tricks the poisoner (Geoffrey Keen) into a confession

35 A Case of Charity- On a flight, a girl passenger bursts into tears, it's a diversion worked by gentleman confidence trickster Frank Littlefield (Cecil Parker). When one of the notes from a stolen airport payroll is changed in Rome, Garnett meets up with Gassini of Rome Air Security and they hatch a plan to use Frank to entrap the boss behind the payroll theft (Francis de Wolff). Once more the girl is in tears, since her dad has apparently died...

36 And One To Go - In Paris, HP Finch (Charles Lloyd Pack) loses at lot in a fixed game of cards, and shoots the dealer dead, or so he believes. He flees on the flight to London, on which Garnett is also travelling. The passenger next to him goes down with smallpox, and everyone has to be inoculated. But Finch panics, as does Mrs Marian Dorlian (Moira Redmond) and both run away. Garnett finds her at home, and diplomatically keeps the secret of her illicit weekend from her husband (Patrick Holt). He catches up with Finch at the airport, and sorts out his problem also

39 Excess Baggage- With his four wives, a sheik arrives at London Airport. One named Anees hides in a supply room. Having got her description and photo, Jimmy Delaney, with a little help from Maya, traces Nadja (Petra Davies), who tries unsuccessfully tries to fool the sheik into believing she is the missing wife. Jimmy discovers Anees hiding in Nadja's flat. Rasool, the sheik's right hand man, attempts to push her from an upper window, but Jimmy saves her. With a new assistant, the sheik departs with three wives. He gives the now liberated Anees, dressed in a beatnik style jumper, a ticket to Hollywood

Zero One Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Return

Garnett is in Detroit being interviewed on tv. On his trip back, he sits next to a nervous woman, who claims she has lost her memory. So he drops her off at Chicago, where she disappears.
We see her changing her appearance, donning dark glasses, and flying back to Detroit. She checks into a hotel, and makes for room 127, to shoot Harry, her husband. Then she returns to Chicago, dressing as herself once more, and is found wandering in a car park, apparently still uncertain who she is. In fact she is Margo Jennings (Patricia Neal).
Garnett escorts her to hospital, where she recovers. She tries phoning her husband to assure him all is all right, but is shocked to learn the bad news. Captain Tyler (Lionel Murton) says Harry is "very dead," suicide. She refuses to accept this.
But Garnett "smells something fishy," and of course he's right. We see her in the arms of Mike (Bill Nagy). "I killed him... I did it for us," she admits to him.
But by an oversight, she has left some evidence, her plane ticket, in room 127 and she persuades Mike to retrieve it. However he is arrested, a fall guy for her. But Garnett is able to break her alibi.
Some American/English language humor from elevator boy Jerome 'Dukie,' which Garnett reciprocates at the end

Zero One Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Deadly Angels
A beautiful fairy doll. It's dismembered to reveal its contents. Ah Chen of International Air Security in Hong Kong is then killed, resulting in Garnett flying in to continue the investigation into dope smuggling. Chen's junior Jerry Wang tells how Chen had befriended and helped him, taking him from the orphanage where he had grown up. Garnett visits this Mission of Light and Hope, run by Rev Judd BPeteer Maddern) and assisted by Len Fu (Jacqui Chan). The money to run the mission is obtained from pedalling toys across the world that they make there. Garnett is impressed with Judd's kindness towards his ch rackets when arg t , for the wire that makes up the halo of a fairy, is identical to the piece of wire clutched in Chen's dying hand.
The bank account of Judd is inspected: "not exactly a fortune," notes the manager. But hold on, there's just been a deposit of $15,000. When Judd is asked to explain he is unconcerned: "suspicion is your business, mine is faith."
The next export consignment of dolls is opened by customs. Every doll is smashed. Nothing. Garnett checks on a second crate, and with Judd and Len Fu watching, he smashes a doll. Len Fu protests, and with reason, for "your angel dolls," he advises the shocked Judd, "have been carrying heroin." It was Len Fu, and she rants against his other worldliness. Her mute accomplice is in the wings, and she spurs him on to finish Garnett off ("if you love me, kill him"). It is Judd who ends the violence. Len Fu runs off, but in her haste, is run over by Jerry's car.
At the airport, Judd bids Garnett farewell. Garnett generously donates the $15,000 to pay for all those dolls he had smashed.

To Zero One Menu

.

.

.

.

Ghost Strip

200 miles from nowhere is a remote African landing strip. A forced landing here finds noone manning the place. Jimmy Delaney phones Garnett from Nairobi about the mystery and he's asked to investigate.
The only two workers at the strip are Renston and Smith, "decent chaps" according to local police chief Rogers (Maurice Hedley). But where have they got to? "This place gives me the willies," declares pilot 1, whilst the other (John Bonney) observes "the tea was still hot," just like the Marie Celeste. Yet tea had been laid for three, so who else had been there? The only other plane there has broken down, and in it Jimmy finds bars of gold, stolen in a recent robbery. That night Ahmed who is guarding the plane has his neck broken. Rogers decides to fly off for reinforcements, leaving Jimmy and the gold as "bait." In the dark bushes Jimmy crouches, and finds the bodies of Renston and Smith. Amidst the croaking of frogs and the sounds of African night life, he waits. Then gunshots- Jimmy has to shoot a dangerous looking snake. That noise drives off the killer.
But he emerges next morning with a gun pointed at Jimmy, who is ordered to repair the stricken plane. But his gun has no cartridges and so the thief and murderer is caught. "Good show," exclaims the returning Rogers.

Zero One Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Body
Two New York villains take the frozen corpse of hoodlum Happy Jack and ship him air freight to London. However the declare the body as that of Sir Philip Humbolt, who disappeared into obscurity ten years ago. The pair are Archie Vance (Hugh McDermott) and "his number one playmate" Ziggy. Air security chief Alan Garnett is an old acquaintance of Vance (see #11) who declares "I'm a reformed man." Garnett is not going to believe that! What Archie hasn't explained is that he's working for a relation of Sir Philip called Cecil (Jeremy Lloyd), who has traced his uncle, now living happily in a doss house. Cecil will inherit the unspent fortune "when the old man kicks off," but that event needs hastening. However they don't want to get into any murder rap, so this is their plan....
Step One- Collect Happy Hack's coffin from the airport. However Garnett doesn't trust that "warped, bent, calculating mind" of Archie's and traces Cecil to his home.
Step Two- Poison the real Sir Philip, just to knock him out, not to kill him. There's a nice moment as the incompetent Ziggy wonders if he's drinking the doped drink instead of Sir Philip.
Step Three- Archie poses as a doctor, and takes Sir Philip away to a 'hospital.'
Step Four- switch bodies and get Bronson, Sir Philip's solicitor, to identify the body. "RIP," sighs the solicitor. "Alleluia," responds Archie.
But Garnett has been watching proceedings and the bodies have not quite been swapped back when the police break in. "Archie, haven't you got a body too many?" quips Garnett, as Happy Jack lies frozen on the floor. Archie shakes Garnett's hand as he is taken off to jail.
This is a tongue-in-cheek tale that ends with Sir Philip sitting up in his coffin, very much alive, but a little mystified

Zero One Menu

.

.

.

.

The New Adventures of Martin Kane
starring William Gargan

1
Missing Daughter (pilot)
2 The Boxer
30 Railroad Story
32 Race to the Finish

There had been several American series about Martin Kane, but this is the seriously forgotten British series starring the creator of the role.
A pilot was made at Rotherhithe Studios in July 1956, and with the series approved, shooting at Elstree Studios commenced about February 1957, lasting 19 weeks. 39 stories were made in total.
Some location shooting was done, including an episode with scenes shot in Paris with Gargan and Betty McDowall (possibly #3 Passport Ring Story). It was stated that this series was "made on location in all the countries of Western Europe," but although this was one of the first British dramas to use extensive location shooting, I can't believe it was that far ranging.
Martin Kane was screened in USA from the middle of April 1957. The series was also sold to Spain, dubbed in Spanish.
Quite why it was largely disappeared from view is a mystery that only Kane himself might have been able to solve. True, this was really British ABC's first effort to make their own filmed series, but it's more viewable than the earlier American made stories, and has its own charm, especially in Brian Reece as Inspector Page, who stiff upper lippedly attempts to rein in Gargan's enthusastic American methods.

To Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Missing Daughter

In Monaco, American Jim Wilson and his daughter Lorraine (Kay Callard) are holidaying, but she disappears from their hotel room.
Ex-colonel in the US Air Force, Martin Kane, who has been in London for five years, is asked to investigate since Lorraine had had a breakdown when her fiance had died two months ago. In Monte Carlo she had fallen for an artist James Richards (Martin Benson), fast, unstable, selfish. The Lucinda is his boat and according to Lloyd's register, it is docked a few miles offshore near the Thames estuary.
So Kane takes a launch to this boat, and learns that Lorraine is on board, here of her own free will. Inspector Hedley of the Yard (John Warwick) tells Kane that Richards is a known diamond smuggler, usually employing an innocent dupe as a courier, yes that's Lorraine. When she comes ashore she is put under surveillance. She calls at a shop, emerging with a box of paints, then goes on to Kane's office where she has a heart to heart with her father, which amounts to "dad, I'm going to marry him."
Kane opens the paint box, the tubes of paint are systematically squeezed, but no diamonds are revealed. The box is in bits so a replica is given to Lorraine, but when she presents this to Richards he is not at all pleased.
He has to risk the trip ashore to retrieve the original box. Up a fire escape, Richards climbs into Kane's flat, and despite the fact that police are watching the place, after a fight he succeeds in running off with the remains of the box.
That sets off a long police chase, with Richards making for his launch at Tower Bridge. Cleverly eluding the cops, he reaches it and sets course for the safety of the three mile limit. But police give chase and by Rotherhithe they are closing, so Richards leaps ashore, still clutching his box, and is pursued round the docks until cornered, "you can stop running, Mr Richards."
Louise is now safe home. Those diamonds are discovered in the lid of the paint box, you'd have thought Kane would have had the brains to think of that one!

Martin Kane Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Boxer
Joey Reardon (Lee Patterson) is in London for a big boxing match. But his wife Helen (Lisa Gastoni) is kidnapped. She'll come to no harm as long as he throws the fight. "Kidnapping is almost unheard of in England," Kane informs us, but this is a rare case. Wisely Reardon informs the US Embassy and they point him in Martin Kane's direction. In turn, he does call in Scotland Yard, Supt Page, who promises absolute secrecy.
Reardon's boxing contacts are checked out and his phone tapped. "It takes time to trace a call," (unlike these days) and preparations are made to do this as efficiently as possible. At 4pm a call comes through, the message repeating the same instructions to Reardon. This call is traced to a phone booth, but of course it is long deserted. No clues can be found at all.
Dominic, his manager, realises he is in no condition to fight properly.
Mrs Reardon is still a prisoner, the boss of the gang is Anders (Leonard Sachs), who is placing bets on the match all over the continent. His ally Hollis (Kenneth Griffith) is getting jumpy and allows her to phone her husband to tell him she's OK.
This call is taped, and a strange background noise is picked up, a kind of whining. Analysing it, Kane surmises it is a jet engine. The most likely address is Stanley Aircraft Works so police swoop on the area, sealing off a street.
The boss is caught as he attempts to sneak away, his voice bretraying the fact that he had made one of the phone calls. Hollis tries to get away using Mrs Reardon as a hostage, but Kane sneaks up on him, and in order to get away has to let her go. After a chase Hollis too is arrested.
At the fight, Joey delivers a KO in the second round

Martin Kane Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Railroad Story
script by Brian Clemens (as Tony O'Grady).
The title is not very appropriate, since the story is about a swindle involving hospital drugs.

Ray Dilling (Walter Gotell), a director of Anglo Canadian Chemicals sabotages his own firm by replacing a batch of drugs with a lethal chemical.
Another director, Bill Wright Jr, calls in Martin Kane who tries "a long shot," bugging the factory.
Playing over the tapes, Kane hears a voice which Wright identifies as Dilling's, directing an employee to doctor Assignment K7. At the rail depot, Supt Page catches the gang of three tampering with K7 and they are arrested.
A ten year old girl is the latest victim of being given the wrong drug, and proof has to be found to convict Dilling.
So Kane joins the firm and in a rehearsed scene is questioned by Supt Page over a crime. Dilling kindly gives Kane a false alibi, in return for which Kane is asked to deliver a package to Paris. It contains banknotes. Kane delivers it to M Bouzanne who is a legitimate stockbroker.
Gilling's plan becomes evident. He's out to create a scandal to force the company shares down, so he can buy them cheaply. But with the little girl set to recover, it looks as though shares won't be falling.
Another tape reveals Dilling has become desperate. He is going to the hospital to kill the girl! Supt Page and Kane arrive just as he's about to inject her. Dilling runs off, there's a chase through the streets and on to Tower Bridge, where Dilling is cornered. "Case all wrapped up"

Martin Kane Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

32 Race to the Finish

A lesson on the evils of gambling.
The Sport of Kings... and Crooks, like Brandon Hall (Peter Illing) and Max Laymer (John Harvey). One of their sucker clients is John Parker (Gaylord Cavallaro), a US businessman who starts betting beyond his means. £200 on Lillywhite. "He's almost at rock bottom," so Laymer helps him on his way. He provides a hot tip for Parker, Saucy Sue, but Parker just hasn't enough cash. Why not 'borrow' it from his firm? When the sure snip fails to come in, John is easy blackmail material.
His boss but also his friend, Forrester, suspecting embezzlement, calls in Martin Kane, who having questioned some touts, has picked up on Parker's heavy betting habit. But Mrs Parker (Ann Sears) knows nothing of her husband's dilemma. Checking on Parker's business contacts, it seems the Ashton Machinery Company are still awaiting goods ordered through Parker.
Reluctantly, Forrester accepts Kane's report and they agree to call in the discreet aid of Supt Page. Parker is arrested and does confess, for he had wanted to break from Hall and Laymer. To redeem himself, Parker agrees to play along in an entrapment.
At the race course, Page and Kane watch as Parker makes a rendezvous with the crooks, passing them the £1,000 blackmail money that will allegedly free Parker. Of course they demand more, but Supt Page swoops. However Hall draws a gun and takes Parker hostage. The crooks get away but the tick tack men relay a message that they have made for the Owners' Parking Lot. Here, amid the shooting, Parker grabs Laymer and Kane jumps on Hall from behind. Thanks to his valuable assistance, "the future didn't look too dark" for John Parker

Martin Kane Menu

.

.

.

.

.

INSPECTOR MORLEY (LATE OF SCOTLAND YARD) INVESTIGATES
(
Many thanks to Jean-Claude Michel for his painstaking research into this series which was definitely shown on American television. However the series was never screened on British tv.)
Produced in 1952 by Ambassador Film Productions Ltd.
Shot at Bushey Film Studios. Producer: Gilbert Church. Director of all episodes: Victor M Gover. Screenplays: John Gilling. Director of photography: S.D. Onions. Art director: Don Chaffey. Editor: Helen Wiggins. Special music composed by W.L. Trytel. Assistant Director: John Workman. MKP: Harry Webber. Continuity: Gladys Reeve. Sound recordist: Peter Birch (GVI Recording).
Photo: J-C Michel has identified the actress on the right as Katherine Black

Surviving stories (if you have any of any others, I'll be glad to swap):
1
Scarlet Letter
2 The Case of the Green Eye
3 The Case of the Wise Monkeys
5 The Red Flame
7 Murder at Scotland Yard
13 Death at the Festival (cinema release as Murder at the Grange)

To Crime Menu

Details of the 13 stories made:
Notes: The 3 first episodes were released as a feature, KING OF THE UNDERWORLD, released in 1952. Episodes 7, 8 and 9 released as the feature MURDER AT SCOTLAND YARD in 1954. Episode 13 released as a featurette (BBC tv screened it this century, Talking Pictures TV first showed it in 2016).

1 SCARLET LETTER
The title of this first episode is according to an old US television magazine.
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter (Morley's secretary)
Len Sharp.......................... Mr. Mullins
John Morley, late of Scotland Yard, is approached by a married woman who is being blackmailed by a crook for compromising letters (this society woman has committed an indiscretion). Morley soon discovers that the extortionist is Terence Reilly, homicidal King of the Underworld, and his arch enemy.

2 The Case OF THE GREEN EYE
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Ingeborg Wells.................. Marie Stewart, alias Joyce Winters, alias Coleen Fenton
David Davies..................... George
Anne Valerie (Valery).......... Susan
A woman is kidnapped to obtain a valuable emerald as a ransom. Of course, Terence Reilly is the real culprit, helped by his accomplice Marie who was the maid of the victim. Spike, a member of the gang, tries to blackmail Reilly but is killed by the arch-criminal. Inspector Morley witnessed the murder. Disguised with a beard he infiltrates the gang and unmasks the woman's husband as one of Reilly's accomplices.

3 The Case OF THE WISE MONKEYS
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Frank Hawkins................... Insp. Cranshaw
An old scientist visits Morley and tells him that his young assistant has disappeared. Reilly murders the scientist to secure his secret formula, for sale it to foreign powers. Eileen Trotter, Morley's secretary, is kidnapped but Morley saves her from an acid bath in the nick of time. But Reilly escapes the police... (note: in the "feature" version, this is immediately followed by a conclusion where Morley tells us that Reilly was finally seized and hanged for his crimes.)

4 SILENT WITNESS
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Tom Macaulay................... Insp. Grant
Clifford Buckton
Hilda Barry
Erik Chitty

5 THE RED FLAME
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Tom Macaulay................... Insp. Grant
Dorothy Bramhall.............. Maria Flame
Arthur Howard.............. Theatrical Costumier
A gang of car thieves is at large in London; during their latest raid, a young motor mechanic was critically injured, prompting police to step up efforts to apprehend them. Head of the gang is Maria Flame, alias The Red Flame, a former pickpocket's assistant whom Terence Reilly had helped to transform into a major-league criminal. Following his escape from prison one week earlier, Reilly is hiding out with Maria, blackmailing her to give him £10,000 in exchange for not exposing her to the police. Morley – who has already identified one of the car thieves as Phelps, a known associate of Riley's from the 'Green Eye' case – responds to an enigmatic classified advert placed by Maria, offering 'profit' to a 'young man in search of adventure.' He goes to meet her disguised with a false beard as a Frenchman named Pierre. She offers him £1000 to kill Reilly, but the latter subsequently sneaks back into Maria's flat, leading to a struggle at the end of which both Reilly and Flame are arrested.

6 ROUGH JUSTICE
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Rita Birkett....................... Pauline

7 MURDER AT SCOTLAND YARD
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Tom Macaulay................... Insp. Grant
Michael Moore................. Fred Carstairs
Dorothy Bramhall............. Maria Flame
T. Nichols......................... policeman
Verne Morgan
Cyril Conway
Terence Reilly, gang leader, determines to liquidate his arch enemies, Fred Carstairs of the Yard and Inspector Morley, private investigator, both of whom are hot on his trail. Reilly conceives the idea of anonymously presenting them both with a radio set which will explode and kill them. His plan works so far as Carstairs is concerned, but misfires in the Case of Morley. The shop where the sets were purchased is located, and after a number of exciting adventures Reilly and his accomplice Maria Flame are tracked down and arrested.

8 FALSE ALIBI
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Dorothy Bramhall.............. Mrs Lester (Maria Flame's sister)
Joss Ambler...................... Lester
Patrick Boxill.................... Spud
Louise Grainger................ Miss Wilson
Brenda Bauell.................. secretary
David Davies.................... George
Reilly escapes whilst awaiting trial on a capital charge. Morley and a man named Foxley are the prosecution's chief witnesses. Morley is warned by Inspector Grant of the Yard of his danger, as loyal associates of Reilly are seeking to eliminate the witnesses and Foxley has disappeared. Morley investigates, but Foxley is murdered. Reilly's accomplice who committed the crime is caught, but Reilly is still at large, and in another of his many disguises is now engaged in diamond robberies.

9 REILLY AT BAY
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Tom Macaulay................... Insp. Grant
Roger Delgado.................. George Grayson
Judith Nelmes.................. Mrs. Foxley
Scott Harold..................... Mr. Foxley
Humphrey Kent............... Major Fry
Rita Birkett...................... Pauline
T. Nichols........................ policeman
Stewart Yantan............... Pat Campbell
William Nicke................ policeman
Hugh Gort...................... policeman
Roy Russell
A diamond merchant who has been robbed consults Morley, who probes and discovers many things, including the fact that the merchant's wife is none other than the sister of Reilly's accomplice, and it is she who has stolen the diamonds and passed them to Reilly. She boldly comes to his office and threatens him with a gun, but is outwitted and on her way to the Yard with Morley, she is shot. Before she dies she is able to give information which leads Morley and the police to Reilly's hide-out, and the master criminal and his accomplices are all captured, bringing their nefarious activities and the story to an end.

10 DARK PASSAGE
Tod Slaughter....................Terence Reilly / Patrick Reilly (his brother)
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Frank Hawkins................... Inspector Cranshaw
Dorothy Primrose.............. Mrs. Hawkins
Andrew Laurence.............. Penshaw
Ian Fleming....................... police doctor
Carl Lacey......................... Mr. Hawkins
Charles Leno..................... Crossley
Joanna Black..................... waitress
Jill Dunkley....................... telephonist
Walter Horsbrugh............. Brent
Ian Sadler......................... Brown
Jack Midwinter................. policeman

11 MURDER IN THE STRAND
Tod Slaughter.................... Reilly (Terence or Patrick ?)
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Frank Hawkins................... Inspector Cranshaw
Amy Dalby......................... Amelia
Dagmar Wynter................. Angela
Jack Newmark................... Glyn
Sidney Hunt ...................... police clerk
Dennis Cowles.................. Dr. Penn
Cara Stevens..................... secretary
Isobel George................... hairdresser

12 SHOWDOWN
Tod Slaughter.................... Reilly
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Frank Hawkins................... Inspector Cranshaw

13 MURDER AT THE GRANGE (shot as DEATH AT THE FESTIVAL)
Patrick Barr....................... Inspector John Morley
Tucker McGuire................. Eileen Trotter
Frank Hawkins................... Insp Cranshaw
Grace Denbigh-Russell...... Cynthia Quelch
Margaret Boyd.................. Agatha Quelch
Tod Slaughter................... Patrick Reilly, posing as Clarence Beacham, a butler
Peter Forbes-Robertson... young clerk
George Bishop.................. senior clerk
Pat Neal............................ maid
John Sanger...................... policeman
Ned Lynch........................ sergeant
Pamela Harrington........... Agatha at 19
Tony Spear....................... Richard Parker
John Miller...................... manservant
Note: when they decided to release this short theatrically, in re-making the new credits (after the change of title) they simply forgot to mention Tod Slaughter, the star of the series! The first five names are the only ones credited in this version. The others came from personal seach at the Film Archives of BFI, like most of the credits mentioned for the series.
An involved story of mysterious murders in Victorian family and two elderly spinster sisters, the only remaining members. The murders are thought to be committed by rejected suitor, full of hatred and revenge. Detective Inspector Morley is called to The Grange by Cynthia Quelch who is fearful that she is the next member of the family on the murderer's list. Her sister Agatha, supposedly confined to a wheel chair, is filled with insane hatred for the world, and particularly her family who were responsible for the broken love affair of her youth. When Cynthia is killed, Morley with the help of Scotland Yard's Inspector Cranshaw, finds incriminating evidence damning Agatha who with the help of her manservant has contrived to satisfy her revenge.

Many thanks to Jean-Claude Michel for this section. Thanks are also due to Robert J. Kiss for the information about the American broadcast of the series.
To Inspector Morley

.

.

.

.

.

Scarlet Letter
Terence Reilly, currently a Hatton Garden diamond merchant, is "tall, sinister looking, frightening charm." He is blackmailing Lady Sylvia Gray, to hand him the Gray Diamond, in return for her compromising letters. Her only recourse is suicide, but she is rescued from Boulter's Lock.
A few years ago she'd consulted Inspector Morley but fear of scandal forced her not to press charges.That decision was a huge disappointment to Morley who had been trying to catch this master criminal for years, ever since he'd killed a fellow police officer.
Mullins is another crook, acting as a go-between, arranging a deal whereby his boss Alec Trent will buy all the blackmail material for his own criminal purposes. Morley poses as Trent to arrange a face to face meeting with his nemesis.
1 Hatfield Gardens Clapham Park is the empty property where it comes to pass. Morley pins Reilly down but the latter has been shrewd enough not to bring any of the letters with him, so Morley leaves him bound and gagged and taken the keys to Reilly's safe, with no lack of scruple that previously he had shown. However a puncture then a traffic jam delay him and Reilly, who had wriggled free, thwarts Morley's plan, "one of us is just a little smarter than the other." Now it's Morley's turn to be trussed up, "then I'm going to kill you."
Rescue comes in the form of Eileen, Morley's secretary. Posing as an American, name of Trent, she buys those blackmail letters in a nice exchange in which Reilly admires her charms and even decides that in future he might call himself 'Miss Reilly.' Too late Reilly realises he's been tricked, she's paid with counterfeit money! But Reilly has been cunning himself, only handing her duplicates. Morley has freed himself and he snatches the real letters and departs with this promise to Reilly, "I'll follow you to hell," since he can't prosecute him as yet because of the danger of scandal.
Uncredited speaking parts: Lady Sylvia Gray (Katherine Black), Sir Donald Gray, a boy playing football who finds Reilly

Inspector Morley Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Green Eye
In her flash sports car CGG240 Susan is held at gunpoint.
Blandford her uncle receives a kidnap note demanding the Green Eye emerald valued at £10,000 for her safe return. He consults Inspector Morley, who advises ignoring the threat for the time being, "she's of more value to them alive than dead."
Marie Stewart, the Blandford maid, she's a convicted criminal associated with Reilly- Morley is quickly on to that! Eileen Trotter is deputed by Morley to watch Reilly's Hatton Garden office, while Morley blames Blandford, who has gone against his advice and handed over the emerald. However Susan has not been released.
In fact she cannot be released since old lag Spike, in a fit of drunkenness has told Susan that Reilly is her kidnapper. Reilly orders Spike to dispose of her. But in one of those improbable coincidences, Morley happens to have seen Spike in the street and "curiosity" makes him follow the crook to the house where his boss George is holding Susan. Spike is paid off and of course spends his ill gotten gains in a pub. He staggers to Reilly's office to demand the Green Eye, the pair fight and Spike is stabbed to death.
A man called Archie, Morley with a thick beard, approaches Reilly offering to bump Morley off as well as the girl. In fact the simple plot becomes more elaborate as the inspector uses his chance to expose the mastermind behind the kidnap. He kindly explains to the gang the errors they always make, "simple deduction" solved this case. It's a neatly done finish though regrettably Reilly must have penetrated Morley's disguise and "the old fox got away again."
Uncredited speaking parts: Blandford, Spike Mulligan

Inspector Morley Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the Wise Monkeys

Scene 1 shows Inspector Morley waiting with Inspector Cranshaw. The former relates how this case had begun.
Scientist John Harrison had approached him two weeks ago. His new discovery is XYQ, but he is worried as his assistant Paul Roger has disappeared, and so have elements of his formula.
Morley's secretary Eileen Trotter had found out that a typewritten note from the crooks was executed on a Derwent Portable Mk II. Now crooked diamond merchant Terence Reilly had purchased such a machine, though when she asks him, he denies it.
Reilly is up to his old tricks, strangling Harrison in order to search his home for the rest of the formula.
Eileen is in danger too. Walking along a street to work, Reilly kidnaps her, bundling her away in his car.
A stranger calls at Reilly's office, pretty obvious it's Morley with a moustache and beard and glasses, but Reilly is slow on the uptake. The stranger wants to buy a diamond, and admires the ring Reilly is wearing. Now its shape matches exactly the indentation in the dead professor's neck. Too late Reilly works out who this stranger is.
In a typical Tod Slaughter scene, with several wonderfully corny lines, the crook attempts to make a deal with Morley, "clever Morley, but not quite clever enough." Eileen Trotter is offered in exchange for the damning evidence of the ring that Morley has got. No, responds the inspector. "Then Miss Trotter will trot no more."
Roger has approached Reilly, £5,000 for the formula. Morley chases him across a bombsite but loses him when Roger grabs a car. Morley hails a taxi, but it's too late.
That brings us back to the opening scene. Hoping for Eileen's release, and for news that Roger's car is spotted. It is, and Roger is tailed to a warehouse.
In another typical Slaughter scene showing him at his nasty best, Reilly has concocted a bath of nitric acid for Eileen's benefit. When Roger joins Reilly at the warehouse, the Yard swoop and Roger is under arrest. Reilly however, tips the bath over to cut off pursuit, and exits a free man. But Inspector Cranshaw doesn't seem bothered, "Reilly won't get far."

For the ending of the tv story- Reilly remains a free man.

The feature length film has one final scene to round it off. Reilly is caught and on the prison notice board, a note as to his time of execution is posted.
Inspector Morley concludes with a mini sermon.
Uncredited speaking parts: John Harrison, the scientist, The assistant in the typewriter shop, Paul Roger

Inspector Morley Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Red Flame
A string of cars have been stolen, the latest being KUC450 from the Circle Car Mart, Western Avenue, where a mechanic is coshed, winding up in hospital. Is there any connection with the fact that Terence Reilly had escaped prison the week previously? "The heat's on."
Reilly is hiding out at the flat of his prodigy Maria Flame, she who had been taught all she knows about crime from the master, "your beauty finished the job." So she owes him one, £10,000 to be more precise to help him. She's got the cash, from the proceeds of all these car robberies, for it is she who is the brains behind this gang. However she is reluctant to hand him all that cash. "Oh frailty, thy name is woman," laments Reilly. "Oh shut up" is her more unpoetic response.
Inspector Morley recognises one of the car thieves as Phelps, an associate of Reilly on the Green Eye case. According to Inspector Grant of the Yard, Reilly has been seen in Paris, but Morley is convinced that this proves he's still in London.
The car of a Dr Simpson is stolen, a note warns him off telling the police. But he does consult Morley, who smells the exclusive Parisian perfume on the notepaper.
Morley buys a beard from a theatrical costumier, then makes his way to Maria Flame's flat. She has been advertising for someone in search of adventure. After Maria meets the bearded Pierre, it transpires the job, for £1,000, is to kill "someone who has been annoying me." You can guess who.
Phelps is assigned to tail Pierre, just to make sure he doesn't renege on the deal. But Morley outwits him and has him arrested.
The final drama. In the best Tod Slaughter manner, Reilly ascends the fire escape to Maria's flat. "You shall pay for this," her double cross that is. Enter Pierre with a gun. A struggle, as Maria watches on. Then the police burst in and arrest Reilly
Uncredited speaking parts: A thief called Phelps. A garage mechanic. A police constable. A radio announcer. A theatrical costumier (Arthur Howard). Dr Simpson
Inspector Morley Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Murder at Scotland Yard
Reilly has escaped from prison! He's somewhere in Soho.
At Scotland Yard, Inspector Carstairs stupidly opens a package, a radio "from an old admirer." The tension builds well, for we can guess, even if Carstairs can't, what's going to occur.
"Get the doctor!" Too late. "Murder by radio," gloats Reilly, and a double one too he hopes, for Inspector Morley has been sent an identical present.
His secretary, Miss Eileen Trotter unpacks it, but since it needs a plug- stupid mistake by Reilly- she cannot switch it on. A kind window cleaner does the job for her, "there we are." But by now Miss Trotter has left the office to meet her boss at Piccadilly Circus.
He has been with Inspector Grant at the Yard sifting through the rubble in the late Carstairs' office. A photo of Maria Flame is mysteriously intact, "slippery as an eel." The radio is traced to a "store" in Wood Green run by Miss Elaine Wilson.
The window cleaner is plugging in the radio when Morley returns, he switches off the sweet music in a haste, then defuses the bomb.
Miss Trotter has been delegated to watch the radio shop, but she is kidnapped. Reilly devises another fiendish plot to dispose of his enemy. "I'm going to settle with that gentleman once for all. It's either Morley or me."
The pair meet face to face in the radio shop. They fight but Morley is shot by Reilly's accomplice and dragged away into a car thence to Reilly's hideout. Here, Miss Trotter has managed to get away, "stand still Reilly," she shouts, and so Reilly and Maria Flame are recaptured

Inspector Morley Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Death at the Festival (cinema release: Death at The Grange)
Phone call for Morley from a Miss Cynthia Quelch of The Grange, Princes Risborough. In his Morris Minor, the detective drives down from London, to discuss Miss Quelch's problem. Before Morley even talks to her he knows what it is, for the door is opened by the butler none other than Morley's old nemesis Reilly, last seen running a marriage bureau.
He ushers Morley in, Cynthia explains her invalid sister Agatha is her worry. The events go back fifty years to when a Richard Parker had wanted to marry her, but their father had not consented because Richard's father was in prison. Parker had sworn revenge on the Quelch family, ten years later Mr Quelch had died in mysterious circumstances. A long gap before last year, at the Festival of Britain (hence the original title of the story), their only brother Roger had died. Find Parker, Cynthia begs. Morley's initial advice is sack Clarence the butler, alias Reilly. But that is impossible, according to Agatha, so just what is he up to here?
Inspector Cranshaw learns from the American police that Parker had died in 1910, the valet and chief suspect was never traced. Now Patrick Reilly was known to be in the USA about then.
To protect the two surviving sisters, Morley stays at The Grange. He discovers love letters from Parker to Agatha. "It must be Reilly," he decides. But when Cynthia takes her afternoon rest, she is strangled in her locked room. How did the killer get in? Cynthia's cup of milk is still warm, suggesting she had only just died.
Inspector Cranshaw warns, "keep an eye on the butler." A smart piece of detective work proves just how Cynthia was murdered, and evidence helpfully points the police to the actual killer.
The evil exposed, a dagger is improbably drawn, but it's not long before arrests are made. But can anything be proved against Reilly? The detectives end by mulling over the case
Inspector Morley

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Crime Club
Towers of London started at the end of June 1959 on this proposed series of one-off stories that hoped to repeat the success of Towers' earlier successful radio series of this name.

The first of the series to be made was Invitation to Murder.
The director was Robert Lynn, the writer Joel Murcott. Robert Beatty starred as Michael Steel, Ernest Thesiger as Sadouris Andrade, Lisa Daniely as Joan, and Douglas Wilmer as Insp Marquand. Others in the cast were Catherine Feller, John Howlett, Bud Knapp, Denis Shaw, Guy Kingsley Poynter, Keith Pyott, Tony Thawnton and Olga Dickie. A bed ridden eccentric leaves his money to the last beneficiary to survive him: one of his two grand-daughters, or his lawyer, his secretary or his nurse. A private eye (Robert Beatty) vies with the police to solve the crimes. This story was not well received by St John Roberts, who wrote after seeing it, "a very heavy handed drama which was supposed to look like one of those creepy French thrillers... We had a millionaire who proposes to leave a will naming five beneficiaries. Each is to receive a hundred dollars a week, though the bulk of the estate would go to to the remaining survivor... the drama was laid on so heavily with a trowel that if it was meant to be taken seriously, I apologise for laughing though I feel I can be excused for smiling at dialogue like this. Millionaire to inquisitive private eye: 'The last time we met you cost me a couple of oil wells.'
'Well, well...'
It is obvious that the play was written for the title because the simplest thing the millionaire to do- if he felt so passionately about his youngest daughter- was to leave all the cash to her anyway and save himself the trouble of going to such lengths to eliminate the others."

The first story in production had been planned as
You'll Never See Me Again.
Script: Cornell Woolrich, adapted for TV by Joel Murcott. Director: Ted Post.
My review: Jim Mason (Ben Gazzara) is an architect, his work affected as Molly his wife has left him for mother. But when he phones her there, he's told she hasn't been there. Worried, Jim consults Inspector Stillman (a laid back Leo Genn). His wife's last words, he says, were the ominous, you'll never see me again.
In his sports car EXL367, Jim drives with his friend Bob to Danby Warwickshire, where her family live- he's never met Molly's mother or her stepfather Joe. "I don't understand," snaps Jim at them, when they claim his wife had written several times saying she was unhappy.
Inspector Stillman becomes suspicious when all of Molly's possessions that Jim said she had packed and taken with her are found in their St Albans' home. Jim's on the point of being arrested, so he locks the police in his cellar and drives off fast. He's chased - by the usual police car XPC898- and avoids a road block, then he learns Molly had boarded the bus for Warwickshire, she must have gone to her parents.
His architectural skills prove useful in locating a dummy wall in the house, the inspector steps in to complete the demolition of the wall, and sure enough there is a corpse. However it is not Molly's!
"She must be with them," surmises Jim, but where are her parents? In fact they have gone south to Jim's home where Joe is digging up the cellar to plant Molly's corpse there. Police arrive in time to stop the frame-up. The first body was that of Molly's real mother, as the whole evil plan is exposed in this neat little thriller

As far as I can ascertain these two films were all that were made in this Crime Club series, and rather improbably they were screened in the 'Summer Armchair Theatre' slot in August 1959. Presumably the project was abandoned. In 1963 ABC did repeat the films under the banner 'Crime Club.'
Main Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Crime/ Adventure series live/ on videotape
My reviews of some of the survivors:

Quatermass Dixon of Dock Green Detective Sherlock Holmes Crane Probation Officer Public Eye Police Surgeon
Maigret The Spies The Dark Number Pair of Private Eyes The Rat Catchers Sergeant Cork The Protectors Redcap
Z Cars Softly Softly A Game of Murder Bat Out Of Hell Boyd QC It's Dark Outside The Avengers Shadow Squad
Death is a Good Living Adam Adamant The Expert No Hiding Place Riviera Police The Man in Room 17 The Corridor People Mr Rose
Colour code in the above chart only of the producing companies: BBC A-R ABC ATV Granada
Sadly, stories screened 'live' have been lost in the ether, while too many 'taped' stories were wilfully destroyed by philistines, some of whom should have known better, like David Attenborough for example at the BBC, who, while enthusiastically ensuring wildlife didn't become extinct, oversaw the destruction of some of BBC television's endangered series.
We must be thankful that Granada, in particular, had a much more responsible attitude to their archive, and kept such quirky series as The Odd Man, and The Corridor People.
ATV's zeal for earning their fortune in the export market, has ensured that some of their studio based series like Sergeant Cork, also survived in some corner of a foreign field, now thankfully, if that's the word, reissued on dvd.
The BBC have sorted out that part of their archive that wasn't annihilated, and we can utter a sigh of relief that those days of wilful tape destruction will never return. My picture is a publicity shot from one Redcap episode that has survived: John Thaw is with Ann Lynn

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Main Crime Menu ... see also 1960's menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Sherlock Holmes (1965-8)
Douglas Wilmer created a fine Sherlock Holmes in this BBC series. Nigel Stock provided staunch support as Dr Watson

Pilot (1964): The Speckled Band - directed by Roger Midgeley
Who is whistling at dead of night in the creepy old house?
Julia Stoner is to be married shortly, she'll be relieved to get away from her domineering stepfather's gloomy place. "You're going to live happily ever after," her sister Helen tells her.
Not so, for that night there's a scream and Julia is dead. But the cause is far from clear.
Two years have passed, and now Helen is engaged to Percy. She tells her fiance that her stepfather has insisted she sleeps in Julia's bedroom until the marriage. Indeed, he forces her to do so. That night Helen hears a whistle. She jumps out of bed and runs away to consult SH.
She is shaking with fear, afraid of her stepfather. A cheetah and a baboon he has brought back with him from India, are his pets, making him even more frightening, she tells the great detective. Dr Watson of course is all "at sea," especially baffled over Julia's dying words, Speckled Band.
After she has left, with a lighter heart, the wicked stepfather himself, Sir Grimesby Roylott (Felix Felton) bursts in to warn SH to mind his own business.
Undeterred, SH and Dr Watson travel down to Roylott's home. Nearby they meet some surly gipsies- one is wearing a speckled handkerchief round his neck.
Now SH examines Helen's new bedroom. A ventilator links the room with her stepfather's. In the latter room is a saucer of fresh milk.
That night, Helen lies petrified as Grimesby prowls the house. SH and Watson gain entry via her bedroom window. "What a nightmarish place!"
They wait. A scream, but this is from Roylott. A swamp snake had entered Helen's bedroom via the ventilator, down the bell rope. SH had beaten it off, and the snake had fled to savage its master, "violence recoils upon the violent."

1.1 The Illustrious Client (1965)- directed by Peter Sasdy.
Sir James (Ballard Berkeley) is seeking SH's aid in preventing the dangerous Baron Gruner from killing "a man of great significance." He has already implemented the first stage of that scheme, by becoming engaged to the innocent Violet (Jennie Linden).
Peter Wyngarde's Baron has an edge, irascible, almost frightening as you fear for the besotted Violet who can't see through her love for this egocentric. She will hear nothing against his "noble nature" for the very good reason he has been so open and honest with her about his disreputable past, even to accusations that he killed his first wife.
SH's first move is to contact at a music hall a petty criminal called Shinwell Johnson. Proof positive against the baron is what Shinwell is asked to supply.
Then it's face to face with the baron in his sumptuous home. They exchange unpleasantries as both stand confident in their positions. Now the baron seems foppish, bantering, yet still menacing in warning off SH.
Miss Kitty Winter (Rosemary Leach) from Islington is the person Shinwell comes up with. She is sure the baron has committed two other murders. He keeps a leather book, his 'collection' of his women conquests.
Dr Watson has mugged up on another passion of the baron's, Chinese pottery, so he can offer him a rare Ming saucer, as a distraction while SH and Miss Winter search his study for the leather book. But it must be admitted Watson is no match for the baron who sees through him, "what is the game?" Too late he understands what SH is doing. The book is snatched, but Miss Winter has her own revenge, acid in the baron's face. Though naturally the good doctor rushes to his side, he's now a disfigured martyr. That at least is how Violet will see him, until she is shown the Lust Diary
To the earliest TV version of
Holmes . . . . Taped Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Quatermass Experiment (1953)
with Reginald Tate as the Professor.
Two surviving stories
July 18th 1953, and
July 25th 1953.

Quatermass II (1955)
with John Robinson as the Professor.
The six episodes from October 22nd 1955 to November 26th 1955.
1 The Bolts
2 The Mark
3 The Food
4 The Coming
5 The Frenzy
6 The Destroyers

Quatermass and the Pit (1958)
with Andre Morrell as the Professor.
Episode 1 was on December 22nd 1958. 1 The Halfman, 2 The Ghosts, 3 Imps and Demons, 4 The Enchanted, 5 The Wild Hunt, 6 Hob

Taped Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 Contact Has Been Established

It wouldn't be British if our first manned rocket doesn't go missing Somewhere in Space, "something went wrong." Judith's husband Victor is the youngest of the three crew members. I was waiting for the line, "it's jolly bad luck," but the script wasn't as bad as that, though we were given, "I'm not letting myself go!"
Here is primitive tv, of its time well done, with numerous close ups, and a few models, then a rather unconvincing mock up of the wreckage. Yes, contact with the errant rocket is re-established and it is guided back to Earth, "somewhere nearer than Croydon." The studio, in fact. The unruffled Dr Quatermass is driven to the crash site, somewhere on "the west side of Wimbledon Common."
You'd expect a larger crowd to be gathered here and there's little panic or even worry evident, however one enjoyable scene as an old lady (Katie Johnson) clutching her cat is helped down a ladder from her wrecked home- she's the only actor who looks at all dazed.
Jaded journalist Jimmy is one of a (slightly) increasing crowd. "There must be somebody inside the thing," for, to Judith's intense relief, tapping can be discerned. The tension and excitement build well, then the press interviews keep us guessing up to the end of part one. The rocket door is opened and out staggers a man in a space suit, real 50's sci-fi. It's Victor, the worse for wear. But inside the ship Quatermass can find no sign of his two companions, "I don't understand"

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2 Persons Reported Missing

Victor Carroon is the only survivor, "where are the others?"
How could they have disappeared from the rocket?
Fullalove, a reporter, probes, as he is sure Professor Quatermass has some secret worry he has not revealed. When an apparent clue is discovered on the space clothing, he won't even reveal its significance to the police.
Victor is delirious, Inspector Lomax cannot get any sense out of him, "his brain must have been damaged." His wife is distraught, even though she had been intending to tell him she was leaving him.
Another clue is found in Victor's fingerprints. Quatermass is so worried by this action of the police, he has Victor removed from the hospital. The professor's own doctor has a theory about the "change" in Victor.
The patient is shown film of the launch. His only comment is "bring something back." However he repeats some his leader's German words, and it emerges that he can understand this language.
"A sort of powder" is found in the rocket. This might have caused an electrical fault. "What went on here?"

By today's standards, this single thread of story is very drawn out, its dramatic impact in 1953 was greater than it is on us today. It is interesting how this drama is sustained so well for over half an hour

Quatermass Menu
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 The Bolts
"Another of 'em!" Captain Dillon heads for a ploughed field and finds a hot meteorite aside a dazed farmworker. Call Professor Quatermass!
He is busy trying to solve why his rocket launch in Australia has resulted in a nuclear reaction on earth, instead of heading for the moon to build his projected moon colony. "We're out of the race!" Britain that is, not going to be first on the jolly old moon. The twin of this rocket in Britain clearly has the same latent fault.
Dillon, who happens to be the girl friend of Quatermass' daughter Paula, brings the meteorite to the great man. He at once goes to question Fred the ploughman about what he had witnessed, but the poor chap is unco-operative, who can blame him?
A security area excites Quatermass' suspicions- it looks like a refinery, though the professor knows what it really is. It is strangely deserted.
What's that? That thing on poor Dillon's face...?

Sorry if my review isn't more enthusiastic. I found some good acting in the story, notably Herbert Lomas as Will in the pub, but there is also some poor acting, here I have to slate Quatermass' daughter, nearly your original BBC-accented actress, who hardly improves as the series progresses and nearly derails several scenes. Still, this makes for interesting viewing

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2 The Mark

The fallen meteorite has sent Dillon into a trance like state. Security guards swoop and take him away, as a semi-prisoner, to the hospital at the mysterious government research unit. Quatermass is not allowed to accompany him, ordered away.
He encounters a tramp (Wilfred Brambell) who talks about the village that had been on this site before this huge base was built. Quatermass collects up a lot of flints, then drives to the nearby new town of Winnerden Flats, a mass of prefabs built for workers at the base.
One of their 'representatives' is Dawson (Michael Brennan) who is uncooparative when asked by the professor about the nature of the place.
A little girl who "wanders" interests him, she is in the same trance like state as Dillon, and has the same mark on her.
Analysis of the fragments, coupled with Quatermass' glimpse of something almost invisible, yield wild theories. Police refuse to help, but then Quatermass is introduced to a civil servant who says the place is researching into synthetic foods.
He finds one ally in an angry MP (Rupert Davies) who is trying to conduct an inquiry into Winnerden Flats. All he has met to date is "evasion." Quatermass is permitted to attend the next session, and oh dear, there he sees on one of the committee The Mark!

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Food

Vincent Broadhead MP's inquiry ends with Quatermass departing in disarray. "Menace" is how he describes the atmosphere in there. But it is also gas, and the MP is turned into a shell of a man.
Public Relations Officer Ward has visited the plant and as he has a pass is persuaded by Quatermass to take him and the senior civil servant Fowler on a tour of inspection.
They begin at the medical centre, where there is no sign of Dillon. In fact very few people are around at all. The tour makes for the processing unit, where the suspicion is that it is not merely food for human consumption that is the end product.
Ward disappears, and reappears a sorry mess from 'The Dome,' handing Quatermass an object that he had found in there before he dies.
On the nearby beach, a picnicking family are ordered off by guards. Meeting resistance they are brought to the plant by armed guards, passing the departing Quatermass.
Leo Pugh has examined the rocks and has identified the source of the meteorites in deepest space. But now, thousands of miles away, "they are coming.....!"

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Coming

Quatermass is certain that the meteorites now hurtling again towards Earth are capable of paralysing the nervous system and instil submission to an alien will. While Fowler delves the top secret ministry files, he becomes the latest casualty.
Quatermass decides to alert the press. He takes Hugh Conrad, a reporter, to a pub used by the workers at Winnerden Flats, and they chat with the McClouds, a couple celebrating their silver wedding. They pick up a few useful titbits, but the people there are nervous of speaking out. Then an" overshot", as they call it, crashes into the building. Vainly, Quatermass attempts to warn them of their peril.
Conrad unwisely handles the fallen object and surely he is succumbing! He manages to phone through his horrific story before dying.
The mud flats seem to be swarming with invaders! Quatermass breaks into the plant disguised as a guard. He stares at the inside of The Dome, swarming with a writhing mass of horrible looking gunge

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Frenzy
Perhaps this title is optimistic, though "coming down in hundreds," are the meteorites to be transformed in the steel dome to beings that control The Earth itself. This "nest" is only one of many around the world.
A mob storms the plant and amid volleys of bullets, some dodge into the control room to where the pursued Quatermass has also fled. Quatermass reveals what he had seen in the Dome, "I don't believe it."
Pump oxygen into the dome, orders the scientist, this will destroy the process these workers had inadvertently created. As loudspeakers order them to quit the plant, union leader McCloud, who is operating the oxygen pump, capitulates and takes many of the workers with him, lured by the promise of being shown what is inside the dome.
"Blood!" Their bodies are used to block the oxygen pipe. If this had been made today, no doubt an ocean of red would have filled our screens- instead this horror is merely reported. Smoke! In the chaos, Quatermass gets away and bumps into Pugh, who is on a rescue mission, or something. Back to the rocket- quickly!
Rocket to take off... What's this? It is The Return of John Dillon, now zombified, who declares, "the rocket base is under our control." Sorry, but I didn't know whether to laugh or laugh

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Destroyers

"He won't be the same man you knew four days ago." That is Cpt Dillon, who hands over some written orders. When Quatermass reasons with the zombie, somehow or rather Dillon responds and permits the rocket to be launched on its mission to destroy the enemy.
Consideirng there is no rocket, only scaffolding in the studio, the model behaves creditably, though maybe the drama by centering on the rocket loses the tension of their objective. Yet the scenes are performed without glorifying these space pioneers, who lurch desperately round their studio capsule.
Leo Pugh has been infected! He attempts to shoot Quatermass but finishes whirling off into outer space, "there's no gravity!" (In case you didn't know.)
Having reached his objective, Quatermass, with a cardboard cutout of Pugh wailing comically in the ether, destroys the enemy. The conviction behind the drama has necessarily to be conveyed by the strength of John Robinson's acting, and he carries it out well.
Dillon is released from his spell. Oh- and the world is saved

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 The Halfman

In Hobb's Lane SW1 (also spelt Hob's), during excavations a skull is dug up. Apeman in Knightsbridge read the popular headlines.
At a press conference, Dr Matthew Roney appeals for more time to study the ancient fossils being unearthed. The concept of a five million year old human grabs the public attention.
Quatermass is falling out with politicians over the misuse of his rocket project for military purposes to achieve British world domination (don't laugh!). His plea for peaceful uses for his rocket falls on very deaf ears.
Back at the dig, a lady alerts Roney's assistant Barbara Judd over another discovery- an unexploded bomb. Or is it? It is not made of metal. Roney calls in the disillusioned Quatermass...

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Ghosts
The officious Col Breen is in charge of operations at the bomb site. Quatermass examines the metal alloy, finding it "harder than diamond." Thus it cannot be a World War Two bomb, though Breen persists in believing it to be so.
A complete skull is unearthed. As there is some low level radiation, a clay sample is removed for analysis, and to Roney's dismay, excavations have to stop.
Local gossip has it that the nearby house is haunted, and Quatemass explores the building, derelict since 1927. Scratch marks are on the wall. Mrs and Mrs Chilcot, neighbours, tell him about "the dreadful sounds" that would emanate from there. Then he chats with Roney about the dating of the bones.
With the radioactive all clear, Breen speeds things up with an excavator, again to Roney's intense anger. The analysis is dismissed by Breen as "absurd," though Quatermass knows that the presence of alien substances in the sample are significant.
Barbara Judd brings newspaper cuttings about The Knightsbridge Spooks of 1927. Breen has uncovered a huge rocket-like structure. Inside are strange markings, and a ghost.

The tension has been built up well, though perhaps too slowly, interesting that even a contemporary review by DEH admitted that much

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Imps and Demons

The markings inside the rocket are identified as a pentacle, as used in black magic. A soldier panics when he sees a "horrible" figure.
Excavations reveal a door, this is made of a heatproof metal.
In a newspaper office, the story of the Apeman seems to be fizzling out. Reporter James Fullalove (Brian Worth) is sent to probe further.
The most powerful cutter fails to penetrate the void inside the rocket. All that happens is eveyone starts shaking. Research by Quatermass reveals the ghost stories are much older than 1927. In 1762 there were stories of ghosts, and several centuries previously, are found reports of demons in Hobs Lane. Each time has been after some disturbance of the ground.
A small hole mysteriously appears in the metal inside the rocket. Through this, a large eye is seen!
More noises when another attempt is made to break into the empty compartment. Success. Inside cobwebs and great demons. Dead demons

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Enchanted

"Colossal" dead insects inside the bulkhead. Roney has them hastily sprayed so they do not decompose and then removes them to his museum. Quatermass and reporter Fullalove scour the area where the things had once lived.
The latter's newspaper article soon has the public clamouring outside Roney's museum, inside which there is much speculation on the origins of the species.
Is Colonel Breen cracking up? He and Quatermass are called on the carpet to the War Office. The minister is briefed. Quatermass hands out his considered theory that the specimens are Martian invaders from many aeons ago. You can't blame Breen for being dubious, his idea is that the last war is to blame. His is not scientific though an "ingenious" counter theory that the Minster eagerly latches on to.
As a result the area with the rocket is declared safe. Things can be returned to normal. But Barbara suddenly becomes unsconscious and one worker, Sladden, goes beserk as he clears away, and totters wildly out of the rocket into a graveyard where he collapses. Mysterious underground rumblings underneath his body add to the mystery

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Wild Hunt

"The whole place was shaking." Barbara describes this latest crisis to Quatermass, who is still fuming over the rejection of his theory by the minister. The two of them go to the church where Sladden is recovering. He becomes wildly excited when questioned about what he had witnessed.
Col Breen is attempting to substantiate his theory, by checking with Germany over the identity of 'their' rocket. Quatermass knows, however, that it is a throwback of the Martian invasion of Earth aeons ago. I'm not sure I knew if I believed either of 'em! That's probably the fascination of the story.
Roney has created an incredible invention, an optic encephalograph, that can depict the imaginings of the brain, and wants to use it to discover what Sladden has seen. As he is in too agitated a state, Quatermass tries to recreate what Sladden saw. It's a failure. But Barbara is more receptive and a violent reaction sweeps around the area as her mind records the scene. Later a tape is shown to the sceptical minister and Col Breen. It is "the cleansing of the hive," and indeed looks dramatic and "most serious," though the doubters put the whole thing down to hallucination.
At the rocket site, Breen delivers his speech on tv designed to calm the nation, but it backfires when there are explosions and Lord knows what else

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

'Hob'
The final episode becomes a mass of cleverly generated wild scenes, which, if you have gone along with the premise, might be pretty convincing and even scarey.
A technician is electrocuted in the hull. This was no accident insists Quatermass, falling out yet again with Colonel Breen, who is preparing for a live tv broadcast to reassure the nation.
In a nearby pub, people are watching the tv screen which suddenly goes blank. Viewers are not shown the chaos at the rocket site, ethereal rumblings, then panic. A stampede along the street. Roney drags Quatermass to the now empty pub. "Everything's going mad." This includes Quatermass himself, who is more suspectible to the 'influence' and rages wildly, Roney acting as pacifier, all thoroughly melodramatic.
At the site Fullalove takes photos while Breen sits amid the ruins mesmerised, impressively baffled. Barbara acts possessed.
An American tv channel, NYBC-TV, puts out a report from a pilot flying over London, fires spreading like an epidemic. His plane crashes.
In the haunted house Potter searches. Roney reckons he knows how to end this madness, and as Quatermass is more in tune, he will execute the plan. This is a success, though not without fatality. When it is all over, Quatermass delivers an ominous warning speech

Quatermass Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

ADAM ADAMANT LIVES! (1966/7)
"It's his courtesy viewers admire. The way he puts every woman on a pedestal and treats her like a rare flower." Alongside the perfect star Gerald Harper was Juliet Harmer as Miss Jones.
The BBC gave this their best shot in an attempt to emulate the fantasy that made The Avengers so unique. It's nice this series has received some sort of recognition following its dvd revival, although it's very hit and miss with a few absolutely brilliant stories but also a number of scripts that are best forgotten

The surviving stories:
1.1 A Vintage Year for Scoundrels
8*
1.2 Death has a Thousand Faces 7*
1.3 More Deadly than a Sword 0*
1.4 Sweet Smell of Disaster 9*
1.5 Allah is Not Always with You 2*
1.6 The Terribly Happy Emblamers 5*
1.7 To Set a Deadly Fashion 3*
1.8 The Last Sacrifice 1*
1.9 Sing a Song of Murder 8*
1.10 The Doomsday Plan 8*
1.11 Death by Appointment Only 7*
1.12 Beauty is an Ugly Word 7*
1.13 The League of Uncharitable Ladies 7*
1.15 The Village of Evil 5*
1.16 D for Destruction 2*
2.2 Black Echo 4*
2.13 A Sinister Sort of Service 6*

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Expert (BBC)
starring Marius Goring as Dr John Hardy, a Home Office pathologist. The other regulars were Hardy's wife Jo (a medical doctor and thus confusingly Dr Hardy), his assistant Sandra and Inspector Fleming.
There were three series shown from 1968 to 1971, with a revival in 1976. So it must have been reasonably successful, though largely forgotten these days. It is certainly lacking any lightness of touch, a serious, almost grim, account of forensic police work, sometimes quite absorbing, but you do wish Marius Goring's character could be just a little more human. I suppose he's a typical anti-hero, though hero is entirely the wrong word for this good doctor with but a hint of dry humour. "Arrogance, to the point of pomposity," is his wife's accurate summing up of his character, though he does vainly protest, "I'm never pompous."

2:1 The Witness (April 1969)
2:2 The Witness -conclusion
2:4 The Yellow Torrish
2:18 Lethal Weapon (August 1969)
2:22 Your Money for My Life
2:25 Flesh and Blood
3:1 A Way to Die? (January 1971)
3:2 Where are you Going?
3:3 The Man on my Back
3:5 Whose Child? The Wife
3:6 Whose Child? The Husband - conclusion
3:7 Cedric
3:11 Smithereens
3:12 Hothouse

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Witness, part 1 Hypothesis
Though this two part story becomes progressively more absorbing, this first half would have been tighter as a half hour story.
A fourth murder in quick succession. "Keep your door locked," is police advice. All the victims are girls aged 19 to 25, all killed in their homes. First knocked out, then stripped and gagged. The motive appears to be some sort of punishment rather than lust.
Cameras follow Viv, a fiery redhead as she shops in a supermarket then goes home. Her gossipy phone conversation is interrupted by a knock on her door. Posing as an official, the killer gains entrance and swoops immediately. Procedure as before, only this time Viv's friend on the phone can hear something is wrong. She dials 999, the police swoop, but the attacker just succeeds in escaping on his motor scooter. Then we observe him in his bedsit, fastidious in his obsession with cleanliness.
A witness identifies a man who was proably following Viv. Another, Mary, who lives in the same block of flats, also identifies Viv's visitor, Jimmy Porter he was asking for.
Dr Hardy mulls over the Case with his wife. He builds up a possible portrait of the maniac, all guesswork but good guesswork- effeminate, good looking, and strong. An arts student, in his early 20s from a broken home. "All conjecture."
Police have been busy too, Martin Ingram is their suspect, who reluctantly but quietly is taken from his bedsit to the police station. Though he protests innocence, he certainly fits in with Hardy's theories.
Viv, dangerously ill in hospital, is just about able to identify her attacker, though the ordeal is far too much for her.
(for the
continuation)
To The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Witness, part 2 Hard Facts
Following the harrowing identity parade, Dr Hardy examines the suspect Martin Ingram, while Jo Hardy uses hypnosis on the victim Viv. Both scenes are well observed in detail, though the best follows. Despite Hardy's protestations, Ingram is immediately interviewed by the police inspector (John Collin).
Viv remembers the supermarket manager looking at her, and a good looking stranger inside the shop whom she quite fancied. He was in the identity parade but she hadn't seen him on that day. We reach the crux, the attack, "haven't I seen you somewhere before?" repeats Viv, though a description of him is hard, too hard to obtain.
Mary identifies Ingram as being in the flats that day. Hardy has pieced together a supermarket bag that Ingram had burned, it is from that supermarket. The manager describes a youth whom he thought might have been watching Viv, "staring" at her. He identifies Ingram in a parade.
All the evidence seems to suggest Ingram's guilt, this is the interest of the story. However what follows is unfair.
Ingram writes down a statement denying any knowledge of the girl. Cameras follow another girl being followed by a man. Ingram admits he had been in the shop, stealing, and had been at Viv's flats coincidentally to see his friend Jimmy Porter.
From his evidence, Hardy now concludes, "there is nothing to connect him and her." Too much of a swindle is this story as police fail to pick up the right vibes and like the story end in a cul-de-sac. 0 out of 10 for the ending

To The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.4 The Yellow Torrish (April 25th 1969)
Frank Houghton (Basil Henson) is worried that his company secretary Arthur Williams (Peter Barkworth) and shareholder Thorpe (Glyn Owen) are attempting to takeover "his" company.
In the river next to Houghton's cottage retreat, Williams finds his boss' bloodstained jacket in a drifting punt. No sign of a body but instead of phoning the police he calls in Dr John Hardy to investigate, fearful lest company shares plummet at the news of Houghton's disappearance.
Mrs Houghton (Jean Marsh) has no inkling of any accident and perturbed by the news that police have not been informed, contacts Inspector Fleming.
Hardy searches the cottage, then the river. Bloodstains indoors, and a possibility that the kitchen floor has been recently cleaned. Any initial injury, Hardy concludes, would have happened here. The boat has scratches on the side and some hair. This is later shown to be from a dog. And the jacket has two different blood groups on it.
Hardy is mystified why some clues have been left, apparently carelessly, while other fingerpritns and the evidence on the kitchen floor have been concealed. Though no fisherman, he is also intrigued why Houghton had taken two fishing rods with him.
The mystery is partly solved when old Greg admits he had borrowed Houghton's boat, he'd also borrowed Houghton's fishing rod, he's a poacher. His old dog had jumped out the boat and is later found drowned. Though the rod is a trout rod, it was a salmon fly, a yellow morrish. The other rod had been taken by Houghton on a trip to Ireland. He returns in time for a vital board meeting, his reappearance part of his scheme to gain control of the company. He is almost guilty of wasting police time, but where's the proof? The author has led us, and the police, a merry dance
To
The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.18 Lethal Weapon (August 1st 1969)

This well constructed absorbing story by NJ Crisp begins with a night worker returning home early in the morning, stopping his car when he sees a dead woman in the road. Prof Hardy examines the corpse.
Mandy Williams is the dead girl, last seen alive at the Riviera Night Club, owned by Terry Warren. This information is relayed to Inspector Fleming by his assistant Charles Oakley, who is struggling to make ends meet with his wife Phyllis (Meg Wynn-Owen). Suddenly becoming reminscent of a 1950s film, there's a cabaret turn (by Lois Lane) at the night club where the boss is reluctant to reveal who Mandy had been with, apart from Oakley, who had used her as a minor informer. She was a hostess here, and had a six month old child, father unknown.
One man who has accompanied her home is traced, William Lever. He claims that though he had indeed offered her a lift, once they got outside the club, she had been picked up by a man driving a Cortina.
Mrs Webster of the Adoption Society explains Mandy had been having second thoughts about having her child adopted. The name of the father is not on record, but Mrs Webster is sure he is a policeman. Now the plot is clear, Oakley owns a Cortina and this is examined thoroughly by Prof Hardy. Underneath are discovered human hair, wool fibre and a wide scattering of blood stains.
"Why can't they treat you like a human being?" Phyll asks, as her husband is now under the closest scrutiny. It's the best scene. To her, he offers to resign from the force, so that they can have a better home life.
However it has got beyond that. In charge of the investigation now is Det Sgt Perry (John Collin). His questioning of Oakley, in Fleming's presence, soon forces the admittance, "it just happened with Mandy," his relationship that is. She had wanted him to get a divorce. He had picked her up that night, they'd argued in a quiet spot, near to where she was later found. In a temper she had walked off, he'd driven after her and accidentally knocked her down.
Hardy tries reconciling the evidence with Oakley's statement. Perry goes over the story in fine detail with the accused. Oakley is arrested but denies murder.
"One of my own men, I don't like that," says Fleming. He takes it on himself to tell Mrs Oakley in another satisfying if sad scene. Phyllis breaks down, she did know about her husband's affair, though the identity of the woman was unknown to her

The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Your Money for My Life
On a dual carriageway, almost empty of vehicles, a car overtakes what traffic there is, and speeds down the outside lane, veers into a bridge, the driver hurled through the windscreen.
Peter Haskins, an Advanced Motorist, had been doing over 80mph, but what is most interesting about the case in charge of insurance investigator David Lynch (Simon Oates) is that he'd only recently taken out a £100,000 policy. The terrible news is relayed to his wife and children Brian and Angela. But Lynch wants to know how such a crash could have happened to a driver who'd never had any accidents before. Was Haskins worried about his son's latest student protests? Lynch engages Dr Hardy to examine the forensic evidence, which has seemed to indicate only a normal if tragic accident.
The main puzzle is why the usually reliable Haskins had turned up late for his office work that morning. The reason for his delay becomes the focal point of the story. Dr Hardy's examination of Haskins' clothing reveals several strands of hair, black white and blonde and lipstick on a handkerchief. Not his wife's. "I think his wife knew," surmises Lynch. The make-up is traced to a cosmetics company that specialises in bespoke products and Inspector Fleming is persuaded to open a police inquiry and contact this company. Over 100 customers have used this product, Angela one of them, but she certainly never saw her father that day. But the trail leads to a friend of Angela's, Penny Sparrow, a model who demonstrates the powder in question.
She provides the story of Peter Haskins' other life. To conclude, Dr Hardy goes over the evidence with Lynch in a typically vague 1970s conclusion
The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Flesh and Blood
Ten year old Jacky Carr is bullied on his way home from school. The purpose of this scene isn't apparent until the end.
His father Albert (Dudley Foster) and "gone to seed" mother Jeanette (Ann Lynn) take him to the doctor to see about the annoying grit in his eye. Albert unburdens himself privately to Dr Hardy's wife about his sudden doubts that Jacky is his child. It's too long a scene but he wants a blood test to confirm his suspicions. "It's not as simple as that," he's warned for this was pre DNA days. Dr Hardy does check the blood. Mother is apparently O group, so is father. So is Jacky, though that doesn't prove anything of course.
The mother-in-law from hell (Marjorie Rhodes at her best) doesn't help the growing tensions between husband and wife. "If your father had known..." and lines like that don't cheer up the atmosphere, or indeed the play.
Albert has decided that Jeanette's former boss Michael (William Lucas) must be the father. He attacks him, nothing very violent, but it's enough to get Michael to complain to the police.
Angst ridden Albert is now arguing with his wife. There was never anyone else she cries. Another more advanced type of blood test might resolve the issue for now Albert is getting ever more neurotic. Another row with mother-in-law only makes it more like the dreaded Wednesday Play.
The new tests produce an "impossible" result. "She's not his mother." The Hardys inquire into Jacky's birth and the awful truth comes out. Unexpected and not at all convincing. About a baby stolen ten years before. That brings the police into the story and Jacky's future looks bleak as he is placed in an orphanage. That's where we go back to the opening unpleasant scene, for here it seems Jacky is going to be happy. It is more than flesh and flood can stand to swallow this story
The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Way to Die (January 3rd 1971)
In a giant pigsty where pigs are fattened, a young man is found locked inside, trampled to death. Head pigman Ronald discovers his corpse.
Not a lot of clothing or personal belongings left, the pigs have eaten almost everything they can. "I can hardly arrest 160 swine." So what's a shotgun pellet doing in his backside?
A scrap of scarf identifies him as a university student, and he is found to be David Lewis a second year undergraduate, known to Dr Hardy's wife as someone who had once attempted suicide. "A neurotic type," she underdescribes him. David's student friends put up a wall of silence, in a none too convincing scene. David's diary is found but "it's all Greek to me," for it is written in Russian and other languages.
Sendall, the piggery manager was allegedly staying at a London hotel on the night of the tragedy. Yet he never occupied his room. He admits he'd been covering up a dirty weekend. A yokel named Bennett (Windsor Davies) is found to be the owner of the shotgun that fired the pellet at David. But he says he lent it to Ron, who had wanted to scare off the students. That brings on a confession from David's girl friend that they had planned to release the pigs, all to do with animal rights. Ron admits borrowing the gun, then says Snedall fired the shot. Sendall in his turn admits leaving his dirty weekend in order to deal with the students.
At the piggery Dr Hardy demonstrates to Inspector Fleming the evidence that supports his conclusions about David's death. A confession follows.

The best characters in this story are David's grieving parents, a fine study.
The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

3:2 Where are you Going?
In the rain a young hippy is hitching a lift. Another girl joins him, but he quickly leaves in an empty bus. The driver comes to a halt on the A425 when he sees a corpse by the roadside. They recall an MGB passing them driving erratically a while earlier and police promptly trace this vehicle. The owner Alan Stafford (Jonathan Newth) is detained. Dr Hardy examines his car, noting a dent on his front bumper, though nothing inside to indicate a struggle.
We see what the police don't, a Cortina driver named Brian (Mike Pratt) with a scratch on his face. It makes the story suddenly pointless as Hardy gives Stafford a detailed examination. Maybe it shows that police work sometimes involves wrong turnings.
The dead girl was Claire, who had been making for London, "one of her daft ideas," to join her poet boyfriend. Cause of death, a fractured skull, but the question is, did she fall or was she pushed? There's a well done scene as Hardy discusses with his wife about hitchhikers, whether she'd pick one up, if so whom she would, whom she wouldn't.
Another quite pointless scene follows. Another sports car driver picks up a student from Warwick University. "These cars are very fast," though we are shown the speedo reading 50mph! He makes a pass she struggles, but he does let her out of his car.
Hardy has discovered lime on Claire's clothing, but what type of lime? Slake lime, cement which suggests a building site. The name Brian crops up but all this science has proved unnecessary. Brian's conscience has weighed him down and he confides in his mum who's not sympathetic but ultimately very worried for her son. She wants to concoct a tale, but he insists on informing the police. He'd given this "beautiful girl " a lift. "I felt funny... I touched her," after a struggle "she was gone."
Not clear if he'd killed her deliberately. The final scene is one that is very unhelpful also, must have been there to fill in time. The same sports car driver, not Alan, picks up another girl. I could have provided several more satisfying and honest endings than this lazy one
The Expert

.

.

.

.

.

3.3 The Man on My Back (January 17th 1971)

Dr Hardy is at the scene of a hit and run road accident in the countryside, by a railway bridge. There's "a car but no body," the crashed car had been stolen from probation officer Davis Jones (Edward Fox).
Inspector Fleming questions Jones as to whether any of his clients might have stolen the car. One possibility is the pathetic Norman Hobson, who can only produce the alibi that he was "at home in bed."
Hardy and his wife enjoy an evening meal with the probation officer and his wife Beth. It's evident from their sometimes philosophical discussion that Davis Jones has an unorthodox approach to his work, "a dilettanti," Flemings calls him, though he gets results.
Escaped convict Jock had been pally with Hobson and evidence connects him with stealing the car. Hardy works out the corpse had been carried in the back of this car to the bridge, traces of an expensive raincoat are evident, suggesting that it must be one belonging to Jones.
Jones resigns his job. He admits giving the coat to Hobson, who claims he has "flogged" it. It seems probable that Jock is the dead man and his corpse had been tipped over the bridge onto a passing train. A goods perhaps, "try Pontypool or Crewe."
Once the body is recovered, Jones who has turned to drink, comes clean. He sees he had been used. A very immature officer, you wonder how he got appointed.
The final scene in prison is very pathetic
The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Whose Child? Part 1 The Wife
Well drawn characters, even if this two parter is too drawn out.
Ruth Fletcher (Ann Lynn) has taken her baby boy to Dr Jo Hardy. She'd been so pleased after fifteen years to have this child, but her dilemma is, who's the father? There follows the familiar angst of the eternal triangle, is it her husband Harry (Anthony Bate) or her boyfriend Michael Jackson (James Maxwell)?
Though Harry's a cold fish, we do see him enjoying an evening out with business colleague Bill (Geoffrey Palmer) at a strip club. Too gratuitous though apparently "not much to write home about." Naturally, when he returns home late, he wants a bit more fun...
That decides Ruth to make a private appointment with Dr John Hardy, who as expected has a slightly high handed approach, wanting her to see the consequences of her action. Her idea is that she will live with the real father even though she loves only Michael. Blood samples taken, result: Michael could be the father. However unless Harry's blood group is ascertained, Hardy cannot say whether Harry might also be the father. Ruth is very reluctant to tell her husband anything, so borrows his hankie. She awaits that result anxiously.
Dr Hardy prefaces his comments with the rider that this hankie might have been borrowed, so could she be absolutely sure the sample on it is his? All Hardy will state is the person who used that hankie could not be the father. To be more positive, Harry's blood sample must be taken. However she decides there's sufficent proof and leaves Harry for Michael. She's all for ducking a confrontation, but Michael is honourable or maybe stupid enough to talk to Harry as he comes home from work. There's a scene outside Ruth's late home which ends in blows.
Now Harry is the one to consult Hardy. Sample taken, the evidence is that he cannot be the baby's dad. "You'll pay for this," Harry threatens his estranged wife
To
part two, or The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Whose Child? Part 2 The Husband
On his driveway, Harry Fletcher is confronted by Michael, "please be reasonable." Divorce is the request, an argument is bound to result, Harry taps Michael with his umbrella and Michael collapses to the ground.
A postman finds the corpse. Ruth Fletcher is distraught (Ann Lynn gives us a fine study in grief).
Dr Hardy conducts a post mortem. Cause of death: a blow to the side of the neck.
Chief Inspector Fleming questions Harry who is quite open about the confrontation but states he left Michael "standing," adding, "he can't be dead." But the postman's testimony is that when Fletcher drove away in his car, the victim was already on the ground.
"I thought he was shamming," admits Harry at last. It bears out what we watched. Harry admits he struck Michael, but "I didn't mean to hurt him." He is charged with murder.
The question is, did he intend to cause his enemy grievous bodily harm? That's what the defence refute, pleading provocation. So why did Harry strike him?
Prof Hardy gives his evidence, the prosecution manage to hint that it might have been deliberate, even if Hardy won't budge from his opinion. A nervous Jo Hardy gives her account about the paternity of the baby. She has to mention Harry's threat to "kill" Michael, but believed it only an idle notion so had not reported him to the police.
"I thought you did very well," Dr Hardy tells his wife, slightly patronisingly.
Harry comes over as the injured party, in the light of his wife's adultery. Carefully staged questioning, and though he admits he hated Michael, his rival's taunt of impotence was what had made him strike the blow.
"It wasn't like that at all," Ruth states privately, even though she hadn't been present. The law states she is not permitted to testify against her husband.
The Hardys discuss the verdict, while Ruth and Harry pass in the street as strangers
to
The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Cedric
A typically bleak drama of the era, of an angst ridden loner, well portrayed by Peter Jeffrey.
Cedric is unwrapping a parcel, inside a rare book, a first edition by Sir Walter Raleigh- phew!
So engaged by it is he, that he consults his doctor, Jo Hardy, since he has no one else to share his find with. Evidently he is seriously depressed, though she, even if sympathetic, only sends him back to his flat. Here he gets in a state, what with the noise of the baby crying downstairs.
Dr Jo and husband John Hardy find his room in an absolute mess, Cedric himself missing. We watch him outside a woman's house. When she goes out, he follows her, and into a supermarket. Their eyes meet for an instant, then she goes home, he behind her. He knocks on her door, it seems he'd been informed she was lonely by Dr Jo Hardy. At his place of work, a colleague Miss Lee describes Cedric as "like an old granny," hardworking though unusually he'd been off sick the last two days.
Dr John Hardy is examining the corpse of the lady we know Cedric had followed. Inspector Fleming questions a paper boy who had seen a man running away from the house, it is Cedric. Dr Jo Hardy is ridden with guilt that she might have inadvertently pointed Cedric in the dead woman's direction. She'd died of a heart attack, is her husband's conclusion, no definite proof she had been attacked, even though her head had been hit, this possibly from her falling onto her bath.
Cedric is in a pub discussing with a fellow drinker football, including Pele's beating England. Then he returns to his lonely room, now clean and tidy, as though in his old routine he makes for his office. This is on the eleventh floor. Miss Lee screams. His jump has been aborted. As usual, the police arrive after the event, such as it was, is all over.
The two Hardys take the unfortunate wreck of a man away to their home. Talk about his landlady's baby being his, an Oscar attempt at a closing monologue, thank goodness it's over
to
The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Smithereens (March 14th 1971)
An old widow, Mrs Carr (Lucy Griffiths), alone with her cat settles down to sleep. Outside a man in a balaclava flashes his torch and effects an entry into the conservatory. Alerted, the lady waits, poker in hand, and bravely or perhaps foolishly, confronts the thief.
Next morning the milkman finds her unconscious and she is taken by ambulance to hospital.
Dr Hardy sifts the evidence, a broken milk bottle. This is the latest in a series of thefts on lonely old people living in isolated houses, others had been robbed of small sums of money. The local pub seems a likely spot where the crook had learned of possible victims. Farmer Stan is one such. Inspector Fleming interviews Mrs Carr when she comes round, though she cannot properly describe her assailant, he wore a balaclava and goggles. She admits she kept a hoard of half crowns in the house, which have gone missing.
Eddie Rutter had been spending half crowns at the pub, he lives in a scrap yard, a bleak place, and Fleming's assistant searches for the cash while he questions the man. Though he is now chief suspect, Hardy cannot provide any conclusive proof as to his guilt. But are the traces of blood found in Mrs Carr's house Rutter's?
Hardy's most important clue is algae that must have been brought in on the thief's clothing. The interesting breakthrough comes when Dr Hardy mysteriously sets about reconstructing the milk bottle broken into a hundred pieces, "what is the point of all this?" That only becomes clear when this long shot pays off as the reconstructed bottle can display a fingerprint, built up from all the fragments, but not, admits Hardy in disappointment, definite enough to obtain a conviction. But Inspector Flerming uses his own cunning and shows the print to Rutter to bluff a confession
To
The Expert Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Francis Durbridge
The early work of that master of suspense serials has not been treated well by the BBC, who did so well out of him.
Thankfully, some memorable series have been released on dvd, here's one complete surviving six part serial from 1966:

A Game of Murder
starring Gerald Harper as Det Insp Jack Kerry,
with Conrad Phillips as Chief Supt Bromford (not ep 5),
David Burke as Det Insp Ed Royce, and June Barry as Cathy White.
Designer: Roy Oxley. Produced and Directed by Alan Bromly.
Others in all episodes were: John Harvey as Charles Bannister, and Christopher Wray as Douglas Croft.
Other semi regulars were: Diana King as Iris Bannister (stories 1,2,4, and 6), Peter Copley as Norman Penn (2,3,4,6), Dorothy White as Doreen Osborne (2,3,4,5,6), Dorothy Frere as Freda Lincoln (1,2,3), John Carlin as Leonard Lincoln (3,4,6) Kenneth Hendel as Cleg Reed (3,4,5), Murray Hayne as Rupert Delaney (1,3) and Patricia Shakesby as Greta (5,6)
Episode 1 (Feb 26th 1966) - With Anthony Sagar as the murdered Bob Kerry, Donald Oliver as PC Collier, Bernard G High as Postman.
Episode 2 (Mar 4th 1966) - With Carole Lesley (billed as Lesley Carole) as Liz Mason, Elizabeth Hopkinson as Brenda Thompson, Alan Hynton as PC Hodges, Bernard Stone/ Derek Martin as Taxi drivers.
Episode 3 (Mar 11th 1966) - With Richard Jacques as Barman.
Episode 4 (Mar 18th 1966) - With Donald Hoath as Det Insp Everson.
Episode 5 (Mar 25th 1966) - With Christopher Gilmore as Dr Friedman, Kenneth Waller as Dr Hasling.
Episode 6 (Apr 2nd 1966) - With Brian Cant as Sgt Fuller, Reg Whitehead as PC Small.

Taped Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Episode 1

Bob Kerry, professional golfer, is to play a round on his own today. Liz and Douglas are left in charge of his pro shop in Putney. Before leaving for the course, Bob says goodbye to his son Jack, a Scotland Yard detective, whose workload currently includes the minor case of finding Midge, the poodle of Bob's daily, Mrs Lincoln.
On his way to see a friend in hospital, Jack is stopped by police. They have terrible news. His father has been hit by a golf ball. He has died. A distressed young golfer, Rupert Delaney, had driven a ball straight at Bob in a bunker on the twelfth hole. Accidentally of course. The doctor had taken an hour to get to Bob, too late.
Jack disagrees with the coroner's verdict of accidental death. But then there is some good news. A Mrs Bannister on Kingston Hill, phones to say her husband has found a dog answering to Midge's description. Jack confirms it is Midge, even though her rather valuable collar is missing. He writes a cheque for £5, a reward, to be given to charity.
Driving home with the dog, he sees a Fiat HXC443C, a numberplate his father had written down before his death for some unknown reason. Oddly, the driver of this car is Delaney, his passenger a blonde.
6 Linton Close Knightsbridge is where Delaney lives. But Jack finds him out, and returning to his car, notices a recently dropped lady's scarf. And close by is Delaney, shot dead in the back of his head.
In his pocket, Chief Supt Bromford finds a receipt for a registered letter posted this day to Jack.
Next morning Jack, with Bromford in attendance, awaits the arrival of the post. Bromford asks Jack if he knows a Basil Higgs. The name of the treasurer of the charity named by Mr Bannister to whom Jack had donated his £5 cheque. Why was this cheque in Delaney's flat?
The letter is delivered. In Bromford's presence, it is opened by Jack. "This is why your father was killed," reads the abrupt note. Enclosed is a collar. Midge's.

For my review of episode 2

Start of Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Episode 2

Jack Kerry recounts the whole tale to Supt Bromford, perhaps for the benfit of new viewers! He says the collar had been bought by his dad for Mrs Lincoln. "It seems a perfectly ordinary collar to me." Liz explains Douglas had told Bob Kerry he could buy it at Penn's pet shop. She also recalls Bob had been talking quite earnestly with one posh customer, a lady called Iris, whom he later told Liz he had never met before. This Iris seems have have given Penn a medallion which had been attached to the collar. Some investigation reveals her real name is Cathy White, from Liverpool, and what's more, she was the girfriend of the late Rupert Delaney. He had been backing a show, which had flopped, which starred Cathy.
Bromford interviews Charles and Iris Bannister who admit they had returned Midge to Kerry, but had never taken any cheque for charity from him. "I don't know anyone called Basil Higgs," states Mr Bannister who, furthermore, is not wheelchair bound as Kerry had described. Now Basil Higgs was the payee for the £5 cheque for charity, and that turns out to be an alias of Delaney!
Mrs Lincoln has resigned her job, why she has lied about staying with her nephew instead of admitting she has got another job isn't at all clear.
Cathy (aka Iris) phones Jack, "I'm in trouble." She arranges to meet him at a Notting Hill restaurant, but when he shows up, she runs off. After a chase along the pavement, she leaps into a taxi, he joins her and she claims she never phoned him. "It was a tip-off," she concludes, "they knew I was at the restaurant." Question is, who are They?
Jack Kerry starts to escort her to the police, but on the way she admits she knows who killed Bob Kerry...

For my review of episode 3

Start of Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


Episode 3

Cathy White is taken to Jack's home where she tells her overlong story, though it is enlivened by partly being told in flashback. She had moved in with Rupert Delaney after the show he'd backed proved a flop, "we were very happy together." She had overheard Rupert being instructed by a man called Charles to be on the golf course at 10am next day. The name Bob Kerry had been mentioned. Rupert had returned next day in shock, "there was nothing I could do," he had accidentally killed Kerry with his golf ball. Rupert says he had never met Kerry before and asked her to forget all about it. Rupert's boss Mel Harris, whom Cathy has never seen, phoned later about the incident. Then later, the night before he died, she had argued with Rupert and left him. It was over such a trifling thing, a mere dog collar.
The chat is interrupted by an intruder who must have whisked Cathy away, for when Jack comes round, she has gone.
An unannounced visitor for Jack, Leonard Lincoln, nephew of his former housekeeper. He's worried about his aunt, "heading for a breakdown." It's a silly matter, she is gabbling something about Jack has stolen something from her, her dog collar. Jack is happy to return it, but insists she collect it in person. Yet it seems a most ordinary collar, nothing out of the ordinary according to the Yard lab report, nothing that could provoke murder surely.
In his father's belongings, Jack notices a guide book with a ring round a hotel in Aldeburgh. Now that was the place Bromford had said that Charles Bannister and his wife were off to!
At the Golden Plough in Barnes, Jack has arranged to return Mrs Lincoln's dog collar. In return, he has warned her he wants information about Mel Harris. But she never shows up, or rather she shows up later in Jack's flat, dead

For my review of episode 4

Start of Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Episode 4

Jack Kerry is reprimanded for seeing privately the late Mrs Lincoln. Kerry also has to explain to Leonard Lincoln what happened to his aunt. The puzzle is, why she'd told Leonard she was coming to see Kerry. And why did she state she was working at this hotel when in fact she was staying there at £3.15/- a night?
Douglas tells Kerry of his father's secret- he had been having an affair with a married woman called Bannister. Oddly she had phoned Doug last evening about a missing receipt for a pearl necklace. Doug had been asked to post it, should he find it, to a hotel in Aldeburgh.
The Bannisters have reported a break-in, only item stolen is a pearl necklace. A police inspector investigating, later informs Supt Bromford that he had seen in the Bannister's house a wheelchair hidden in a cupboard. This corroborates Jack Kerry's statement that he thought Bannister was an invalid.
Cathy's friend Doreen Osborne had been spotted with Penn the pet shop owner. Kerry questions Penn about this "dreadful woman," who at the moment "has money to burn." 32 Defoe Mansions is where she lives.
Kerry finds her at home but not very forthcoming about Cathy's whereabouts. "She did a bunk," after Delaney died, is all Doreen can offer. But Jack hides in her flat and overhears her on the phone to Mel. Evidently she knows more. When she goes out, Jack pokes around and ends up at the wrong end of a gun, held by Stella, alias Cathy. She says she is so scared she is going to be charged with Rupert Delaney's murder. There's a struggle and the gun goes off...

For my review of episode 5

Start of Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Episode 5

"Suffering from shock more than anything else," Cathy is now recovering. "Are you falling for her?" Inspector Ed Royce asks Jack Kerry. He fills his colleague in on what he has learned about Rupert Delaney. He worked for the shadowy Mel Harris, running a call girl racket. Cathy was the front girl, and blackmail followed. Jack can't accept Cathy was involved. But how to find the elusive Mel?
Doreen, with money to burn, seems the weakest link. Jack finds her weeping, having been beaten up. Mr Penn had been seen leaving the building. "You've got to tell me about Mel Harris," Jack urges her. But she is too scared, so Jack demands the same of Penn. He admits seeing Doreen but says she had been beaten up before he got to her.
A thin story, Ed believes. Is Penn Mel?
Cathy has now recovered enough to confide in Jack. She says she knew nothing about Rupert's business, though she knew Doreen was a call girl. She's never seen Mel Harris. Together they go to question Doreen, but she is now not in her flat.
Jack will take Cathy to Steeple Aston, to hide her away from any danger.
Leonard Lincoln brings Jack the dog collar, which has a zip which conceals a receipt for a pearl necklace. Jack arranges to return it to Iris Bannister. They are to meet at The Danish Cafe, but it is her husband Charles who comes to the rendezvous, "did you have trouble parking your wheelchair?" Jack asks him drily. He wants to know about his dad's involvement, but all he receives is a warning off. The real trouble is that Bannister knows exactly where Cathy has been hidden...

Review of episode 6

To the start of Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Episode 6

The Priory Hotel Steeple Aston is where Cathy is. But Jack had spotted the hidden microphone in Doreen's flat and had given them a "bum steer." Bannister has no hold. Iris phones her husband at the cafe to warn that Mel Harris is watching the cafe. He is driving his grey Jag. When Bannister comes out, he is run down.
Iris is in "a terrible state" and tells all. Mrs Lincoln had gathered incriminating evidence against one of her former employers, Harris, and had tried blackmailing him. Wrongly, she had implied that Bob Kerry was her partner. Her dog Midge had been kidnapped to persuade her to call off the blackmailing. Cathy had sent the dog collar to persuade Rupert to speak out, but that scheme had failed. So who is Mel Harris? And where is he? That we still don't know.
Doreen is in a nursing home in St Albans, to undergo plastic surgery on her disfigured face. Jack asks Cathy to speak to her. "You know Harris," Caths urges her. Doreen is too scared to talk, but Cathy gets her to agree to a meeting, for "I want Rupert's job." To enforce the point, she adds darkly that she knows about Mrs Lincoln.
This works. Harris arranges to talk to Cathy about her proposal. "Play it cool, Jack advises her, "and watch his hands." She does act the part well. "I know why you killed Charles Bannister," she tells him. Mel curses him as "a bloody fool," he'd been trying to peddle narcotics on the side. With Harris increasingly suspicious, Jack intervenes to arrest the boss who is now trying to throttle her.
So all is explained, well almost. And Cathy really is taken to Steeple Aston... by Jack

The End

To menu for Game of Murder

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Death is a Good Living (1966)
starring Leonard Rossiter

A deposed dictator, Salias, lives in comfortable exile in Florida, but longs to start an invasion of his former empire. He sends his pal Ramon Aguirre (Michael Godfrey) to Europe. to drum up support from his rich sympathisers.
Ramon flies in to Shannon Airport, two security men, Jim Prescott (Geoffrey Toone) and Tim Barton (Jeremy Burnham), with a watching brief on his every move. On the other side, two professional assassins are charged by the present regime to stop this trip succeeding- at any cost. Norman Lynch (Leonard Rossiter) is the principal killer.
From the novel by Philip Jones, script by Brian Degas and Tudor Gates.

To menu of taped Adventure series

.

.

.

.

.

.

Bat Out Of Hell

A 1966 5 part serial by Francis Durbridge
Starring John Thaw as Mark,
and Sylvia Sims as Diana.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

To menu of taped series

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 1
The wealthy Geoffrey Stewart and his young wife Diana are packing, for tonight they are off on holiday to Cannes. Second in command at work, Mark Paxton lends them a suitcase- that's how stingy Stewart is with his money! Ned is to pick them up at 17.00 to drive them to the airport.
Geoffrey is a superior estate agent, and before he takes his break, he must see an important client who is very interested in buying this large mansion the firm has on its books. He is dropped off by Mark at the empty property, where he is shot. Dead. It's all so Mark can make out with Diana. Mark dumps the body in the boot of his Cortina and locks his car away in his own garage.
Diana phones the police, who are not at this point over concerned that her husband has failed to turn up to go on holiday. The plot is very straightforward.
Mark plans to drive the corpse to a gravel pit, "they'll not find him in a thousand years." However this is where things get complicated. The body has vanished. Then Diana receives a phone call. It's Geoffrey's voice, and he warns her, "they've got to think it's me."
Panicked, Mark and Diana puzzle what it all means. It cannot have been Geoffrey on the phone. He was definitely dead.
Next day Inspector Clay questions Mark about Geoffrey's death. His body has been discovered in a gravel pit. Diana identifies the corpse. She confides later to Mark however that her husband is not dead. The phone rings...

Note- one section of the background music is the theme later used in Callan

Bat Out of Hell

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 2
Alunbury 8130. Mark answers. it's only bachelor Ned Tallboy, to see if Diana is all right.
Offering sympathy, family friends Walter and Thelma call to comfort her. Walter is a writer, and curiously advises Mark not to underestimate Inspector Clay. Thelma promises to come by in the afternoon to keep Diana company.
A cigarette case that Geoffrey had given Diana is returned to her, though she says it is not hers. The inscription inside from Geoffrey is odd, "who came like a bat out of hell."
Inspector Clay is mystified. A pair of gloves belonging to Geoffrey certainly do not fit the dead man. Moreover fingerprints also suggest the corpse is not that of Geoffrey.
Thelma tells Diana that she has had a call from Geoffrey saying he wants to meet her at three o'clock. Mark however is certain he had killed Geoffrey. Don't go, he advises Diana. But she goes to the Chichester Motel only to find another corpse being removed, this time it definitely is her husband. Shot dead.
Miss Tracey, owner of a sweet shop, phones Mark informing him that Diana has been arrested. She rings off after a reference to Bat Out Of Hell

Bat Out of Hell

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 3
Kitty Tracey's phone call has come like a bolt from the blue. Mark returns home to start packing. Diana calls. She has not been arrested as the phone call had said. She'd admitted to Inspector Clay that she had gone to the hotel hoping to meet her husband.
He had told her that the first corpse in the woods has now been identified as that of Ken Harding, who ran a betting shop. Geoffrey's wallet had been discovered in these woods. Inside was a notebook with a list of payments to or possibly from "T." Tracey perhaps.
Alunbury 7432. Miss Tracey answers Diana's call. They fix a meeting for 7 o'clock tonight at her shop.
Ned is trying to flog an old Bentley to Walter. Thelma is against it. She tells Inspector Clay that she did not take any phone call from Geoffrey, despite what she had said to Diana.
Inspector Clay finds a message in Italian, which he gets translated: You Came Into my Life Like a Bat Out Of Hell.
At 7pm Diana arrives at the shop. A bloodstained knife is on the stairs. A dead body. But it is Thelma's corpse!
Shaken, Diana informs Mark. Inspector Clay calls round, then in walks Thelma very much alive

Bat Out of Hell

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 4
Diane faints when Thelma walks in. She is put to bed. Walter explains that they had called round to "have it out" with Diane over her claim that Thelma had taken the phone call from Geoffrey.
Inspector Clay, suspicious, calls at Miss Tracey's sweet shop. He soon discovers her dead body.
Next he makes for Nigel Mills, who had wanted to see Diane urgently. He is the family solicitor. He explains that under Geoffrey's will, the bulk of his considerable fortune had recently been made over to a Diana Valesco. She lives in Chelsea, and Clay is soon talking to her. She is surprised to learn of the bequest.
"I think Kitty was blackmailibng Geoffrey Stewart," Inspector Clay informs Ned Tallboy. Kitty was a tenant of Ned's. Tallboy had guessed Geoffrey was seeing another woman, but he didn't know her identity.
Mark and Diane row over the will. Contest it, is Mark's first thought. Then he changes his mind. We can guess why, when he phones Diana Valesco asking to see her. 7pm tonight.
When he reaches Diana's flat, he is confronted by Clay. What is Mark's relationship with Diane Stewart? Mark bluffs. Why has he come to see Miss Valesco?

Bat Out of Hell

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 5
An edited tape of Geoffrey's voice has been discovered in Miss Tracey's flat. The question is, who was her partner in crime? Inspector Clay concocts a possible scenario.
Walter tells Clay that he is worried about his wife. She was being blackmailed by Miss Tracey, and had gone to see her on the night of the murder.
Diane asks Mark about Diana Valesco, "very good looknig." He had learned that she had met Geoffrey by accident, like a bat out of hell. She has made an offer of accepting £10,000 rather than taking the whole legacy. But Diane is in an angry mood, the reason for which is revealed: she had received an anonymous note stating that Mark was running off, and she had checked and learned he had bought a ticket for a flight to Australia. She shoots him dead.
Thelma admits to the inspector that she had been blackmailed to the tune of £200 a month, on account of a swindle she was operating with Ken Harding. That fateful night, when she had called on Miss Tracey, an unseen intruder had knocked her out.
She receives a message via her husband to go to Diane's house at 2pm with £4,000 for the return of the blackmail documents. This she hands over and police swoop. After a brief chase through windy woods the blackmailer leaps into his getaway sports car. But Clay has disabled it. The ending is unintentionally slightly comic, when at least a dozen uniformed policeman close in on the one villain

Bat Out of Hell

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Dixon of Dock Green (1955-1976)
starring Jack Warner as PC George Dixon, an Ordinary Copper.
Other long serving cast members included:
Peter Byrne as Andy Crawford, George's son-in-law, Jeanne Hutchinson as Mary, his wife, as well as Arthur Rigby as Sgt Flint, the gruff but likeable station sergeant.
The series was one of the most famous creations of Ted Willis.

A "cosy" police drama which reflected the integrity of a pre-Z Cars police force. It ended up being derided as an anachronism, but that wasn't the fault of the programme, but of the world that had changed all around. Despite periodic attempts to make the stories more contemporary, this was always Jack Warner's show, and he ensured it was never unpleasant. One critic at the time nicely described watching the series as like "slipping into a comfortable pair of old slippers."
Jack Warner didn't begin every story, as some think, with George Dixon welcoming us with his celebrated "Evening All," though he often did.

16 The Rotten Apple (1956)
17 The Roaring Boy
18 Pound of Flesh
19 Father in Law
120 The Hot Seat (1960)
350 Waste Land (in colour, 1971)
367 Jig-Saw
397 Eye Witness (1973)
399 Harry's Back (1974)
411 Seven for a Secret- Never to be Told
412 Sounds
413 Firearms were issued
416 Looters Ltd
422 Conspiracy

Taped Crime Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Rotten Apple
George Dixon: 'Ah, good evening!"

"A dickens of a surprise" awaits Alderman Mayhew (AJ Brown) in Glenside Terrace, he's been robbed. As it's on PC George Dixon's beat, he is on the carpet for not spotting anything. The irascible Sgt Flint bawls him off, so a chastened George returns home silent. Andy is here, having his radio repaired by PC Tom Carr, from Bristol (Paul Eddington). As the policemen chat idly about a spate of similar robberies Tom observes the crook must have "tons of nerve," while Andy believes it must be the work of The Captain, even though he has an alibi.
Now we see this gentleman crook, in Nelson Terrace, robbing the house of Mr Collings. But the owner interrupts the thief and phones the police. The captain waits unperturbed, sipping a drink. The pair exchange philosophies before the Captain catches Collings off guard, knocks him out and makes his getaway.
But Collings supplies the crook's description and it fits The Captain, "underneath he's a rat." The robber is arrested, though he denies any of the other crimes, and indeed his alibis for these remain watertight.
Mrs Gilbert in Westhouse Street is robbed that same evening, this can't be the work of The Captain since he has the very best of alibis! Observes The Captain, "someone else did these jobs, and did them to look like my work."
George is having a tiff with Mary about plain cooking, before Mary goes for a night out with Andy, all paid for by Tom Carr, who has had a nice win on the horses. George, back home, has a chat with Maurie, a bookie, who's owed a tidy sum of money. He asks George to help, as the debtor is Carr. "A damn young fool," he must be, decides George.
Next day he calls on Tom in his High Street digs. Carr does admit he is in debt, but implies that George is only making these inquiries as Maurie has given him a backhander. Naturally that riles our honest George and the pair exchange words. In the struggle stolen jewellery is exposed. "I can explain...." But it's all very clear now, "there's nothing worse than a rotten copper," pronounces George. Before Carr is placed under arrest, George forces him to take off his dishonoured uniform. "The only bad copper I ever me," he informs us in conclusion

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.


17 The Roaring Boy - PC Dixon comes face to face with an army deserter, Douglas Beale (Kenneth Cope), who is holed out in the room of his girl Diane (Jennifer Wilson). "Don't be a fool son, give me that gun." But he won't, getting a sadistic pleasure from the power it gives him, and he enjoys arguing with his prisoners. Remarks the disillusioned Diane: "I only hope there's no men in the next world." For Beale has declared "I've always wanted to kill someone." But PC George Dixon gives them both a lesson in morals before pulling the carpet, literally, from under the coward

.

.

.

.

.

.

Pound of Flesh
George Dixon: 'Ah, good evening!" Turning a blind eye, that's a policeman's art, he tells us. This is illustrated in the case of Mrs Kay Evans (Dorothy Gordon), of Turner Street, who reported "a sort of burglary." Her husband's best suit and shoes had been stolen while she popped out to post a letter.
An aside, old Billy calls at the station to announce that he has reformed. No more drink, he has signed the pledge. He explains to Sgt Flint that he found Glory while at the dogs at the White City, He's now at the Mission, and would like, please, a reference so he can get a job there.
George has had a look round the Evans home, but her story strikes him as a little odd. Neighbour Maisie can't confirm Mrs Evans' story that she met her on the way to the post box. Andy Crawford agrees her story's "thin" when he chats with George about it at home. When Andy investigates, his obvious question is, "are you sure the suit was stolen?"
Then Andy relaxes at the pub with Mary, chatting with George Blake (Leonard Williams), their window cleaner. George enjoys a drink also, with another friend, Jim. George has been busy, down at the pawnshop where he's been told Mrs Evans had pawned the suit. So he and Andy have to leave poor Mary high and dry to sort out the Evans.
Alf Evans is worked up about his missing suit. Why this cock and bull story? She's short of money, indeed she's been borrowing to make ends meet and owes £52 plus interest. She'd borrowed the money off Blake, "daylight robbery." Husband and wife make up tearfully.
Blake is running quite a moneylending business. Mrs Watts is his latest 'victim,' " a secret between us," he snidely whispers to her. She signs up to something she doesn't follow, actually a high rate of repayments. George Dixon arrives on official business. Blake possesses no licence to lend this money, so he is arrested. "Thank you Mr Dixon," concludes Mrs Evans.
Perhaps a very simplistic solution to a debt problem, but well acted

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Father in Law
George Dixon: "Ah, good evening."
This is the joyous story of Andy and Mary's wedding, that begins with a cosy chat between George and Andy on the eve of the big day. Guests include the bridesmaid Peggy, and 23 year old Pam who had been jilted at the altar.
Next day, it's off to church as a crowd watches outside the Dixon home extraordinarily undemonstrative (well, these filmed scenes were only shot without sound in those days). "Like a white angel," Mary takes her dad's arm, tramp Billy seeing them off and receiving an unexpected invitation to the reception.
Here Sgt Grace Millard and Sgt Flint are checking over the last minute arrangements. Grace thinks she recognises one of the helpers. Pam is there early also, as she can't bear to sit through the ceremony.
There's film outside the church, Andy and Mary now happily married. Nice shots of father looking on. Dinner afterwards then dancing, Billy has a turn with Grace. Pam can't dance however.
So well it all goes off, until a hitch, the reception manager Frank has found his wallet has been stolen, £10 missing. George is forced into a spot of quiet sleuthing, "this is a fine lark."
Billy is first to be questioned, naturally he takes offence. Then Grace recalls that the cloakroom girl she recognised is Muriel, who had been in court for something. Tempers start to fray until George calms them down and provides one of his comic monologues about his relations, then renders the sentimental Her Name is Mary, which all join in. To romantic music Andy and Mary take their leave, "I wish your mother could've seen you today." Then George gets a confession of theft, and all is forgiven
Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Hot Seat
George Dixon, "Oh good evening all."
George, Andy and Mary, plus Grace Millard spend a weekend in Paris. On the flight over the two men jest they are living the high life and are overheard by a conman. Peter Ames (Kenneth J Warren) and Joyce Cardew have a partner named Treadgold (William Mervyn) who gets to know Dixon in the hotel bar. He says he's in fertilizers, and is very impressed with George and Andy who say they're in Public Relations. He kindly loans them his car so they can tour the city.
Not so green Andy checks up with Dock Green, where there's a certain jealousy over this foreign trip, "I could do with a nice long weekend in Paris meself." Sgt Flint, tears Andy off a strip for making such an expensive phone call, but is already on the lookout for these swindlers. "They're not trying it on George, are they?" he asks incredulously.
On film we watch the tour de Paris, the flash car taking them in style to shots of them at the Arc de Triomphe, Eifel Tower and the Artists' Quarter in Montmartre. Then it's dinner with Treadgold, when Grace finds a stray wallet that is claimed by Peter Ames, and this introduces the other two crooks into the group. By way of thanks, Ames insists on buying drinks, after which Andy gets so carried away he offers to pay for the meal, kindly accepted. Then a night drive round the bright lights of the city, this time shots of the British inside the car with street scenes flashing by. At midnight they are admiring Nore Dame, by 1am it's time to turn in and Treadgold makes his move. Peter has this fantastic deal, 135,000 francs, about £10,000, would George and Andy like a slice of the windfall? A cash deal, bring it next morning, there's a big profit to follow. But it's the French gendarmes who swoop next morning and the conman find out it's they who have been conned, "we had to pick a couple of coppers."
But Andy has to pay for that meal, which George thinks funny until he gets a shock too, that fancy car had been hired out in his name
Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

350 Waste Land
"Good evening all."

He was living in a wasteland, a policeman, whose mind was damaged after a fight. While on duty, he goes missing, last seen in this sawmill, closed for the past six months. It makes for a distinctive backdrop to this story.
PC Norman's movements are traced, his wife is very worried since he was a very quiet man, "he couldn't get his mind to work." (Nor could the writer, you could add.) Yet somehow he was still allowed to work as a policeman.
A woman is found who knows him. She is Ruth. Though denying she knew Norman, finally she admits she was "an ear" for him. Not more? The whole story is always teetering on the Wednesday Play until the tedious search is stopped when a body is fished from the river, drowned.
We are offered "private thoughts" on his death, but it hardly makes for satisfactory drama

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Jig-Saw
available on YouTube

Forbes is a watchman at a huge site, a derelict gasworks. In a warehouse he is locked in- briefly.
He gets out and George Dixon spends a long time questioning him. A baby book has been discovered on the site, belonging to Pamela Warren who was reported missing on Monday night. Her husband Colin is brought to the site.
A dog sniffs around the complex, then a posse of policeman join in the search. In fact three women two years ago had been attacked in the vicinity, is this a related case? Why was Pamela here? Colin doesn't know, saying he had attended an evening class on Monday. It turns out he was spending the time with Joan, a girl friend.
Pamela's handbag eventually is discovered. Uncle George chats to two small children who tell him they had found it earlier today. They had become scared when Forbes showed up, and locked him in.
That night a watch is kept. A decoy policewoman in plain clothes bravely strolls up and down. Though nothing happens, on the third day, after an attack, an arrest is made and Pamela's corpse unearthed. Very simple really, well written though ultimately very straightforward

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Eyewitness
George Dixon: 'Good evening, all!"
A crooked croupier, about to flee the country, is stopped by Colley (Steve Plytas). His girl Anne watches in horrified hiding as he's shot dead.
She refuses to tell the police the truth, but when Colley's hitmen, realising the danger she poses try to shoot her too, she consents reluctantly to accept police protection after Andy Crawford saves her life. Not that she's grateful, she travels with her 'uncle' George Dixon to the safety an island hotel (Burgh Island).
The place she finds boring, though if she were aware of the extensive network of criminals that Colley has summoned to find her, she might be more cooperative. Instead, she grabs a chance of borrowing a car to drive off the island. However police soon stop her progress.
She is returned to Uncle George, but the alert crooks are istening in to police radio messages and are easily able to locate the hotel. An annoyed George makes Anne stay in her room, though even he underestimates the danger as Anne is snatched and dragged at gunpoint away from the island.
By speedboat, then by car, George gives chase. As the law, he is able to take a shortcut along an unfinished motorway and after turning off (at Eastwick) arrives at an airfield in time to prevent Colley's aircraft from taking off with Anne. Colley is placed under arrest. Well, that is what ought to have happened, but Colley hands Anne a fat bribe and she gives some cock and bull tale that means Colley gets away with it. George concludes by describing to us the rest of Colley's life history

To
Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Harry's Back (January 12th 1974)

George Dixon: "Good evening all."
Lee Montague has a fine role as the likeable villain, "one of the best," friend to all his mates, Harry Simpson. Among his own, he's loved by one and all, in his flash white suit, driving his flash white car. He's just been booted out of Spain.
Andy Crawford however knows Harry's other side, he's "the scum of the earth," his partner Lennie has gone to ground somewhere, though Harry with his typical Cockney generosity sees Lennie's wife's all right. Now Harry is becoming legit, marrying the posh Miss Marion Croft.
The sting for Andy is that he's up for promotion at long last, and Harry's one blot on his past, three cases against him collapsing when witnesses had mysteriously withdrawn their statements. Andy scans the wedding photos to see what villains had been present. Perhaps not unreasonably, Harry is upset when he finds out about this, and tries a quiet word with George Dixon. As George won't respond, Harry has a word with another, the chief superintendent no less. Thus Andy gets invited to a round of golf with the super, and Andy forthrightly says what he knows, or believes he knows about Harry, "he buys and bullies immunity from the law." Tread carefully, Andy is advised.
Harry's right hand man Bernie Moss is setting up another job. He leans on Freddy for his clean driving licence, reminding the poor Freddy, "Harry looked after you when you had that accident." The licence is needed for the hire a car used in a robbery of cosmetics, and Freddy is soon traced. His licence had been lost, he claims, why he'd even reported the fact. But a little leaning elicits a reluctant name, Bernie. That puts Bernie and Harry on a quest for revenge, and Freddy is "encouraged to change his tune," that is, run over and all but killed, "didn't see who it was," he moans pathetically.
Harry has decided wisely to scarper. But at the airport with his wife who seems in shock, he's asked a few pointed questions. In return Harry threatens to scotch Andy's promotion. However the news that his ex-partner's corpse has turned up is enough to prevent him flying off.
A search of Harry's luxury flat proves disappointingly fruitless, as Harry gloats and Marion remains in shock, until Andy finds a key concealed under a coffee table. A safety deposit box is later opened and the case against Harry complete when the gun that killed Lennie is found. However a lot of people still cannot believe anything bad about good old Harry

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Seven for a Secret- Never to be Told
"Good evening all."
A gas explosion in a house, one dead woman, assumed to be suicide. But George Dixon is wise enough not to take things at face value. Why was the kitchen window open, if she killed herself?
The corpse is that of Mrs Margaret Pengelly, a thoroughly unlikeable and detestable woman by all accounts. Her sixteen year old daughter Chrissie is missing. Her estranged husband Alfred isn't at all bothered by her demise. He'd not seen her for two years. Mrs Pengelly's most recent partner was Kieron O'Shea who tells George they had split up recently.
Another oddball character in her life was 'Uncle' Ralph Harding, whom we know, and Andy Crawford finds out, has taken Chrissie away. His borrowed car is found empty in Devon. It looks sinister, as "he's off his chump." Ralph has taken her to his mother's isolated cottage, and Andy is soon there, with the invaluable assistance of local policeman Sgt Goacher.
O'Shea decides he must tell the police he knows Mrs Pengelly was murdered, though subsequent events make you wonder what he is rabbiting on about.
After a chase, Ralph takes Chrissie to a derelict house, where Goacher is waiting. Ralph explains about Mrs Pengelly's death, the reason for their flight is hardly very clear. As George Dixon had warned us at the start, this wasn't really a case at all. And of course George is always right, isn't he?

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

412 Sounds

George Dixon: "Good evening all."
Phone call to Dock Green police station, a woman sounds as though she is being strangled. Then a young girl picks up the instrument and explains, "mummy's fallen down." Patiently Uncle George Dixon tries to find out more, but all she can tell him is that she's called Janey. These days of course, such a call can be traced, but back then all the police have to go on is their taped recording of the conversation.
There's the sound of an industrial machine faintly in the background, yes, and a hooting of a ship.. This is a simple but absorbing tale of the hunt for Janey and her mum. To obtain a fix on their whereabouts, the hooting sound is identified as that of a tug on the river, the captain of this vessel is asked to play those hoots again, with police officers recording the noise at strategic local points.
Electronics expert Dave has the task of matching these recordings with the original hooting on the phone. He also refines the noises on that original tape. Two possible areas are suggested, and the machine noise identified as that of a printers. Hammond Street is where the search homes into, and above a printers is a flat, empty. Living here is new tenant Mrs Anne Turner, separated from her husband.
Mr Davis calls at the police station. He works for a security firm whose phone number had been scribbled on a wall in the flat. Oddly, it's a special line only used for confidential matters. Davis wants to know how she got it. He does recall a Mrs Anne Turner working for the company for a short while, but then we see him phoning Anne.
She does what he orders and phones Goerge at the station. She explains she is OK now, and quickly rings off. But sharp witted George has recognised the background sound on this phone call, she's at a railway station and a police car swoops and picks her up.
Andy Crawford questions Davis. Anne's his wife. He had beaten her up, trying to persuade her to return home to him. She maintains it was an accident. A frustrated Crawford has nothing to charge Davis with, he smugly confident no charge can be laid against him, as his wife won't betray him. It's a frustrating disappointing though maybe realistic conclusion to an absorbing little story

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Looters Ltd
Sam Kydd gives another of his sympathetic portraits, this one of recently released ex-con Charlie Bennett, who had served his latest sentence after a bad accident on his last job.
On the way home, he witnesses a mugging. He helps Mr Price who is badly shaken, but is most reluctant to talk to police.
But he leaves his name and address and proceeds homewards, to a welcome from many friends and family. His son Ray gives him a present, a gold watch. The party falls silent when George Dixon pops round. But he only wants to praise Charlie for his part in helping Price. But when Charlie learns that keys and a gold watch had been taken from Price, he suspects the worst.
A lot of shoplifting has been going on of late, "organised raids." Andy Crawford's inquiries are at a dead end. In fact, we see that Charlie's wife Olive has been earning money while he was inside by getting her gang to steal goods to order, then sell them on to friends in the neighbourhood.
Charlie is touched when he receives a £20 thank you from Price. But he knows Ray was one of the muggers. As he reprimands his son, Ray realises the keys he had nicked must be those of Price's shop. He arranges with a pal to rob the place that night.
One of Olive's 'workers' is caught shoplifting. She refuses to talk. However PC Harry has been given a miniature tv as an engagement present from his fiancee Barbara. Andy spots that it is on the Stolen List. An offended Barbara says that she had bought it in good faith from Mrs Bennett.
At Charlie's house, Andy swoops with a search warrant. Olive Bennett is nicked, so is Ray when he returns home with the proceeds of his robbery, "a full house"

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

413 Firearms were issued

An £80,000 armed bank robbery and police have to be issued with guns so they can close in on the three crooks who are now sharing the cash out.
After a tense time of waiting, the house where they are hiding is surrounded and the police move in. One criminal is shot as he tries to escape, but it turns out that none of the men are actually carrying shooters. So a detailed investigation is organised as a matter of urgency by brusque Inspector Donovan (Percy Herbert) whose main concern appears to be press reaction.
Questions are asked, still relevant today.

Dock Green Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

422 Conspiracy
"Good evening all."

Here's a familiar theme, is policeman Len Warren bent?
He is the key witness in the trial of Ben Randall and his wife June, accused of drunk driving, knocking down and killing a pedestrian. However "a wellwisher" writes suggesting Warren has been bought. Against Andy's advice, George investigates, his instinct is that Warren is a good copper.
However he has recently purchased a new car. Andy questions him. Len believes Ben is out to frame him. "I don't have to prove my honesty to anyone."
George chats with Len's fiancee Sally, She does explain the new car had come from their savings. He had been receiving threatening phone calls from someone. This animosity is traced to the anonymous letter writer, who had recently been charged with assault by Len. The man withdraws his letter of complaint.
Groge observes to Andy that Len does try to play it alone, very much like young Andy used to do. Len resigns, telling George his reasons. George offers him a gentle lecture. The ending is open ended

Dock Green Menu
Taped Crime Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Maigret
Rupert Davies achieved a well deserved success as the celebrated pipe-smoking detective. That opening sequence of his striking a match to light his pipe, accompanied by Ron Grainer's evocative music was a classic.
Initially the programmes were telerecorded using Kinescope, "just as effective as film and a great deal cheaper." According to another contemporary report they were shot on both 405 and 525 line videotape as well as on 16mm and 35mm film. You takes your choice!
When shooting started the new BBC Television Centre had not been opened so the first two stories were shot at the old Lime Grove studios. Riverside Studios were apparently also used for a few early episodes before the BBC Centre opened officially on June 29th 1960. Rehearsals had already began (at the end of the previous month) and the first episode shot around June 14th 1960. The stories were screened from that October.

36 Death in Mind (Nov 1962)- Two lonely old women are murdered and the ten million they've left seems sufficient motive. Maigret however risks his career in letting the obvious suspect (John Ronane) escape, with the idea of following him. Has he contacted Emile Radek (Anton Rodgers), an impoverished medical student? When the man who inherits the money (Jerry Stovin) shoots himself, Maigret finds himself taunted by this Radek who is now in the money. "There could be another murder," Radek warns our policeman. But Maigret can play cat and mouse too, and he toys with Radek at the scene of the murders
37 Seven Little Crosses (Dec 1962)- 'The Sunday man' kills another old lady and the chase is on for eyewitness 12 year old Francois, whose father (James Maxwell) is suspected of the crime. But while Maigret sits at home enjoying his Christmas dinner, Lucas works out the murderer is actually an ex-policeman sacked for drunkenness, who has now kidnapped Francois. At times this story seems like a French Z Cars, though much less coarse
41 Fonetenay Murders (Oct 1963)- Three murders in a small town where Maigret just happens to be holidaying with a friend, the local magistrate (Alan Wheatley). All killed with a spanner, murders seemingly unconnected. Soon class tensions are mounting, before Maigret reveals the murderer's name- it's Mr Grimsdale! Well, it's actually the local bigwig played by Edward Chapman, for ever immortalised for his role as stooge to Norman Wisdom
52 Maigret's Little Joke (Dec 1963)- The wife of Dr Jarvet (Michael Goodliffe) has died over the weekend- Inspector Lucas investigates as Maigret is injured. Digitalis is found in her body: "it's impossible!" Unable to resist following case unofficially, Maigret keeps sending Lucas anonymous little notes with suggestions as to what to look into

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

Take a Pair of Private Eyes (1966)
Almost a take off of a drama serial starring Derek Fowlds as Ambrose Frayne, and Jeanne Roland as Dominique Frayne, his new wife, who together run a sort of detective agency.
The cartoon opening and closing credits set the mood, which is hardly improved by some weak acting and a script that uses every cliche in the book. As a comedy it fails, as a drama it never ignites, so all that's left is to enjoy the polished acting from those of the cast not afflicted with the above mentioned malady.

Part 1 (April 10th 1966)

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6 (May 15th 1966)

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Take a Pair of Private Eyes

1 (April 10th 1966)

Ambrose is demonstrating how to pick pockets to his new young wife Dominique or Nicky for short. He also calls her 'Frog.' His business partner Charles runs numerous businesses, including that fronted by Ambrose, Recovery Enterprises. He has a new line for kiddies, a large snake. A customer in a grotesque mask attacks him and steals the file on the Grayden Pearls. He takes it to the novelty shop of Crozier (John Sharp), where Cornelia is assistant.
Inspector Ross wants to know if Ambrose has discovered anything about Lady Grayden's missing pearl necklace. But Ambrose has no information to offer. He consults his mentor, Hector (Sam Kydd) who points him in the direction of the man in the mask, Feinster, a fence.
However this crook's home is "well wired." But Ambrose and Nicky find a way in via the roof tiles. After a search, behind a mirror, Ambrose locates the safe. Cracking it takes longer than it should due to interruptions in the form of a few kisses with his new wife. She retreats to watch quietly, but then nearly screams when a hand dangles in front of her face.
End of part one

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

2
A corpse is sprawling above the four poster bed. Ambrose cuts away the awning so that it falls on to the bed, then he leaves a note in the dead man's hat.
Hello hello hello, a constable on the beat spots Ambrose's car parked outside, and nicks him and Nicky as they emerge from the house.
Inspector Marshall listens to their doubtful story, and they are put behind bars. But Ambrose sneaks out of his cell and enjoys a cuddle with his wife.
Raoul Feinster returns home and keeps the corpse away from police eyes. He claims nothing has been stolen. He then mysteriously corroborates Ambrose's fiction that he had been replacing a few loose roof tiles- what, at dead of night?
Charles checks up on Crozier, who has the pearls. This villain drives a large van from his weird shop, to deliver a large wooden crate...
Clearly, possibly, the corpse has something to do with the missing pearls. With the assistance of Hector, Ambrose works out that the dead man was Roger Curran, a known embezzler. Ambrose waits, for Feinster is bound to show up. But in his office, Charles discovers that a corpse has been delivered

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

3
Charles swallows a tablet after finding the corpse in his office.
Hector offers Ambrose and Nicky a transmitter and receiver in the shape of a pen and lighter.
In a feeble scene, Amvrose is introduced for the first time to Nicky's dad at the French embassy. He is suffering a painful massage. "'e is my 'usband," she tells dad, which drives the man to drink. Ambrose relates his dubious family history.
Feinster phones Inspector Roth, advising him of the corpse in Ambrose's office. It isn't there. the policeman informs Ambrose that Feinster is moving out of his office.
The body proves to be that of an Armenian client of Charles. It was, so the story goes, there for Charles to arrange to have it embalmed.
Feinster now phones Cokey Brock, a crook for whom he acts as a fence. Subject: "a little job."
Ambrose poses as the Armenian's brother, requesting the embalmed body be delivered to Feinster's home at 1.30am. Of course it's "to give Mr Feinster another shaking." Ambrose disconnects Feinster's home alarm system so as to watch proceedings. But in his car, Nicky discovers another corpse...

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

4

The 'corpse' is only Ambrose messing around. No, actually it's a ruse to lure the policeman guarding Feinster's home, away from there so Ambrose and Nicky can indulge in a spot of trickery inside the house.
At 1.30am promptly, as per instructions, Charles delivers the corpse to the property, amid funereal music. Naturally the noise awakens Feinster and he prowls round suspiciouasly with his gun. He finds Ambrose's written demand to return Lady Grayden's pearls, "a very curious business."
Other sidelines which may and may not be significant: Dominique encourages her dad in his desire for a new alliance, "voila!" The lady in question is Marian, who is very inhibited, but by what? Inspector Ross is angry because Ambrose had tricked that bobby. Hector provides Nicky with a useful tip. Then Charley is given another job by Feinster, who wants "the boot putting in" to Ambrose and his wife, anything short of actually killing them.
At a club, the couple listen to a song, and indulge in a slight disagreement over women. When they return home, Charley's men lie waiting... corpse...

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

5
The masked men are startled in the car headlights. After a punchup, Ambrose knocks them both out of course. Nicky sketches the unmasked faces, enabling Hector to identify them as members of Cokey's mob. Ambrose beards him in his den. He gets his own back by setting light to Cokey's pride and joy which reduces the pathetic criminal utterly to tears.
Ambrose has been "casing" Feinster's joint, which is a set of the creeky variety. Next door Crozier is putting cash into an envelope.
Nicky watches from next door to Crozier's shop, but she is spotted, and packed away in a large trunk, a magic box in the shop. However Ambrose rescues her.
Crozier and Feinster are definitely in cahoots she tells Ambrose in her broken English.
Lady Grayden is grateful to receive back her pearls- from no less than Feinster! Happily, she kisses Dominique's dad- obviously the pair are an item. But he is unamused. Ambrose tells them these jewels are fake. "It's all very complicated."
Ambrose and Nicky renew surveillance of Feinster's office, Nicky by posing as a model in rooms opposite. After dressing up as December, she dresses down for July...

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

6
Feinster calls at the room where Nicky is posing. It's to collect a passport photo of Alfred Crozier, who turns out to be his brother.
Nicky spies on Feinster in his office and sees Crozier enter via a cupboard. "We're going to pull out." After a disagreement over this, Alfred is shot dead.
Ambrose discusses his next move with Hector, who then confides in Nicky's dad, to the latter's advantage, over a painting Hector had once nicked. Magnanimously, Hector is going to return it, anonymously, to no less a place than the Louvre. Then he shows Ambrose how to rob Feinster's safe to recover the stolen pearls. (Why couldn't he have done this is episode 1?)
Feinster kidnaps Nicky at gunpoint. She's a hostage. Cornelia, the late Crozier's assistant, drives Ambrose in her Mini to the magic shop where is prepared the latest illusion- a guillotine. Naturally it is Nicky's head at the end of the chopper, and unless Ambrose returns the jewels and smuggles them out of the country for Feinster, she is for the chop! But of course Ambrose rescues her and Feinster is left trapped in the guillotine for Inspector Ross to collect.

This plot has so many holes and loose ends, that it is impossible to do any justice to a serial that seems to have been written on the back of old envelopes and strung together anyhow, as though the whole must make some wacky impact on the longsuffering viewer. Occasional moments of fun however are no tonic

Take a Pair menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Spies (1966)

starring Dinsdale Landen as agent Richard Cadell.
"Spies don't have friends, only enemies and lovers."

My abiding memory of the series, is an episode in which Dinsdale Landen, ever looking to score nice subtle comic touches, chats to a bandit leader in the Spanish mountains, who lives on what he describes as "Bake-ed Beans."

1 If He Runs, I Want You There (Jan 1st 1966)

15 I Didn't Even Volunteer (April 16th 1966)

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

I Didn't Even Volunteer

The dread word 'Russia,' which has come up with "a new box of tricks." Some satellite system, which has crashed in a remote mountainous region. 1A1 priority, agent Richard Cadell is dropped by parachute "to take a few photographs," and may bring back a souvenir or two.
Of course, "others will be trying to reach the impact area." After dodging crossbow fire, he rescues a girl who is tied to a tree, Leila, who tags along with him, "she's probably a plant." Also lurking among the trees is Copic (Peter Arne) of the Russians, plus of course American CIA. And Cadell's superiors, Kelly and Hastings. So there is quite a crowd! But yet one more unseen enemy, watching their every move, the local boys.
Mortar shells are the next danger, then a punch up in a lake as the Russians show up.
At long last, the crash site is located, however the place is surrounded by gunmen and Cadell & Co are taken prisoner by local mercenaries. Their chief bargains with Copic. After a fight, Cadell & Co get away. Despite a lot of bullet dodging, Cadell grabs his souvenir

The Spies

.

.

.

.

.

Z Cars
The BBC's long running series ran from 1962 until 1978, a total of 799 stories! I'll be honest, I am no fan.
James Ellis as Lynch appeared in the most stories rising from the patrolman in episode one up to superintendent. Next most episodes are credited to John Slater as Detective Sergeant Stone. However, surely the best remembered detectives were that first pairing of Stratford Johns as Barlow and Frank Windsor as Watt. Many others made their names in the series, to name a few, Brian Blessed, an acquired taste, as PC Fancy Smith and Colin Welland as PC Graham.

Reviews of these surviving stories:

Series One. 1 "Four of a Kind" - (Jan 1962)
2 "Limping Rabbit"
3 "Handle With Care"
4 "Stab in the Dark"
5 "Big Catch"
6 "Friday Night" - (February 1962)
7 "Suspended"
14 "Found Abandoned"
15 "The Best Days"
16 "Invisible Enemy"
17 "Down and Out"
18 "Further Enquiries"
20 "People's Property"
21 "Hi-jack!"
22 "Incident Reported"
26 "Contraband"
28 "Appearance in Court"
Series Two. 72 "The Whizzers" (1963)
Series Three. 75 "Made for Each Other" - (September 1963)
76 "A La Carte"
87 "Tuesday Afternoon" - (December 1963)
102 "Happy Families" - (1964)
115 "A Place of Safety"
Series Four. 135: "I Love You Bonzo"(1965)
136 "Brotherly Love"
137 "A Matter of Give and Take"
Series Six. 519: "A Lot of Fuss for Fifteen Quid" (1970)
Series Seven. 656: "Relative Values" (1972)
660 "Breakage"
Series Eight. 667: "Damage"
668 "Day Trip"
Series Ten. 752: "Incitement" (1975)
Series Thirteen and last. 791 "A Woman's Place" (1978)

To Softly Softly (1966-1976)

Taped Crime Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Four of a Kind (January 1962)
The formation of a picked band of patrolmen with such integrity that our police of today would surely envy. This is an absorbing opening story that starts at the grave of PC Reginald Furrow, "shot down in the execution of his duty." This murder might never have occurred if there had been a proper crime patrol, that's the view of Chief Inspector Barlow, and he asks Crime Prevention Officer John Watt to select the best men he can find to form this new unit. Since John's wife has just left him, he has the time!
Bob Steele and Herbert Lynch are the first possibilities to be considered, they are introduced via a scene with Bob's girl Janey. Lynch is the first man to be chosen, "not a copper, a con man," but his merit is "he can catch thieves."
Fancy Smith is the next up, "a ted in uniform," along with Jock Weir a rugby league player.
Having marked his men, Watt asks them to volunteer, Jock first, as he lies injured after a match. Lynch is second, he's on duty in the rain at the docks, seemingly more concerned about a bet he's laid than his job, though he's quick to pounce on a gang of tearaways. Yes, he'll join, "anything to get out of this rain." On duty outside a dance club, Fancy Smith is dancing about in the street, chatting up a few birds. "I like flat hats," he decides, he's in.
Only Bob Steele remains to be approached. In fact he's disappointed at not being asked. He's helping a mother find her missing son Rodney. He's gone potty, wielding a huge knife, but Bob persuades him to take his pills and he calms down. Tired, Bob returns home, where Watt and Lynch are waiting to greet him, with their invitation. "I won't say no."
"That's the four of them"

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

2 Limping Rabbit
A dour seedy kitchen sink drama.
Child vandals smash a window on a rough modern estate. Janey Steele lives here, but she's told a more serious problem, anonymously, 14 year old Hilda is missing from home. PC Bob Steele looks round the miserable squalid place where she lives, not worthy of the name home. Someone knocks him out.
He comes to. A drunkard named Boyle, the girl's grandfather, lives here, unworthy to be in charge of any child, he claims Hilda has been taken by this man. This turns out to be Dennis Stegan (Harry Towb) who is living with Boyle's daughter. Lynch looks round their flat, Stegan objects and comes off worse, but Lynch fails to find the child.
Steele finds Hilda's granny, a hard case, she'd left Boyle recently after an abortive attempt to look after him and Hilda.
17 year old Tessa is also missing, she had been pally with Hilda. The likelihood seems they must have gone off together. We see Stegan who is arranging for the pair to go by ship to Australia, apparently for Hilda to be reunited with her father, though it is suggested the real motive is a child prostitution racket. But Hilda won't go until she has her toy rabbit, left behind at her grandfather's house.
Old Boyle gets out a few words to Lynch, about the rabbit that has been taken. 18 inches long, one of the legs off. Get the rabbit, get the girl. The man who has taken the rabbit for Stegan is followed by police on the way to the docks, where he hands the animal over for a pound. It is handed to Hilda. The long surveillance ends with consternation, for Lynch has craftily swapped rabbits, so that Hilda gets the wrong one. "That's not my rabbit." Hysterics, arrest, then Hilda is reunited with her own rabbit.
I have to admit to not enjoying this. I didn't watch Z Cars after this in 1962, and I didn't want to watch it again recently. The grim characters offered nothing at all to endear themselves, and grainy 16mm film mixed with the studio scenes were too dark for comfort; maybe at the time we didn't notice that sort of thing so much

To
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Handle With Care (January 16th 1962)

The time is about 2230, an eager couple are snogging in their car when there's an explosion in nearby Blackby Quarry. ZV2, Lynch and Bob Steele are first on the scene. En route, they have been discussing the merits or otherwise of married life. ZV1, Smith and Weir, have to cover their patch, their conversation is mostly on who'll win Saturday's match.
Tom is the man who had reported the crime, though Lynch seems more interested in his girl friend. Weir and Smith are more conscientious, finding an abandoned van VME 309, owner Jacob Ramsden (Arthur Lowe) a petty thief. As he's so wily a customer, Smith, suspecting he has just done a toy shop, drives the van back to outside Jakey's house, something PC George Dixon'd surely never ever do!
Here Jacob 'Dad' Ramsden is smashing up some of the evidence, going to sell the crushed toy cars only for scrap. But his sons Little Jakey (Michael Brennan) and Ritchie (Anthony Sagar) though chips off the old block, have bigger fish to fry.
The quarry explosion had been caused by unstable gelignite that the two Ramsdens had nicked. One 'sweating' stick had exploded, the rest is hidden in a tea caddy at home. But "if anybody knocks it or drops it, there she blows!"
As Jakey doesn't fall for Smith's ruse, he's made to open up the locked rear of his van where more toys are found. Under arrest he is, but the officers are offered a cuppa before leaving for the station. "It's jelly," notes Smith, as the caddy is opened, Carefully the sticks are lifted and placed in a bucket of earth and carried to the bottom of the garden. Bang! Noone is hurt.
But the bulk of the gelignite has been taken by Little Jakey and Richie to sell. At a local cafe, Danny hands them the cash and drives away with it in his lorry SKA896, picking up a tart for the ride.
Chief Insepctor Barlow questions Jakey and his wife who won't admit anything. But apprised of the danger, she does shop her sons and they are picked up at the cafe.
Now the hunt is on for Danny's lorry. The time is now 2310, amazingly quick police response time! ZV2 first sight SKA896 and stop it. Bob is happy to rescue the tart in his arms, "could you believe it?" Moments later the jelly goes up, Lynch emerges more like a comic, his face blackened.

A mundane tale only enlivened by Arthur Lowe's strong Midlands accent

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Stab in the Dark
On her own doorstep, Sadie is stabbed. She doesn't recognise her assailant.
Supt Robins (John Phillips) is in charge of the case. "It should have killed her," yet her thick clothing had afforded some protection. "'e just jumped on me." She's reluctant to concede to Robins that she even has a boy friend, but Robins just can't believe this and the scene of his semi-bullying interrogation of her becomes overlong. "We'll get him tonight," promises the superintendent, but with no description of the attacker, that's problematic.
Janey has her own problems with PC Bob Steele, he's always at work, never around, and now he's forgotten it's her birthday. Now he can't stay with her as he has to go to Sadie's house. Steele and Lynch are assigned the task of tracking down the attacker's knife, and Steele finally gets round to apologising, in a way, to Janey for being delayed. She's staying with Mary.
Jim is one local who supplies them with a possible name for the knife owner. A witness is of more use, she'd seen a man hanging round in the street, possibly his name is O'Connor. At a fish and chip shop, Steele learns his first name is Tom, and lives with his dad. For a short while he'd worked at the shop , filleting fish, using knives like the one used in Sadie's attack.
Lynch questions Tom's belligerent father, who admits he'd had an argument that evening with his son and thrown Tom out. Then Steele spots the pathetic lad hanging round outside his home, so he's taken to the station where Robins turns on his interrogating method once more.
"I don't have a knife," Tom insists. He threw his away, he says. He had kept a knife to protect himself from his father. At the psychological moment, Robins shows him the knife, and some tough probing elicits Tom's confession. He never knew Sadie, it was a motiveless atttack brought on by that argument with his father. "Diminished responsibilty" seems the most likely verdict

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Big Catch
Watt disputes with Barlow whether this plant is a gloxinia, but of course Barlow is as ever right.
More serious business, the Olympic Tracer, a Norwegian whaling ship is docking, and sailors will have plenty of cash. Already leaving Lime Street station are plenty of what Smith and Weir describe as "bombshells", out for their pickings. One is the professional Gloria, but another is not one of them, Maggie, out to solve her own financial problems. She sets her sights on Nils.
Toddy the local publican is expecting trouble. It's a vibrant scene, but too protracted, arrests are bound to come soon.
Nils, now drunk, books a room, number seven, "no ladies allowed." But Maggie slips in and soothes him sending him to sleep, She is now free to steal his pay and savings, £500.
But Weir sees her coming back down the stairs and questions her. There's another punchup with local "mustard" agitator Big Dez and Nils, who has awoken to find his money gone, is caught up in it as well.
Weir can't find the cash on Maggie. Barlow takes it up, in the pub, and even sings Maggie May, a song about a girl who takes everything belonging to a whaler. He forces her to tell the gist of the story's theme. It's another overlong scene, "why don't you shut up?" My thoughts entirely.
Look in the Gents, suggests the all wise Barlow. Weir finds the money in a cistern. "You've got no proof," says Maggie, she's wise to that. Thus, though she receives the beady eye from Barlow, there's no charge can be brought against her.
Noisy, unsatisfying, seedy, here is authentic contemporary kitchen sink, or at least pub sink drama

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Friday Night

"It's going to be one of those nights," prophesies Sgt Twentyman, and by gum, this story is a right mix of comedy that sits uneasily with the tragic, almost tasteless to my way of thinking.
Bob Steele is extra grumpy tonight, compounded after his ZV2 partner Lynch has signed, off and Bob has to be sent to the scene of a road accident at Castle Crossroads.
In the staff canteen, Sgt Watt tears Twentyman off a strip for sending out one of His crime patrol officers to a traffic incident. Not his job. But Steele is having a tough time, no ambulance on the scene, he has to comfort dying moorcyclist Jim, knocked down by a drunken car driver (Garfield Morgan). Jim asks for Mary, his pillion passenger. She is dead and soon Jim is also.
Back at the station, an irritating Irishman, Granpa they call him (JG Devlin) asks Sgt Twentyman to put him in jail! He's so talkative that you can't blame Twentyman for suggesting Granpa "rob a gas meter, or blow the gas company." Granpa takes him at his word, and leaves his dabs all over the shop, once he has broken in.
Steele has to break the bad news to Jim and Mary's mother, en route picking up George, drunk. More serious news, the Comber gang have stolen a blue van FEF 799, which PC Jenny Stacey follows, as it drives erratically. Poor continuity here as a different van is seen on film, which brakes suddenly to cause Jenny to crash. However she is only shaken, not injured.
ZV2 see a chance for glory as they know the gang hide out at Kelso's Garage. Chief Supt Robins ateps in to round up the crooks.
Granpa's job has hit a slight snag, he's no matches with which to blow the safe! In a nearby pub, there's a long aside before he gets what he wants. But this is only after a pub brawl in which a placating Twentyman gets punched. Once he's come to, he kindly gives a match to Granpa.
"Eee, what a night," police staff reflect in the canteen, "blood, alcohol, tears." A typical Friday night, reflective of real life. Comedy returns as there's a loud explosion and everyone dashes off to find a dazed Granpa at the scene of his crime. "he gave me the matches," he explains poointing at poor Sgt Twentyman

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Suspended

John Wilson (Derek Francis), owner of The Cedars is attacked and robbed. He phones the police from next door, but has not returned home before the prompt ZV1 are on the scene. PC Jock Weir looks round the grounds while PC Fancy Smith investigates the deserted house.
The irascible Wilson returns to provide a list of the items stolen.
The thieves are Walter and Cappy (Rex Garner) who sell the goods for a pittance to pawnbroker Tommy Thwaite.
But one item is not on this haul, Wilson's gold watch, which was not one of the things taken at the time. Wilson alleges that Smith has stolen it.
Barlow is obliged to suspend Smith, and Weir, and despite the distastefulness, their homes must be searched, "they've found nowt." An angry Smith storms out of his house, with Watt and Barlow, and even Weir uncertain if he's guilty or not. That's the best theme in this story, characters' reactions to his possible guilt.
Watt is soon on to Thwaite, but no gold watch in the haul. It looks bad for Smith.
Despite protests from his girl friend Nelly (Angela Douglas), Smith angrily goes to The Cedars to confront Wilson, but Lynch gets there ahead of him. Inside Wilson's home, they think they see him with his watch, but on closer inspection, sadly it's not the same watch.
Walter and Cappy are robbing Fabian Road Secondary Modern School, a motley collection of clocks, woodwork tools and cups, but an alert constable gives chase and ZV2 stop the pair, not without a bit of banter. More stolen property is found in their home, but still no sign of the watch.
Watt is now convinced of Smith's innocence, so could Wilson be lying? That seems the most likely possibility.
But the truth does emerge and the police are exonerated, with a good final scene as Barlow abruptly concludes, "that settles that then." That's all, no apology, "Smith reflects, "if he'd just said sorry." Aye, lad, this were t' blunt North

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Found Abandoned (April 3rd 1962)
This could be another potential Wednesday Play, the baby screaming starts to grate after a while. A lighter touch is the running quest by green PC Sweet to discover what a Doll Trick is.

On a windswept rainy evening, Annie is awoken by a crying baby outside in the cold. Despite protests from her boyfriend Enoch, she brings in the little girl. ZV1 pick her up and thus she arrives at Newtown police station in the arms of Fancy Smith.
Asking round the local hospitals at first brings no luck, but off duty, Smith is persuaded by Insp Dunn to try again. This time a day nurse remembers the girl whose father had taken her out of the hospital to be cared for by his sister. Name of Toddy Edgar, who claims when questioned that his wife Fran had retaken the baby, "she's on the game." But he seems a shifty fellow himself.
Another case takes ZV1 to a railway warehouse but the crooks elude capture though the stolen property is recovered including two giant cheeses that Smith takes as trophies to the police station.
Patsy and Jock Weir, Jeanne and Fancy have a laugh over the incident at a pub where Fran is reputed to hang out. Toddy is waiting for her here too, threatening to kill her.
An informer Mousey tells Insp Dunn where the railway thivees are hiding. ZV1 keep surveillance on the place and lo, Toddy turns up. Fancy tails him to his home where he also finds Fran, "it was his idea." A lecture from Fancy followeth. He also kindly informs Annie that the baby's safe and well now

Of to Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


15 The Best Days

Lynch is offering Steele the chance to earn a bit of extra money, that is if he takes him as a lodger.
Nearby at Barry Wood Comprehensive, Ted's gang are breaking in to vandalise the school. Very unpleasant, even more so when they knock out the caretaker, Sawyer.
On his way home, one of the lads is stopped by ZV2. He gives the name Billy Walton. When questioned further he says he had been with Tommy Hesketh (David Cook) all evening. Of course he's not called Billy, though he does know Tommy as they go to the same school. The interest of the story lies in whether Tommy is part of the gang, even though he's the son of a policeman.
Tommy comes home after 11pm to a bit of a ticking off from mum who has been entertaining Mary Steele. Lynch is called to the school and calls for an ambulance. Inspector Barlow is soon there and asks the headmaster to check on missing property, which proves to be a tape recorder and record player. These the gang sell off to a dubious electrical shop owner Charlie Grove for a paltry £5.
Steele questions Tommy about Billy Walton, Tommy doesn't know him, he had spent the night at the Youth Centre, though Lynch later learns the boy hadn't been there. Tony's dad, PC Alan Hesketh, can't get anything out of his son. Barlow tries and fails too.
One of the gang, Jimmy, Ted's younger brother, is scared, and is off school. He's the lad who had given the name Billy. He has to join in the next break in, revenge on Mr Grove. Goods are nicked and Ted damages the premises.
But Grove doesn't dare complain to the police. Barlow has seen it all before and puts two and two together. He questions the boys at school, they use big words, the script not entirely convincing. Ted is taken to the police station. "Don't you ever work?" Barlow asks him scornfully.
This becomes a slightly interesting study in the policeman's son who has to mix at school with pupils with criminal tendencies. You do feel for him, is he one of the gang or not?
The breakthrough in this case is made by ZV2 when they see Jimmy alias Billy in the street. They also find Tommy who's had a nasty beating. Barlow now works his tricks on the gang, man against boys, only one winner. The younger betray them, "you stupid flaming nits," improbably cries Ted.
The story is rounded off with Tommy on the mend. "I'm putting in for a transfer," his dad admits wisely. Yet does he need to, Barlow asks perceptively.
Oh yes, we also note that Lynch is now happily staying with the Steeles

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

16 Invisible Enemy (April 17th 1962)
Another dark night, this one's windy also. On the eleventh floor of a depressing modern block of flats, the lift not working, Smith and Weir brush past a noisy crowd muttering about tearaways to reach an old frightened lady, Mrs Crawford. Burglars, she's all worked up, worried they'll come back. Nothing stolen except a shilling from the meter, though the best tea set has been smashed. "What's it all about?" asks a puzzled Smith, but he can get little sense from the distressed woman or her dithering husband.
Weir finds no trace of any intruder, but learns of one suspect, not a gang but a loner, Jack Nichol, a moody youngster who likes to sit on the roof by himself.
Patiently Smith pores over the case with the Crawfords and their neighbours. It's very slow going piecing together the gossip, and an alleged vendetta against the couple. The witnesses verge on caricatures, too cliched to be convincing. For example, one's an old maid Miss Sullivan. All this gossip becomes very tedious, the plot submerged under the woffle.
Smith questions young Jack, whose depressed manner is connected with the death of his girl friend six months back. He claims he'd been paid ten bob "for a giggle," should you still be interested in proceedings at all.
There being not much doing at the police station, Barlow and Watt come out to the scene of the crime. Even though it's now 1am, the unfortunate Sgt Twentyman is ordered to take everyone's fingerprints. Smithers, the fingerprint man (Ken Jones) adds a ray of humour into the dull night as he loses the vital evidence over the railings.
Suddenly what truth there is, breaks out. Barlow puts his finger on the vital missing piece of information. Who was Jack's girlfriend? Ah, it turns out she'd been related to one of those fascinating neighbours. Barlow makes his arrest, you feel he'd been playing the whole thing for mini-laughs up until the moment the suspect bursts into tears. I'd been buried in tears myself long before this

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Down and Out ((24 April 1962)
The title honestly describes this dour tale set one rainy night.
"Recognise them two?" Charlie MacManus and Joan Nelson, on probation. Their story is intertwined with that of Douglas Tully (Patrick McAlinney) who's "strong as an ox," and has been drinking heavily, barricaded in his room.
Lynch and Steele take an age to break in, and idly chat about ducks until they disarm him. However he tricks them, and locks them in as he gets away.
Charlie and Joan have broken into a pet shop where she once worked. The owner keeps his cash in the cellar, they take an age to find it, "there's hundreds!" They share it out on the spot. They also take a swig or three of the alcohol, "this is heaven!"
ZV2 have got free and circulated Tully's description, and are now scouring the streets for him. He's running round in the downpour, inarticulate, depressingly pathetic. He so happens to find the door of the pet shop open, and is so pleased to meet some friends, he talks to the birds. The thieves are trapped, worse follows when they fracture a gas pipe attempting to get out another way.
Det Sgt Crawford has just been made detective this very day. With Inspector Dunn, his first case is to arrest a drunken Irishmen clutching a birdcage. ZV2 find Charlie and Joan almost gassed in the cellar, the stolen notes proof enough of their intentions. The improbable becomes even more far fetched when the thieves take Steele and Lynch hostage in their own car, "drive to the dock." A knife at his throat, Steele has to obey.
But the car is crashed into that of Inspector Dunn and more arrests follow. Paying for the damaged car is down to who?

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Further Enquiries

ZV1 stop a white sports car driving without lights. Young Margaret Carson is the driver and cannot produce her licence. One of her two passenger friends Mike, resents the police intrusion and proposes they rob a friend, Sally Spencer, just for kicks, "it'll be marvellous," leading the police a merry dance.
Smith and Weir have moved on to assist a sailor (Milo O'Shea) who says his suit is missing. It's an attempt at comedy that falls flat. Mulalley's the name, and he has "good money" in cash on his person. The sailor uniform had come from a deserter.
The youngsters break in via a rear door, "simple," Mike in the lead, Margaret doubtful like Barry Hume (Keith Barron). Their fears are realised when the family return home unexpectedly. They run off, but Barry is stranded after he falls downstairs in his panic. Sandy recognises him and perceives it's "a gag," but as Barry won't answer his questions, Dr Spencer phones the police. Smith and Weir take down the details and question Barry, son of a local solicitor.
Things take a more sinister turn when Sandy finds her valuable necklace has gone, though even Dr Spencer remarks, "I'm sure they meant to give it back."
At the station, Watt has to tread carefully, with a solicitor on the scene, and Margaret's father is a general! The army man phones Barlow who's back at his home, to complain! Barlow is not amused at having to come down to the station in the middle of the night.
The two parents are trying to sort out their delinquent offspring's mess, but the story that is concocted isn't pat when Barlow steps in. "What are you cooking up, this time of morning?" Barlow sorts Margaret and Barry out, sending them home with the news, new to them, of the missing necklace. As Barry has remained silent, even his solicitor father can't get him to betray his so-called friends, he's the only one to be charged, but Maragret can't stand by, specially as Mike must have stolen the necklace.
Mike is caught. In court Mulalley, if you remember him, is fined £10, Hume is committed. Just about an end

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

People's Property
ZV1 are called to Brownson's warehouse, suspected break-in. Soon an army of police with dogs are swarming the building, and it is Watt who finally corners the intruders. They turn out to be two young lads, Jimmy Harris and Tommy Higgins.
The magistrate is unimpressed with the police overreaction, and places the pair on probation. Watt has to liaise with Mr Williamson, the boys' stern headmaster, who however is unable to prevent them taking unauthorised absence in the lunch break with their pals.
In Martin's Store, a customer is complaining her handbag containing £84 has been stolen. We see Tommy chucking it in the river, the cash being generously distributed in gifts to his friends.
ZV1 picks up Jimmy, and Watt questions him and he admits his guilt. Fancy and Jock feel some sympathy, recognising that they were a little like the tearaways when younger.
The pair are sent to a remand home, but all are full, so the lads have to be placed on bail. Instead of returning to school, they scarper. They steal a camera from one shop, then help themselves to a bike each. There's a long and somewhat tedious police search.
The pair are ejected from a bus bound for North Wales. They thumb a lift and alight in rural surroundings and climb a mountain. All this conveniently fills out the fifty minutes, at the end of which ZV1 catch up with them, "quite hopeless."
I'm not sure if this was supposed to be exciting, or a chance to show us some beautiful scenery, albeit on grainy 16mm film, but the juvenile's motives are never analysed, it's a sad commentary without a whiff of a solution

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

21 Hi-Jack! (May 22nd 1962)
A running minor story is the upcoming big boxing match. Everyone has tickets, Lynch won a couple in a raffle, only poor Barlow is without, and he can't get one anywhere.

ZV2 are enjoying a break at a transport cafe, where Bob Steele bumps into an old Malayan army buddy Les Fielding (Glyn Houston), now driving lorries. It is police business, when his vehicle full of 21inch tvs is stolen from outside the cafe. While Barlow and Insp Dunn try and work out "the modus operandi," ZV2 gives chase in vain.
The tvs are being hidden by the thieves in an old barn near the cafe, the abandoned lorry found elsewhere, "clean as a whistle." PC Sweet spots motor cycle tyre tracks which is about the only clue the frustrated Barlow gets.
While other lorries are also knocked off, one with corsets, Les has to go off sick with all the worry. Lorna, his wife, looks after him in their flat, which has got £100 of new furniture, thanks to Les' small win on the pools. Bob Steele is assigned, reluctantly, to check Les out, and so goes to see his old pal with Janey his wife. They chat obliquely about not ruining the good jobs they now hold, "I don't like it," Janey says quietly to her husband, who wants her to phone Barlow to get Les tailed. For Les has gone out, enabling Lorna to come a little fresh with the policeman.
Les has returned to the cafe, to tell the gang that he is worried Bob is on to him. After a punch up, the thieves are roudned up. "So much for wartime friendships," as Bob has had to do his duty as a policeman at the expense of an old mate. A shocked Lorna screams at Bob when she learns her husband is under arrest, it's a sad if well done scene as she shouts off camera, which is trained on Bob, "you filthy stinking copper"

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


Incident Reported
For me, the series was now running out of ideas, so how did it continue for so long?? Here's a tired old plot, in which most of the new characters never spring into life, perhaps there are just too many of them.
ZV1. Smith is bothered by sticky toffee paper, but more serious, Mrs King's complaint about rowdy neighbours the Carrons, a pram being thrown down the staircase in their flats.
Next port of call The Tabernacle pub, where Stan Carron is his usual belligerent self. Smith chucks him out and this nasty piece of work goes home in an evil frame of mind, and throws his wife's soup on the floor. He hits her and his grown up timid son Arthur, who runs away in a panic when Stan gets what he richly deserves. ZV1 size up the mess remarkably slowly, until Barlow and Watt take charge. Mrs Carron is in a daze, her husband dead.
Arthur has fled to the shop where his sister Vicky is working late. ZV1 find him hiding here while witnesses are interrogated by Barlow and Watt. The liveliest of these is Dad (Tony Quinn) whose vivid imagination is cut down to size by the brusque Barlow.
At the station, Barlow gets Arthur's version, "he was going to kill me," he had to stop his dad's fury. But Barlow isn't satisfied. He goes to the hospital and calmly informs Mrs Carron her husband is no more. "He'd've killed me," she responds weakly, and that's enough for Barlow. The truth is out.
Smith is depressed he hadn't arrested Carron in the pub, though perhaps he's not as depressed as us, since it is all so very depressing

To Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Contraband
Employees are emerging from the Sheer Stocking factory. As ZV1 admire the scenery, a lady cyclist is knocked over. Fancy Smith comforts the slightly injured Miss Stansfield (Helen Fraser), but Jock Weir notes a pile of new stockings in her handbag. Stolen. The manager of the factory would have pressed charges if ZV1 had not been so persuasive. She is getting married next week is no excuse, but the sack is sufficient punishment. Her sailor father is exceptionally grateful and promises to repay the policemen.
Another lady catches Smith's eye in a pub. She's called Pet, and her cousin offers Smith a £15 watch. But they get a tipoff from barman Terry who Smith is. And he's not so daft as he doesn't know they're working "some kind of racket." He's right, they are flogging off watches brought into the country for which no customs have been paid. Inspector Driver of the Customs is after this gang whose boss is Curry (Reginald Marsh), and Smith is able to point him, Barlow and Watt in the direction of this pub. But the tipoff has warned Pet away from here, and all the miffed Barlow can do is lean on the barman and confiscate his watch.
Smith is in the doghouse as his lead has failed, "I'll find 'em," he vows. He gets a break when a slightly inebriated Stansfield (Frederick Peisley) donates a bottle of whiskey to ZV1, plus a watch, "from a grateful father."
He says he bought it on board his ship, and ZV1 are instructed to keep surveillance on his ship the Forsythia. This seemingly thankless task is a kind of tit for tat from Barlow, but it proves a winner. Suspicious goings on, something taken from the ship and hidden in a recess. Bravely, Smith examines what has been concealed: tins full of watches. Stay put, orders Barlow, until the loot is collected.
An oarsman rows to the spot. He is caught red handed, though in the struggle both tip into the water, Poor Smith gets soaked. Barlow arrests the gang, but sadly Smith does not get the reward he was expecting
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Appearance in Court
The opening scene is really unrelated to the main story, except it introduces the magistrates court. Here William Ogilvie (Bill Simpson) is denying the charge brought by Bert Lynch, that he stole a bottle of milk from the dairy. "I put it back," he claims, defending himself. But with no witnesses, it is the policeman's word that is accepted.

Inspector Dunn investigates the theft of crates from Hardwick's lorries. Driver Ken Mannion is a suspect, even though his boss trusts him. We see that he is working a fiddle with Trevor Kiernan, who runs a "nice friendly shop," the description is PC Fancy Smith's. It sells at bargain prices.
He and Jock catch Ken removing the stolen crates from his shed, and tail him as he takes them to Kiernan. As Ken drives away, police give chase, but Ken eludes them. Later he is found dead in his shed, suicide.
Kiernan is caught and arrested in an unpleasant scene. In court his clever solicitor Garston ties poor Smith up in knots, with some clever-dick legal points, then turns on Weir, who is slyly accused of making "improper advances" to Mrs Kiernan. Unlike in the case we saw at the start, the police version is not accepted and the case is found "not proved."
Perhaps the inference is, the best legal brains can often wangle the case in your favour, it's not a very happy notion, and it is left to Inspector Dunn to offer a semi-reassuring epilogue

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Whizzers
A filmed sequence depicts some dubious characters outside a wrestling venue. Inside, in the studio, we watch a team of pickpockets at work. Fingers (Rex Garner) has nicked £90 from Ralph, and shares it out with his two mates (Michael Brennan and Harry Locke).
Weir and Smith are moaning to each other about being placed by Watt on Saturday night duty, when they are alerted to the theft of Ralph's wallet. They get a good description of the thief who is driving a white Mercedes. At a roundabout they spot the speeding car, "he's travelling." The driver, not the crook, is apprehended and after a slanging match escorted to the police station, where he lays a complaint about Weir's bad language. However he's clearly not the wanted man.
With an official report filed against Weir, Barlow investigates, learning about Weir's disgruntlement over his duty roster and the fact that he had been selected to play for the county on Wednesday.
The pickpockets have now robbed first a lady, then a gentleman in the men's lavatory. Their method is, one man distracts their target, the boss picks his pocket and hands it to the third man who scarpers. The Chief Fire Officer is their next victim.
Description fits the trio, but proving theft is another matter. Some legwork, and Watt traces the correct white Merc to a posh hotel, The Alpine. It belongs to Mr Davis, alias Fingers. The thieves' next scene of operations will be tonight's dog racing meeting, but Watt anticipates this as their likely venue.
Weir's disciplinary hearing sees him represented by Det Sgt Watt with PC William Smith as a witness. Watt's questions elicit the truth, proving there were some mitigating circumstances in Weir's favour. Though he is found guilty, he receives only a reprimand. Fingers is tailed as he drives to the dog track with his girl and two accomplices. At the nearby Station Arms a suitable victim is sought, and they find someone, actually undercover Fancy Smith. A bit of barging and Smith's wallet is snatched. Watt chases the getaway thief round the railway sidings, a rugby tackle felling the crook. Barlow arrests Fingers.
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Made for Each Other
This almost has the elements of The Wednesday Play with a momentarily scintillating performance from a young Judi Dench, but writer John Hopkins decides that as this is not the WP, he'd better not explore her character, but rather opts for the stock situation, though there's an interesting reflection on PC Fancy Smith's motivation in trying to help her.

Is there someone in this large empty house in Derwent Avenue? Weir and Smith nose around nearly missing the teenager who topples downstairs as she bids to get away. This "spitfire" Elena taunts them as they have difficulty getting her to respond sensibly. Down at the station Watt tries also, "I don't have a home to go to," she admits pathetically but proudly. Yes, this is the old teenage angst stuff, she's left home and her parents have disowned her.
A second police 'customer' is Kenneth Harvey (Peter Woodthorpe), a cyncial character charged with loitering with intent. As Watt can't get him to admit his guilt, in court next day the magistrate hears his case. Then it's Elena's turn, she's remanded for a probationary officer's report.
The house in Derwent Avenue is burgled.
Off duty in a swinging coffee bar, Fancy bumps into Elena, who is sporting a black eye. She's in unsavoury company, that of Harvey who warns Smith off, Weir interrupting the imminent punchup. The two policeman have a well done heart to heart in the deserted high street. But the incensed Fancy goes to Elena's parents to find out why they care so little for their daughter, "I don't care," affirms the mother, a brick wall is what Smith encounters. It's the old generation gap drama.
Watt has to severely reprimand Smith- that's for his scene at the coffee bar. Watt hasn't heard about the visit to Elena's ex-family yet! Smith has another task now, find Elena who has skipped probation. Of course she's with Harvey, she's acting as lookout while he robs another house. Weir and Smith spot her loafing outside, she runs off, they give chase. When caught, she spits on them. She's brought into the station just as her dad is leaving, having registered his complaint against Smith. Harvey is also arrested and faces a possible jail sentence. A rather contrite Elena pleads guilty, but the writer cops out of offering any ray of hope
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

A La Carte
Dave Graham and Herbert Lynch in ZV2 are checking out The Rose pub, but scarper when they see Barlow's Rover parked outside. Here's an upmarket pub, "no riff raff," run by Malcolm Wright (Leslie Dwyer) who treats his best customers to the cuisine of his chef Henry (Peter Sallis). Barlow asks to thank Henry personally, and recognises him, ex-Strangeways. Henry insists he is going straight, and their conversation, like much of the tale, is of the veiled typed, "don't underrate me, Mr Barlow." It is clear Barlow isn't only here for the food and drink.
Some "familiar faces" can be seen at The Rose, Barlow is suspicious of His Lordship, toff Peter Pennington, but his surveillance is exceptionally low key. Barlow leaves a message at the station to be collected at 11.15, since he is just slightly tiddly, nicely acted. ZV2 are given the unenviable job, but on the way to the pub stop Pennington for dangerous driving. Then Dave drives Barlow's vehicle, while Barlow is driven by Lynch in ZV2, via the outside of Pennington Hall, to his own home.
Newly promoted Jack Elliot (John Thaw) has checked on Pennington. idle rich he is. Elliot is assigned to sit and watch in the pub, nice work if you can get it.
Nobody knows, not even Watt, what Barlow is up to, recovering stolen goods seems the most likely guess.
At long last Barlow makes a move. He drops in on Pennington in his mansion, and is strongly rebuffed. The unpleasant cocky Pennington doesn't even believe Barlow is a copper. Exit Barlow, embarrassed, round one to His Lordship.
Elliot spots the same faces at The Rose next evening. PC Sweet who is with him, is sure he recognises one of them as a villain. He is driven to the station to look at the mugshots- he has to be driven as he's had five creme de menthes. Meantime, Henry tips Elliot off that one of them is a crook, Cecil Canfield. Barlow and Watt raid the pub. "Turn out your pockets." If Pennington refuses, he's made to show what he has. Stolen diamonds are in his possession. Game set and match to Barlow.
Poor Terry is seen leaving The Rose. He had to resign, but he's found another job at The Anchor
To
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Tuesday Afternoon
One of the better observed character studies by some distance.

"You expect to see women out shopping... but men...! You'd think they'd be working." Those were the days when full employment meant most men were never seen in towns in daylight hours during the week. In this script by Alan Plater, Eric Barker gives a fine bitter-sweet portrait of a man on the dole, with pride yet without money.
Shopkeeper Mrs Marshall has called in PC Fancy Smith as 3s 7d worth of gobstoppers have gone missing. He solves that one, no problem. A more serious complaint is from Mr Farmer, a builder, who has lost some bricks, three thousand of them.
Then there's that bowler hatted gent pushing a pram, Pawson, he's also a shoplifter. He nicks a small toy car as a present for his grandson, but is caught. "Don't go soft on him, John," the hard Barlow warns Watt. Pawson offers no excuse, it's just that he couldn't afford to buy the car as he has been made redundant. He's very honest about his fall from grace. Various of the police reflect on his sad case, and the rights and wrongs of it, "they're charging him."
A more nasty piece of work is the driver of a sports car, caught speeding, who rubs Fancy up the wrong way. This driver then knocks over a cyclist, Finch (Jimmy Gardner) an estate agent, "a funny feller."
These strands come together when we hear Pawson's daughter is buying a house on this estate that Farmer is building. Finch has sold her a house as part of a scam. For estate agent Davies explains the houses are priced at £5,000, but Finch is selling them cut price for a small deposit. Barlow and Watt have soon rounded him up and with Fancy getting his man too, the sports car driver, there's a busy day in court the following Tuesday

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

102 Happy Families
Mrs Sargent (Betty McDowall) has locked her young son Reg in his room, because he has got hold of some pictures. She calls in the police, and PC Fancy Smith gently questions the timid lad who explains he was given them at school, and finally he gives a name, Tommy Shields. It's left to John Watt to "sort it out," though his mind is on sorting out his own marital problems. The result is that it is Smith and Weir who are sent to question Tommy about these "filthy" photos. He says he got them from Larry.
John Watt is, according to Smith at least, "chasing a bird," though it's actually his wife, who tired of being a police widow, had left him. "Will you come back?" he asks her. However he does admit he just cannot quit his job, "it's important." But, turning more into Wednesday Play verite, she admits she's pregnant and is going to leave him for good.
Now the police have caught up with Larry, who is much more amused by the whole affair than the other two lads. He counter claims that it was Tommy Shields who had been passing the photos round.
News comes that young Reg has run away friom home. The search begins. Barlow questions Tommy's rather creepy dad (Joss Ackland) in his home with his wife. They are entertaining a friend, Mrs Ann Guest (Catherine Woodville), whom Barlow recognises, yes she's the woman in the pictures. Smith and Weir are assigned to keep watch on her house.
Inside, realising the game is up, she is confessing all to her husband Alan. They'd taken these "good" photos of her, then got her to pose "with nothing on," Alan storms out before she can complete the saga.
John Watt's little chat is likewise interrupted by a call from Inspector Barlow. They question Ann, "it began as a joke," she confesses. The detectives return to the Shields' home, armed with a search warrant.
Tommy admits he had found these pictures and passed them round at school. The remainder he had hidden in the gang's den, and it is here that Reg is found by Weir and Smith. Reg has another heart to heart with Smith to round off the unhappy tale.
Alan smashes up all the photographic equipment at the Shields. A coda sees Watt admit to Barlow that he is getting divorced
Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

115 A Place of Safety
The opening depicts a rough block of flats where a man tumbles down a flight of battered stairs. He's a baliff, calling on a black man, who promptly barricades himself and his wife and two children in his room.
ZV1 are on patrol in this run down district. The injured man is being treated by ambulancemen as Fancy Smith questions the residents, all of whom have nothing to say. However it is learned that he was named Wallace and was delivering an order against a Mr Sadik (Johnny Sekka), in flat number 13, "he's in there."
Smith and Weir are about to break down his door, when Barlow barges in to take charge. His method is more subtle but rather smacks of the cunning of the serpent as he surrounds the place in the best tradition, then talks frankly through the closed door to Sadik. The frightened man, axe in hand, listens silently, Barlow convincing him he's alone. Cautiously Sadik opens his door and police jump on him.
He's taken off and Barlow accompanies Mrs Sadik to the station too. Here Watt questions the suspect, Sadik admitting he was in the wrong even though Wallace had taunted him. Now the story develops along familiar lines, exploring the racial implications. Mrs Sadik finds herself locked out of her flat while it is clear Wallace was a racial bigot, but are the police also?
The root of their problems had been Mrs Sadik buying too many items on the hp, but now she's on the pavement with her two children, where ZV1 find her being bullied by some unpleasant whites. Smith clears them off then attempts to persuade Sadik's landlady to let the family back in. But she stands up to him so the family are taken back to the station where Watt organises some lodgings. The children however have to be separated from their mother against her wishes.
Watt has had to harden his heart, and Barlow does likewise, so that noone, least of all the children are at all satisfied. The story ends with only realistic observations, no more, no less, indeed no hope

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

135 I Love You Bonzo
A robbery at a supermarket, Super Shops. £350 stolen from the cash register, not a proper safe, "bit funny." The newly promoted Lynch investigates, Smith prompts him into sharing his belief that store manager Cassidy is the guilty party. As there seems no evidence of any break-in, Unsworth the general manager (Reginald Marsh) sacks Cassidy, even though Lynch has no evidence.
A down and out Brian (George A Cooper) guesses that his old partner in crime Arthur dunnit. At the Texas Club there's some rough stuff as Brian faces Arthur with, "how did you get in?" A fiver secures Brian's silence, but not for long as five pounds of drink loosens his tongue.
Sgt Blackitt questions the recovering drunk next morning and learns of Brian's suspicion. Lynch, who has arrested Cassidy despite the lack of proof, is tipped off and chats himself with Brian. Barlow wises Lynch up to the mistakes he has already made, and sends him back to the supermarket to check the premises more thoroughly. Smith this time finds that a door had been forced.
Arthur is on to his next job. After casing another shop, he pounces. he's some sort of weirdo, as he talks to a photo of his dog as he cracks the safe. This proves tougher than he expects and so tired is he after stealing the cash that he lies down on the job, literally in the shop, and improbably falls asleep. Hard to imagine that isn't it? Lynch is asleep too at the police station, worried about his treatment of poor Cassidy.
Arthur wakes up in the morning light, and the sight of a suspected criminal around at that time of morning is enough for Smith to arrest him

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Brotherly Love

This is the first time that Thomas Martin (Philip Latham) has been to a police station, and he's here to confess that he has stolen five pounds seventeen shillings and sixpence from St John's Church. "I've never done it before." He's a churchwarden, responsible for the collection, and he had given away the money to causes he deems worthy, all in protest against the vicar Rev Corbett (Francis Matthews). Is he trying to use the police in his religious dispute? Barlow leaves the case in Watt's hands, he, frustrated, interviews the vicar.
According to the mild mannered Corbett, Martin holds the old fashioned idea that it's sinful to have a good time, "he doesn't altogether approve of people enjoying themselves." Here are typical religious stereotypes so popular with writers of the era, with a basis in fact, but used too frequently to convince. The current modernist cleric and the old fuddy duddy. The vicar probes Martin's motives, Watt, more matter of fact, misses a vital thread.
Martin is given a conditional discharge by the court. And the religious theme largely and thankfully dies away as ZV2 investigate an obscene phone call. A Mr Reynolds has been on the receiving end, being labelled "a dirty old man." However it seems the caller had hung up when she realised she'd dialled the wrong number! As she'd called him vicar, and Corbett's number is almost identical, it's easy to guess the rest.
Corbett admits he has had several such calls, and he knows who it is, but won't give her away. Turning the other cheek is his noble motive and Barlow deals with the matter with unusual tact. But he must know the name. It's Mrs West (Carmel McSharry), ex-parishioner. ZV2 go to her house and take her down to the station.
She evades Barlow's questions and it takes all his skill to induce her admittance of guilt. By outlining a possible scenario on the basis of what Corbett reveals, we reach a not pretty denouement.
Oh dear, that Thomas Martin is back at the station, with more and more revelations, hard for us to swallow them all, but the bottom line is he's her estranged brother. It's none too interesting, and eminently frustrating. Amen, concludes Watt cornily, a rare off day for that fine writer Alan Plater

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Matter of Give and Take
A grimy industrial canal is being dredged. Smith and Weir, ZV1, help a man with a twisted ankle, young vandals had caused him to trip in a pothole. Smith chases one of them and loses his hat in the water, leading to a running gag through the story.
Canal Superintendent Briggs (John Arnatt) complains to Sgt Watt about the persistent hooliganism in the vicinity of the canal. He demands police patrol the area more frequently.
That night, lock keeper Towser whose eyes are "like a hawk's," proves himself maybe a little too old for his job when he spots a thief at Ted Stone's barge, but can't catch him. ZV2 and Bert Lynch question him and he's so confused there's doubt if there even was any thief. "Don't you believe me?" The police are sceptical. It's a fine portrait of a muddled old man by that master actor Wilfrid Lawson.
Ted Stone claims nothing has been stolen, his barge only carries coal. Watt, under pressure from Briggs can make no progress, Lynch has a little more success, but the canal folk are so suspicious of strangers.
Fancy Smith gets a break when he sees the lad who caused his hat to tip in the canal and catches him. As he'd been playing with an air rifle, he is pressurised into giving a statement, he saw the theft, the thief is Tandy, a mate of Stone. It has all the hallmarks of smuggling, so watch is kept for the next time Stone comes through the lock.
Towser, who had been frightened off identifying Tandy, watches Stone's barge moor at the lock. Lynch is nearby. As is Watt and a customs officer, though Briggs is excluded much to his annoyance "by heck."
Towser is beaten up. But the consignment of cheap smuggled watches are confiscated, the gang apprehended, or rather, "you're nicked"

To the Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Lot of Fuss For Fifteen Quid
At a coach station, a woman with a young boy walks off with the contents of a passenger's handbag. Police trace a taxi driver who had dropped them off in the high street. The suspect is Sheila Ashton (Sheila Allen), who is seen the very next day in the vicinity with her nephew Ronnie. She catches a bus and PC Quilley follows her when she alights, to a property in Balaclava Road.
Sgt Tom Stone calls here and takes her off to the station, kicking and screaming because she's been separated from Ronnie.
By concentrating on her sad relationship with the lad, you have some sympathy for her impoverishment, "a nice handful."
A sub plot is "blue eyed boy" Quilley's possible promotion if he handles the case well. Inspector Goss questions Sheila. Quilley watches and listens, and learns. Ronnie is apparently actually her son, the father had run off, Ronnie placed in an orphanage while she went inside.
After a struggle of conscience, Mrs Doris Gibbs, the lady robbed of the £15, decides she cannot identify Sheila, "'twere only fifteen quid." Perhpas she is sorry for Sheila. But the police cannot be sentimental, so Goss and Stone persuade the lad to admit his mother is a thief. "He'll go into care," the disturbed Quilley is informed. It's a sad end, when Sheila is also told this

To the Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Relative Values
Amid moaning about police pay, there's a suicide to be investigated in Larkspur Road, home of Mr and Mrs Martin. "Nobody's fault," a note indicates they were worried about their high electricity bill. Sgt Stone tears off the electricity company representative- the bill was "deliberately inflated"- or was it?
Another elderly couple are Alice and George (Bert Palmer). To solve their financial worries, he's decided to revert to the bad habits of his youth- he is breaking into the local post office, and bashing in the safe. Sgt Stone investigates the theft of £150, strangely more was in the safe, yet it was not taken. But that's all George requires to buy a big bouquet for Alice's birthday and a promise of a short honeymoon.
But his antiquated method of "treacle and brown paper" is a useful clue for the bemused Sgt Stone. While recently divorced Sgt Skinner wines and dines his girl, Alice and George hold a party for two, the contrast is a bit too manufactured. Skinner proposes, "I've never met anybody like you before." George also proposes, as they are 'living in sin.' It's all quite sad, nearly well done.
But when Alice learns the source of George's new found wealth, she escorts him to the police station, "he's come to confess." Stone speculates nicely with George on the possible penalty he will face

To the Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Breakage
Wandering down a street is a semi-innocent Scotsman George T Wood (Fulton Mackay). "I've been robbed," he informs Jim who is watching a semi-riot in the aftermath of a wedding. Jim offers to take him to the station, but is delayed en route by a suspected intruder at a factory. However nothing suspicious, so Jim returns to the station to question George over his missing £37.40p.
The watchman at the factory phones again stating there really is an intruder. He is on the roof threatening to jump. Poor George has to be left unattended, and tired of waiting he leaves, "I don't blame him either." Nor do I.
Jim opens a dialogue with the man on the roof, a sad case. But meanwhile, George, ambling down the street is thought to be "acting suspiciously," and is brought in for questioning. After apologies to him, Det Sgt Miller takes up his complaint of theft. It's a simple job, for it happened at a doss house. It's run by Rupert and Miller orders him in a roundabout way to return George's cash. He does, case solved, never opened in fact.
At the factory there's a philosophy on suicide, and discussion whether he really intends to jump. After "a bit of a giggle" it turns serious and one copper falls and is badly injured in a rescue attempt, "it shouldn't have happened this way." Perhaps the writer was trying to make some point about police attitudes, but what happens to that man on the roof we never learn, for there's not enough time. Surprising really, since both parts of these 25 minute stories contain more than enough padding, an example of how to spin out a story to at least twice its real duration

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Damage (October 1972)
(Production number 497 on clapper, though it's 667)
A mysterious opening, as an intruder finds his hand trapped in a letter box as he attempts a break-in. Inside, a woman silently ties up his hand as he utters his protests. He promises to go away if she'll release him, "it was weird." The string which holds his hand, she sets light to. In pain he scuttles away at last.
He's Terry Moon, and the police spot him running along Davemport Road in the darkness. As he has a record, he's taken to the station, where Det Sgt Stone and Sgt Lynch can't get him to even explain the burns on his hand, "the sort of person who does this sort of thing worries me," admits Stone. It's good to see Stone pursue Case, like a dog after a bone.
Though it is 2am police knock up some locals in the area who are still burning a light. One sleepless lady had heard a man running along the road, but no more.
Terry does admit he had been trying to burgle a house but won't say where, for fear of prosecution. A doctor examines his injuries.
Patient detective work locates the house, 17 The Close. Several times, we have been shown the odd woman pacing noiselessly inside. Now, like a spider, she listens, as police search outside. Stone learns that Mr and Mrs Armstrong are the owners, but are on holiday. They have no children, for their only daughter emigrated twenty years ago. Back into Stone's memory comes the case of a young woman who about that time had tied up her still born child with string.
PCs Skinner and Yates effect an entry and try to communicate with her. She herself says nothing. "I don't like this." She is taken away, the whole sad story is related by her parents, not a happy conversation. Today the story would have moved at a much faster pace, expanded with graphic scenes and flashbacks, this is so low key

to Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Day Trip
Sgt Haggar gets a shock when he's told to move his car on, by "Dracula's mother-in-law," traffic warden Mary. We see snatches of her life and work intermixed with Haggar's surveillance of that important hub of Newtown, the bus station. A double decker terminates, and of the passengers disgorging, Haggar picks out Dilly Watson, a thief and "she's very good at it." Thanks to him, she'd done a two year stretch, but now he treats her to a cup of tea at the cafe with the warning, "don't do it." He sees her off on the 43 bus back to Seaport, but not unexpectedly we see her alight soon after to make for a block of flats and Rose.
The pair embark on a shoplifting spree, and after a successful morning Rose hides the stolen goods as Dilly goes off on her own. She wants to buy, not steal, a present for her child. But Geordie Joe spots her and tips Haggar who treats Dilly to another cuppa and politely searches her baggage. She's clean so she is allowed to go.
But fed up with his pestering, she resolves to pay him out. She picks a quiet suburban house, evidently empty, which she robs of jewellery and a couple of pink pillowslips which she likes the look of. However the owner returns, and Dilly has to think quickly, locking the owner in her bedroom before slipping away.
After bidding Rose farewell, Dilly bumps into Mary, an old pal and they enjoy a drink. Mary decides to shop her late friend and this time Haggar's search proves Dilly's downfall.
"Why pillow cases?" he asks. They were for her kid. A fine character study of a hardened petty thief

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Incitement (1975)
"She's got more angles than a distortin' mirror, that's the main character, "looker" Yvonne.
She's married to the laid back Dennis, a minor villain, but she's tired of him and wants to have it off with Johnny Pearson. Newtown police ponder her motive as she offers to shop her husband. She meets Geordie Skinner and Inspector Lynch at a pub, "it's going to be tonight." The target, a sub post office.
But Dennis is unfortunately having second thoughts. Maybe he can fathom his wife better than she thinks. He confides his doubts to his boss, who happens to be Johnny. He of course relays all this to her. They all do the soul searching bit, both villains and police for far too long.
The inevitable happens, Dennis is talked into doing the job. For their part, the police start grilling Yvonne what she doesn't know. it's too drawn out.
At last we get to the wretched robbery which turns out a complete damp squib. Johnny drops Dennis at the post office, "looks promising." However Dennis isn't as daft as he seems for while Johnny isn't looking he disables the car. "That's odd," from the police who are watching and waiting to pounce. Dennis moves to the shop entrance and as he breaks in Lynch strikes, the action's all over. For Johnny's cue is to zoom away but as he cannot, he is arrested too.
Now there iare some more tedious interviews with the criminals, some clever cross questioning makes Dennis and then Johnny realise they have done each other. As for Yvonne, she is informed of the double arrest, Inspector Lynch quite enjoys that task.
"Muggins" Dennis can't quite get it down that his own wife shopped him. She faces a charge of incitement. All rather C movie material

to Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Woman's Place
Very typical for its time, the focus is on WPC Jane Beck, in her "black stockings." She asks Insp Lynch if she can further her career with less boring tasks, like going out on patrol. "It's too risky," is the response, but her persistence wins Lynch round, and she is given a one night trial alongside the less than enthusiastic Alec Quilley. Doing this on a Saturday night implies a lack of judgement somewhere!`
Jane has been counselling Mary, whose husband this night is involved in an attack on PC Fred Render at a bus station. At Mary's house, Jane has a few eye openers. Mary had been planning to leave her husband. The husband is found hiding in a bedroom and he makes her listen to "his side" of the story. Mary may not have revealed all the facts about her stress and depression, but he is outnumbered, "you women always stick together."
Police surround the house, a mini-siege, Lynch prepares for a stand-off. But there's a struggle inside, Jane is facing a terrible fate before Mary intervenes, and police swoop in to make their arrest

Z Cars Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Softly Softly (1966-1976)
A Z Cars spin-off, Barlow and Watt the big names to be transferred.
When Barlow left for Thamesmead in 1969, the series was redesignated
Softly Softly Task Force.
A total of 269 stories were made.

1.13 A to Z
2.5 Sleeping Dogs
2.7 Find the Lady
3.9 The Hunt
3.12 The Bombay Doctor
3.21 Unfinished Business
4.1 Theory
4.5 Take Them in Singles
4.6 Red Herring
4.7 Five Pair O' Hands
4.9 An Old Song
4.11 For a Rainy Day
4.12 Assistance
4.13 Equal Status
4.15 Going Quietly
4.16 On Christmas Day in the Morning
4.17 Departing
4.18 Cross Reference
4.19 Run for the Hills
4.20 Pressure
4.21 A Quantity of Gelignite
4.22 Critical Path
4.23 Persistence
4.24 Second Chance
4.25 How's the Wife, Then?
4.26 Right to Search
4.27 Proved Connection
5.1 Recovery
5.4 Error of Judgement
5.5 Dead Aboard

TASK FORCE: 1.1 Arrival
1.2 Exercise
1.3 Diversion
1.4 The Spoilt Ones
1.5 To Protect the Innocent
1.6 Any Other Night
1.7 The Aggro Boy
1.8 Standing Orders
1.9 Private Mischief
1.10 Open and Shut
1.11 Sprats and Mackerels
1.12 Like Any Other Friday
1.13 Power of the Press
1.14 Trust a Woman
1.15 The Hermit
1.16 Escort
5.3 A Quiet Man
5.4 No Way
5.6 27 Pieces of Porcelain
5.7 Night-Watch
5.8 Catch as Catch Can
5.10 Interrogation
5.12 Trial
5.13 Skipper's Walk
5.14 Cover
5.16 Trouble-Maker
5.17 The Raider
To Taped Crime Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

"A to Z"
Has Barlow cracked up? He's muttering to himself. In fact he is trying to recall a face he'd seen last night. A villain from his days in Salford. Got it- Race, that's the name.
Race (Richard Carpenter) is tailed, "not quite sure what he's up to yet." You could say the script too takes a delight in keeping us guessing.
We meet Ben Snow (Peter Copley), a salesman, who before going home to his sickly wife, takes an hour's pleasure with a shady lady. She's part of Race's frame, for Race follows Snow after his fun as he drives to his respectable home. "Repent," Race advises Snow as he leaves, tongue in cheek.
As his time of passion has been tape recorded, Snow returns to find the machine, smashing up the woman's room. He makes such a row, police are summoned. Though they get there too late, his numberplate AWK843B has been noted.
Race phones Snow from Temple Meads station. He has the tape which he plays to his victim. "What do you want?" Simple, money.
But Snow is arrested for causing a disturbance, but he won't talk about anything to do with the blackmail. Race is arrested also, but is confident there's no evidence against him. However when the tape is found, it gets the truth from Snow, worried Mrs Snow might hear its contents

To Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Sleeping Dogs
Sunday afternoon, all is quiet. Discussion of the Villa match with the topical line, "footballers get paid too much!"
But on rural Pelham Rise there's heavy breathing. Robins is beaten up.
Monday morning, and Watt sends Det Constable Reg Dwyer to interview the victim. He's evasive, as is his protective wife. Dwyer notes he is Jewish. The policeman links this attack with the smashing of two shop windows, also belonging to Jews. Dwyer's motives seem not entirely related to his job, the issue of involvement of policemen is touched on, mixed in with banter at the station.
There are the usual soapbox speeches next Sunday at Pelham Rise. Dwyer watches on. Home Rule for Great Britain, urges Arthur Bannister (Ewan Hooper). Back at his home, he confides in Dwyer in a fairly serious discussion. "Words and actions," are his aims, "the movement's gaining in strength." His photos of Nazis tell their own tale, "we mustn't fail again."
Dwyer informs Watt. Entrapment is what Dwyer urges. But the wiser Watt can't contemplate making martyrs of these fascists. "The revolution is nearer than you think."
Yet Watt does have his own methods, in a final scene at Bannister's house. A warning. This interspersed with more heavy breathing at Pelham Rise, "it's warfare."
Far too laboured.

Note- Though the setting for this series was supposed to be the Bristol area, we see railway tracks that can only be from the Southern Railway, London area!
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Find the Lady
Release day for Frankie Amber (Victor Maddern). Once outside, he is met by Sadie Jarvis (Pauline Yates). That night he joins his mate Jim Kennedy, and his gang who had nicked £6,000, the job for which Frank had been convicted. They are soon busy cracking another safe, and then sharing out the proceeds. But Frank wants to know what came of his share of the previous robbery.
Barlow is not amused. He had detailed Hawkins to keep watch on Frank, who had missed it all. They pull in gang member Terry Fletcher for questioning. Once this villain is allowed to go, he is tailed. He drives straight to Sadie.
Frank finds it hard to believe Jim does not know what became of that £6,000. Sadie must have it! She is trying to get away, Fletcher however refuses to offer her any help. Frank and Jim find she has gone, and ransack her flat, wild with fury. Fletcher is found and beaten up, "where's the money... where's Sadie?"
A battered Fletcher goes to the station, asking to see Barlow. He knows what happened to the money.
Sadie is waiting for a train when Jim and Frank spot her at the station. But as they race to get her, Hawkins arrives. She is taken to Barlow. But she refuses to squeal. She is kept in police custody, but somehow is able to run off, no credit again to Hawkins. She returns to her flat where Frank is sure waiting for her. However Hawkins redeems himself by racing there in time to nick Frank

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Hunt (December 6th 1967)

Wanted, James Robert Perkins, for questioning following the shooting of a commissionaire at a jewellers. There's a tip off from a phone box- he's still in the district, "he's got connections."
He had been lodging in a remote farm, taking advantage of the very simple family, specially their wayward daughter Ethel, who had run away from home.
Barlow deploys a helicopter to keep surveillance on the farm, only annoyed he's prevented by the pilot from going up himself. Into the farmhouse burst the police, to find no sign of Perkins.
Barlow questions Ethel, even giving her a fag, which prompts her to tell him about the cave in The Gorge where Jim used to take her younger sister, the very impressionable Annie.
Barlow at last gets himself airborne, as the net closes in on the cave. But it's empty too, though there are signs of occupation. An increasingly airsick Barlow moves his force in to capture Perkins. The long filmed sequences all look like an excuse to pay for the helicopter hire

To Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Bombay Doctor

What is George Milton (George Sewell) doing at the house of fifteen year old Janice, who is alone at home? The answer is he's brought Christmas presents for her and her mother, who he has never got round to marrying him. Some stilted dialogue introduces this background, then he kisses the young girl. That's the unfortunate moment her mother returns, but she seems not to notice.
He meets up with Janice later in the street, and asks her to wait while he gets some cash. He's an informer and gives the lowdown on Gentleman Jim Cassidy who is planning a robbery.
When informed, Barlow is dressed as Santa Claus and orders surveillance on Cassidy, waiting for the tip off as to when the crime will take place.
The cash is of course for ex-prisoner George who is seen going off with Janice by a neighbour. She tells Janice's mother, who tells the police. They seem struck by seasonal blindness and do not understand that the normally reliable George has been spinning a story to get the money.
It is Christmas Day. The couple have booked into a Weston hotel as father and daughter. There's a lot of talk and their actions are not father and daughter, this is not smutty exactly, but not salubrious either.
At least George is an informer with a conscience, and his tip off seems good. After more inconsequential dialogue twixt George and Janice, he leaves her behind at the hotel, and tells police where she is.
It's now Boxing Day and Cassidy is tailed by Watts and his men as he goes out on his job- with his wife. Down the A38 in a hire car. The police take a long time to cotton on. Cassidy is at the airport when he is cornered. He's flying to Paris.
"Job's off." If it were ever on.
Janice is back home. "I love George" she cries in her hysterics. "He's left you," is the hard reply. All very unChristmassy and leaves a bad taste, Christmas kitchen sink with all the leftovers swilling in the bottom of the bowl.
But the ending contains a touch of class. Barlow quotes from the good book, the bit about King Herod's nasty part in the Christmas tale. Yes, that was appropriate

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Red Herring

Why should anyone want to break into Crakewell Linings? Nothing stolen. As the place includes a research section, maybe that's the motive.
Watt is required to investigate, "not our cup o' tea." He thinks politics might be behind it, Gilbert disagrees, believing sabotage might be being planned.
Watt interviews the officious nightwatchman Jim Henderson, who had once been part of the research team, but failing eyesight meant he is reduced to this work. Ken Jones places the bitter Commie with a touch of humour.
Next night a second hole is made in the perimeter fencing. Watt summons reinforcements and a dog, while Henderson calls Dodds, the securitty officer at the firm. The dog snoops round, and tackles poor Henderson!
Watt's idea that the firm also employ a watchdog is rejected by Henderson. Gilbert suggests the man ought to be replaced.
Next night, another hole! Henderson takes "a nasty knock" and is unable to describe the intruders at all well, "a very incoherent story." Watt has to issue "a formal caution," after Henderson threatens him. Sgt Box comes out with the obvious question, why did you do it- to Henderson. "I deny it." His motives are clear. "How do you always know?" groans the Commie.
In the end, this is a molehill not a mountain, but an entertaining little molehill

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Five Pair O' Hands

A pedestrian story, no scenes at the police station. Some of the filmed sequences have intrusive background sounds.
Edward (Tommy Godfrey) runs a shoplifting racket with his wife Betty, and daughter Eva, along with his other daughter Rita and her man Harry. Out shopping, they create a simple diversion, and walk off with a £750 mink coat. The coat is sold for £200.
Barlow spots a pattern to these thefts from large stores, the same place is never robbed twice. He sends two detectives, Allin and Gigby, to interview store detectives, while he noses around, learning the gang dispose of their loot in London.
One store assistant describes the two women in the gang, who are now casing their next shop. Barlow works out that his likeliest suspects are Betty and her family, for she has a history of shoplifting. But she is nowhere to be found. Actually the whole gang are living in some style in a hotel.
The store is robbed. Edward nicks jewellery when a distraction is created. Eva grabs a coat.
In his Jag, Barlow swoops on the store. Too late of course. The gang are planning a nice holiday when Barlow shows up at the hotel, after Digby spots Harry in the restaurant.
"Get lost," Harry snaps at Barlow, as well as "get stuffed." He's apprehended, the rest of the gang try and do a runner. But police are waiting, although Edward zooms off in his Rover, only to crash fatally

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

For a Rainy Day

Trouble at Margo's Club, Abel Jackson and his heavies muscle in, putting the frighteners on. Joe Breem, the elderly owner, had taught Jackson and his boss Tommy Ford all they know, none of it very salubrious.
Watt and Harry Hawkins are keeping a watching brief on their civil war, though the less experienced Harry would like to pull them in now.
Abel is run down. Two eyewitnesses identify Joe as the driver, though he denies it of course. He gets six years.
Tommy is pursuing Margo, with a view to running the club with her, but she is loyal to old Joe. She goes to a bank, and opens an envelope containing Joe's sealed instructions. She finds them amusing. She fixes a deal with Tommy.
Watts receives a shock when a Mr Gibbs informs him that he had nicked Joe's car that night, and it was he who had run down Abel accidentally. The eyewitness are confused when they attend another ID parade. "It's a fix," declares wise old Watt.
Of course he is right, but Joe has to be released. He knows where to find Tommy, at the club chatting up Margo, and while he is there, Joe's men nick the considerbale cash Tommy has stashed away in his safe at his home. Tommy is nicked, but so too Joe is renicked as it were. The Fraud Squad have caught up with his shady dealings. Not a likeable villain in sight

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Assistance
Not a satisfying storyline. It seems likely that Barlow will be having a go at being in charge, since his boss Gilbert (John Barron) is likely to be called away to investigate a suspect neighbouring Chief Constable. The two have a long talk about Barlow's "elevation," in other words his ambitions.
Drafted in to help in Gilbert's absence is Arthur Jones (Glyn Houston), not an ideal choice, since John Watt might have been considered. But two of Watt's DCs have recently messed up one of Jones' cases.
Gilbert returns from the Home Office to confirm he will shortly be required to undertake the invidious investigation, "a wretched business." Barlow treats Gilbert to a slap up meal he has thoughtfully provided, as the pair enjoy a genteel and civilised musing, very slow and all.
Now Barlow is in charge, Jones and Watt clash with him over priorities. Jones' attitude is to "sort 'em out." Barlow is more subtle than that. Their first case is the murder of Millie. The story focuses on the politics of their helping the Wyvern County investigation. Watt's two unfortunate DCs do a lot of the groundwork, door to door questioning. As luck has it, they happen on Bernie, an old lag, and bring him in.
The trouble is the scene has not enough dramatic tension with what has gone before. Barlow and Watt explain their modus operandi to the sceptical Jones

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Going Quietly

The two main characters are introduced slowly. Ben Box is a detective, good at his job in his slow way: we see him sitting on a lonely railway station at night. After a fruitless wait, he leaves for home. His wife Janet has been waiting restless for his return.
Next morning, Ben fails to keep a routine appointment, he says he has been busy, but is very uncommunciative to Harry Hawkins about what he is up to. Next night, he is back at the station waiting. Ditto Janet.
Barlow and Watt are concerned about two unsolved post office jobs, is that what Ben is on to?
"I don't like mysterious errands," Watt wisely states.
Janet turns to Hawkins for advice, though he is unable to resassure her, as he is unaware of what Ben is investigating. However he does follow Ben when he drives next evening to the station. The pair chat on the platform. Though reticent, Ben claims he is hoping for a lead from someone called Jack, related to the post office jobs? It is evident Ben is suffering from low professional esteem, and after listening sympathetically for a while, Hawkins goes home, can't blame him, as for Ben he ought to have tried for The Wednesday Play. As it is, he consults a shrink, while Watt and Barlow discuss Ben's future, if any. All very sad, as Barbara from the Force is despatched to visit Ben, resting at home. After a long chat, Ben sees his way to packing it all in, the police job that is. He is happier and so is Janet

Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


"On Christmas Day in the Morning" (1968)

Watt's festive spirit is diminished when he's called to investigate a Christmas Eve theft of property worth £11,000 from guests at the Pentland Grange Hotel- "they came upon the midnight clear."
Other jolly seasonal references follow in a rather ordinary Alan Plater script, hardly special Christmas fare

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Departing
Det Supt Gilbert is returning (see 4.12) so Barlow is back to his old duties. In fact he needs a break, says Gilbert, and is ordered to take some leave.
On Watts' orders, "young Digby" (Shay Gorman) is working undercover at a motorway construction site, where machinery has been going missing. He has made a mate of Paddy and in a cafe they chat up "a bint," actually Sgt Allin undercover also. She passes info on to Sgt Harry Hawkins.
Watt is on Gilbert's carpet for arranging the operation without the knowledge of Arthur Jones. The team must work together. Accordingly Jones briefs the team, or more correctly Watt does. Digby has been invited to help remove three bulldozers this weekend, so the team are deployed on watch. During this briefing, news comes that the plane on which Barlow was flying has gone missing. Thus the rest of the operation contains much speculation on who might succeed Barlow, as well as reflections on his character, "I didn't like him much."
A transporter is seen driving to the motorway site. One dozer is loaded, and driven off towards Wyvern. The destination is a plant hire company. The transporter returns for a second cargo, but unfortunately Harry Hawkins is spotted as he watches from a lorry. Digby feels he has to shout a warning to Harry and the operation is blown. "A real fight" is joined by the "bint" and the thieves are arrested. However the top men elude the police. Reflection on whether Digby was right to call out or not.
Good news, to finish. Barlow is safe. I think it was good news

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

How's The Wife, Then?
Watt is considering marriage to Jean.
He's got a tip off about the rogue Ted Fisher, but "is it too good to be true?"
In a pub, he bumps into an old colleague, Barnet, who'd left the force to give himself more time with his family.
Barnet happens to be tailing Reggie Milner, who is probably one of Fisher's partners in crime. Barnet is employed by Mrs Milner, who erroneously believes her husband is seeing another woman.
Police work out it's to be a wages snatch, they can guess the night, but don't know where. However they are sure Fisher will be flying abroad from a small airfield. We watch the crooks' elaborate plans.
This is to be Fisher's proverbial last job. But at the airstrip he is surrounded and caught and Barnet prevents Milner from eluding justice, "b***** ex-copper."

In between the action, there are minor insights into the problem's of married copper's private lives

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Arrival
Proudly puffing his cigar, Charles Barlow with a smile settles into a posh new antique office. But he is just as ascerbic as of old, and he needs to be with the slackness he finds all around. Over a cosy drink with his Chief Supt Cullen, it's agreed "his task is to "lick this crummy force into shape."
Nine year old Alfie was reported missing at 20.31. But when Inspector Harry Hawkins of F Division commences duty at 10pm, he's dismayed and angered to find noone has acted on the case.
He despatches "dishy" WPC Donald to interview Alfie's mum, "where is he?" Last seen at 4.45pm, when his mum had given him sixpence to buy a comic, Inky, the dog, with PC Snow, is set sniffing his trail. Robert, Alfie's dad, knows Veale, the newsagent has a reputation with young boys, Sgt Evans is sent to head him off. Veale's shop is given the all clear, though Inky does find some cannabis.
"What the hell have you been doing till now?" Barlow demands of Hawkins, who has wisely woken Barlow from his beauty sleep. After filling in Cullen on the failings to date, Barlow questions Donald, and a picture is built up of this "impressionable" lad.
A proper search commences with daylight, "as many men as we can muster." But slack interrogation by some constables on the ground infuriates Barlow.
Donald offers her theory, the comic Alfie had bought contained an article about express trains. Sgt Evans knows of a "nutter" named Finch who lives nearby and loves trains. WPC Donald calls on him, "he's upstairs, we had a splendid evening."
But the boy has been strangled.
"There's a world of things we should have done." An impressive opener, even if it has a sad ending
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Diversion

Like a "Sermon From the Mount," Watt briefs his force of fifteen about a series of petty burglaries in an area of terraced houses. Likely suspects are pointed out and a watch of the area is set up, "bit heavy isn't it?" queries Barlow, wisely, who has a watching brief. Everyone expects this to be "a quiet one."
But forces have to be redeployed when there's an armed robbery at Haynam Timber Company. Inspector Hawkins investigates and learns there had been two robbers, one had fired a gun, but only as a warning. A third crook drove the getaway van. Roadblocks are immediately set up.
However, as might be expected, the van is ditched, and the men board the X10 coach. Hawkins is soon on to the van, and learns from a newsagent that they caught "the coast bus." Because of possible danger to other passengers, it is not stopped at the road block.
Barlow questions Watt's decision, in view of the gun. The bus holds six other passengers who might be in danger. At a lonely bus stop (as this is a limited stop service to Southend, the location seems highly improbable), Hawkins and WC Donald board the service. It's tense.
At the next stop, Sgt Evans adds his presence, and the gang are surprised and overpowered. "That was quick work."
So quick that Watt decides there is still time to complete their original assignment

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Spoilt Ones
This is Wednesday Play sluttery, but with caricatures of impoverished characters, this is no masterpiece, impoverished script, depressing realism.
Sid and his wife Jennie are having one of their usual arguments over money, all £3 of it. Their two young kids "spoilt," to use their words, deprived according to a more sober analysis. The usual problem here, the two youngsters Molly and Mickey are not convincing actors.
Task Force are still in pursuit of the petty burglar from the last story, 32 break-ins involving small sums. Watt and his team "merge" into the landscape, and the local, here they witness the unpleasant scene of Jennie beating her children for interrupting her in the pub.
Watt's experienced eyes light on Sid, a likely villain. He has a record, though we know that though he is a wastrel, he is trying very hard not to return to stealing, even though he's spending those three quids in the betting shop. WPC Donald is deputed to pal up with Jennie, who is making her three pounds a time on the game. But while the couple are watched, the house of a Mr Rix is burgled. So is Watt's hunch wrong?
PC Snow, on the beat, sees the two waifs and surmises that they are the thieves. Having apprised Watt, there is an ugly scene at Sid's house. The two battered kids are thinking of running away as Watt questions them gently, "we was hungry." Thankfully, they are removed from their appalling parents, and Watt, having restrained himself, exits offering said parents a solid piece of his mind

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

To Protect the Innocent
Barlow is required to stand in for the Chief Constable at a Christmas concert by inmates of the prison. The choir's soloist is Jack Gregory, "a vicious thief," six years inside. He asks for a word with Barlow.
His concern is for his wife Mary who left their digs four weeks ago. Can Barlow find her, and more importantly her baby Tim? A deal is agreed and Jack grasses on a job planned on a local pub- Bill is to snatch the Christmas takings.
It is an easy arrest. Bill knows who squealed on him, "she" did. Barlow picks up the word in his quest for the news of the baby. The truth emerges, Mary is "shacked up" with Bill.
Watt goes to the arrested Bill's room, and questions Mary. Tim is in hospital, fell out of his high chair, "poor little mite." It's too melodramatic.
It's very evident Tim has been neglected at the least, and Barlow loses his temper with an obstructive defensive hospital doctor. Jack is informed the baby is safe, and he reveals his true character and the motives behind his deal.
There's not much Christmas spirit here at all. Watt and Barlow muse on the efficacy of prison for these culprits, but the point is sadly laboured. One seasonal concluding scene is more appropriate, Barlow patching it up with the doctor

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Any Other Night

The Chief Constable is preparing his annual report for 1969- more crime, more police expenditure. He sees New Year's Eve as the opportunity to patch up old differences, and under the genial influence of a few drinks with the Chief Superintendents, Barlow and Chris 'Snooty' Marshall mellow. A few more drinks and they are all gently pissed, though the mood passes when crime strikes.
A bobby on night patrol finds that thieves have had the nerve to break into the police workshop. £800 of heavy duty tyres nicked. Barlow questions the laxness of security, responsibility of Marshall, near end of beautiful new friendship. At a lower level, routine police work has isolated some likely suspects. We know that one of them Frederick Chapman (Victor Maddern) is responsible. with his mate Jim, he is having some difficulty locating Tommy Sleath, garage owner, who had promised to buy the tyres. At last he is found in a pub. Tom hands Fred his keys.
Car TF7 has already been deputed to watch Sleath's premises, and much patient waiting is rewarded when Chapman's van drives up.
"I think we made it," cries Chapman with a sigh of relief, but I think not

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Aggro Boy
This would have been better in the Wednesday Play's grim slot, very depressing and inspiriting. It's an attempted study in the malaise of football hooliganism, shallow observation masking for dialogue that pretends to analyse the issue. These were the days when too many so called fans were merely troublemakers.

Dixie is a 16 year old who has a troubled relationship with his self centred parents. He's a sad comment on some of the youth of the day. It's match day, and as staff prepare for the local derby, he and a mate prepare their own idea of fun.
Police are on "special measures," but their scattergun approach is never likely to prove adequate.
Barlow himself mingles, "he needs doing," says Dixie. Numerous minor scuffles, "they started it," yobbos not here for the soccer. Barlow questions Dixie as the match goes on, searching for answers as to his motives, hardly convincing and hardly likely to elicit a meaningful response. Of course Barlow makes no headway and comes across as the failed Gestapo type.
Match over, The Two Bells is the next potential trouble spot, but the police presence ensures peace there. Barlow & Co even travel on the train home, which time we are subjected to more superficial police observation on the problem and possible solutions. However Watt does come up with the idea of all seater grounds.
But the threat of violence isn't even over once the train reaches its destination. On the way home Barlow is too late to prevent Dixie getting injured by a rival gang, it's amazing Barlow even cares

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Standing Orders
Closed shop- workers out on strike. Simpson the manager is stopped at the gates. Later a brick is chucked at his car.
Inspector Hawkins, with Betty and 2 pcs, are despatched to maintain a presence and chat informally to both sides, Simpson and the workers' representative Butler, impartially, that's Hawkins' byword.
A trouble maker Elliott confesses to brick throwing, seeking to be a martyr, but he's not the only one. It's a workmanlike study of industrial relations at differing levels, though I found the political points too laboured.
On tv, Chief Supt Barlow is interviewed. He provides confidently some diplomatic answers, but he had not been briefed about a late development, Hawkins' refusal to take sides and give police protection to delivery lorries. Hawkins had seen this as taking sides, and definitely against standing orders. But Barlow is clearly thrown.
The point of principle is well made, Hawkins defends his end in the face of combined pressure from Barlow and Watt. "What is the police for?"
Hawkins gets his backing. However the strike goes on

To the Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Private Mischief
There are some fine lines and thought provoking moments in this.

Watt is enjoying a very late lunch break at The Talbot Arms, where the landlord 'Charlie' tells him the police have been harrassing him. Name of DC Scot... "an imposter," it transpires. What's the motive? Watt questions Charlie, "it's a right puzzle."
After inquiries, police are led to a former "overzealous" policeman named Scotland (Vincent Ball). Barlow is against prosecuting him, for the sake of the image of the force. However surveillance is kept on him, and it is soon discovered he runs an organisation with six others, posing as policemen or other officials, bent on some unspecified swindles.
Sgt Jackson is caught spying on them by Scotland and his associate Fowler and they duff the real policeman up. Sgt Jackson arrests them for assault.
For once, Watt takes control from Barlow and charges the two men with impersonating police officers. It's very unfortunate that after being released on bail at 3am, Scotland, walking home, is beaten up badly. Jackson had been on the carpet and had taken a long slow walk home, thus having no alibi. Here's a well developed drama, "there's going to be a lot of muck flying about," as we wonder who dunnit.
"Did you do it?" Barlow interrogates his sergeant face to face, literally. No, says Jackson calmly. Barlow believes him and almost enjoys himself questioning Scotland's solicitor

To the Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Open and Shut Case
The eternal triangle, if on a very low level, Tom and Jerry (!) have a "barney" over Betty, a seedy tart. The former is done in with a hammer, This looks like an open and shut case to Inspector Harry Hawkins. It is very "straightforward."
"She 'it 'im with the 'ammer," explains Jerry. A dazed Betty seems to concur.
However Chief Supt Barlow wants to probe deeper, to get a 'feel' for the crime. Local police admit Betty doesn't seem the type to kill. Barlow asks officers who had been at the scene for their impressions, while at the station, Hawkins coaxes a confession of sorts from his suspect. But she actually says nothing.
Barlow however has the skill to open her up, via Billy, who is, you guessed, her beloved poodle. "I never killed him."
So Barlow interrogates Jerry. Which of them is telling the truth? That's the intriguing part of this story.
For once even Barlow is floundering, perhaps due to his lack of local knowledge. Watt tries his hand.
Unfortunately, though it's a valid ending, having posed the questions, the script by Allan Prior doesn't answer them, which is, to my mind, cheating the viewers. We needed to see more clever detective skills at work to come up with more of a sniff of an answer

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Sprats and Mackerels
There's a whisper, only a whisper, that there may be illegal immigrants at the docks. That was enough in them days to set the police scudding down to mount a covert investigation.
WPC Donald dons leathers to chat to Len in his cafe. He bars "coloureds," but he does slightly admit that he had been offered twenty quid once to put some up.
She joins Sgt Evans to look into a "domestic" at a nearby caravan site. George Ashley has been fighting with girl friend Susan, who has run off. It transpires she is taking shelter in an empty caravan she cleans, owner Mr Reeder is often away as he's chief steward on the tanker the Barbella.
Evans does trace her there, though it is evident her cleaning skills are not put to much use. So Sgt Jackson is sent incognito to hire a caravan at the park, and keep watch. The surmise is that Reeder is running the racket using the caravan as a hideout and to transport the immigrants away.
In between the action, Supt Watt is attempting to date Dr Morrow, but he has to stand her up. However they do finally meet, and it's as well she is on hand. For George has accosted Reeder, who is home on leave, and the steward ends up in hospital. Too late Watt works out that Reeder is running a one man operation, hiding immigrants in an empty tank in the tanker- no light or air. As they have been incarcerated there, it's Dr Morrow's awful duty to certify many of them dead.

Although this case depicts painstaking detective skills, there are a lot of loose ends, like WPC Donald acting the loose woman, PC Snow sniffing out suspicions with his dog Inky, that are not followed through, making for a story that's never completely dramatically satisfying. Authentic police work it may be, and at least we don't actually see the grisly finish
To the
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Like Any Other Friday...
A housekeeper named Miss Mathieson reports a burglary at the home of her employer, Mr Hartley, who is away on holiday. Mt Watkins, the only servant, is not very communicative. He had been batman to Major Watkins in the war, and both have a keen interest in world war two memorabilia, including guns.
Watt learns from Miss Mathieson that despite the strict rule on the matter, Watkins had entertained a friend recently in the house. After much stalling, Watkins admits it was an old colleague, Patterson, a known criminal.
Police are particularly concerned that some unregistered guns may have been stolen. Interrogation fails to elicit any concrete information, this is far too protracted to be dramatically satisfying, but it confirms the police view that stolen weapons are shortly likely to be used in some wages snatch.
Intensive search fails to find any hidden weapons however, so the gang, working on a building site are kept under close observation. It's a complex task with a final reward, as the gang are caught, literally, in the spotlights. Four stolen guns are recovered.
Barlow has a final surprise, Watt's going home as he has just got married
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Trust a Woman
Chris Conner, garage owner and big time crook, is setting up another job- that's the whisper that WPC Betty Donald has picked up during a routine search for a missing Swedish au pair, Greta. In a pub Donald had met Molly Carson, an Irish girl who is Conner's girl friend. "She wants to get away from Conner."
It is Watt's decision whether Donald should accept Molly's invitation to go to Conner's flat, where she has been promised she will be given more details about the planned robbery. Though Watt is suspicious of women informers, Donald is given the go ahead.
Molly does provide the names of Conner's four accomplices and information about a van and Rover car they are planning to steal. The job is on Saturday night. But Watt worries Molly is up to no good.
With Greta traced, all seems to be going well. Molly's information all checks out. Police surveillance confirms Chris Conner's plan is proceeding smoothly.
Molly makes one attempt to talk her boyfriend out of the job, but, even though he doesn't need the money, he needs more and can't call it off. It is tense as Watt and Hawkins wait for the burglars to crack the safe. It's a simple arrest, though Conner puts up a desperate fight.
Molly leaves for home in Ireland, having helped herself to the complete contents of Conner's safe
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Escort

An American senator (Alan Gifford) is to visit his ancestor's church. A death threat means the Task Force's "Heavenly Twins" have to instigate security checks, including meeting the vicar who is leading the welcoming party.
In charge of the senator's security is O'Hara, who discusses the difficulties with Chief Constable Cullen and Barlow. The whole force is on high alert, the senator getting "the full treatment."
A parade of five cars drive from the station to the church. Inside, swelled by a horde of security men, the vicar offers his dull speech. Eyes peeled. Thankfully WPC Donald escorts one suspicious visitor outside. He runs off, and shots can be heard by those inside the church. Inky the police dog is wounded.
Visitors are dispersed safely, the lunatic named Arnold is holed up in a hut with his gun. Barlow oversees the siege with stern words to his men. However PC Snow, so furious at Inky's shooting, storms the hut and ends the siege simply if against all Barlow's strict orders

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Quiet Man

When Jack Hodder opens his garage door, a bomb explodes, injuring him. Chief Inspector Hawkins isn't convinced by Hodder's bland belief that the bomber must have got the wrong person. Chief Superintendent Watt picks up on the fact that Hodder is hardly shocked by the incident, and that he won't say anything. A seemingly quiet man, who runs a construction company, he was an expert in demolition, and isn't liked by his workers.
Hodder pursues his own inquiries, contacting an old mate George who suggests the bomber might be David Miller (Alun Armstrong), who works for the company. It appears that George and Jack had been partners in a previous business evidently crooked, and that their partner is now inside, wanting his share.
Watt catches up with Miller before his car blows up. A shaken Miller admits he was after a share of the cash from Hodder's crooked past. Hodder is arrested, attempting to make a break for it with his money

To the Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Twenty-Seven Pieces of Porcelain

There's a robbery at the enormous mansion of Sir John Mallin (Basil Dignam). His son, an MP, leans on the police to make a special effort to recover the stolen property, a valuable collection of exquisite porcelain, worth £30,000.
The posh young thieves are Archie and Clive who now fall out over Archie's girlfriend Dolly.
Watt and Hawkins make slow progress in their investigation, indeed the whole tale moves at a sedate pace, until a link is made with one of the MP's friends, Archie, who had visited the house. (I found this confusing, since it was Clive we saw!)
The trail leads our detectives to a free trip to France, and with the aid of a French inspector (surprise, he's played by Andre Maranne!), they track down Clive and Dolly in a posh chateau near Deauville.
Clive is interrogated, but Dolly has sneaked off. Somehow Clive is persuaded to sell out Archie and our detectives rush to Clive's boat where Dolly is about to dispose of the evidence, dumping it out at sea. Though the evidence is recovered, she has already smashed it all up

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Night Watch
Two unrelated crimes are interwoven in this.
1. A big haul of 1,500 watches from a van parked overnight in the factory yard. A bookie named Tommy Jarvis is identified as a likely fence for the goods, and this is indeed correct. However Jarvis hadn't told his two men to steal such a large haul, and they fall out over the amount the watches are worth. The two thieves dream of riches, and believe they can find another buyer. No luck, so they are forced to cut their losses, and they actually dump the watches. The police never quite catch up with them.

2.Sgt Jack Stirling (Warren Clarke) reports that a tart named Greta came to him because she believed two lads she had met in a club were about "to do" a filling station that night. But as no such crime occurs, Sgt Evans questions her. She thinks there may be some revenge killing also!
Watt guesses the crime may actually be for this next night, so watch is kept on the local all night petrol stations. But police are too late.
Alfred Sutton, a cashier, is badly wounded. Cash is stolen. A Mrs Harrison visits Sutton's hospital bed, and it becomes clear her ex-husband, a sailor, is the wanted man

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Catch As Catch Can
A straightford, detailed portrayal of a police swoop.

David Marshall is chased and arrested by Sgt Stirling. In his possession is a large amount of Swiss francs. He demands to see his solicitor, Edward Turnbull (Donald Pickering). Which is odd, as Marshall doesn't know the man.
Watt leans on Marshall to reveal where he got "the foreign lolly. The facts come out, the money was in an envelope given to him by a council employee, Eric Purley. Turnbull's name happened to be printed on the envelope.
Now Purley happens to be the chief witness in a case of council corruption being built up by Harry Hawkins. He is planning Operation Ratcatcher, to simultaneously arrest a group of corrupt officials, to which Purley is now added.
67 police are on standby to swoop, once all the necessary permissions and documentation are obtained. At the chosen hour, the raids begin. At Ramsgate Hoverport, the smooth Turnbull, on the verge of skipping the country, is apprehended. So are the others, though Purley eludes arrest by killing himself

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Interrogation
A very detailed study of a police interrogation- would never get done like this these days, it's too long and drawn out, but very well observed.

Two armed robbers at a jewellers- safe emptied. But the driver of their getaway car is boxed in, and in a panic they scatter on foot. The job has some of the hallmarks of another three months previously.
Thomas Ross is questioned by PC Snow, then by Watt, "I don't believe you." It's a matter of wearing him down. In the end, Ross points to Billy Meacham, who produces an alibi- he was in Eastbourne. The police booked him for parking!
"There's something funny going on," mutters Watt as he tries to coax a confession from them. Find the driver, that's the urgent task.
Worn down, Meacham admits to organising the first robbery, but is insistent he didn't do the second botched job. He wouldn't work with Tom again as he had panicked and brought a gun.
PC Snow brings in the driver, a David Stevens, along with his mate Alfred Kelly. The frightened Stevens admits he had stolen the car, and had run off when he saw their car was blocked in. It was Ross who had led the second robbery, using Meacham's plan. The incompetent Ross had tried to plan it himself, but hadn't the brains
To
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Trial
Chief Inspector Hawkins and PC Snow are in court after arresting Andrews, a professional criminal, for robbery at Jones & Co. The defence case is not known, but the prosecution barrister warns the policemen that it is likely to be in the form of attack.
After a jury is selected, forensic evidence is brought to support the prosecution case. However, Dodge, the aptly named defence lawyer, questions how this material had been collected. The judge decides to make the jury withdraw, while Hawkins is questioned. Dodge is skilfully belligerent, questioning Hawkins' credentials, motives, and methodology. Hawkins tries to give as good as he gets, but the central evidence is that Andrews denies that the clothing is his, on which the forensic evidence is based. Hawkins made the fatal error of assuming the clothing was that of Andrews, even if it obviously was.
Court is adjourned for the night. Chief Constable Cullen deplores "the shambles" but intervenes so far as to persuade the prosecution barrister, despite his misgivings, to give the case "a whirl" to enable the evidence case a chance to be substantiated. A flurry of police activity, questioning local tailors. PC Snow hits the jackpot, and is able to establish that Andrews had indeed purchased these clothes. As he had paid by credit card, this detail is decisive.
The case against Andrews is proven. Dodge, for all his aspirations as Perry Mason, has not emulated the master

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Skipper's Walk
Hawkins is taking his dog Skipper for a late night walk, when he bumps into old lag Walter Dale, who has some nasty allegations concerning Det Sgt Jack Stirling. Dale had spent time inside with Tony Buxton, and according to Dale, Stirling has been having it off with Tony's wife Jean.
Watt decides on a discreet inquiry, "not exactly by the book." He and Hawkins call on Jack's wife wife to very bluntly inform her of the suggestion that her husband might be bent. She doesn't seem to live in the lap of luxury, the well constructed scene with her three young children amid the household chores has a pathetic quality.
Next interview is with Jean who runs a hairdressing salon, "you're asking me to shop him." In fact she denies Stirling has ever met Tony, whom she has divorced, as the story turns more soap opera than crime.
The critical interview is with Sgt Stirling, "I've done nothing... I've been stupid."
The aftermath. Back home he rows with Mary, with the result that she phones the police to admit her husband is bent. That brings on a violent row, well acted, this is true soap with an appropriately very very very unhappy ending

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Cover
"Three hundred years up in smoke"- a derelict old barn is destroyed, but arson is suspected. The owner Roy Jarman (William Marlowe) immediately sets about rebuilding it. But why?
Sgt Bob Evans is taken on as a casual labourer in this project, and he is well paid. Some rubble he sends for police analysis and it later is confirmed as badly burned remnants of a recent robbery. The arrival in the nearby farmhouse of wanted criminal Johnny Drew (Mike Pratt) suggests something fishy is going on.
The seductive Maggie Jarman (Vivien Merchant) is fairly sure Evans isn't what he seems, enigmatically checking up on him but then offering him a job as a lorry driver. Johnny confirms the offer, but Evans pretends he hasn't got a driving licence-as though that would stop the villains!
Johnny and Roy's hijacking of a security van with foreign currency takes place that night. Evans informs Watt of events before being discovered by Johnny. It looks like curtains until police swoop, for once not too late

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Trouble Maker

As Watt and his wife listen peacefully to Mozart, the Task Force are keeping surveillance on a "dump." It's a midnight raid, and some drugs are found, but there follow complaints about police harrassment from innocent residents, co-ordinated by a lawyer named Fordyce (Cy Grant).
Watt is ordered to conduct an internal police inquiry, as there are overtones of a racial nature. Alan Plater's script needs a fresh slant, but for once, this fine author doesn't deliver, instead throwing in hints of mixed marriage, student demos, rather than tackling the difficult issue.
Inspector Hawkins had headed the raid, PC Nesbitt's attitude is the main cause of anger. Watt gives each in turn an unofficial "kick up the backside," they can redeem themselves somewhat, in police eyes, if they succeed in their next assignment.
Nesbitt has been to a pub after a tipoff about Kidson, who uses his boat for illegal purposes. As Watt muses it all over with his wife and listens to Bach, the Task Force wait and wait by the shore for the boat which is to bring in illegal immigrants. At last their waiting is rewarded. Finish.

An ending that sums up the whole tale
Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

The Raider
An armed robbery of a Post Office van, police give chase as far as a large estate. A karate chop fells one crook, Darby, despite his gun.
Watt's unsubtle interrogation of Darby is shown at length, such methods would not be permitted these days, though hardly on the Sweeney level. The script seems designed to try and evoke sympathy for the hounded villain, and we can also start to feel sorry for the organiser of the crime, Jackie Warren, whom we see hiding out with a girl called Marge.
Eventually Darby is bludgeoned into confessing that Jackie had planned the job, and we learn for the first time that Warren is a wanted and dangerous criminal, escaped from prison some time back. Now his unpleasantry toward even Marge who seems to love him make us lose sympathy for him. He's bored hiding in her flat, she's all for getting away.
More prolonged questioning reveals that Jackie is with some woman. Watt, in a flurry of publicity, calls on Jackie's old girl who runs a place in Soho.
"They want us to start running." But there's no need, all the tension so well built up, evaporates as though the director suddenly noticed they had run out of time. Police swoop on Marge's flat, and despite his gun, he tamely is carted off to jail, believing Marge has shipped him. We are told who it really was, but there's no escaping the fact that this ending is an awful let down

Softly Softly Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

CRANE
Taped Crime Programmes Menu
This was one of the replacement series while No Hiding Place was being given a breather, running for three series from 1963-1965.
Crane had been a successful city businessman, who has traded in his old suburban home for the excitement of a new life as an importer and exporter in Morocco. Patrick Allen was a natural for the part. Explained writer Patrick Alexander "he looks like a real smuggler!" It seems shooting the series was fun too. Patrick explained he played many dangerous scenes, but usually came through without a scratch. But the night before he was flying back to England, in a hotel bar someone got off a stool and knocked it over on to Patrick's foot, with a broken toe for his troubles!
Other cast regulars in each story were Sam Kydd as Orlando O'Connor and Gerald Flood as Mahmoud, and Laya Raki as Halima. Orlando went on to star successfully in his own sequel.
Jordan Lawrence was the producer. Patrick Alexander script editor. 16mm film sequences were directed by Christopher Hodson and Peter Moffatt. As the series was in black and white, it looked absolutely nothing like the publicity picture seen here!

My reviews of 1.3 The Cannabi Syndicate , 3.10 A Cargo of Cornflour

1.1 A Death of No Importance (Tuesday April 2nd 1963 8pm)
1.2 Bad Company (April 9th 1963)
Script: Eric Allen. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Peter Moffatt.
Orlando said 'pick up a strange woman and you pick up trouble.' But neither he nor Crane knew a dead man was involved.
Remainder of cast: Arthur White (Pirelli- he recurs in series three in 3.2, 3.6 and 3.11), Desmond Jordan (Insp Slimene), Katharine Blake (Sonia Dajos), Graham Suter (Police doctor), Charles Tingwell (Albert Ringwood), David Nettheim (Chavez).
1.3 The Cannabi Syndicate (April 16th 1963) with Peter Reynolds
1.4 My Deadly Friend (April 23rd 1963)
Script: Patrick Alexander. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
Someone is very anxious for the Moroccan police to catch Crane. To find out who, Crane sets a trap.
Remainder of cast: Bruce Montague (Insp Larbi- also in some other stories), Geoffrey Colville (Aubrey Feltham), Anthony Steel (Gil), Thalia Kouri (Rosamaria), Arnold Yarrow (Louis Barreto), Richard Davies (Willie Jones), Richard Montez (Omar), Guy Deghy (Primo), Henry Soskin (Arab guide), Peter Allenby (Ali).
1.5 The Executioners (April 30th 1963)
1.6 Yesterday's Woman (May 7th 1963)
Script: Bruno Christian. Designer: John Emery. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
By the time Madeleine Tissot returns to Casablanca, someone has devised an ingenious plan for murder.
Cast also includes: Donald Morley (Georges Latour), Madi Hedd (Madeleine Tissot), Bruce Montague (Insp Larbi), Rex Garner (Sgt Fazil), Joe Enrika (Ali), Horace James (Tommy), Ian Gardiner (Krim), Terry Bale (First policeman), Louis Raynes (Second policeman), John Atkinson (Sam Bennett).
1.7 The Price of Friendship (May 14th 1963)
Script: Leo Lehman. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Peter Moffatt.
When Haufman's boat docks at Casablanca, the police are inquisitive. They are looking for two thieves- one a murderer.
Remainder of cast: Dermot Walsh (Haufman), Desmond Newling (Roberts), Louis Raynor (Arab boy - in a few other stories also), Bruce Montague, Mellan Mitchell (First customer), Sally Nesbitt (Jacqueline), Edmund Bailey (Fatim), Frank Singuineau (Second customer).
1.8 Three Days to Die (May 21st 1963)
Script: Max Marquis. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
The man in the condemned cell maintains his innocence, but all the evidence supports the verdict of the courts.
Remainder of cast: Charles Carson (Jean Collard), Margot van der Burgh (Maitre Zem), Peter Bowles (Nikkola Drax), Bruce Montague, Barbara Assoon (Raya Drax), Jose Berlinka (Fourth guard), Reginald Barratt (Insp Misrai), Michael Peake (Brun), Gertan Klauber (Habbas), Margaret Denyer (Therese Severin), Edward Cast (First guard), Brian Cant (Kramm).
1.9 My Brother's Keeper (May 28th 1963)
Script: Max Marquis. Designer: Frank Gillman. Director: Richard Doubleday.
Somewhere in Casablanca a callous murderer is in hiding. But the police are faced with the traditional loyalties of the Foreign Legion.
Remainder of cast: Maitland Moss (Priest), Barry Keegan (Ferenc Szabo), Bruce Montague, Andreas Malandrinos (Patriarch), Bernard Rebel (Bishop)< Alec Mango (Dr Abbib), Frank Tregear (Taxi driver), Richard Marner (Alexis), Maria Andipa (Lise), Roy Patrick (Ludwig).
1.10 The Unwanted (June 4th 1963)
Script: Phyllis and Robert White. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Crane decides to look after a homeless, hungry little boy, and he unwittingly puts himself and Orlando in grave danger.
Others in cast: Peter Newton (Abba), Dalia Penn (Lakita), John Hollis (Hamid), Christopher Carlos (Imam Alhaj Ali), James Wellman (Midge), Steve Plytas (Krussos), Paul Gillard (Policeman), Lloyd Reckord (Feisan), Bill Hepper (Ahmul).
1.11 Return of a Hero (June 11th 1963)
Script: Alan Plater. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Peter Moffatt.
A man is running from a danger in the darkness and Crane discovers the menace of a yellow rabbit.
Others in cast:
Louis Raynor (Arab boy), Edgar Wreford (Matthews), Bruce Montague, Tony Cyrus (Barman), Arthur Hewlett (Colonel), John Rumney (Mickey the Greek), Tom Gill (Bertie).
1.12 The Golden Attraction (June 18th 1963)
Script: David Cumming. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Richard Doubleday.
A corpse is found in a palm grove, and Crane has reasons of his own for refusing to be involved.
Also in this cast: Nicholas Evans (Boy), Bruce Montague, Jacqueline Ellis (Alison Harrington), Alan Tilvern (Paul Harrington), Peter Arne (Michael Harrington), Nadja Regin (Maria Cortez), Richard Gatehouse (Griffiths), Nisar Husen (Policeman).
1.13 A Case of Dolls (June 25th 1963)
Script: Frank Harbourne. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
When Crane and Orlando find a box floating in the sea, its contents form the first of a number of surprises.
Others in cast: Bruce Montague, John Bennett (Smith), George Coulouris (Dr Jackson), Alec Mango (Chatterji), Gautam Mukerjee (Boy), Dallas Cavell (Customs official), John Quayle (First policeman), Ray Roberts (Second policeman), Michael Mellinger (Hotel receptionist).

Second series: principals as for the first series.
2.1 The Death of Marie Vetier (Monday January 13th 1964 8pm)
Script: Patrick Tilley. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Richard Doubleday.
Crane meets a desperate woman.
Remainder of this cast: Patricia Haines (Marie Vetier), Louis Rayner (Abdul, also in series one), Michael Hawkins, Martin, Gertan Klauber (Darius), Leonard Trolley (Shaab- in many other stories), Peter Vaughan (Max Godard).
2.2 Epitaph for a Fat Woman (January 20th 1964)
2.3 Dead Reckoning (January 27th 1964)
Script: Bruno Christian and Reed de Rouen. Filmed sequences: Richard Doubleday. Director: Christopher Hodson.
The man in Tallal prison is a storm centre. One attempt to rescue him ends in death. Crane has no wish to be involved but nearly gets killed himself.
Rest of cast: Edward Higgins (Chief warder), Louis Raynes (Warder), Bartlett Mullins (Governor), Leonard Trolley (Shaab), Richard Vernon (Wolsey), Diana Chappell (Solange), Brandon Brady (Russian sailor), Alfred Edwards (Russian musician), Terry Gilbert (Russian dancer), Sheila Keith (Mrs Ambrose), Edward Harvey (Fuentes), Chinks Barucha (Tamir), Colin Gordon (Lang), Jan Waters (Liz), Brian Cant (Man), Richard Davies (Willie Jones).
2.4 Picture of My Brother (February 3rd 1964)
2.5 Two Rings for Danger (February 10th 1964)
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: Richard Doubleday
Crane was one of the last people to see the murdered man alive. Mahmoud is curious, and so is the victim's brother.
Also with Job Stewart (Alphonse), Geoffrey Alexander (Hasso), Julian Sherrier (Dr Sul), Saadoon Al-Ubaydi (Policeman), Sydney Bromley (Slotz), David Futcher (waiter), Annette Andre (Petra), Brenda Kaye (Clarice), Ian Curry (Edgar), Anthony Morton (Mewkic), Dudley Foster (Charles) and David Ellison (Albert)
2.6 Death Is a Black Camel (February 17th 1964)
Script: Gerald Wilson. Designer: John Emery. Director: Ronald Marriott.
Crane keeps a rendezvous with death- and Mahmoud solves a baffling case.
Rest of cast: Philip Latham (Salbiere), Ric Hutton (Vanel), Lee Richardson (Corto), Jon Rumney (Sgt Zartar), Reg Lye (Stanley), Allen Helder (Police sergeant), Gabor Baraker (Fat policeman), Mel Fahri (Young policeman), Patrick Godfrey (Dr Launay), Ian MacNaughton (Mackenzie), Leonard Trolley (Shaab), Helen Lindsay (Christine Vanel), Robert Crewdson (Doctor Ramesh).
2.7 The Secret Assassin (February 24th 1964)
2.8 A Mouthful of Ashes (March 2nd 1964)
Script: Gerald Wilson. Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
When Crane gave Orlando a ticket for a theatre he never thought it would be a free pass to death
Also with Maxine Audley (Freda Lang), Anthony Newlands (Aviram Stark), Martin Sterndale (Becker), Anthony Viccars (Manager), Arthur White (Pirelli), Tim Hardy (Clerk) and Leonard Trolley.
2.9 Recoil (March 9th 1964)
2.10 Gypsy's Warning (March 16th 1964)
Script: Alan Plater. Director: Richard Doubleday.
Philippe plans revenge on a police informer, but Gypsy sees violence in the cards and the shadow of death falls on Crane's cafe.
Rest of cast: John Woodvine (Philippe), Howard Goorney (Gypsy), Anthony Blackshaw (Warder), Harold Innocent (Jacko), Leonard Trolley (Shaab), Len Russell (Shop proprietor), Frank Singuineau (Ali), Jose Berlinka (Customer), Olga Lowe (Woman).
2.11 Knife in the Dark (March 23rd 1964)
Script: Phyllis and Robert White. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Ian Fordyce.
Orlando goes out into the night, and the morning finds him with blood on his hands.
Rest of cast: Rex Rashley (Samaka), Thalia Kouri (Rosamaria), Raymond Miller (Emile Brillon), Derek Sydney (Arif), Stephanie Bidmead (Annette Brillon), John Bonney (Charles Cabet), Michael Mellinger (Aboul), Leonard Trolley, Zoe Zephyr (Mokahl), John G Heller (Bartender), John de Marco (Waiter).
2.12 Murder Is Waiting (March 30th 1964)
Because somewhere in Casablanca there is a ruthless killer, Crane receives an unexpected invitation.
Also in this cast: Basil Dignam (Raswani).
2.13 Man Without a Past (Monday June 15th 1964 8pm)
Script: Carl Nystrom. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Peter Croft.
The only way to stop Crane helping a thief is by killing him.
Rest of cast: Patrick Troughton (Hugo Krantz), Joby Blanshard (Rahman), Antony Baird (Sgt Miraz), Leonard Trolley, Alan Wheatley (Michaud), Lucille Soong (Yasuma), Malya Nappi (Auntie), Hal Dyer (Hostess), Royston Tickner (Sgt Khatib), Michael Allaby (Doctor).

Third series- same principals as before.
3.1 Death Is a Closed Door (Monday October 26th 1964, 8pm)
Script: Max Marquis. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
Murder can be prevented if a door can be opened. Crane is in no position to help.
Rest of cast: Valerie Sarruf (Zena Fahmy), Camilla Hasse (Raya), Sandor Eles (Shafik), Leonard Trolley (Shaab, in several stories), Dean Francis/ Jeffrey Isaacs (Policemen), Russell Waters (Doctor), Robin Chapman (Sr Maher), Eric Francis (Undertaker), Aleksander Browne (Sgt Mansour), Beverley Cohen (Sgt Hamdi), Harcourt Curacao (PC Karam).
3.2 T.N.T. (November 2nd 1964)
Script: Anthony Scott Veitch. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Marc Miller.
Crane handles dynamite.
Rest of cast: Edwin Richfield (Steve Hanna), Henry Soskin (Mogista), Leonard Trolley, Peter Bayliess (John Arrowsmith), Arthur White (Pirelli), Delphi Lawrence (Lisa Martens), Barry Lineham (Harvey Troop).
3.3 The Third Bullet (November 9th 1964)
Script: Gerald Wilson. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
When Crane receives a telephone call from an unknown woman, the first bullet is aimed at him.
Rest of cast: Margaret Whiting (Tina Mondrego), Philip Gilbert (Official), Felix Felton (Major Calvao), Leonard Trolley, Laurence Hardy (Dr Jorge Salas), Peter Halliday (Eladio), Paul Danquah (Faro), Peter Birrel (First guard), Bruce Wightman (Second guard), Brian Badcoe (Raoul).
November 16th 1963 - no programme.
3.4 A Danger to Others (November 23rd 1964)
Script: Guy Morgan and Doreen Montgomery. Designer: Fred Pusey. Director: James Ormerod.
Julie disappears into the night- and the most likely consequence is murder.
Rest of cast: Sally Home (Julie Lamotte), Leonard Trolley, John Bryans (Dr Mustapha), Eric Pohlmann (Dr Knudsen), Zoe Starr (Yasmin- also in 3.12 and 3.13), Golda Casimir (Concierge), Diane Lambert (Francine Lebon), George Mcgrath (Smith), Michael Godfrey (Perez), Liam Gaffney (Captain O'Hallorhan).
3.5 Death Walks Beside Me (November 30th 1964)
Script: Gerald Wilson. Designer: John Emery. Director: Ian Fordyce.
Johnny is desperate. Crane is prepared to help but what Johnny asks is impossible.
Rest of cast: Edward Harvey (Doomsday Man), John Nicholas (Harry), Christopher Carlos (Jericho), Gabor Baraker (Cairo), John Bonney (Johnny), Leonard Trolley, Peter Honeywell (Doctor), Victor Baring (Sgt Hidis), John Cazabon (Perrichon), Dallia Penn (Dr Djamila), Monique Lewis (Girl), Reginald Barratt (Public Prosecutor), Beaufoy Milton (Judge), Virginia Dignam (Hilda), Conrad Monk (Guard).
3.6 The Man with the Big Feet (December 7th 1964)
Script: Ludovic Peters from a story by Donald Giltinan. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodson.
The Master may possess strange powers but when he prophesies death, Crane is not the only sceptic.
Rest of cast: Bruno Barnabe (The Master), Campbell Singer (George Lewis), Vanda Godsell (Ida Lewis), Zakes Mokae (Achmet), Leonard Trolley, Lloyd Lamble (Denning), Arthur White (Pirelli), Peter Laird (Halima's cousin), Philip Ridgeway (Landlord).
3.7 In Trust Find Treason (December 14th 1964)
Script: Max Marquis. Designer: Frank Gillman. Director: Richard Doubleday.
When Crane hears the news about Mahmoud, his first reaction is to laugh.
3.8 The Painted Lady (December 21st 1964)
Script: Ludovic Peters from a story by David Ellis. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Richard Doubleday.
Crane meets Louise by chance, but what happens later is cold-blooded and deliberate.
Rest of cast: George Pravda (Carl Hassler), Richard Carpenter (Laurent Barjou), Harvey Hall (Otto), Moira Redmond (Louise Gerard), Maxine Holden (Maxine Duret), Leonard Trolley, Steven Morris (Boy).
3.9 Moving Target (December 28th 1964)
3.10 A Cargo of Cornflower (January 4th 1965)
Script: Denis Butler. Designer: Barbara Bates. Director: Ian Fordyce.
The job is too simple and Crane is suspicious.
Rest of cast: David Nettheim (Aziz), Terence Soall (Frem), Leonard Trolley, Peter Bowles (Vincent Moro), Edina Ronay (Carmena), John Hollis (Djiba), Robert Lanen (Jussef), Mark Kingston (John Florio).
3.11 A Violent Animal (January 11th 1965)
Script: Arthur Swinson. Designer: Frank Nerini. Director: Marc Miller.
Crane meets a trained killer.
Rest of cast: Keith Barron (Rene Leclerc), Suzanne Neve (Hilary Grantley), Arthur White (Pirelli), Peter Dyneley (Peter Garvey), Leonard Trolley, Michael Mellinger (Achmet), Michael Allaby (Policeman), Kenneth Nash (Eton Boy), John Cater (Afiz), Jolyon Booth (Gibbah), Rick Jones (Mogat), Arthur Blake (Sgt Zahaz).
3.12 The Death of Karaloff (January 18th 1965)
Script: Ludovic Peters. Designer: Barbara Bates. Director: Marc Miller.
Crane is involved in an attempt to keep Karaloff alive.
Rest of cast: Denys Graham (Karaloff), Tony Steedman (Brig Harris), Danvers Walker (Perlington), Robert Gillespie (Ames), John Garvin (Doctor), Philip Stone (Boris), Brian Cobby (Lev), Frank Tregear (Sir Pelham Forster), Leonard Trolley, Zoe Starr (Yasmin), Artro Morris (Prof Ikbal), Aubrey Morris (Mustafa), Hazel Terry (Lady Julia).
3.13 The Man in the Gold Waistcoat (January 25th 1965, last ever story, though Orlando returned with his own series in April that year)
Script: James Mitchell. Designer: Henry Federer. Director: Christopher Hodsony.
The murder in the desert would not have involved Crane at all if it had not been for the waistcoat.
Rest of cast: Leonard Trolley (a regular in this series), Steve Plytas (Franz Bauer), Frank Singuineau (Ali), Nicholas Chagrin (Selim), William Devlin (Sheik Gamal), Annette Carell (Giulia Bauer), Alan MacNaughton (The Major), Ayton Medas (Didi), Zoe Starr (Yasmin), Alan Wheatley (Dr Hilfe).

Taped Crime Programmes Menu

The Cannabi Syndicate
Agricultural adviser Austin Crispin (Peter Reynolds) offers his old school pal Crane cash, but what exactly for? Crane never finds out, for while he is dabbling in contraband whiskey, he notices Crispin dying in the street, muttering the words, "cannabi syndicate." Crane can't help him, in the midst of his dealings, but when he has time, when he returns to Crispin, he finds he has gone.
The body is found on the beach. Osman witnessed a white American car on the beach.
Col Mahmoud as well as Crane, who feels honour bound to help an old friend, investigate the murder. Primo, who holds a file on "everything crooked," says he has no information on any Cannabi Syndicate.
Sharif is "a greasy little witness" to the murder. He says Crane dunnit. Even Mahmoud doesn't believe that. Sharif even offers privately to Crane that, for a consideration, he will change his story. Then he is found dead.
To evade the Colonel, Crane hires a car and makes for Jacob Ben Hassan, who owns an American car. He lives in the very town where Crispin had been working. Jacob is dead, Crane is informed, but it seems Crispin had stayed with the wealthy Rodriguez (Raymond Young).
Crane poses as the replacement Agricultural adviser to call on Rodriguez, whom he finds relaxing, listening to Vivaldi. He takes to Crane, invites him to dinner, "a delightful evening." But Crane's demise has been planned, his car tampered with. However Col Mahmoud arrives at the mansion to arrest the villain. He had found in Crispin's strong box, photos of plants growing in a field. They were evidently being used as blackmail. With the site located, Mahmoud swoops, and after a fight, Crane saves the Colonel. Rodriguez gets away, and in the best tradition, hastes away in the nobbled vehicle.
"He was far too sensitive for his own health," epitaph on the suave drugs baron. Apparently Crispin's dying words had actually been "cannabis indica." Seemed obvious to me
Crane

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Cargo of Cornflour
To make ice cream over in Italy, this cornflour needs to be shipped there. Crane is asked by a man called Aziz to do the job, but he is naturally suspicious that he might be transporting drugs. He gets poor Orlando to inspect "every sack," to check it out. Orlando is already the worse for drink, and adds a touch of humour in his search, "nothing but damn cornflour."
Crane sets off with his cargo, sure "something smells." He is right for Aziz is actually Inspector Aziz, working with Col Mahmoud. The complications start when the police stop his ship. However this is merely a ruse to get on board, it's not the police at all, and the cargo is hijacked, the work of Vincent Moro (Peter Bowles), suave dealer behind the local drugs scene.
He is worried a rival gang might be muscling in on his territory. He is surprised when he discovers the cornflour is really cornflour. "It is cornflour."
Aziz is scared, lying low in his hotel room. With good reason, for thugs beat him up. Vincent then pays his informer to bring Crane to him. At point of a gun, Crane is grabbed. However an American named Florio, a guest at the same hotel as Aziz, rescues Crane.
Col Mahmoud finds Crane in Aziz's room. Aziz is dead. The pair strike a bargain. He wants to find Aziz's murderer, in return for which he will overlook the "cornflour" episode. In fact, Crane has found the boat used to hijack him, it is owned by Djiba, who works for Vincent. Crane makes it known he is transporting another two tons of cornflour, knowing the crooks will probably intercept him.
As we can guess, Florio is in league with Vincent. Crane however doesn't realise it. Florio persuades Crane to protect his cargo by the simple means of a machine gun that Florio can supply. However the gun is turned on Crane and the cargo snatched. But not quite, for Mahmoud is lying in wait and rounds up the gang
Crane

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Riviera Police
"A crime series set on the French Riviera- and there are exotic crimes to match an exotic region. Out to catch the criminals are three young police officers seconded to the Surete in France, who are all working under a French officer." In the overall TV Ratings for 1965, this Rediffusion series came fourth, ahead even of No Hiding Place. Surprising another series wasn't produced, in view of its popularity, and only 13 stories were ever made.
The main characters were: Inspector Legrand (Brian Spink), the only character to appear in all stories. The other three stars rotated their appearances, and were: Lt-Col Constant Sorel, a 28 year old Canadian bachelor (Frank Lieberman), Supt Adam Hunter, a Londoner seconded to the Riviera Police (Geoffrey Frederick), and Supt Bernie Johnson, a languid Aussie (Noel Trevarthen).
The theme music was written by Laurie Johnson and titled Latin Quarter.

Rediffusion publicity: "All the filming has been done on the French Riviera... each week actors were flown out to take part in location sequences before rehearsing in London. Producer Jordan Lawrence says, 'whereas in previous Rediffusion shows only the principal actors have appeared on location, now all the main characters are seen in the French setting. This gives the series all the glamour and picturesque quality of the Riviera and at the same time releases it from the limiting factors of the studio.'" (What he didn't add is that as the filming was on 16mm film rather than 35mm, the filmed sequences always look rather murky.) "'The object of the series is primarily to entertain, and all the possibilities of the setting, the smart rich living, the sunshine and the beautiful scenery will contribute much to each episode. A special attraction are the beautiful girls who appear... they are in every episode, and often in bikinis.' Glamorous Italian actress Crista Nelli, a green-eyed brunette appears in the first story, the setting is Cannes during the Film Festival."

The titles of all the stories in this series were-
1 Who Can Catch A Falling Star? (Mon Aug 2nd 1965- with all four stars), 2 That Kind of Girl (Aug 9th- with NT plus Bill Nagy, John le Mesurier), 3 The Lucky One Was the Snake (Aug 16- with FL), 4 But the Company She Keeps (Aug 23- with GF plus John Bailey), 5 Duet for Two Guns (Aug 30- with NT), 6 A Shot in the Dark... and Two in the Mid-day Sun (Sept 6- with FL plus Raymond Young, June Thorburn, Paul Maxwell, Jennifer Jayne), 7 Take It Sideways and Pray (Sept 13- with NT), 8 There Comes a Point (Sept 20- with FL plus Laurence Payne, Pauline Letts, Anna Carteret, Patrick Mower), 9 Past Indefinite - Future Imperfect (Sept 27- with NT plus Peggy Thorpe-Bates, Peter Copley), 10 There's Something Moving in the Water (Oct 5), 11 Girl on a Plate (Tues Oct 12- with GF plus Stephanie Randall, Basil Dignam), 12 Bubbles Through a Looking Glass (Oct 19- with FL plus George Pravda, Jacqueline Ellis, Geoffrey Palmer), 13 A Rainbow has Two Ends (Oct 26- with all four stars plus Erica Rogers, Frederick Jaeger, Alan White).

My reviews of these surviving stories:
1
Who can catch a Falling Star?
3 The Lucky One Was the Snake
5 Duet for Two Guns
7 Take it Sideways and Pray

Taped Crime Programmes Menu

.

.

.

.

.

1 "Who can catch a Falling Star?" (Aug 2nd 1965)-
with Supt Adam Hunter and Inspector Legrand
(Supt Johnson and Lt-Col Sorel also appear, but only on film).

Anna Corelli, "Italy's newest star," is cavorting on the Riviera. These opening scenes on 16mm film are disjointed, but the gist is clear enough: to a Callan-like theme, she's arguing with her boyfriend Tony (Anthony Valentine) over the attentions of a rival, Craig. He throws her over the cliff, but Joan Mayer (Katharine Blake) happens to see him.
Joan's "made some great pictures in her time," but now she's "a drunken lush", with her husband Eric (Alan Gifford) an old-style movie director, "a couple of old has-beens." Eric decides that what Joan knows could be of use to them.
Tony's father, Jerry (Ronald Radd), is one of the biggest European film producers. "Joan's going to make a comeback," Eric tells Jerry in the old story of blackmail.
Supt Hunter with Inspector Legrand question the influential guests at the party where the "limited" actress had been murdered. "We all loved her," is the typical showbiz response, but Douglas is more helpful, he remembers seeing Joan Mayer near where Tony and Anna were arguing.
Hunter also discovers Tony has had several other similar scrapes, though his dad insists "nothing's ever been proved against Tony." Possibly because Jerry puts pressure on the police, Hunter is similarly put under pressure from his superior to go easy. Tony's "a natural killer" insists Hunter, and indeed he's correct.
For Tony is arranging for Joan to be warned off "permanently." High up in the hills, she's happily preparing for her starring role. The assassins shoot Eric and chase after her, as the police arrive. A gunfight and Joan gets away. "We've got to find her," before Tony can finish her off. Jerry is persuaded to cooperate with the police and Hunter goes to where Joan is making a Personal Appearance. Tony is lurking there too. Joan, rather the worse for drink arrives, a shot rings out, a fight and Tony is dragged away. "I'm still a great star," wails Joan, to more Callan-like music
Riviera Police Menu

.

.

.

.

.

3 The Lucky One Was the Snake (August 16th 1965)
with Lt Col Sorel and Insp Legrand.

On a mountain road, a marksman shoots at car 138EU06 causing it to career off the road. Nearby a girl is watching.
Canadian Mr Frederick W Mitchell was the driver. He had been making for Paradise in Nice, the Villa Paradise to be precise. The luxury place is owned by Gaston Baghouelle (Harold Innocent), and wild parties are held here. Lt Sorel joins a kind of safari hunt at the mansion, with ladies dressed as animals. "I scratch men to death," warns the scantily clad Marguerite (Wanda Ventham). Sorel claims he's a friend of Mitchell's, and is taken to be a courier. Has he brought "the real thing?" Whatever that means.
Next stop for Sorel is the mortuary, where he is knocked unconscious. Some of Mitchell's effects have been stolen, but nothnig of any significance for most had been burned in the crash. It seems he had stolen some kind of secret back in Canada for he's wanted by police over there. But where is this secret "thing" now?
Sorel returns to the luxury villa to resume his bluff with Baghouelle. $25,000 is the price agreed for the thing. Sorel realises Lisa (Nadja Regin) was behind Mitchell's death, she is after the thing too, and offers $35,000 if he will deliver it to her partner Jeff at an airfield.
From Canada, Sorel is informed that the secret was a lightweight plastic that could withstand high temperatures. A sample was Mitchell's pen, which unbeknowns to the crooks as to its significance, had been stolen from the mortuary. Sorel knows where the pen is- Jeff has, rather strangely, kept all the charred items and there it is. However Baghouelle had been warned of Lisa's doublecross, and claims the pen, only to be shot by Jeff, Lisa and he quickly running off. Sorel gives chase only to be forced to join her and Jeff in their flight by air. A police car vainly chases them down the runway, but Sorel sprays a fire extinguisher in the pilot's cabin and take-off has to be aborted.
"She tried to steal my pen," Sorel playfully informs the police.

There are several way out scenes at the party, and one great visual one with Wanda Ventham in a bikini sunbathing on a grand piano with champagne by the shores of the Med. I am informed that this is how the other half lives

Riviera Police Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

5 "Duet for Two Guns" (Aug 30th 1965) -
with Supt Johnson and Inspector "Legs" Legrand.

There's a 90 second sequence to start, on grainy 16mm film showing prisoner Harry Borden (Fredric Abbott) leaping from a 200 foot cliff and swimming to freedom. He has "to talk to" the man who shopped him, "respected citizen" the crooked La Salle (John Turner), who still has the gold bullion from their joint robbery "hidden away somewhere." Borden's old acquaintance Supt Barney Johnson is assigned to recapture this "tricky customer," who eludes police by jumping a lorry and sneaks into Nice during a carnival by donning a clown's costume.
La Salle's villa is near here! But the crook is confident his mansion is well guarded by his 'secretaries,' Mike and Jack and he rejects Johnson's rather reluctant offer of protection.
Nearby, with his pal Guido, Harry is planning his attack, whilst safe inside his fortress La Salle plans his reception for Harry. Johnson has to keep a watching brief outside the giant gates that guard La Salle's property. At the point of a gun Johnson is forced by Harry to join him enter La Salle's. "It's a trap," insists Barney Johnson as they easily walk in through the front door. "The best way to beat a gambit," retorts Harry calmly," is to accept it."
"This isn't chess," is Johnson's profound conclusion. But La Salle's trap is beaten, Mike and Jack silenced. No sign of La Salle, he's flown. Jack is forced to reveal where.
Inspector Legrand is tracking all their moves by helicopter: "they're slowing down... a no through road... a cottage." There digging up the garden is La Salle, but not for horticultural reasons, but for the stolen gold. He's shot dead by Harry who ironically ends with "I told you you'd dig your own grave!"
But the police swoop and Harry has to run for it, and Johnson shoots him dead too

Riviera Police Menu

.

.

.

.

.

7 "Take it Sideways and Pray" (Sept 13th 1965) -
with Supt Johnson and Inspector Legrand.

The Monaco Grand Prix. Lew Scarsdale (John Meillon) crashed at the Nurburgring a year ago. He still has nightmares about the crash in which a fellow driver died. "I thought I was finished," he tells Jenny, his wife.
But now he's on the Riviera, "lapping faster than Jim Clark," to try and persuade his old boss Jack (David Burke) to let him drive again. "I can win Monte Carlo for you!" But Jack's had enough of Lew's bravado, calling him a "suicide pilot." Against rival Harvey Brooks it'd be like "High Noon, with cars for guns." For Lew blames Harvey for that crash.
But after arson at Jack's garage, Lew's lighter is found nearby by Peter, Lew's best mate. Supt Johnson accepts Lew's alibi, but "someone's trying to get at Jack Dyson," but who or why is a mystery. Then a man in a skeleton mask kidnaps Jack's driver and suddenly Lew is needed to race. Johnson rounds up the kidnapper just as the race is starting.
Lew starts badly, but in those days overtaking wasn't any great shakes as "Lew always comes in with a late run." "What a race this is!"- as Harvey and Lew battle it out. Lew is forced off-line as Harvey regains the lead. Wheel to wheel racing (on sound commentary with some film), "they're going to crash! Someone's in the water." So taking the chequered flag is........ Lew.
Maybe the kidnapper will be forgiven, as he was only trying to help Lew get a seat and Jack to win the race
Riviera Police Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Boyd QC
The stories starred Michael Denison as Richard Boyd.
More on the series
in the Boyd QC Research Section.
My reviews of three of the surviving stories.

2.5 The Not So Civil Servant (May 2nd 1958) - Shopkeeper Luigi faces prosecution and a fine of 20 pounds (gulp) for the technical infringement of driving his goods van without a C licence. However Richard Good, an officious ministry inspector (Peter Vaughan), asks "How about 7 pounds and I'll forget about it?" But Luigi tells a policeman (Stratford Johns), and seven pound notes are marked enabling Good to be caught in the very act. Boyd has to defend Good. Is he a "nasty piece of work"? "If he's honest, he's a fool!" Prosecuting Counsel Mostyn (Terence Alexander) looks confident. Boyd pounces on the fact that Luigi wears a hearing aid and significantly wasn't wearing it that day. Is it going to be Perry Mason all over again? Certainly Good's version of events contains no reference to any bribe. However this is one case that Perry, sorry Boyd isn't going to win. "Tight as a lord, bragging he was going to get off," Good slips up and Boyd has to withdraw as on Good's own admission he is guilty. Sentence: Two months in prison for the unfortunately named Good

3.9 In Camera (February 24th 1959) - 540 insurance stamps, a cigarette lighter and a compact are all items Elizabeth Wayne (Brenda Hogan) is accused of stealing from her employer. Bolton (John Welsh) of Security at Alison Engineering Company, on the instructions of her boss Mr Morley (Peter Bull) had installed a camera in an office from where items had been going missing, and "nice kind" Miss Wayne had been snapped with her hands in the till. A Mr Tickle (pronounced Tickell, he insists- Charles Gray) of Histon Newspapers takes up this minor case, which thus promotes it to front page news. The only way out seems to be "Quis custodiet, ipso custodes." What else?! As narrator Jack (Charles Leno) tells us: Boyd "revelled" in this trial, though frankly it doesn't require even Boyd's brainpower to work out the truth. A long cross examination of the ailing Bolton leads to "a slice of luck" when Bolton is taken ill under Boyd's questioning. He's taken to his bed, and in his home the stolen cigarette lighter is discovered

3.10 Escape (March 3rd 1959) - Boyd is a judge at Hasleford Assizes. Having escaped from Hungary after the uprising, 52 year old Mrs Eva Kristof and her daughter Olga, a qualified chemist, find "life was good" in England. But then a compatriot started trying to persuade them to return to Budapest. The threat by the communists to harm Eva's nieces produces unbearable pressures, but for them, "the answer does not lie in Communism." On 18th January 1958 they attempt to gas themselves. Insp Ireland had found them unconscious in bed
To Taped Series Menu

.

.

.

.

No Hiding Place
starring with Raymond Francis as Tom Lockhart

The Superintendent Hedges a Bet 1.17 Victim of the Dark 3.6 The Widower 3.26 Dead Ringer 4.37 Beware of weepers 4.40 Operation Tiptoe
Lockhart Finds a Note 4.44 A Bird to Watch the Marbles 5.8 Expert wth Salt 7.14 Smokey 9.2 Ask Me If I Killed Her 9.14 A Home Posting
This was Associated Rediffusion's flagship crime series that ran for ten series. Raymond Francis had previously appeared in Murder Bag and Crime Sheet, but A-R went to some trouble to build on his character for this new hour long series. Max Ehrlich was brought in from America, "it's a question of speed," he explained. Added script editor Guy Morgan: "I feel that in the past Lockhart, as head of the Big Five, has been called in on a lot of crimes that were not important enough for an officer of his status. In future he will only deal with that type of the case that would make headlines in the national press." Publicity stated "viewers will see more of Lockhart the man," at home with his wife Mary and teenage daughter Jill. However stories they were actually in were few! Mary (Barbara Lott) appears in 1.4 A Genuine Sale of Murder and The Man Who Left His Coat, but anyone know if Jill was ever seen?
Before the second series in the summer of 1960, Guy Morgan told TV Times: "I don't want it to appear that crime detection is easy and that all cases are solved by one man....the plots will not solely concentrate on murder, they include a prison escape, a case of alleged police perjury and a bomb scare in a newspaper office." Ray Dicks (executive producer) tells about the addition of Deputy Commander Hutchins: "by showing that even Lockhart can have someone breathing down his neck." More outdoor filming was included to put the stories on authentic backgrounds.

Raymond Francis became a huge star through No Hiding Place, and wrote in 1964- "It's tough going, long hours and all that, but it's very enjoyable. Of course almost everyone calls me Lockhart and when my wife goes shopping at home in Eastbourne, she is always called Mrs Lockhart by shopkeepers!"
In a 1967 TV Times interview Raymond Francis declared- "When Lockhart began, it was a little too early to worry about being typecast. And by the time I woke up to that danger, it was too late." And asked about the future- "well of course I hope it goes on. If it does end for any reason, I think I could take it philosophically." Prophetic words for what was just around the corner- this series only finally came to an end because Rediffusion's contract was not renewed.

In July 1965 according to a TV Times article at the end of series 7, Lockhart had been "in 277 stories." Rediffusion had planned to axe the series at this point, but "viewer demand" brought it back! It's not entirely clear if this reference includes a few stories in which Lockhart's deputy appeared. However this reference suggests that there were 341 stories altogether (imdb lists 338), but how many are still in existence? One Crime Sheet is at the BFI, there's a clip of the titles on YouTube, and another issued by Network dvd. In the 1990's, the owners of the Rediffusion archive advertised only nine stories available for tv stations to buy, and it seems about 20+ survive, but where are the other 300 stories?
Some synopses from NHP series 5, from NHP series 9. Details of Echo Four-Two, a 1961 spin off with Eric Lander

To Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

No Hiding Place
had made an inauspicious start in 1957 with 57 live half hour stories titled
Murder Bag- click for outline details of some of this series.
Advance publicity stated the series was about "how Scotland Yard goes to work from the moment it discovers a murder has been committed." It was said Ray Francis prepared for the part "by visiting police stations and courts and talking to policemen."

In 1959 the title was changed to Crime Sheet.
Guy Taylor wrote- "Wondering why A-R has so much faith in Chief Supt Lockhart, I looked in on Wednesday August 5th 1959. Remembering the earlier Murder Bag programmes I will admit that the overall production has improved and the series is better for being on film (perhaps he means the linking scenes?), but the storylines still remain corny and just a little too obvious. The characters are black and white. They are not shaded to any degree of reality. The crooks are as crooked as you make them, and the police are just a little too staid and slick. Lockhart is devoid of any warmth or real character."
Despite the critics, after 23 episodes of Crime Sheet, in Autumn 1959 stories were lengthened to one hour, and No Hiding Place was born

To No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Series One
Opening - a policeman's hand indicates STOP to allow police car 892FPC to leave the Yard and proceed along Whitehall in a northerly direction and on to other London streets. Dt Chief Supt Lockhart is assisted by Sgt Baxter (Eric Lander)

1.17 "Victim of the Dark" (Jan 1960)
There's a cosy little introduction by Raymond Francis telling us about the remoteness even today of some country districts.
Then a film clip of a large property that would have been worthy of the later Avengers. Margaret (Marjorie Stewart) is returning home after a long spell away, spent in a mental home as we learn later. There's joy on the faces of her daughters Angela and Catherine, but her ex-husband Alfie (Peter Vaughan) is distinctly less welcoming. He'd been the cause of her breakdown, and now he's even married the 'other woman' Jean (Anna Turner) who has borne him two children, young Johnny, "the apple of his father's eye," and six month old Susan. But strangely it's Jean who had invited Margaret to stay. Perhaps it's partly because her marriage is now also on the rocks, because Alfred has been having an affair with their maid Gerte. "I never knew anyone could be so selfish," Jean tells her husband. She finds a sympathetic ear in Margaret, who despite her illness is now more rounded and understanding. But of course "cold-blooded" Alfred resents Margaret's presence. "Don't forget, if anything happens, you're responsible," he warns his wife.
Indeed something does happen. The introduction of these characters has taken up the whole of the first act and is a trifle out of proportion to what follows. Very surprisingly when there's a murder, it's little Johnny who's the victim.
Splashing through the puddles in their car 894FPC, Lockhart and Baxter come to investigate. The child had been killed with a knife in a shed at about 1am. First task is to locate the weapon and any blood stained clothing.
Whilst the search commences Lockhart orders the family to stay in their rooms so he can question them individually. Alfred blames Margaret as "she's been in an asylum." But he's rather suspicious too, as he has a bad cut, got whilst shaving he claims. Viewers must have hoped he's the killer, but he has no obvious motive.
Jean is of course very upset and blames herself. To hurt Alfred, she had made up a story that Johnny wasn't his son.
Gerte admits threatening Alfred after he'd broken a promise to marry her.
With the characters thus well developed, the ending comes too abruptly. As Lockhart questions Marjorie, a torn nightdress is discovered stuffed up a chimney. "Why did you do it?" the police superintendent asks the killer
No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Series Three
The opening sequence showed a policeman holding up his hand authoritatively to allow through a police car (the familiar 892FPC). Whilst this is the same as the series one opening, the pictures then differ. Dt Chief Supt Lockhart is assisted by Dt Sgt Baxter (Eric Lander)

3.6 "The Widower" (Mar 1961)
Here's a gem of a part for Griffith Jones.

Mr Slade-Jones (Griffith Jones) is grief stricken over the death of his wife Amelia, died 26th October 1960. Only been married 3 months, she died of a heart attack. According to his landlady Mrs Nuggett (Gwen Nelson) he has taken a ring promised to her. Furthermore, she believes he poisoned her! But where is he now? Noone seems to be able to give a precise description except Mrs Nuggett who says he had "horns, cloven hooves and a big blue beard." Quips Lockhart who's frustrated by his disappearance: "at least that's something definite!" Meanwhile,"impeccably dressed" Henry has returned home to his real wife, after months of "secret service work." In his specially locked room he keeps the jewellery he's inherited from his deceased 'wife' as well as lots of plants and scientific apparatus. He has to go off to work again, however, and a Mr Fraser-Smith is now wooing another wealthy widow Edith Sudbury (Georgina Cookson). He asks his wife to check her credentials: "Henry, I do hope you know what you're doing," his wife innocently tells him. He does, they're soon married, and shortly the new wife's heart is having "a wee flutter."
Dt Sally Jordan (Rowena Gregory) gets a lucky break when she spots the disputed ring on a woman in a Knightsbridge hotel. Her action leads Lockhart to Henry Potter, a lab assistant who had been convicted of theft back in 1949. A constable recognises the photo leading Lockhart and Baxter to Henry's real home where his wife of course, cannot discuss his top secret work, which is "of a highly confidential and important nature." But a look round his secret room convinces the police that "Mr Potter is preparing the way for his next victim." Indeed he is, waiting like a spider to adminster a fatal dose of nicotine. But in burst the police. Poetic justic ends this Case

No Hiding Place Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

3.26 "Dead Ringer" (Aug 1961)

George Berrington (Jack Rodney), a 'painter' (ie a fixer) of horses is wanted for murdering an Epsom stable lad, but the only witness has just been killed in a motoring accident.
His boss, Joe Mulvaney (Peter Vaughan) who's in cahoots with trainer Frank (John Horsley), now finds a dead ringer for the dud Frzser D who's running at Alford Park. Berrington has to make it look like Frazer D. A police expert explains to Lockhart "they switch a good animal to represent an indifferent one, and when the substitute wins they have to produce the genuine horse..." Lockhart completes the horrible sequence "... and so they destroy a good one." Mulvaney starts betting on the outsider, but the odds fall too quickly when Madge, Berrington's wife, places a £3,000 bet on FD. "You ain't 'alf started something." Yes Frazer D wins, but as joint favourite at 4-1 noone makes a packet. Mrs Berrington is questioned why she's chartered a flight from Gatwick to Paris, paid, no doubt, out of her winnings.
The buried animal is found, Berrington lying dead alongside. "I'm going to call my solicitor," snarls Joe Mulvaney when he and Frank are accused of murder. They only admit that they ordered Berrington to kill the horse. "And then," jokes Lockhart, "he committed suicide, fell into the hole and buried himself." But they are cleared as it's finally proved who really did it.
A quick moving story with a flowing plot and characters that gel. This, the final programme of the series, ends with assistant Harry promoted to Detective Inspector Baxter

No Hiding Place Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Series Four
The brief opening depicted Dt Chief Supt Lockhart and Dt Insp Baxter being driven in Humber 408CXW.

4.37 "Beware of Weepers" (Jan 1963)
Out of the snow in a hut, tramps Mort (Reg Lye) and Joss (Duncan Lewis) spot some gelignite. "There's a fortune in this stuff!"
Baxter is just off to watch Fulham ("you ought to be in mourning," jokes Lockhart) when they are called in to investigate the theft of "weepers," unstable pieces of gelignite. "Don't get yourself blown up," Lockhart still in jocular mood warns Baxter, "your intray's still full."
The tramps break into a factory to crack a safe. It's when the jelly explodes prematurely that they discover it's unsafe, and they scarper double quick. Mort ropes in Joe Macclesfield (Danny Green) "a real criminal" to help his next job, robbing a music hall. Another failure! Joe is picked up, in tatters. "All time booby prize" Lockhart awards him, convincing Joe the weepers need to be traced urgently. However, by now Mort and Joss are approaching "one of the big boys" (Harry Fowler) who won't buy, warning them it's too dangerous.
An inebriate woman breaks into the tramps' ramshackle home under a railway arch. She overhears them discussing their problem: "no need to lose our heads!" A sewer on the Brighton Road is where they decide to bury it, but with the woman's info Lockhart and Baxter race to catch them up. The jelly has already been chucked down a manhole: "you need a gas mask for this job, sir." Rashly Baxter radios for help which triggers the explosives. One rather battered explosives expert (Ewan Roberts) glares out of the sewer. A trace of a smile creeps over Lockhart's face.
That perhaps sums up this story in which writer Bill Strutton can't quite decide whether to make a tense drama or a comedy out of a potentially explosive situation
No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

4.40 "Operation Tiptoe" (Feb 1963)

"Thank you Tiptoes" is how a stylish thief has signed his calling card at no less than 47 robberies in the past two years four months. As the investigating officer is retiring, Baxter is briefed: none of the stolen jewellery has been recovered.
Job 48 is in Kensington, a £1,100 necklace, only recently purchased from Frazer of Knightsbridge. A footprint shows the thief wore crepe soled shoes, and these are eventually traced to a Mr Freelove.
Infidelity proves to be the downfall of the crook. We meet Eddie Frazer (Ian Shand) with his secretary Jennifer. Her husband suspects her and her "fancy pants." We also meet impresario Mendelssohn-Jones who has given a £3,500 necklace to his "baby doll" Michelle Duval. But is his "French oo-la-la" two-timing him? A detective, Guppy Watson is assigned to watch her.
Thus Job 49 proves Frazer's downfall. At Mme Duval's flat Guppy watches Frazer drive up in the snow and climb up to her balcony. Lockhart and Baxter catch up with Frazer alias Freelove, but it's too late- he's dead. Who killed him? Jennifer or her husband, who admits following Frazer, or Guppy or his paymasters? A final scene is at Mendelssohn-Jones' office where the killer stupidly gives himself away.

Well defined characters in this story, though it doesn't quite capture the swagger of the gentleman thief

No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

"A Bird to Watch the Marbles"

The family funeral of Joe Stanley, a crook whom Lockhart had only once caught, "nobody's perfect."
Louise wants to marry Dave, Joe's son, but her dad absolutely refuses, "there's plenty of other fish."
Clive Dudley (Derek Francis) is the manager of actress Miss Vanessa Purchase (Delphi Lawrence). He is seeing her off on The Golden Arrow when her case containing her jewels is stolen. The thief is Dave, the value £80,000.
Lockhart is brought in. He wonders if the case is all about her "instinct for publicity." But he pops round to Joe's old house and Dave is persuaded to hand over the jewels he has hidden up the chimney. However not all of them. He says that is all he nicked. But the most valuable pearls have gone.
The insurance company receive a tipoff from Marlowe, an informer, who stands to get a big reward. But next day he is found dead. His dying words were, "a bird to watch the marbles." A comic named Like had threatened Marlowe with a mallet only the day previously. His alibi is that he had been with Joe's daughter, Marge.
Worried that his sister Marge will get beaten up, Dave tells the police where the pearls are. However they have disappeared from this place.
After arresting the villain, Lockhart has some nasty news for Vanessa

No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Series Five

5.8 "Expert with Salt" (Aug 1963)
The opening scenes at a Wimbledon tennis party are far too complex, unsuccessfully attempting to introduce too many characters.
Stockbroker Arnold Gracie (Ronald Leigh-Hunt) "owns one of the biggest broking houses in the City." Together with Derek (Ronald Allen), a scam is planned on Charles Milner, currently staying at the Belvedere Hotel. They have concoted an assay report on a valuable gold mine which Derek, accidentally on purpose, has left behind in a taxi he's been sharing with Milner: "the fish is hooked."
However blonde Gloria, a model friend of Arnold's, and who can't act, get's pally with Australian Sadler (Alan White) who's a con artist himself. He's been brought to this country by Nesta who works for Justine (Naomi Chance) and together they plan to diddle her of "thousands and thousands." But Sadler, an expert himself in the old dodge of "salting" mines to make them appear to contain a genuine seam of gold, gets greedy and tries to muscle in on Arnold and Derek's scam. He breaks into Derek's home and finds a phoney gold mine report. Thus he realises it is indeed a "squeeze" and that Milner is "being taken for a ride." He approaches the swindlers demanding an equal cut. They "kid him along," playing for time.
Keeping a watching brief is Lockhart's team. Non-intervention is their current attitude: "people who are being conned don't appreciate advice- not until it's too late."
In her posh Regent's Park house, Justine receives a report, this is part of Sadler and Nesta's blackmail plan. It purports to be in her late husband's handwriting, implicating him in a gold mine scam. Arnold and Derek's shakedown of Milner is complete, as he hands over £22,400 believing he's investing in shares in a real mine.
Finally Lockhart moves. Sadler's plan is to "retire for life" which indirectly comes true, as he is found murdered in his flat, his pockets cleaned out. Murder weapon seems to be a yellow metallic figure. Odd that Milner claims he saw this figure in Arnold's office. Arnold is about to do a runner when Inspector Baxter catches up with him and he's arrested.
But who killed Sadler? Nesta is questioned and provides, says Lockhart, a pack of lies. However her conviction that Sadler should have had plenty of cash on him rings true. Then Justine is interrogated. Lockhart has discovered it was Sadler who had worked with her late husband to fake a gold mine. More lies. Finally the truth
No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

Series Seven
Opening sequence with a camera closing in on the Yard. Lockhart on the phone answers "Lockhart here." Then a picture of the Houses of Parliament with our chief superintendent riding past. His car then picks up his two assistants.

7.14 "Smokey" (Apr 1965)
A potential Derby winner is "the pin-up of the greyhound world." His minder Jerry Dempsey (Donal Donnelly) is in financial difficulties and seeks help from "tough nut" Harry Lavey (Glyn Houston). It's forthcoming to the tune of £300, as long as Jerry fixes the dog. Jerry's girl has "problems of me own" including her unemployed father Smokey Flynn (Liam Redmond) who used to be one of the best greyhound trainers.
Smokey gets wind of what Jerry is planning and tips off the dog's owner Joe Briggs who dashes off to the race meeting where the betting scam is going on and ends up with his head bashed in. The dog that has won the race, The Thief of Bagdad had conveniently broken a hock and had to be destroyed. So when Lockhart arrives on the scene, he finds it difficult to prove any scam has taken place. Nor can he find Smokey who has been hidden away by Jerry, since he knows it was The Queen of Fiji that had actually run in the race. Although a prisoner, Smokey is still able to lecture Jerry, warning him that he doesn't want to end up the same way as he, old Smokey, has gone.
Lavey realises that as Smokey is wise to the scam, he will inevitably talk eventually. So he and his mob decide to arrange for Smokey's 'suicide:' "he's like a dog that can't run any more." Luckily the police arrive in time. Jerry has admitted he killed Briggs as he was on to the scam.
Whilst this is a mainly sympathetic portrayal of the greyhound world, the characters don't come over as entirely convincing and so the story really never quite comes alive
No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

Series Nine
The opening sequence showed a window being smashed followed by various other crimes. Dt Chief Supt Lockhart is assisted by Dt Sgt Russell (Johnny Briggs) and Dt Sgt Perryman (Michael McStay).


9.2 "Ask me If I killed Her" (May 11th 1966)-
A filmed scene at a post office introduces Duncan Myers (Derek Godfrey) who is asking if any letters have arrived for him. We follow him back to his work at a college where his wife (Yootha Joyce) is the principal. She realises he is disturbed by the fact that his affair with Anne seems to be over and warns him "don't make a fool of yourself."
Now there's film of Anne (wonderfully played by Mary Miller), walking along a street, watched by Duncan. He finally makes up his mind and joins Anne, who is ecstatic. A sour Mrs Myers goes to the police to inform them "the last time this happened he murdered a girl." He strangled Janet Ainley three years ago in 1963 in a holiday camp, and she's worried he's going to murder again! As Lockhart's busy in court, Dt Sgt Perryman is told to check out her claim, but Lockhart warns him "Peter Treble killed her, you can take my word for that."
So, with Lockhart's doubts ringing in his ears, Perryman interviews Mrs Myers wanting first of all to know why she has taken three years before coming forward. "I think it's possible we've made a mistake," Perryman, after some reflection, suggests to his boss. Lockhart is not amused: "what do you know?" he asks pointedly, with the emphasis on the 'know.' It's true Myers had had an affair with Janet but even though Treble wasn't convicted of the crime, Lockhart is sure in his own mind he was guilty.
Publicity seeking Myers' whereabouts comes to Anne's attention so she suggests he call at a police station just to reassure them he's OK and that he's not returning to his wife. But Myers, perhaps fearing something else, refuses to go.
Another filmed interlude as Anne drives her Mini, discussing her situation with a friend (Shirley Cain), rationalising her thoughts in favour of Duncan. A nagging voice urges her to contact the police, which she does, just to let them know Duncan is fine. The police speed to see the couple but they've run off together to his secret hideaway: "they won't find us here."
Anne and Duncan are discussing his past. His attitude to his late ex-girl friend is very ambivalent, making for some tension. He's getting rather drunk. Is Anne worried he did kill Janet? Yes, he did see her the night she died, but like tonight, he was too drunk to recall what happened. He forces her to express her view, Anne screaming "I think you killed her!"
Lockhart can now spare the time to join in the hunt. He's used his brains and worked out where they might be. Arrival of Lockhart to comfort a hysterical girl.
Myers is questioned, but the evidence proves he is not guilty. Lockhart breaks the news to Anne who is free to do what she wants...
No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

"A Home Posting"

The 1st Devonshire Duty officer has better things than stay in the Armoury, he leaves Smithy in charge, who is killed when two intruders steal twelve machine guns and a pistol. Cpt Holly (Alan Macnaughtan) brings in Lockhart who questions the duty officer Corporal Johns. He blames Mrs Betty Black (Patricia Haines) who'd enticed him away. Sgt Black (Derek Newark) and Lt Morrison (David Lander) had then entered the armoury, though the brains behind the robbery is Mrs Sheila Morrison (Jane Downs). Ten of the guns are recovered, and the motive for the robbery is unclear. The missing pistol is found in a search of Black's quarters and he is arrested. That driving force, Mrs Morrison, goes ahead with her plans, Mrs Black standing in for her husband. Their target- an army pay truck. Success eludes them when the box with the payroll is too heavy to carry and after opening it with machine gun fire, Betty Black is accidentally killed by a ricochet. "A bunch of right amateurs." Expecting her nervy husband to bluff it out is another mistake by Mrs Morrison. Sgt Black, distrssed by his wife's death, comes clean and the too simple case is easily closed, but at least you can admire the good acting in this story

No Hiding Place . . . Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Superintendent Hedges a Bet
Crime Sheet Story 4 (April 29th 1959)

Can be viewed at BFI

NHP Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Lockhart Finds a Note
available in the "ITV60" dvd release
Crime Sheet story 17 (July 29th 1959)

A case about crooks who steal letters in order to remove cheques and alter the value. Lockhart briefs his four assistants.
Three crooks are behind the racket, Harry, his girl Linda, and Danny. They have come into possession of one letter from shipping magnate Everton McDonough made out for £9 10/-, this is altered to £940 10/-. The crooks' associate, Mark, obtains hotel notepaper from where McDonough is staying, and Danny then takes the forged cheque with a covering letter to the bank.
Linda also goes to the bank to keep an eye on the cash. Then the gang share out the cash. With such a good haul, they decide it is time to take a holiday. Harry and Linda plan to go to Spain.
The fly in the ointment is that Linda has fallen for Danny. She intends to ditch Harry and fly to Ireland with Danny.
The chief bank clerk alerts Scotland Yard to the fraud, and Sgt Melvin takes down the serial numbers of the banknotes. One of the banknotes is handed in at Curzon Court. That leads Melvin to Jacobs.
Files at the Yard suggest Harry Dane is the likely forger, and Lockhart calls at his home. He breaks down the front door, nearly wrecking the studio wall, which rattles alarmingly! Harry has flown the nest.
At London Airport police are in time to Danny and Linda. Harry has also been found and is being questioned, and Linda's farewell note to him is entertainingly damning evidence. It's a good twist to finish

NHP Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Echo Four-Two (1961, A-R)
A spin-off from No Hiding Place starring Eric Lander as Detective-Inspector Baxter, in charge of the Q-Car Divison, and with Geoffrey Russell as Det-Sgt York.
Music by Laurie Johnson, issued on the reverse of the recording of Sucu Sucu, on Pye N15383.

1 First Day Out (Thurs Aug 24th 1961, 8-8.30pm)
2 The Dummies (Aug 31st 1961)
Script: Bill Strutton. Director: James Ormerod.
Also in this cast: Barry Steele (Snelling), Matthew Vaughan (Sligo), Nelson Adams (Charlie), Raymond Hodge (PC Proudlove), Jill Melford (Joanna Chance), Julie Paul (Elsie), George Pastell (Joseph Marks, Doel Luscombe (Joiner), and Michael Harrison (Fred).
A safe in full view from a neon-lit shop window, is stolen without any suspicion beng aroused. The cleverness of the theft is a challenge to the police.
3 Bag and Baggage (Sept 7th 1961)
Script: Leonard Fincham. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Also in this cast: Dermot Kelly (George Kelly), Neil McCarthy (Birdie Martin), Gerald Turner (Railway police constable), Peter Glaze (Doctor), John Scott (Railway police sergeant), and Brenda Dunrch (Landlady). Travel Light would appear as good a motto for baggage thieves as for their victims.
4 Innocent Informer (Wed Sept 13th 1961, 8.55pm)
Script: John Roddick. Director: James Ormerod.
Also in this cast: Geoffrey Chater (Acting Supt Dean), Olive Lucius (Carla Perigo), Bartlett Mullins (Tulio Salvatri), Christopher Guinee (Bennie Finch), Tony Bronte (Mickie Darrow), Jeane Franks (Ellie), Margaret St Barbe West (Dolly Seymour), Hamlyn Benson (Hugh Lawford), Mercy Haystead (Shirley Winston), and Maureen Beck (Jill Elland).
Baxter and York conduct two separate enquiries, meeting with everything including the kitchen sink!
5 Hot Money (Sept 20th 1961)
Script: Leslie Watkins. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Also in the cast: Fiona Duncan (Angela Maxwell), Margaret Gordon (Catherine Morley), Peter Thomas (Mr Matthews), John Moore (John Peterson), Philip Latham (Sid Fensome), Kevin Stoney (Owen Shelby), and Gawn Grainger (Reginald Haydon).
Baxter finds out how money makes money in a rather unusual way.
6 Opportunity Taken (Sept 27th 1961)
Script: Peter Yeldham. Director: Wilfred Eades.
Also in this cast: Donald Morley (Sam Norman), Yolande Turner (Angela Russell), George Mikell (Julio Anvers), Peter Elliott (Barman Frank Delany), Jeremy Longhurst (Driver PC Bird- recurring character), Yvonne Ball (Kitty Haynes), and Anthony Harrison (Georgie Starr).
On duty, Baxter and York visit a night club, and don't get home until morning.
7 Break Out (Oct 4th 1961)
8 Frozen Fire (Oct 11th 1961)
9 There She Blows (Oct 18th 1961)
Script: Frederic Gold. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Also in this cast:Jeremy Longhurst (PC Bird), Fred McNaughton (Staff manager), Hermione Gregory (Secretary), Jack Smethurst (Jack Sprawling), Diane Hart (Marie Perry), Anthony Sagar (Frank Perry), David Gregory (Lennie Meadows), Russell Waters (Tom Dark), Martin Miller (Hymie), and Margot Lister (Sadie).
Careless talk about a payroll causes overtime for Q Cars.
10 The Kite Dropper (Oct 25th 1961)- final story

No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Rat Catchers
For
brief outlines of the stories. This is the 1960's favourite world, espionage and secret agents.
Gerald Flood starred as Peregrine Pascale Smith, MD of Transworld Electronics. He travels in his Rolls Royce, driven by his chauffeur Miniver. Utterly callous. Susceptible to beautiful women, inclined to conceit.
With Glyn Owen as Ex-Supt Richard William Hurst, security officer at Transworld. Efficient but lacking finesse ie not a gentleman, uncouth even. He shows pedantic attention to detail, still following the police manual which guided him when a detective at Scotland Yard.
Also starring was Philip Stone as Brigadier H St J Davidson, adviser to a government committee on exports and imports. Head of the ultimate-secret unit of British Intelligence. Declared his publicity, 'his only indulgence is feeding his unsmiling face with cream cakes.'
The music for the Rat Catchers was composed by Johnny Pearson. Cyril Coke edited and produced the series.

1:3 The Unwitting Courier (February 14th 1966)
The Brigadier argues with Hurst over his attitude, as they await Peregrine Smith's arrival. There is a problem. Two couriers in Madrid have been killed. The Brigadier wants to use a third, a Mrs Jane Hope-Dawson (Jeanne Moody), but she's not to know she is being used. She is an American sales manager, and Smith's task is to get her to take the information without her realising it.
But in fact she too is an agent, working for the FBI. She flies in from New York, Peregrine greeting her at the airport. But it seems he's been upstaged, a millionaire Harry Beshman (David Bauer) is an admirer and gets in first. He's smitten with her. That makes Peregrine just a bit peeved, much to the Brigadier's later amusement.
Jane makes the next move, bearding the Brigadier in his den. Obliquely she tells him she has come for revenge on the organisation Alpha who had killed their courier. Will he cooperate? He tries to look blank. "We're well past the tea and crumpet stage," she nicely informs him.
One known Alpha agent she is after is already known to the Brigadier. Actually "his name is Hurst," he lies to her. This is all part of the Brigadier's own devious plan.
Jane enjoys a night on the town with Beshman, dining, gambling. Hurst is sent to tail them. An old police colleague notices what he's doing, and warns him off.
"Too obvious," Peregrine tells Hurst later. Beshman also wants to know why Hurst is following them. To find out, he asks Peregrine of all people to help. Cunningly Peregrine suggests Beshman checks up whether Jane is an Alpha agent really after his money. That results in a showdown between Jane and Beshman, a rather one-sided one. Beshman is easy meat, and is out for the count. The story fizzles out as Jane leaves for Puerto Rico without him.
All that's left to do is for poor Hurst to undertake that Madrid courier job

Surviving fragments, nearly all on film of
1.7 The Umbrella - Ronald Howard is seen in the finale, Hurst follows his man to the very top of the statue in Rio
2.10 The Heel of Achilles (February 23rd 1967) - Peregrine follows a girl to the top of the Acropolis. A trap, he's shot at. Another trap- Hurst follows the girl. She waves to him across a lake. He is nearly shot by a waiting assassin
To Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Rat Catchers: STORY OUTLINE DETAILS
1:1 Ticket to Madrid (Monday January 31st 1966, 8pm, some regions February 2nd 1966, 8pm)
Script: Raymond Bowers. The director was James Ormerod.
With Jan Waters as Miss Larks.
It is with surprise and some disgust that Richard Hurst begins to learn just what his new job entails, a job that is to lead him down a lonely, strange and dangerous road.
1:2 The Captain Morales Way (February 7th 1966)
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: James Ormerod.
With Edward de Souza as Captain Morales.
In carrying out an apparently simple task in Madrid, Hurst comes face to face with the cold horror of the new world into which he has been admitted.
1:3 The Unwitting Courier (February 14th 1966) - this episode survives
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: James Ormerod.
With David Bauer as Harry Beschman, Jeanne Moody as Jane Hope-Dawson, Tsai Chin as Chinese girl.
A friendly foreign agent can sometimes be a danger- no matter how beautiful she may be. At such times the Brigadier finds it necessary to be diverting in more ways than one.
1:4 Madrid Delivery (February 21st 1966)
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: James Ormerod.
With Patricia English as Betty and Edward de Souza as Captain Morales.
It is in Madrid that vital information must be passed to other hands. It is Hurst who is detailed to pass it, so it is he who is placed in the greatest danger- danger greater than perhaps even The Brigadier envisaged.
1:5 The Missing Agent (February 28th 1966)
1:6 The Baited Hook (March 7th 1966)
Script: Paul Lee. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
With Wanda Ventham as Gerde, Sandor Eles as Nils.
A door difficult to open... an old man recovering from an illness... a Swedish student anxious to learn English. And somewhere, a girl with a gun. All these can only lead to - danger in Stockholm.
1:7 The Umbrella (March 14th 1966)
Script: Jeremy Paul. Director: Don Gale.
With Ronald Howard as Charles Lysaght (also in 1:7, 1:8), Robert Raglan, Jonathan Elsom, Tenniel Evans.
it's called the Umbrella Project. Once it is in operation, our whole nation will be protected from all aerial attack. But the project is threatened by a vital breach of security. Where and who is the leak> Time is short. Action is vital.
1:8 Thieves' Market (March 21st 1966)
Script: Jeremy Paul. Director: Don Gale.
With Ronald Howard, and Edward Underdown.
An old man in a wheelchair... a Nazi general's memoirs... a golf bag flown to Lisbon. Somewhere there lurks a traitor, but who is he? Lisbon holds the key.
1:9 Return of Evil (March 28th 1966)
Script: Jeremy Paul. Director: Don Gale.
With Madeleine Mills, Ronald Howard, John Gabriel, John Abineri, and Geoffrey Palmer as tv interviewer.
As Smith and Hurst follow the trail of a possible traitor, there comes a threat from the past- the return of one man whose shadow could envelop all Europe. The danger point is Lisbon.
1:10 The Edge of Disaster (April 6th 1966)
Script: Paul Lee. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
With Reginald Marsh as Barlow, and Geoffrey Palmer (Washington TV reporter).
It hangs in the air around us, it is invisible and yet pointed with deadly accuracy. As a nation we are threatened. How can it be found, isolated, and destroyed?
1:11 Operation Lost Souls (April 13th 1966)
Script: Victor Canning. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
With Bernard Kay, Eugene Deckers, Patricia Haines (these all in 1:12 and 1:13 also), and Liz Gebhardt as Receptionist.
Traitors for sale- but by whom? The trail leads Smith and Hurst to Geneva. But traitors, like a lot of other goods, can be perishable.
1:12 Operation Irish Triangle (April 20th 1966)
Script: Victor Canning. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
Also with Alan Gifford and Rachel Gurney (who are both also in 1:13).
A strange operation seems to be brewing in Ireland. It has the earmarks of being vital and dangerous. What's in the mysterious parcel? Why does Irving Caldwell (John Mackin) arrive from America? And whose side is the beautiful Arlette Maylam (P Haines) really on? (Location shooting for this story was done at Dromoland Castle.)
1:13 Operation Big Finish (April 27th 1966)
Script: Victor Canning. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
Everything is getting set for the kill. But what exactly is the operation? And where will it take place? Can the Brigadier's little lot prevent what would be one of history's most spectacular crimes?
2:1 Rendezvous- Vienna (Monday December 12th 1966, 9.10pm, some regions: December 15th 1966)
Script: Jeremy Paul. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
With Geoffrey Palmer as Timothy Hoylake, Zulema Dene as Henrietta Hoylake.
Why has Hoylake suddenly gone to Vienna? Because it's a beautiful city, or because it's near the Iron Curtain?
2:2 Mission to Madeira (December 19th 1966)
2:3 Death in Madeira (Wednesday January 4th 1967 8pm, Tuesday January 10th 1967 9.10pm)
Script: Victor Canning. Director: Don Gale.
With Frederick Treves, Hannah Gordon, John Abineri and Richard Warner.
Hurst wants to resign for personal reasons. The Brigadier's plan to prevent this results in violence of a most unpleasant variety.
2:4 Midnight Over Madeira (January 11th/17th 1967)
Script: Victor Canning. Director: Don Gale.
With Frederick Treves, John Abineri, Richard Warner and Jerry Stovin.
The death of one particular man would send the worl'd stock markets crashing and make a gigantic fortune for the Midas Consortium. Is there a way to prevent it? There is little time.
2:5 Wednesday in Dubrovnik (January 18th 1967)
2:6 Murder in Mostar (January 25th/31st 1967)
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: James Ormerod.
With Reginald Marsh, Derren Nesbitt, and Jacqueline Ellis as Miss Larks (different to 1:1).
Murder- an unpleasant murder. The Brigadier's miscalculation puts Smith and Hurst in a state of revolt.
2:7 Dead-End - Dubrovnik (February 1st/7th 1967)
2:8 Big Grab - Amsterdam (February 8th/14th 1967)
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: James Ormerod.
With Jacqueline Ellis as Miss Larks, Cyril Shaps, Raymond Huntley.
An American disappears in Amsterdam- Washington presses for action. The Brigadier's plan must be fast and deadly.
2:9 Retribution Amsterdam (February 15th/21st 1967)
Script: Jeremy Paul. Director: James Ormerod.
With Jacqueline Ellis, Cyril Shaps, Raymond Huntley.
A hidden prisoner, and an acute brain matched against the Brigadier's. The only way out will depend on the Brigadier's orders being followed to the letter, orders that could produce horrifying results.
2:10 The Heel of Achilles (February 22nd/28th 1967)
2:11 The Seven Pillars of Hercules (March 1st/7th 1967)
Script: Stanley Miller. Director: Don Gale.
With Dora Reisser as Gerde and Yanni Voglis as John Casimir (both also in 2:12). Also with Anthony Marlowe, Catherine Lacey, Esmond Knight, Ralph Michael.
High up in the mountains of Greece, a man is hiding. The Brigadier has ordered his capture. But so has Madame Achmet (CL), and her weapons are likely to be far more deadly.
2:12 The Mask of Agamemnon (March 8th/14th 1967 -final story)
Back to
The Rat Catchers

.

.

.

.

.

.

Redcap with John Thaw as Sgt Mann

Perhaps I shouldn't write it, but this is one series that it wouldn't have mattered if it had been junked, though all surviving stories are available on dvd.

1 "It's What Comes After" -Excellent story by William Emms. Why has exemplary Cpt Lynne (Keith Barron) suddenly become a bundle of nerves?
2 "A Town Called Love" -Local girl Magda "puts the squeeze" on Army personnel, forcing them to steal to order or be reported for pilfering. Pendlebury (Michael Robbins) is the latest victim, but when Magda is found "carved up" Pendlebury "goes over the wall." Unofficially, Mann also goes to East Germany to bring him home, but he's rumbled by the Commies and an exchange has to be arranged, but not before Mann has given Pendlebury the route how to escape back to the West. Somehow he makes it, without even Simon Templar to help him. Maybe in those days, scriptwriters didn't realise you couldn't just 'pop over' the border.
3 "Epitaph for a Sweat" - In a "god forsaken unit" in Aden, Sgt Rolfe (Leonard Rossiter, appearing to out-Hartnell William) works over a native "wog" who naturally complains. An overlong story of army bullies and political expedience that could still, sadly, apply today
4 "Misfire"
5 "Corporal McKann's Private War"
6 "The Orderly Officer"
7 "Night Watch" - Sgt Graham (Brian Wilde) is "in a mess." He's been busted to private after a court martial in Burma. But his whole platoon under Major Stokely (Allan Cuthertson) are at rock bottom morale, about to "burst and the pus come flying out." Me, I just nodded off
8 "The Boys of B Company" -Strict discipline in a company of cadets, Duffy (Richard O'Sullivan) one shining example. But "nutcase" Bellamy attempts suicide and Pickering kicks over the traces. Sgt Mann, with a few cheap bribes of fags, uncovers an all too familiar tale of sadistic bullying and blind eyes among the senior officers. This is a fine portrait of a young lad promoted without an understanding of the proper use of power. A kind of updated Tom Brown's Schooldays, in which "kiss my boots" can hardly be "horseplay," for it brings its own revenge
9 "A Regiment of the Line" -"The Queen's Own Scottish are back" in Germany long after the war, "one forgets so easily." But old bitternesses end in a riot, then worse when Hughie Scanlan (Colin Blakely) provokes a brawl in a cafe, killing the German bartender. His colonel (James Grout), with his own bitter war memories, is rather obstructive when Sgt Mann investigates, but when Scanlan's mate Tolley absconds it almost seems the Case should be closed. An impressive stand off rounds off the story
11 "A Question of Initiative" - A German civvy is run over by soldiers who'd stolen a car on a tough initiative test. As we know the guilty pair, the interest is seeing how Sgt Mann solves the Case and deals with the delicate political implications. The final Act nearly does a fine job of fleshing these out
12 "A Place of Refuge" -By gad sir, Major Trust is blowing his brains out. Perhaps it's no coincidence but money has been borrowed from regimental funds. When Sgt Mann isn't "dead careful" interrogating civilian Wendy, the major's girl friend, he's withdrawn from the Case, but he still finds enough evidence that she's involved in drug trafficking. The story provides an interesting role for Barbara Jefford as the ambivalent Wendy, "you're not a woman, you're a psychopath."
13 "The Patrol" - Sgt Mann lands in the jungle to get statements from a patrol commanded by two "eccentrics" (Graham Crowden, Robin Bailey). Much crawling round the studio jungle before Mann sees some Action. Truly Awful

14 "Crime Passionel" - A respected sergeant is shot dead in a crowded canteen. Why is the truth being covered up?
15 "Pride of the Regiment" - A simple investigation into a pub brawl leads Sgt Mann to the sad story of 'What Price the Hero Now,' Fred Barratt VC. Mann teaches him some home truths about living on past glory. George Sewell gives a strong portrayal of the tarnished hero in Arden Winch's excellent drama
16 "The Killer" - Old friend O'Keefe (Garfield Morgan), the 'Blue Angel of Bolton,' is a sergeant in the "toughest mob" in the army. He wants Mann to uncover a killer he believes is in his unit, so Mann joins them on an exercise. Nevertheless he fails to prevent O'Keefe from ending up with his throat slit. But does Mann then arrest the wrong man? He doesn't exactly cover himself with glory
17 "Buckingham Palace" - At a snowy Cyprus relay signal station, a gambling craze leads to murder. No1 suspect is Cpl Cowell, though Sgt Buckett (William Lucas) knows a Greek called Butros (Peter Bowles) is the guilty man. Sgt Mann plays poker to prove there's been a security leak
18 "Rough Justice" - Impressive script about laxness in an upper crust crack regiment, under its colonel (Terence Longdon), where new recruit Richardson (Edward Fox) is tarred and feathered by his fellow officers, juvenile squirts all of them. Richardson disappears just before Sgt Mann inspects the books, which Richardson had been blackmailed into fiddling
21 "Paterson's Private Army" - A sub machine gun has gone missing from a Jungle Warfare Training School. It had been in the care of Cpl Donald (Colin Campbell) who is a genuine Scot, but some of the cast struggle bravely with their Scots accents, notably Pte Ogilvie (Geoffrey Whitehead), Sgt Burns (John Junkin) and Major Cleghorn (John Horsley). Sgt Mann meets the bitter members of Donald's platoon and the case seems "far too obvious" though I would have called it plain uninteresting. "I'm a bit fogged," admits Sgt Burns, and he isn't the only one. Even Mann has to conclude "it doesn't make any sense at all"
22 "Stag Party" - Terrorists at a Greek base? Or an inside job? A grenade during a strip poker game seems to be an act of jealousy- "it's pretty obvious, if you think about it." Ann Lynn enlivens a dull story, whilst Harold Goodwin as a Greek policeman delivers an odd Anglo-Greek accent
24 "Time Alibi" - AWOL, Cpl Harkness is identified at an ID parade as a robber. Mann has to find out why this "model soldier" has gone "off the rails" in a plot and guest star, Keith Barron, somewhat akin to the first story of the first series. This time it's a girl (surprise!- "I met this girl...") and when the cash is found in Harkness' room it looks pretty conclusive. To prove his innocence, all Mann has to do is break down a naval officer's alibi
25 "The Proper Charlie" - Who beat up Charlie Ringwold, a shy recruit with 2 left feet?
26 "Information Received"- MP Sgt Bamber (James Grout) is accused anonymously of nicking petrol. But Harry Bamber is an old colleague of Sgt Mann who can't believe such a straightforward chap be guilty. The right thief is found and he admits writing the accusation. But, this, Mann's last case, is only now beginning....

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

POLICE SURGEON (1960)
Ian Hendry starred as Dr Geoffrey Brent, a young ideallistic police surgeon in London. The next year Hendry returned as Dr David Keel in, of course, The Avengers. But there is no connection between the two series apart from this, and the fact that ABC made both.
Appearing alongside Hendry in some stories was John Warwick as Inspector Landon, based at Bayswater police station. Ingrid Hafner as Dr Brent's receptionist was another semi-regular. Julian Bond produced the first four stories, the rest were in the hands of Leonard White.The theme music was entitled The Big Knife.
13 stories were announced though only twelve stories were transmitted. Indeed Police Surgeon was panned by critics, one (LM) complaining that the first story was "amateurish, long-winded and unrealistic... it was just too much to swallow!" He concluded, "if this exaggerated series wins any plaudits at all- well, I'd be surprised."

1 "Easy Money" (September 10th 1960, 7pm)
Script: Julian Bond. Director: John Knight. Just out of Borstal, Jim Clark (Michael Crawford) is arrested when he's found standing by a cigarette machine that has been knocked off, with twenty half crowns on his person. Inspector Bryant (Robin Wentworth) questions the lad, who claims he won the money at the dogs.
Kindly Dr Brent is at the nick to examine Murphy, charged with being drunk. That's over in a moment, and Keel is asked if he can talk with Jim, who claims he is going to be framed. But his story of how he won the cash is easily disproved by Brent when he checks the winners in his evening paper. But that enables Jim to answer Bryant quite easily about which dogs had won that evening at The White City! Bryant is not convinced, but has no choice but to release Jim.
Brent has "a little talk" afterwards with Jim at Ray's Cafe: "what you going to do about that money you stole?"
The doctor is unamused by Jim's youthful bravado in calling the incident "a right giggle," showing up the baffled inspector.
"No sermons please," Jim has had enough questioning. But it's uncanny how Brent can perceive why Jim had stolen that money. Brent urges Jim to earn his money as they argue over morals. Jim sticks to his philosophy, "you don't get nothing from noone these days, not unless you take it."
But when some teddy boys enter the cafe and rile an old man, Jim intervenes, that proves he's not all bad. "You've got to draw the line somewhere." Maybe he will try and get a proper job, though that idea is quashed when the police rearrest him.
Yet the programme offers no solution to what is after all insoluble. These days would the police bat an eyelid at such petty crime and would a high and mighty doctor have any time for such a delinquent?

This is the only surviving story. Other episodes included Bernard Archard in #2 Under the Influence, about a drunken driver, Harry H Corbett in #3 Lag on the Run as a man who beats up a club hostess, and Jean Anderson who appeared in #8 Sunday Morning Story about a refugee girl's suicide.
Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Protectors (1964, ABC)


all 14 stories on dvd:
1 Landscape with Bandits
2 The Bottle Shop
3 Happy Is the Loser
4 No Forwarding Address
5 The Loop Men
6 The Stamp Collection
7 It Could Happen Here
8 Freedom
9 The Pirate
10 The Deadly Chameleon
11 Who Kidnapped Lazoryck?
12 Channel Crossing
13 Cargo for Corinth
14 The Reluctant Thief

Rehearsals begam on February 28th 1964, and the first programme went out on Saturday March 28th that year.
"The criminals and us- we're all in the same business. The difference is, our clients pay us to keep one jump ahead of the criminal mind. Diagnosis? Call the Police. Prognosis? Call WELbeck 3269."
The firm of Souter and Shoesmith Ltd is a specialist in security.
From offices in Marylebone, secretary cum Girl Friday Heather Keys (Ann Morrish) is also an expert in art forgery. Ian Souter (Andrew Faulds) went to school, like Prince Charles, at Gordonstoun and served at the end of the war in The Black Watch.
His partner is Robert Shoesmith (Michael Atkinson), formerly of the CID, who said of his character, "he playes hunches, he's a creature of instinct."
The producer was Michael Chapman.

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

"Landscape with Bandits

The Veritas Gallery in Manchester is "not a place for nobodies," wily owner Mr Ware (Gordon Gostelow) currently planning to go big time by buying River at Argenteuil by Monet, which is up for auction at Wheeler and Bond. Ian Souter is in charge of security at this auction house where "you've got to be a millionaire to shop." However the bidding doesn't quite reach this league, partly because doubts have been expressed in the newspaper group owned by Farnham, that the ownership of the painting is questionable.
From a starting bid of £12,000 (laughable by today's standards!) it rises slowly, until a Frenchman, Scionneau (Martin Miller) interrupts the dignified calm, claiming he is the owner. Souter and Shoesmith quietly eject him and the bidding continues, Farnham being one bidder, but Ware hasn't even got to the sale. The winning bid is for a mere £36,500 from a Susannah Lane (Elizabeth Shepherd), but "who is she acting for?"
Souter learns the answer when he delivers the Monet to her home. She's bought it jointly with one Christopher Searle (Barry Justice) an employee of Ware, but who has fallen out with his boss. The pair plan to resell the picture to start up their own gallery, and they ask Ian Souter to look after the Monet until they find a buyer.
The blustering Ware, angry that he has been doublecrossed offers them a maximum of £42,000, but that is rejected. So Ware arranges for a mate called Tinker to duff Searle up. He then promises to get Scionneau back his painting- for a consideration!
Whittle, a solicitor, tells Susannah and Chris he has an prospective buyer for them, a rich French widow. A figure of £45,000 is agreed and Bob Shoesmith is despatched to Paris with the Monet.
Ian Souter, conicidentally, is flying to France on behalf of Farnham, at the same time as Bob is boarding the Golden Arrow with his clients- "roll on the Channel Tunnel," he says presciently.
The train screeches to a halt, and two of Tinker's men snatch the painting. Bob has to break the bad news to his partner, but he and his clients are in for a surprise. The stolen picture was a forgery made by Heather, Ian Souter had secretly brought the real Monet over to Paris himself. He'd been highly suspicious of the French widow story.
So Ware is disappointed, but Susannah and Chris are pleased to sell for £47,000 - to Farnham

Note : though shown as the first of the series, it had not intended originally for it to be so

The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Bottle Shop

Industrial espionage at Transco Pharmaceuticals. The boss (Doand Hewlett) calls in The Protectors to find out who is selling the company's research secrets to rivals.
Dr Peter Fothergill (Peter Bowles) is the research chemist, resentful of head of research Dr Helen Bradbury (Faith Brook). Ian Souter joins the firm and obtains some specialist drugs advice from Geoff, Heather Keys' boyfriend.
Some of Souter's photos of the lab suggest Dr Bradbury is working on a private line of research, so an "ambush" is arranged. Geoff wines and dines Helen Bradbury, though she seems appalled at his offer to sell him secrets.
However she is the guilty party, for we see her approaching an intermediary called Maynard. Then she gets greedy and contacts Geoff, who tapes their conversation. However she spots the mike and very improbably knocks him out.
Souter breaks into her private lab, and finds gas cylinders. When he tests one it has weird effects. It is, gasp, a discovery that has terrible military uses.
A scared Dr Bradbury resigns and seeks help from Maynard, who insists she first clear her lab of all evidence. I wasn't clear how Souter traced Maynard. He must find Dr Bradbury to stop her selling this secret. But this scene isn't needed, for she is back in her lab where she is arrested

The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

Happy Is The Loser

The seediness of this episode is exemplified in the opening scene, set in an ill lit studio street. Mr Johnson is beaten up. Later Mr Milton is duffed up too. Both are refusing their payments to the racket run by 'Happy' Dyer (Brian Worth). For a large consideration he and his associate Cyprian, collect bad gambling debts.
Bob Shoesmith is commissioned by the Society of British Gaming Clubs to offer a much more legal protection. But Milton is too scared to accept. By way of reprisal, Happy smashes up Milton's club, and then gets Milton to accuse Bob of the crime. Bob's old colleague, Jarrott, has to arrest Bob. Bail £100.
Then Happy offers Bob a "business deal," which is in effect, lay off.
Bob and his partner Ian borrow an expensive Mayfair flat from Dolores, and get the Hon Arthur Keir to act as their secretary Heather's gambling partner. Gerald Harper plays the toff with his usual charm, but isn't allowed to develop his role. The plan is that Heather will get into debt and incur a visit from Happy, "a bit naughty."
At the Casino Club, she seems to have got the wrong idea, for she wins over £1,000! Another flutter, and she's even richer! But in the end she does lose, and her cheque for over £5,000 bounces. Happy comes to collect, his conversation with her recorded by Bob and Ian. Pay up tomorrow or else.
Next day she does cough up, but police are waiting nearby and Jarrott tails Dyer. However Happy is wise enough to pass the money to his mate Cyprian, so Jarrott looks a bit of a twit when he swoops. Cyprian has also taken Heather a prisoner as a precaution.
Bob takes matters into his own hands, and his rough stuff on Happy soon has the wimp squealing out a dubious confession. Even Ian can hardly approve of his colleague's method.
It looks as though Heather is going to be done in by Cyprian. Luckily Dolores returns to her flat to interrupt that.

Note: two gaffes. The sum that Heather owes is variously quoted as £5375 or £5735- maybe it's inflation. Dolores' Mayfair flat has an unusual phone number... in Teddington!

The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Loop Men
A lot of untidy ends in this story. Muir (Archie Duncan) of Lammond-Muir Electronics Ltd is losing a lot of his electrical goods in transit. Though he is insured, The Protectors are assigned to check up on the next big consignment which is being taken by train to London. Bob Shoesmith joins the despatch department at the factory.
McNally, a signalman, had spotted a lorry without lights, and had been badly hurt when he looked into it.
The leader of the robbers is The Corp (Jeremy Kemp), hard and ruthless, and he briefs his gang on their next job. His fence is duffed up as a warning to keep in line. His wife Dora is having it off with another gang member Payne (Derren Nesbitt).
Ian Souter gets McNally's version of what happened with the lorry. Bob is warned off very viciously by Payne. As an attempt to keep him off the scene during the robbery, it fails. Night falls and Ian waits by Halverstead Loop, where the last robbery had occurred.
The gang knock out a signal operator. An old railway man is given his instructions, but he says the signalbox has changed as it is now an electronic box, something he doesn't understand. However he is able to stop the train, before he collapses. The gang pounce. Souter spots the getaway lorry, and chucks away the ignition key. Bob materialises and silences some of the crooks. The Corp goes beserk. Bob sorts him out.
An express is hurtling towards the stationery train. Drums roll. But it is diverted and police round up the baddies. Actually there had not been a real train in sight!

The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

Freedom!
No less than The Albanian Symphony Orchestra are playing in Britain, and The Protectors' job is working for their hotel to ensure there are no "diplomatic bust ups." However that's exactly what Ian Souter starts!
"The incomparable conductor" Stefan Yurasov (Anthony Newlands) is playing "flag waving rubbish" with pianist Miss Tamara Petrovna. At a press reception, he is challenged about his censored compositions, some of which he secretly passes to music critic Edmund Newton. When these tape recordings are played (not sure how recordings could hae been made of censored pieces), Newton declares Yurasev's expansive Freedom Symophony "his finest work."
Tamara gets news of her father's death in prison. She is distraught, but realises it was his plan for her to get her freedom in the West. "I do not wish to return," she informs Ian, who decides he must help her obtain political asylum. Bob Shoesmith however is against this, they are, after all, employed by the hotel. "She's a prisoner," retorts Ian, who is set in his decision.
After the first concert, Tamara secretly sdneaks off to Ian in a lift, bringing Yurasov with her. It's a tense scene, another victory over the Commies.
But Bob is not amused. Nor are the Albanians. "The damage is done." The refugees stay with Newton, but the Commies burst in to try to persuade Comrade Yurasov "to come back." He does go with the Albanians, but his desire to be with Tamara takes him back to her. He remains uncertain where his future lies. He finally makes his choice. Ian and Bob patch up their differences.
One of many Commie dramas, but this one has the advantage of well delineated characters

The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

11 Who Killed Lazoryck? (6th June 1964)
After serving five years of his twelve year sentence, Pearce Kettner (Esmond Knight) has been released on medical grounds. His daughter Janice (Patricia English) is worried he might do "something stupid" for this "poet pacifist" always maintained he was framed for being a communist spy and killing Peter Lazoryck, a known spy. Chief witness against him had been Lord Keele (Peter Williams), and why has Kettner ordered his secretary Christina to moor his houseboat La Querencia suspiciously near to Lord Keele's home in Bandersly?
"What I have to do must be done alone," he tells his daughter, so how can Ian Souter "protect a man who doesn't want to be protected?" And when Lord Keele is found with a knife in his back Kettner is "the obvious suspect." But luckily, Souter had been watching him on his boat, and can supply an alibi. Nevertheless Souter manages to have a heart to heart with the convicted spy, going over the day he was arrested. Lazoryck had been knocked on the head with a spanner just before Kettner had been going to visit him about his paintings, for he was "a painter of some merit." Keele, who had known Kettner from their Cambridge days, and who was currently working with him on a scheme of cultural exchanges, had lied at the trial, even to the extent of saying Lazoryck had kept that appointment with Kettner that day.
Souter explores Bandersly, in the vague hope of unearthing something that will clear Kettner's name. But the search is interrupted by The Major, a spy who has been caused "considerable inconvenience" by Souter's inquiries. "You haven't a grain of evidence," rightly sneers the confident Major. Though Ian Souter is able to surmise fairly accurately how it must have been. "Keele only did what I told him," corrects the over-confident spy. The chat continues, sipping wine, The Major telling all, as this is to be his last assignment. And Souter's he adds. But he has gabbled too long, and they fight. The Major is shot by one of his own men, then the police drop in, late as ever.
Kettner admits he's almost sorry for Keele who'd been under The Major's thumb for years. There's one last traitor to expose, who claims "the party is my life- I had no choice." A familiar epitaph. The last line of philosophy is Kettner's
The Protectors

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Reluctant Thief
After a visit to the bank, Heather is chased, her handbag grabbed. "I don't want to hurt you," the thief mutters. He is Hugh Long (Derek Fowlds), and police are soon on to him. He has just fallen out with his mates, an unconvincing gang of rockers whose dubious accents produce such gems as "steamin' nit."
Heather has to pick Hughie out at an ID parade, and later tries to talk to the lad. "I got no job," he says pathetically. After he is placed on remand, Heather gets him "a decent job" in her office, doing the filing, and running errands. She buys him a "uniform" of sorts.
Hugh's old gang hang out in a lively, noisy coffee bar. They can see potential in Hugh's new post in the security firm.
Souter's latest job is protecting Tillotson's, the jewellers. He advises on strengthenng locks, and when he spots that Duffy, one of Hugh's old friends, has just started work there, he sacks him. By way of spite, Duffy informs Ian SOuter of Hugh's dubious past. Then Hugh is blackmailed into helping in the robbery.
Since security at Tillotson's is dodgy, their consignment of scrap jewellery is stored in Souter and Shoesmith's safe. The gang, with the key supplied by Hugh, break in. Perhaps not for the best of reasons, Hugh tips Heather off, and the robbery is foiled.
At the police station, Hugh is contrite, "don't be sorry for me." The series ends with a promise to re-engage Hugh, and thus Heather can happily take her holiday
The Protectors

Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Sergeant Cork (1963-6) with John Barrie

1.1 The Case of the Reluctant Widow
1.2 The Case of The Girl Upstairs
1.3 The Case of Two Drowned Men
1.4 The Case of the Knotted Scarf
1.5 The Case of the Stagedoor Johnnie
1.6 The Case of the Respectable Suicide
1.7 The Case of the Slithy Tove
1.8 The Case of the Persistent Assassin
1.9 The Case of the Sleeping Coachman
1.10 The Case of the Soldier's Rifle
1.11 The Case of the Public Paragon
1.12 The Case of Ella Barnes
1.13 The Case of the Gold Salesman
2.1 The Case of the Fenian Men
2.2 The Case of the Fourth Visitor
2.3 The Case of the Ormsby Diamonds
2.4 The Case of the Hangman's Noose
2.5 The Case of the Bristol Mail
2.6 The Case of the Silent Suffragette
2.7 The Case of The Self Made Man
2.8 The Case of the Stricken Surgeon
3.1 The Case of the Two Poisons
3.2 The Case of the Six Suspects
3.3 The Case of Big Ben Lewis
3.4 The Case of the Amateur Spy
3.5 The Case of the Elegant Mistress
3.6 The Case of the Medicine Man
3.7 The Case of the Dumb Witness
3.8 The Case of the Monk's Hood Murder
3.9 The Case of the Penny Plains
3.10 The Case of the Hero's Return
3.11 The Case of the Great Pearl Robbery
3.12 The Case of the Killer's Mark
4.1 The Case of the Vengeful Garnet
4.2 The Case of the Wounded Warder
4.3 The Case of the African Murder
4.4 The Case of the Dutiful Murderer
4.5 The Case of the Pious Patriarch
4.6 The Case of the Merry Widower
5.1 The Case of the Fellowship Murder
5.2 The Case of the Wayward Wife
5.3 The Case of the Missing Cabinet Maker
5.4 The Case of Horseless Carriage
5.5 The Case of the Prominent Thespian
5.6 The Case of the Dutiful Bride
5.7 The Case of William Huckerby, Platelayer
5.8 The Case of The Notorious Nun
5.9 The Case of the Rogue Regiment
5.10 The Case of the Travelling Texan
5.11 The Case of a Lady's Good Name
5.12 The Case of Albert Watson VC
5.13 The Case of Vanishing Victim
5.14 The Case of the Threatened Rajah
5.15 The Case of Devil's Daughter
5.16 The Case of the Unpopular Judge
5.17 The Case of the Painted Boat
5.18 The Case of the Strolling Players
5.19 The Case of the Chelford Changeling
5.20 The Case of the Silent Bell
5.21 The Case of the French Mademoiselle
5.22 The Case of the Simple Savage
5.23 The Case of the Fallen Family
5.24 The Case of the Crystal Ball
5.25 The Case of the Silent Policeman
5.26 The Case of the Hooded Students

The jokey name that workers on the series used for it was "H-Cabs" (ie hansom cabs).
"The idea came to me," creator Ted Willis claimed, "when I was reading about the history of the CID." He describes Sergeant Cork thus- a bachelor in his 40's living in lodgings in Bayswater.
"Playing Cork has undoubtedly been one of the happiest periods of my life," later claimed Barrie. "We're an extremely contented team. My only ill-comfort as Cork is the clothes I wear- heavy tweed coats. Under those hot studio lights they can be very uncomfortable." But one thing he really had baulked at was having a moustache, until producer Jack Williams told him it was "essential."
66 stories were made from 1963 up until the final series in 1966. However this last series was not networked, and was not premiered in some ITV regions until as late as 1968- proof that it existed on videotape. Now, for better or worse, it has resurfaced on excellent quality dvds.
Each story was strung out to an hour, with John Barrie stolid but uninspiring as the 1890's policeman. His assistant, played by William Gaunt was simply stodgy. Cork's boss, Supt Rodway, turns up in the later stories, played by Charles Morgan.

For my research on the cast and transmission times
Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 1227 The Case of the Reluctant Widow
Cor blimey, guvnor, yer can tell it's Victorian London by the cockney langwidge plus of course the clip clop of horses on the streets, not that we ever see one.
We follow Mr Bob Marriott who is starting yet another career, this as a detective who is to be placed under Sergeant Cork, "a law unto himself." We meet the great detective absorbed in a study of fingerprints. It's a fine introduction to the two main characters.
Bob's first case is in Kilburn, the inquest of Benjamin Oxley. This is a detailed scene, too long by today's standards. The young doctor decides the evidence indicates that Oxley poisoned himself. Proceedings are interrupted by Kate Oxley, the man's mother, who accuses his wife Julie of murdering him. When her employee Clive Graham quits the court, Marriott is ordered to follow him, for Cork is certain too that it is a case of murder.
In the pub later, Kate admits her son was "no oil painting," twenty years older than his young wife, she saw in him "a gold mine." Marriott returns with a bottle of chloroform that he had dug up after following Graham and watching him bury it. Cork questions them both at which time Marriott spots a flaw in Graham's story. "You blasted fool, "Julie castigates him.
Later Julie admits the chloroform was hers, she'd used it to send her randy husband to sleep when his attentions became over zealous. Clive had bought the bottle, "he'd do anything for me." Liar, shouts Cork baldly at her, telling her how she did it. Clive confirms Benjamin was an animal and admits adminstering the poison. Both are arrested.
But the case is not over yet. The doctor at the inquest had, according to Cork, made numerous errors in his analysis, so why was he so anxious to obtain a verdict of suicide? Cork reveals his methods and gives us the facts ma'am
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case No 2457: The Case of Two Drowned Men
The story of very unsalubrious characters in "a disagreeable neighbourhood."

Cork is in the docklands, in pursuit of two men who have robbed a bank, Jack Simons and his mate Gurling. But Simons is found drowned in the river. The next day, Gurling is found dead in the Thames also. But both had been battered beyond recognition, only their posssessions can identify them as the villains. Nancy, the ward of Alf, the owner of the dubious Adam and Eve public house makes the identification.
Poor Bob Marriott is sent undercover to this pub, soon returning to Cork with one black eye. Cork interviews Alf, and his wife Annie (Sheila Steafel), who is hoping to run off with the bank robbers and their £1,000 cash- for the two villains are very much alive, hiding in the pub cellar. Cork takes Nancy aside to get her to admit she has lied about the bodies. She is clearly very frightened. Cork informs the pub customers there's a reward for the two robbers. Nancy jumps from her bedroom window and is killed. Alf had been surprisingly fond of the girl, so Cork leans on him for the truth. He won't talk.
But Alf takes it out on his wife, who presses Jack Simons to take her with them on Old Joe's boat. Cork gets Alf to talk, and Marriott prevents them all from getting away

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Case 1452 The Case of the Knotted Scarf

In a bungalow in the grounds of General Langford, a retired man living in Devon with his Indian retinue, lies a corpse, strangled with a drum stick under her body: It's Lady Cornelia Langford, second wife of the general and twenty six years his junior. Ex-actress, all that's needed to create a host of suspects. But what relationship was she with a French artist who was engaged to paint her, staying at the general's? This artist had found her corpse.
The Indians are Sorya, the beautiful ward of the general, and his personal servant, almost a son, Kulil. Mrs Helen Henderson is an old family friend, once close to the general's first wife. All are horrified by Sergeant Cork's conclusion that the killing was not by some stray tramp but "a planned and premeditated killing by someone who knew Lady Langford."
Cork has another bombshell which is hard to believe. She had not been strangled but poisoned. Lots of suspicious facts pour uncomfortably out, the usual, everyone has motive and is suspicious. Blackmail is one motive, revenge another possibility.
In the gun room, Cork reveals the truth. "This is monstrous." But when he explains how the murder was committed, there's a confession. But it's a cover up.
"I hated her." Another confession. It's all too pat, corny also

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 1290 The Case of the Stage door Johnnie
There's a reference back to a previous case of a young woman in Bayswater, but this seems to be the next case.

The golden voice of Miss Kate Seymour has attracted one infatuated admirer, upper crust toff Jimmy Stratton. Marie Lloyd had better look to her laurels, declares Bessy, Kate's ambitious mother (Cicely Courtneidge). Kate gives us several songs, and perhaps the general verdict is more realistic, she's only adequate.
Jimmy's friend Lord George tries to dissuade him from marriage. That sailor Arthur is more her type! Will Kate be put off him when she receives an anonymous note claiming Jimmy had an affair with a Lily Brander?
Jimmy takes the note to Sergeant Cork. It's the third similar note. Written in block capitals. Lord George is one suspect, Arthur's another, and what about Bessy? She produces a fourth note, this one threatening violence against Jimmy. It's pretty obvious to me who it is.
Cork confronts Lord George with his usual bluntness. He strongly denies the suggestion, "I'm a gentleman." From Cork's examination of the writing, he reckons the writer is aged between 30 and 50.
The threat of violence becomes fact when Jimmy is beaten up at the stage door. He snatches a button on his assailant's coat. It proves to be Arthur's, "I've been a right idiot." He admits that he did attack Jimmy, but insists he did not write those letters. He runs off. He goes and attacks Kate, but somehow comes off worse.
It's left to Cork to confront the actual letter writer. It was indeed pretty clear from the start. "There won't be no more letters." Cork finishes with a lecture to ensure it stays like that
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 1629 The Case of the Respectable Suicide
Religious pillar of Bayswater Mr Bertram is found dead, suicide. He leaves his religious artefacts to his estranged wife Sarah, but his house goes to his housekeeper Mrs Holland (Diana King). Though solicitor James Lord feels sure it was suicide, he sympathises with Sarah, who is now living with a man of a lower class named Albert Parry.
Mrs Holland is clearly deeply attached to Bertram, a very pious man she describes him, though Sergeant Cork dissmisses it as "synthetic goodness." He assigns Marriott the task of watching Polly the undermaid who had first seen Bertram dead, though she didn't know it at the time. When she attempts to burn a newspaper, Marriott prevents her and shows it to his superior. In The Pillory is an article headlined Charitable Figure with Feet of Clay. Owner of the paper Rev Septimus Barrow explains the article was by new writer Victor Brandon and had not yet been published. It had only got as far as two proof copies to be checked by his solicitor. Name of his solicitor- you guessed it, Lord.
Marriott discovers that Sarah's maiden name is Brandon, Victor her brother. We see her living happily in some poverty with Albert. She admits she hated her late husband who refused to divorce her, treating her as "a plaster saint." Victor is even more forthright, "he deserved all he got, a sanctimonious hypocrite."
Thus there are, as ever, lots of people who are glad to see Bertram dead. Cork proves it was murder and makes his arrest. One of the most obvious solutions, for once, easy to guess. But the characters are well drawn, apart perhaps from the caricature of Septimus, with the usual religious mumbo. The confession has a hackneyed feel too, "I knew it was xxx all the time"

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case No 1384: The Case of The Slithy Tove

Cork is spouting from The Jabberwok, when he is called to go to the East End, where an old lag Arthur Trumble has been murdered. Old fashioned Inspector Bird is in charge of the case, he has no time to waste on such low life.
Norah, the dead man's daughter (Ann Lynn), is engaged to the respectable Mr Manners. A cap from a gentleman's cane is found in Trumble's room, via the improbable route of police photographer Perryman spotting its reflection in his photograph. Even more useful is an eyewitness who had seen the killer. He is a street urchin and very unwilling to talk. A doctor examines the lad and suggests to Cork that a favour might tempt him to speak up.
Marriott's own theory is that the killer is James Lake (Bruce Beeby) against whom Trumble had testified 25 years ago. He had been deported to Australia, and the weak spot in the theory is that Lake is reported dead.
A photo of a young woman attracts the urchin, and clutching it his tongue is loosened. The lad tells Cork that the killer is booked into the Hotel Excelsior. He is named Arthur Morton, and Cork confronts him with the broken cane top. "You are Lake aren't you?"
If you can swallow the denouement, you'll swallow almost anything

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case No 1849: The Case of The Persistent Assassin
Cork is in the presence of no less than the Prime Minister. Cork is required to protect Prince Frederick of Silesia (Garfield Morgan), whose very life is being threatened by dissidents, and "it could lead to war." Sixteen coppers are briefed to provide the necessary cover while the prince visits Britain.
The local "bomb throwers" are checked out. Cork goes on board the ship to welcome the prince, his "man" Jakob, and Leon his Secretary General. It seems the prince is not that keen on being protected, until a bullet is fired at him through his hotel window. It narrowly misses naturally.
Mr Smith is a gunsmith, who is persuaded to reveal what little he knows, that someone is making a bomb. Actually he could make a good guess who it is.
Maria and her brother Max run the Silesian Radical Party, and they are to meet the prince in a pub. They have political ambitions, seeking Frederick's support to help oust the current ruler, Fred's uncle, who is allegedly a despot.
In the boozer, Marriott's vigiliance is rewarded when he spots a time bomb, and before Max arrives, the place is cleared in the nick of time. Irene Stone is arrested- she had asked Smith for the name of a good bomb maker. It is proved that Max is behind the plot, though he denies it.
Cork allows him to finally have his meeting with the prince. Now poisonous fumes overcome poor Bob Marriott, and then there is an explosion. But the revolutionaries are seemingly inept since the plot fails once more.
Irene sees that she has been duped by these assassins, as Cork gathers the usual crowd and neatly proves who is attempting to kill Prince Fred. His reward is a shot in his arm, before the potential killer is placed under arrest

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 2128 The Case of The Sleeping Coachman
Nicely drawn character studies of a fossilised Victorian gentry. Cork's fame has spread thanks to the Billingsgate and Railway Carriage murders.
Housekeeper Mrs Fielding is packing Cork's case as he is off to investigate a murder in Wiltshire. Servant girl Nelly had been stabbed in the coach house.
The high and mighty Sir Henry Melrose resents police intrusion, his wife is equally flustered, "I do dislike strangers in the house, they always make an atmosphere." Their children, the spoilt George and the modernistic Victoria (Rosalie Crutchley), are quite close.
Sergeant Cork quickly falls out with Sir Henry, while Bob Marriott happily gets the low down on the family from Sarah the maid. The suggestion is that Nelly had taken cook's knife to kill herself. She was pregnant.
Jim the coachman was in a deep sleep the night of the killing. He had had too much to drink, thanks to a gift of a bottle of wine from George, a token of thanks for all Jim's good work.
It transpires Sir Henry had given Nelly her cards when news of her pregnancy had emerged. Cork sets "the yeast to work," by questioning Victoria about what she had might have heard the night of the murder. He is puzzled why the horse Midnight, an irritable creature, had made no sound when Nelly had been killed. He outlines the likely sequence of events, and names three possible suspects.
Then Bob kisses Sarah in the coach house, Jim overhearing their intimate chat, They make a tryst to meet later that night. Jim does a bunk. This seems to have no relation to the denouement.
Cork exposes the killer in a very straightforward ending that was easy to guess at, "you'll be hanged"

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 946: The Case of the Soldier's Rifle

A strike at the Furniture factory has led to the army being called in. A soldier shoots, killing a striker named Strong. What starts as a story of a court martial soon changes when Sgt Cork investigates, despite protests from Major Edwards, who is obstructive, "the army doesn't have to give reasons." Cork is refused permission to interview the suspect, so in return he helps himself to the offending rifle.
The army thread is largely lost after that. Ivy Strong, widow, is in mourning, though not much since her brother in law Albert has eyes in her direction. Cork also meets Ned Fisher, militant union leader (played by Charles Morgan who later co-starred in the series). Ned particularly hates Charles Robinson, one of the company directors.
The fatal bullet was fired not from an army rifle but from a revolver. Cork is now allowed to interview the soldier, who claims he did shoot Strong. Why is her lying?
Pete, another striker was also injured, and Marriott visits him in hospital. He knows the soldier isn't guilty. The reason: he killed Strong, accidentally. Unclear why he confesses, anyway, later, Pete dies.
In a street, Cork and Marriott are duffed up by roughs including Ned. Cork asks him if he killed Strong. No. However he does reveal what you feel ought to have come out sooner, that Strong had numerous lady friends, including one of a higher class.
Mr Cook, another company director, offers Mrs Strong compensation in the form of a job as his housekeeper. He says her late husband had been friendly with Mrs Robinson. The job offer arouses Alf's feelings, "I did it for you," he tells Ivy in yet another confession. Cork arrives in the nick of time to prevent his jealousy throttling her. Though she hardly deserves rescuing, Cork stops her hysteria by chucking at her a jug of cold water

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case No 3126 The Case of Ella Barnes
A body is found floating in Hoxton Wharf. Ella Barnes had been due to testify to a House of Lords committee about the sweated labour business, where she was employed. Her husband Alf identifies the corpse. He had been in the pub when she died.
Cork goes to this sweatshop, a sort of Victorian edition of The Rag Trade. Stan, the Polish foreman, explains what happened, Mrs Magda Brandel (Isa Miranda) wife of the boss translates, though Bob Marriott believes she alters some of the information.
The working girls at this sweatshop had gone on strike, but this had been broken, and though Ella had been the ringleader, Brandel had re-employed her. Or she went "crawling back," according to her two friends, Babs and Rose, who are sure she had been "done in."
Alf knew Ella was pregnant. He wasn't the father, since he had been away. This is subsequently shown to have been in prison.
Cork and Marriott reconstruct how she had been attacked with a knife before being thrown into the river. It seems she must have known her killer. Chalky White interrupts this scene and is worried the two coppers are fighting to the death. It's a nice touch, relieving some of the gloom of the tale.
Babs claims Stan is the killer, for she knows he is wanted for murder in his native country.
Magda rows with her husband when she finds him paying for the services of one of his girls. It's not the first time.
Alf has vital evidence for Cork. One of Ellen's younger brothers is Charlie who had seen Ella out with Brandel on the night she was killed.
"I didn't touch her," Brandel tells Cork. But at the sweatshop, Marriott gets the truth out of Stan, and after a fight, the truth is out. This is one of those cases where pertinent facts keep getting added- it's real life I suppose, but unsatisfying as drama.
Finally we return to the wharf, scene of the crime, where Babs and Rose give us even more of the truth

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.3 Case 4137 The Case of the Ormsby Diamonds
"Austen, it's Geoffrey!" in the best Victorian melodramatic tones, only giveaway that this is not from that era is the semi nudity. Emily bids her lover a hasty farewell. But her diamonds have gone too.
Guests from the party the previous evening have to remain in Sir Geoffrey's country mansion. Only he had not been present, he'd returned, as noted, after being away on affairs of state- with the Prime Minister actually. Not a bad alibi.
Sgt Cork is abrupt with this distinguished gathering, "this is outrageous!" Austen Carew (Edward Woodward) is Sir Geoffrey's political opponent, though the pair maintain a friendly rivalry. Despite the opening scene, Austen is actually here with his fiancee Kate. Sir George is far less friendly with his brother, a silly ass type and his wife Dora, the poor relations who inherited nothing. Emily suspects them. But they claim Sir George had been trying to sell the diamonds recently.
The verbose Menzies (a nice portrait by Geoffrey Bayldon) is an insurance investigator who reviews the case with Cork. They agree to delay payment on the claim.
"I know you took the diamonds," Kate tells Austen privately. He denies it but admits his dalliance with Emily, "a moment of madness." All over now, he claims.
A left luggage ticket is posted to Austen. It's for a parcel, which when opened contains those diamonds. He's arrested, facing scandal not only for himself but his political party.
But he has been framed. Piercing the venom, Cork returns the diamonds and exposes the thief. A confession. The end

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 4910 The Case of the Hangman's Noose
Cork and Marriott are in Brighton in order, to protect Judge Palmer (Ronald Adam), recently retired, whose last case had seen him sentence fourteen year old Alan Fowler to be hanged. He had worked as a gardener at a school where he was convicted of murdering a teacher, Sweeney.
Letters to the judge have threatened vengeance, eye for an eye, unless Fowler is reprieved. Are the threats from Len, Alan's older brother? Marriott is assigned to watch the judge's elder daughter Virginia, a not unpleasant assignment, and his fourteen year old son David, who happens to be a pupil at the school. When they take a stroll on the pier, David somehow gives them the slip. Cork deduces he must have left on a boat trip, and the captain of the boat is none other than Len. But when Len is found, he really does not seem to know anything about David's disappearance.
No sign of David. Virginia goes bathing, Marriott of course close by her, admiring. They meet Unwin, of the Brighton Bugle who is vehemently opposed to hanging, and a few topical points are plugged on the issue. Another threatening note, David will die if Fowler dies. But the judge is a man of iron, he knows his duty and will not yield.
In Lewes Prison Cork chats with Fowler, who claims the teacher Sweeney treated young David Palmer "like dirt." Cork takes Howard, the headmaster to the jail, and the truth emerges.
Judge Palmer meets the blackmailer, but still refuses to meet the demands. It turns out that David has been hiding almost of his own volition, partly because he had witnessed Sweeney's death. All is almost explained, just about plausible.
An arrest is made. Fowler is spared, as the judge says, on "a point of law."
A final scene on the pier, Bob takes a dip. Cork: "you look like a barber's pole!" It's a gallant attempt at making a grand studio set, and the beach is complete with genuine studio pebbles. A relic of lost days when all was studio bound
To the
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5116 The Case of the Bristol Mail
"Somebody's robbed the Night Mail!"
Chalky is not keen on answering that new fangled telephone, he's in enough trouble as he's moved Sgt Cork's things from his nice old comfy office to a brand new one.
Having finished with the Eastbourne murder, Cork agrees to assist the "very sensitive" railway police at Paddington Station. Traffic Superintendent Little shows him the scene of the crime, even though he's convinced it's an inside job, some dishonest staff at Bristol and an accomplice here in London.
However railway policeman Bilson is less sure, and Cork concurs. He questions the conscientious guard, Jenkins, who had unlocked then locked the mail van at the five intermediate stations. Warren, the chief sorter in the adjacent mail van is mystified.
A three minute delay at Ealing, was that where the thieves made their getaway? It so happens that a dismissed employee Pocock lives in nearby Greenford.
Cork suspects Jenkins even though, as Bilson confirms, he's a railwayman through and through, twenty seven years loyal service. But it is noted the key to the van was new, evidently recently cut. Marriott traces the cutter, who states he had been asked to make two copies for a Mr Little. But he cannot identify the Traffic Superintendent, "it's ridiculous," claims Little.
Murder! The thieves have fallen out over the loot. Sgt Cork was on to them anyway, but too late to prevent the murder. The killer flees with his floosie on the Bristol local (surely they'd take the fast train?), Cork catches the express which overtakes the slow train. Both trains make an unscheduled stop at a small station, it's "the end of the line" for the crook.
And not a steam locomotive in sight
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 4732 The Case of the Self Made Man
The story is beautifully developed, if a trifle slowly, by fine actors, dominated by Joyce Carey as Aunt Maud, who takes quite a shine to Sergeant Cork. He reminds her so much of her late husband, "by God, he even looks like me!"
We meet her on the LMR train to Prestergate, with her nephew young Bob Marriott. He's accompanying Cork, or is it that Cork is accompanying him? The pair are looking into the death of Will Pickering, murdered six months previously in the mill of local bigwig Mr Bellamy (George A Cooper).
However their journey isn't really necessary as local Inspector Spicer (John Sharp) has suddenly made an arrest, though we know it's a forced confession from simpleton George Earnshaw.
Cork has nothing to do but return to London. But on the train back he is accosted by Mrs Earnshaw who persuades Cork to return to Prestergate, where he joins Marriott who has taken a few days off with his aunt.
Cork unofficially tries to wheedle from Inspector Spicer the facts of the case. This Pickering had been a union leader who had stolen funds. Cork is mainly preoccupied with why he would have returned to the scene of the crime if he were guilty, there to be killed by Earnshaw. Spicer, in a nicely uninformative scene, refuses to divulge anything.
The storyline deserved a better and longer denouement. The climax comes at Mr Bellamy's dinner party. Julia Bellamy, who is recuperating from some unspecified illness, sings a curious version of Blow Away the Morning Dew, implicating her own father in Pickering's death. Aunt Maud: "how very indelicate, one might allmost say coarse."
The story comes out of Julia's involvement with Pickering, and the resulting confession is hardly worthy of the build up. Cork's hands are frustratingly tied
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5123 The Case of the Stricken Surgeon
The story centres on the perennial struggle between the old garde against new progressive scientific thought, this case Lister's research into antiseptics, but the issue is too laboured.
Dr Jamie Briscoe is the new garde, operating as a matter of urgency on a girl with a brain tumor, the only snag is that he has not obtained permission either from Alice Baxter's parents or from hospital principal Sir Wilson Hermitage (Bernard Archard), he of the old school. According to him, it's the height of irresponsibility," though is his view clouded by "the fog of prejudice"?
While Briscoe answers Sergeant Cork's questions about the legality of his actions, Sir Wilson has to treat Alice when she suffers convulsions, and he does so none too well. "She is dead." Septic poisoning. "You killed her," Sir Wilson accuses the young Briscoe.
Dr Wright's post mortem puts her death down to the operation, and so Briscoe is charged with murder. Even his own wife knows it's all partly as a result of his opposition to Sir Wilson. The feeling is mutual, and the question is whether Sir Wilson had caused the post-operative infection when he had examined her. The pros and cons of Lister's work on antiseptics are explored, with the great man, or at least an actor playing the great man, appearing at the medical tribunal.
It's clear where Cork's sympathies lie. He persuades eminent and boisterous counsel John Geohegan to represent Briscoe, and the final act consists mostly of the inquiry at the medical tribunal. Bob Marriott learns from Mrs Briscoe that she was on the verge of leaving him because of "his stupid pride," but she is able to produce her husband's personal surgical instruments, which she had oddly found on the hospital rubbish dump.
This is enough to steer the inquiry away from medical ethics to the heart of the "truth." The heart is Sir Wilson's evidence, a heart of conflicting attitudes, "wild accusations, sir." Rather a Victorian melodramatic outcome, but then this was a Victorian drama. "I enjoyed it," admits Cork
Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5784 The Case of The Six Suspects
The victim: Stephen Lancing, in his Hampstead sitting room, with a gun, shot in the head. He owned a valuable gold mine in the Congo.
Six suspects: Mrs Hester Lancing who has packed up and left. Twenty years younger than he, alleged to have many admirers.
Clara, Lancing's sister who lives with them. She hates Hester who wants her out of the house.
John Hoskins (John Stone), "an adventurer" of questionable background, who has run off to Liverpool with Hester.
Gourlay (Archie Duncan), who had found the corpse. Working with the Congo Missionary Society, he was hoping for a donation from Lancing.
Brewster and Piggott, Lancing's business associates, the former cynical, the latter frightened- why is his handkerchief stained with blood?

Bob Marriott thinks Hoskins must be the guilty party, his choice influenced by the fact that Hoskins had knocked him out, eluding police. Corks says it might be best to arrest the lot of them! The solution seems to lie in a secret document from Africa delivered to Lancing by Gourlay.
Hester returns to London alone, she thinks Hoskins is the murderer. He "returns the compliment" accusing her. Impossible to guess really, with the "pack of lies," Cork is not far out there. Usual last minute revelation, but I enjoyed some convincing acting, notably from Robert Webber as Greeley, and Lloyd Pearson as Piggott
To
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5237 The Case of the Amateur Spy
Clubbed to death, Henry Jones, top secret plans of a torpedo on his corpse. He worked as a junior clerk at Woolwich Arsenal.
The minister (Geoffrey Keen, unusually stumbling over a couple of lines) explains to Sergeant Cork about the stringent security arrnagements at the Arsenal. He also admits that some documents relating to the new torpedo project are missing.
Miss Hartfield, Jones' fiancee is naturally distrssed, "I don't believe it." Woolner his boss finds it hard to accept too. Harris, the designer of the torpedo, seems the only other likely suspect.
Bob Marriott nearly gets a walloping from Mr Fish. He is worked up over his daughter's morals, she can give Woolner an alibi, so he can't be the killer or the thief.
Cork's theory is that Jones had stumbled on to a spy, that's why he was killed. Checking the Yard files, he decides the most likely customer is an old acquaintance, Jean Pierre. He's a vain man, who admits with professional pride that he could have stolen the documents, but he didn't and offers to sound out his sources for Cork.
He reports back that the Germans are expecting to receive the papers, but have not yet got them. They have been receiving, through the post, several other top secret papers.
The minister confesses that this is only the latest of a series of leaks, there is a traitor in the department, or maybe in his own house. His embittered son Alan is the obvious suspect, he is prepared to steal as a protest against his father's ruthless warlike ambition. He's a pacifist. But he did have to silence Jones.
The minster is more concerned over his own need to resign. The opportunist Jean Pierre is arrested on a technicality
To
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5329 The Case of the Elegant Mistress (2nd May 1964)
Police dash to a large house when they hear shots at night. PC Elms tends to a dying army officer, PC Peters (Norman Mitchell) cautions the lady with him.
Landlady Mrs Wharton says her tenant, or "guest", Mrs Sanders (Moira Redmond), had been under a week's notice to quit, because she had been entertaining men in her rooms. "It couldn't be more clear cut," at least to Supt Rodway, since she admits shooting Captain Bell, a family man who is in the Coldstream Guards. She even has 50 sovereigns taken from the man who has now died.
Sergeant Cork is puzzled why the accused lady acquiesces in her fate. He learns she had once been married to Sir Morris Hampshire (Ronald Leigh-Hunt) and Bob Marriott is sent to find out more about their failed marriage. But the rich Sir Morris is only anxious for his name to be kept out of any scandal. Rodway, meanwhile, gets Mrs Sanders to admit that she had left her husband after she had wrongly been named in an adultery case as the other woman. Her personal fortune had been left with him, and even more sadly, "they took my children from me."
The rent for Mrs Sanders' flat was paid by Col Scott-Dunning, Bell's senior officer. Dunning does not see eye to eye with Cork, who questions him about his movements the night of the shooting. An alibi is supplied by some other men in the regiment. But he has to admit that Mrs Sanders was his mistress.
Though the soldiers supporting his alibi remain firm, Lt Harding's conscience gets the better of him, and he admits that fifty sovereigns had been bet that wild night, against the keys of Mrs Sanders' flat. Bell had won. Revolted by this degradation, she had shot him in defence of "her virtue." An explanation is offered as to why she has only just revealed this....
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 5881 The Case of The Penny Plains
Widow Mrs Lily Saunders was once the leading lady of Adrian Tarbuck, who is now down on his luck, sharing a seedy theatrical boarding room with the alcoholic Dicker. Only we are able to work out it is he who has attacked Lily.
With much sympathy, Bob Marriott listens to her tale of woe. (Sergeant Cork is on holiday in Margate.) Tarbuck is also at her luxurious Highgate home pleading for funds. Bob realises Lily needs protection and offers a personal service, which extends to taking her on the town to the opera. Bob learns of her past, her marriage to the well-off Robin had never been approved by his family. He had been killed in the Sudan. Bob's duties even extend to kissing her.
She screams! A face at the window. "Please don't leave me!" Since the scared housekeeper has left, there's only Bob who can stay with her.
"You spent the night with her." Bob is in official hot water, Sgt Gardner put in charge of this case.
Tarbuck outlines his grand new theatrical production to Lily. £2,000 will set it up. In return "dear Lily" does at least persuade Tarbuck to stay in her house to protect her.
Sgt Gardner questions John Sinclair, brother of Lily's late husband, for he will inherit should Lily die. He claims Robin died of a broken heart, that Lily is no lady. That explains Tarbuck's hold over her.
Tarbuck throws a celebratory party at Lily's house, to Bob's horror. He hits one of Tarbucks uncouth friends who is "molesting" Lily.Worse follows when Tarbuck is found dead.
We can work out what happened. It is all very theatrical darling, over the top. Bob hasn't our brains, and so travels to Margate to obtain much needed advice from his superior. Cork has soon solved the case. Result: Bob talks to Lily.
This is no masterpiece, the end of an unbeautiful romance. The ending is far too obvious
To the
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6318 The Case of the Hero's Return

One of the more palatable stories set in the small Dorsetshire country house of the irascible Sir Hector. His daughter is going out with Bob Marriott, the "pathetic" Claire (Patricia Haines) also lives with the family, living off her cousin Hector's charity. She had been cut off by her father after marrying Jason "a bounder," who had soon deserted her.
Thus Hector has inherited this pleasant estate. However all this luxurious living could cease, since heir Freddy, presumed missing eight years ago in Sudan, has suddenly turned up. Sir Hector is philosophical about his possible change in fortune, but since he hadn't seen Freddy since the lad was fifteen, Bob offers to fetch Sgt Cork to check in case the claim is fraudulent.
Cork is doubtful about undertaking the task, but is persuaded as a favour to Bob. "Our whole future is in your hands, sergeant."
Freddy recognises them all, seemingly, but Claire is sure he's an imposter. The reunion takes place at a cosy afetrnoon tea, Freddy carelessly saying he is not interested in the title anyway. But Sir Hector is the man to see fair play and has one infallible test to prove Freddy's bona fides, "the forge." His arm had been scalded at a forge, a fact not generally known, and there's the scar, he's genuine!
Cork however is bound to dispute the issue and unpleasantly crosses swords with Hector's redoutable wife Lady Agatha. "You're a real social asset," Mariott scoffs at his boss.
Of course the "jackanapes" Cork is right. Sir Hector, refusing to listen to anyone, determines to hand over his estate to Freddy. Surprisingly, Claire offers to keep house for him. So Cork consults the family solicitor of Claire and armed with the facts, proceeds to interrogate Claire in front of everyone. "How could you?"
But Cork's revelation gives the tale a good twist, "very, very touching."
The final scene- Felicity expresses her thanks to Bob, well sort of.

This story holds together mainly thanks to the cast, led by the seasoned Wensley Pithey as blustering Sir Hector

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case No 5903 The Case of the Great Pearl Robbery

Diamond dealer Chris Van Norden receives a registered packet from Paris, but there is no diamond necklace inside, only lumps of sugar. Delivery had been taken by Jan, the owner's surly son, and had kept the parcel under lock and key until his father arrived to open it.
Supt Rodway and Bob Marriott investigate this baffling theft, noting that the sugar is oblong in shape, leading them to deduce the switch must have taken place in France. As Marriott speaks French, he's the lucky man to go abroad to pursue inquiries there.
Marriott interviews the sender of the necklace, M Billot (John Barron). He has four charming witnesses to the fact that he had packed the pearls securely, his own teenage daughters. Marriott finds an excuse to stay with them and enjoys a lovely time playing forfeits with them, all losers happily receiving a nice kiss. But sadly he is recalled back to London.
Sgt Cork is busy on other cases, so Rodway interviews Jan. Suspicion falls on a Miss Victoria Smith, a poor friend whom Chris had taken up. Rodway's doubtful plan is to impersonate a diamond buyer to retrieve the pearls, but his disguise fools nobody. Jan has also worked out Miss Smith must be the thief, but her accomplice knocks him out. It's left to Sgt Cork to come to the rescue, "I thought you were taking rather a long time on this case." Jan chips in during the fight with the thieves as the pearls are recovered in a bottle of smelling salts. Cork explains all to the mystified Rodway

To the Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6597 The Case of the Vengeful Garnet
Charles Garnet (Donald Hewlett) has planned his vengeance on Sgt Cork for the eight years he spent in jail. His cell mate James Brady, now a sweep, is bribed with £1,000 to burgle the house of Charlotte Wilson (Jane Griffiths). The money is to pay for his time in prison after he is arrested.
On the case is Inspector Price (Gerald Cross) whose by the book approach annoys Cork whose methods are more unconventional. The Honest Man is a dubious pub where Cork's informer can be found. Here Brady nicks Cork's wallet, just before Inspector Price conducts a raid on the pub.
Supt Rodway finds it a little bit funny that Cork has been robbed. But he is not laughing long. Inspector Price arrests Brady. At the trial, he states Cork had stolen the money from him! Cork's stolen wallet miraculously appears, and behold, the £50 is inside.
Cork is certain Mrs Wilson must be in on this frame and attempts to break her down, but fails. He also leans on Brady in his prison cell, losing his temper. Brady hangs himself, "Cork can't be held responsible for that." But he is suspended from duty pending the public inquiry.
This is presided over by Sir Edward (AJ Brown). Marriott spends his time, unofficially, chatting up Mrs Wilson's maid Polly. A little kiss, and he's got what he needs, the link between her mistress and Garnet. It seems Cork had arrested him and his wife for fraud.
At the inquiry, rather in the style of Perry Mason, Cork browbeats Mrs Wilson. She admits Garnet's wife was her sister. She had died in prison.
Privately Cork has an exchange of unpleasantries with Garnet. It has a good sting to it
To the
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6446 The Case of the African Murder

It's all too obvious: drums beating in ATV's reconstruction of Lagos. The Brits here dream of home and London, which in reality, somebody tell 'em, is only just outside the studio.
A French envoy Pierre Rolland is "a dead duck," was it because he was so heavy handed with the natives? No, for he has been shot with a white man's gun. It's inexplicable why Sgt Cork and Bob Marriott have been sent to investigate, even though Captain Frazer of the local police suffers from a serious case of overacting. Our London bobbies stay with Richard, married to the sickly Margot (Mary Kenton), other suspects include George "bash the blacks" who is a railway engineer, and his wife Freda. The local doctor reveals Rolland was a womanizer, his nurse Angellee, half French half native, one of these mistresses.
The blundering Cpt Fraser arrests two houseboys for murder. Yes this is all synthetically unauthentic pidgin English, the gramophone recording in the background playing softly its local songs and wildlife sounds. Cork soon pounces on one woman Rolland was having an affair with, she was also being blackmailed by him. Marriott obtains evidence from Angellee, who claims to be married to the Frenchman. That revelation draws a confession from another rival, all entirely unconvincing, script by Ted Willis at his worst. The finish is appallingly awful

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6273
The Case of the Dutiful Murderer
Dreadful stories like this one, make me realise why I never enjoyed this series in the 1960s.

Feng is played by Peter Sallis. I know this was normal for the time, British actor playing a Chinese, but it's entirely unconvincing. He entertains Cork and Marriott at his Chinese restaurant. But the meal has to end abruptly when Cork tells the Chinese off, not for the absurb spectacle he presents, but for his stern treatment of his daughter Lotus, not permitting her to see her suitor. So when Lotus runs away, Cork refuses to help search for her, saying it's none of his business.
However Lotus is found near Epping, strangled, and in the circumstances, it could prove a bad break for Cork. Her lover Chang is the chief suspect. his alibi is weak and his story "doesn't fit the facts." But in fact the couple had secretly married and suspicion now turns on the jealous Hsien, even more improbably Chinese played by Geoffrey Hibbert.
To get at the truth, Cork risks his life by questioning members of Feng's Tong. In his determination to get at the truth, he rants against their "mumbo jumbo." Yet the Tong want the truth too in a stand off of monumentally uninteresting proportions, "you are a very brave man." Though not as brave as Julian Bond who dared submit such nonsense, and ATV for producing it

To Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6161 The Case of The Pious Patriarch
Enosh Catterton MP is your stereotyped Victorian bigot, "a pompous ass" according to Cork. Since his wife's death, he rules his four children with a biblical iron hand.
He is receiving anonymous threatening letters, which a handwriting expert tells Marriott are in a child's hand, age similar to the youngest Chatterton Paul. Alexandra is his slightly older sister while their grown up siblings are Thomas and Vera, who spout texts depressingly.
By one of those fortuitous chances, Marriott, with his girl friend Diana, "a secret pre-Raphaelite," is at a low music hall where he's surprised to spot Vera. Is she "roaming the streets like a loose woman?" She denies it and Thomas demands the investigation cease. But Charlie Rodway asks an old pal Lil to let him know if she sees Vera there.
Chatterton is promoting a bill banning chloroform, yet it seems Vera and Thomas are making him ill with small doses of the stuff. In a scene aping Hammer, thundering night, you know the genre, in the cellar "the young devils" lock up Bob Marriott and Rodway. "You'll be in trouble," Marriott rather feebly warns.
"Barbaric rites" are underway, or you could call it like Marriott "nonsense." From behind bars, Rodway persuades Alexandra to confess she had written the letters. It had been at the dictate of Thomas. She is unaware he and Vera are drugging their father. She believes her dad killed their mother as she was a "Jezebel."
Deep into the cellar, Vera has lured a client. It is Paul's job to stab him as "divine justice." When father learns from Cork of the goings on he perceives he has fostered vipers. "I've failed," but no less than this writer.
"What was going on your heads?" he asks. Put that to the author also, this is high Victorian Hammer at its very very worst
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Case 6300 The Case of The Merry Widower

A good old traditional mystery. Industrialist Harry Bell brings his new second wife Ruth to his Norfolk mansion, "welcome home, ma'am," greets Yates the butler with the five servants in his command. He however is no Upstairs Downstairs Hudson, for he is even seen kissing Parsons the housemaid!
Cork has completed the Tower Hill Case and is ordered to take some well earned leave. It so happenes his old friend Harry Bell invites him down to Norfolk to discretely investigate his missing jewellery worth £25,000. It also so happens that Sgt Bob Marriott has been smitten by this girl who happens to be Julia, Harry's daughter. She says she is concerned about her father's safety, "I believe somebody tried to kill him."
Marriott gets very worked up about Bell's "foul" suspicion that his daughter is the thief. A death cuts short the inquiries, though it's only Bridget the dog, she has been poisoned. She had eaten a sandwich Bell was supposed to eat. Julia had given him the food, but who had prepared it? As cook had been ill, was it Ruth? And Greta, Ruth's evasive companion looks terribly suspicious.
Julia admits removing the jewels as she wanted to stop her stepmother getting them. But she's no attempted killer. Cork easily pounces on the guilty party, "all rather clumsy."
"You bitch," is the awfully corny reaction

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Fellowship Murder
Back from leave in Paris is Bob Marriott. Into the office strides the officious new Assistant Commissioner Thor (AJ Brown), who upsets the whole office, including Cork.
Miss Maude Mallow, hon sec of the Fellowship for the Relief of Foreigners in Exile, has been assaulted and strangled. Body found in her office by caretaker Brill and Edgar and Rose Whitbread (Donald Hewlett/ Mary Kenton). Brill, though he has a record, was kindly employed by Miss Mallow. He says her brooch is missing. A pin is found near the corpse.
When they had entered the office, a man was seen running out, "we hardly saw him."
The Whitbreads are friends at her church. Rose says she thought Miss Mallow encouraged admirers, "not always gentlemen." She is dubious about her relationship with Brill also.
The brooch is pawned by a foreigner named Bronsky. The dim witted Thor tries blustering the thief into confessing to the murder, but Cork will have none of it. He threatens to resign. "Get on with it man." Cork does so, questioning Bronsky in far too humane a manner for Thor's liking. With this information Cork qustions Brill, who admits Miss Mallow had made eyes at him, nothing more. He cannot identify the pin, but Cork knows there is something he is not saying.
Brill is followed to the home of the killer. The script had prepared us for this- "you! and that woman!"

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the Wayward Wife
A patient has taken laudanum. Dr MacGregor calls in the Yard.
Cork is sent to 12 Taplow Square, and asks Mrs Maud Tempest (Diana Fairfax) is it were an accident. She says yes, but Cork is doubtful she is speaking truthfully, and goes to see her husband George who is living at 27 Carlton Terrace, He tells Cork that it was she who initiated their separation, some notion about women's rights. This introduces the theme of the story.
According to politician Sir Charles Emsworth (Ernest Clark), Mrs Tempest is "a complete nuisance." He himself had had to correct his own daughter Julia's suffragete notions. Cork has to see Sir Charles, since Maud's suicide note was addressed to him. Her relationship with him, if any, could well damage his reputation, not to mention his possible appointment as home secretary.
Cork takes Supt Rodway to meet the redoubtable Mrs Tempest, who is now recovering and quite chirpy. Cork comes straight to the point, but Rodway is more discreet. It seems she knew Sir Charles "intimately."
"Damned lies," insists the upright Sir Charles, and seeing his career in possible ruins, gets Julia to go to beg Maud to deny their affair. But she meets with no success. Reporter James Arthur questions Mrs Tempest about her suicide attempt. She tells him all.
No less a personage than the Prime Minster wants to talk with Rodway and Cork. Caution, urges the superintendent, but Cork is a little too honest in offering his opinions.
Then the "shrewd" Cork interviews Mrs Tempest once more. He knows the truth.
Against his better judgement, Sir Charles is taken to confront Maud. His reputation is now too tarred. She gives him as good as she gets. It's the old issue- does the end justify the means?

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Missing Cabinet Maker
A better than usual script, by Martin Worth, showing up Victorian social prejudices.

"Too mean" is Bethnal Green cabinet maker Mr Quigg. His workers don't like him as he is welshing them, selling his goods to expensive dealers like Scroops Ltd, though claiming local buyers are purchasing them. His wife doesn't like him either, as she is sure he has a piece of skirt hidden away.
Mr Scroop complains to the police that Quigg's workers seem to have taken over the business. When Cork investigates, he is informed that Quigg has been away these past four days. His wife adds she is "better off" without him too.
An informer points Cork in the direction of Quigg's corpse, found in a wardrobe in the river at Limehouse. The case centres on Quigg's lady friend, whom Mrs Quigg thinks may have lived in Islington. Marriott is despatched there to find her. With newspapers on to the story, Asst Commissioner Thor demands an early arrest. He is certain that Finch and the other workers are guilty. Cork is taken off the case and a warrant is issued for Finch's arrest.
But Cork is not so easily thwarted, his main interest is in Quigg's bank account, recently his whole savings of £500 had been withdrawn. The search takes him to Kennington where a flower seller puts him on to the lady friend, name of Phyllis Weston, she'd recently "come into a fortune."
At this woman's digs, Marriott finds evidence that murder had been committed here. Phyllis had gone off with a sailor named Alf. Cork steps in to arrest Quigg's murderer

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Notorious Nun
Someone is too obviously chucking leaves in front of the camera lens, as if to show it is autumn. However it is not important as regards the storyline. We are outside a convent. PC Ward hears a scream, and an intruder runs off, injuring the constable.
Sergeant Cork finds Mother Madeleine, who is in charge, peculiarly unhelpful. But Cork insists on questioning the nun, whose name is Sister Scholastica. The chaplain is more co-operative, revealing that she was formerly known as Miss Havelock, notorious in the press six months ago. Her father a colonel, runs The Christian Shield, The Voice of The Protestant Faith, in other words very anti-Catholic.
Marriott does get to talk to Sister Scholastica next morning. He becomes convinced the attacker knew her. Cork finds a piece of cloth torn off by PC Ward that is of expensive material, indicating this was no ordinary intruder.
Though he did have once, Col Havelock denies owning a coat made of such material, or indeed that he even has a daughter. Charles Parker, his assistant, was once engaged to Miss Havelock, however it seems he had only proposed marriage in order to stop her becoming a Catholic.
Who is the mysterious man who visits Mother Madeleine at night? She admits she knew the colonel back in India and that he blamed her for the death of some soldiers under his command. The plot is struggling under too many complications.
The mystery man calls again, Marriott catches him, but fails to apprehend him. However he is wearing Parker's cloak, that identifies him. However as with the colonel before, Parker claims he had given away this coat.
The guilty party is exposed. He had been blackmailing Mother Madeleine. In the convent, Cork gathers the whole cast for the usual expose, "what the blazes is all this?" I found it all far too impausible

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Travelling Texan
Bill Craig's script starts promisingly, but becomes seriously lost.

Col Slocumb (Eddie Byrne) and his ailing wild west show is visited by Marriott and Felicity, his latest woolly headed girl friend, "it's not very good." Marriott has to ditch her, not unwillingly, when the colonel is robbed of his takings. Nearly £500 missing, which should have been paid to his employees, and his duaghter and right hand woman Georgia (Pat English).
Marriott's chief suspect is Zac Ledbetter, in charge of the horses. He is nearly shanghaied, but Marriott prevents that, at the cost of some bruises. His investigations now get sidetracked as he tries to find who assaulted him. The story badly loses pace as Mr Budge, a debt collector, reveals to Supt Rodway the poor state of affairs at Slocumb's show. Macready (David Bauer), his general manager, is clearly up to some funny business.
Back from another case, Cork starts his own investigations. Slocumb admits he had faked the robbery, the £500 had been used to pay off his debt.
Then Zac shoots a guy who has found out he is wanted Dead or Alive in Texas. Macready persuades Zac to hide away on the ship of a friend of his.
However blanks in Zac's gun prove he never killed the man, as if it matters.
Cork perceives Macready is a detective, charged with bringing Zac back to face trial in Texas. Somewhere along the line poor Marriott reappears, to find the robbery has been cleared up. The colonel is mighty pleased, since all the publicity has boosted interest in his show. Georgia is pleased too, for she can marry Zac. British police are apparently not supporting Zac's extradition, and the colonel is not being prosecuted, though Bill Craig should have been

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of A Lady's Good Name
James Meredith (Geoffrey Palmer) is a gentleman though as he admits, also "a bore." The rich Emma Fitzroy is his intended, but who has thrown a knife at him? Cork and Marriott are summoned to question the couple.
Via Meg, a loose woman at the pub, Marriott traces the seller of such knives used in the abortive attack. One customer is a man with a birthmark on his forehead. When Cork and Marriott call at Meredith's office, they see there a clerk with such a mark. His name is Alex de Vere, though it proves an assumed name. He has aspirations above his station, "quite the swell" he looks as he readies himself for an assignation at The Empire.
In his flat, Marriott discovers a knife identical to the one used on Meredith, and he goes to the music hall in search of Alex. However he has left with the informant Meg, off to her rooms, but only to find out what she has told police. He tells her he loves a rich woman. Of course we can guess that is Emma.
Alex is later found dead in his room, badly beaten up. We know James Meredith had been there to beat him up on account of Emma. A very determined Meg tries to blackmail Emma. Cork finds her drinking champagne, on her finger "a very nice ring," definitely the property of Emma.
Cork interrogates Meredith, who admits beating up his rival, but not killing him. He was "a scoundrel," says Meredith.
Cork is inclined to accept that Meredith left Alex alive. He questions Emma.
Then the irritating bit. It is now revealed Alex died of cyanide poisoning. Cork can make his arrest

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Vanishing Victim
Famous explorer Sir Charles Brackett has a row with his nephew Master Cedric. Moscrop the butler, and Betty the maid eavesdrop outside. They hear a shot being fired. It is very obvious that Cedric has shot his uncle.
But when Cork and Marriott arrive from Scotland Yard, the body has vanished. Cork questions the staff, then Cedric who remains calm and unflustered. But Cedric refuses to say anything, and Supt Rodway is brought in to put police questions for him to answer.
"I'd rather not," the unflappable Cedric tells him. Miss Vera, Sir Charles' sister adds yet more comedy into the story when she too refuses to answer Cork.
A jury acquits Cedric, arrested despite Cork's warnings. A lack of evidence is the reason. Inspector Owen of the Welsh constabulary sends for Cork, since a corpse has turned up on his patch. It is, or was, Sir Charles. He had a second home in the vicinty.
Marriott interrogates Betty again, while Cedric moves in to his late uncle's mansion, with his new fiancee Sally. "I killed him," Cedric now admits, "I can't be tried twice."
However Inspector Owen is certain Sir Charles had been murdered about a week before his alleged murder that the staff had witnessed.
In Jollybody's waxworks, the mystery is solved. A dummy had been employed. But as Sally has now married Cedric, she cannot be made to testify against him, even though Cork has proof that she had been at Sir Charles' home in Wales. A second piece of evidence proves equally useless and the story ends unsatisfactorily, except that is, for the guilty parties

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the Albert Watson VC
Not for the first time in this series, you feel the writer has transposed a twentieth century storyline into a Victorian melodrama.
A drunken women is brawling in the studio's reconstruction of the Elephant and Castle area. She is escorted home by a copper, but moments later there's a scream and a man emerges, stabbed to death.
That brings on a siege, inside the house is holed out Albert Watson (Ronald Lacey) in the style of a primitive Chicago gangster with his huge rifle. Hornby, the Assistant Commissioner, organises a plan to shoot him out, but when Sergeant Cork arrives on the scene, he points out that Watson had won the VC out in India. He offers to act as a go-between, and Hornby allows him five minutes.
Bravely Cork walks up to the house. He is allowed in. He's a hostage! Predictable conversations, one novelty is Hornby's impatience to end the standoff.
However he changes character with the appearance of the Hon Percy Monkton-Parker (Moray Watson) who proposes an even more callous approach. Appreciating that Watson is a fallen hero, he intends to feed the press with a revised history of the murder to honour Albert's heroism. Watson will not be able to dispute it, for he will be dead. As for Cork, he'll have to take his chance. The plan is simple, set fire to the house.
After more conversation between Albert and Cork, mostly on his deprived upbringing, mostly depressing, and futile, the army prepare for action. Hornby, against orders, advises the two inside the house of what is about to occur. Albert kindly allows Cork to go. The house is alight.
Watson climbs to the roof like a second rate James Cagney in White Heat, only without any shouting, and dies his death
Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Threatened Rajah

This story centres on young Bob Marriott, sent to the lonely outpost of Majapore. On the train there, he meets Mr William Smedley, blunt owner of a mill, travelling with a lady, whom Bob later finds out is no less than the British ambassador's wife.
The ambassador (John Harvey) warns Bob that the powerful Prince Ratanbir must be protected at all costs, mainly so British interests can be protected. For someone is out to bump the autocratic prince off.
Bob finds the prince's servant strangled, he's arrived only just in time to prevent the prince's murder. Main enemy is Amal Bhose, who has his own designs to rule the state, as well as kick the Brits out. His daughter Rani is pally with the prince, and kindly shows Bob the sights, as well as kissing him.
The prince terminates Smedley's lucrative work at the mill, amid allegations of corruption. Later Smedley is found dead in his offce by his new clerk, the wily Chand.
The ambassador orders Marriott home. Bob refuses. The prince also orders Bob to go, since he no longer fears any danger. Actually Bob can leave, for he now proves who killed the mill owner and wanted the prince dead.
This improbable story degenerates into the caricatures of stiff upper lips and native insurrection, jolly bad show. But Bob has proved himself, and is even offered the post of Chief of Police

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Devil's Daughter
There have been much more credible stories about Second Sight than this, which is weighed down with all the usual Victorian cliches.
The action begins in a raucous music hall, where guests include the party of Charles St Clair, the well known MP. A crowd of hooligans are also there, St Clair's enemies. Your Innermost Thoughts Revealed boasts the act of Mystico The Great and his assistant Rachel (Ann Lynn). The act is a fiddle, since the illusionist warns a member of the audience, Percival Humphries, that he is in grave danger. But the object Rachel uses to bring on this scenario actually belongs to the MP.
When St Clair is found dead by the river, Mrs Martha St Clair points the finger at those who are to lose their homes in a slum clearance organised by the MP. But Bob Marriott, who just happens to have been in the music hall at the time of the prediction finds other suspects. Faraday an archaeologist had fallen out with St Clair over his sponsorship. The MP's secretary Pawley (Peter Elliott) is extraordinarily tearful over the tragedy, unlike Martha, who clearly hated her husband for being a dreadful womaniser.
Cork questions Rachel, treating her statement that she hadn't invented the prediction of death as nonsense. However he agrees that cynics would be confounded if she could demonstrate her bona fides. Benedict Caradus (Robert James) of the Society of Psychical Research arranges this, but she fails to convince in front of Cork and Martha. However this is put down to being pressurised, and later she describes "a tall man" she can see at the scene of the murder.
"Sergeant, what is all this about?" An apt question

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Strolling Players
All the cliches of repertory are here, the stagey lines, and very melodramatic, as the real story also becomes revelation after dubious revelation.
In one of the plays of Jasper Greene, the character Alice is shot dead. Though blanks are always used, this time it is for real, she is dead.
Thus Sergeant Cork and Bob Marriott travel to Pudsea (there is a wonderfully crude mock up of the train as it departs from the station).The play Banished For Love starred Jasper and his wife Emily, and Miss Sarah Amberly, the dead actress, talented and destined for greater things.
Others in the company include Charles Pike who had loaded the gun, Miss Lucy Rogers (Angela Douglas) who now steps into Sarah's role, and George, the stage manager, who had placed the gun in the props basket.
The detectives accompany the players to their next performance in an old run down building. It emerges that Sarah was pregnant, and any of the company could have been the father.
The show must go on, and next evening, as Cork questions backstage, and watches the scene that was so fatal last time, Marriott's attention is drawn to a vital clue. After the performance, Cork makes his arrest. "One final terrible exit," though the story struggles on with yet more revelations, so that looking back on it I am unclear who really did it. Everyone thought someone else did it

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the French Mademoiselle

Cork is looking slightly baffled as a French inspector, spouting French of course, explains to him he has arrested a gang of forgers. One of them however has "slipped his fingers." He warns that the "beautiful delicious" Nanette may recommence her operation this side of the Channel.
She has. With her new partner Eusatce Benjamin (John Bailey) they have secured the services of one of the finest engravers, Catchpole. However he is also an unsalubrious drunkard, and passes one trial note in a pub.
This note is used for payment to a Ju-Jistu instructor by no less than Supt Rodway! The trail goes back to Chalky, the office 'boy,' who'd obtained it from a bookie's runner, Benjy, who'd got it from Josh, in this pub.
That leads police to the Barrington Gallery, but the owner says he doesn't know this Josh. But Cork's snooping gets Nanette jittery and she orders Josh Catchpole to be silenced, now he has perfected his engraving plates.
Cork investigates his death. Nanette and Barrington are packing their notes, ready to flee. But they are interrupted by Cork who discovers their secret room with the forged notes, "you have been busy!"

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Simple Savage

A Maori monarch has come to stay at the home of diplomat Wilfred Laverock. You know he must have arrived, because we hear the unmistakeable sound of horses' hooves, well truthfully it sounds vaguely like coconut shells.
With him is the princess and Rev Horace Greely, missionary to the natives. The Maori's table manners are decidedly unsophisticated, his chasing of the maids ditto. It's all abysmally embarrassing.
But this is by no means the depth of his misdemeanours, or the appallingness of the script. He is robbing his host and the local shops, the explanation being that he is in search of "mana." He however, though he admits acquiring trinkets, denies stealing any of the missing money. To avoid a diplomatic incident, Laverock generously pays for all the damages. Bob Marriott is convinced Greely is a fraud.
Now a bank is robbed, again Laverock offers to make good the £115 stolen. Poor Laverock's home has descended into chaos, his wife is leaving him on account of the problems. Fortunately, the thief is caught in the act, and a diplomatic exit is arranged for the chief, after an audience with The Queen, and an unconvincing long guffaw from Marriott. Possibly he was the only one who could see anything funny in it all

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Fallen Family
One of the better stories. Bob Marriott is having a day off, dutifully spent with his Aunt Maud. She talks a lot, has some story about some well-to-do family having to beg for charity. She drags Bob to the house of this Louise and are introduced to this distressed gentleman Colonel Hawksworth (Richard Pearson). He presents a very sad sight.
Aunt Maud is slightly unsure if the family is genuine, but Bob Marriott is completely convinced, no doubt influenced by the pretty daughter Louise. But in fact, as soon as he and Aunt Maud leave, we see the colonel spring from his sick bed.
To appease his aunt, Bob does make some perfunctory inquiries about the Hawksworths. A very pleasant task, since it enables him to take tea with Louise, with a further assignation to follow.
In a pub, a one armed sailor begs Marriott for help. "You've been had," Cork tells Bob, who had put the sailor up to show Bob he is a little gullible. Cork gets the sailor to find out about the Hawksworths.
Louise is getting a conscience over the deception. Especially after Aunt Maud sends a large donation. The sailor confirms Cork's suspicions, much to Bob's annoyance. Bob makes straight for the colonel, and finds him not in bed at all. "You sir are a swindler." He also reprimands Louise for being part of the swindle. She retorts that he had also deceived them, by not revealing he was a detective. The family do a bunk before they can be arrested.

Joyce Carey as Aunt Maud adds some humour to her role, as does Fabia Drake as Lady Dumayne. Angela Piper as the maid throws some appealing silent looks in Bob's direction

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the Crystal Ball

Madam Zina finds things- fee half a crown. Reporter Jim Starkey consults her as he has lost his watch. She tells him where it is, then falls into a trance raving about Charity and Cork.
With little success, Cork is investigating the theft of a charity diamond. When Jim informs him of the fortune teller, Cork discovers the diamond in Cork Street!
So Cork calls on Madam Zina, incognito, then Supt Rdway in a more official capacity. She relapses into another trance and there are ramblings about Lord Westwood.
Cork suspects she might be predictng the theft of a most valuable necklace guarded at his mansion. When he hears this, his lordship invites Madam Zina to see him for "further guidance," and in a trance, she gives the message, "tomorrow morning, eight o'clock."
She returns next day with another vision, a warning of death. She advises that the necklace be taken to the bank for safety.
Fortunately Cork is at Madam Zina's to recover the stolen necklace, and he provides a plausible explanation for all the unlikely happenings

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of The Silent Policeman

A confusing opening at a warehouse, which is being robbed. Cork is called in to assist the local Hammersmith Inspector Fox (Bernard Archard), who has already arrested some of the gang, including, sadly, his own PC Clark. The evidence against this copper is strong. Cork tries to interrogate him, but finds him most unco-operative, while his wife Maggie is very worried. Cork can't seem to find out why he won't talk- who is he shielding?
Doris, an eyewitness, is found. She knows something, possibly, and is followed.
Marriott has the unenviable task of informing Insp Fox that Cork wants Clark's trial to be postponed. Fox refuses to agree to that. In fact Clark has broken out of his cell and got away. However he is caught at the docks, and Cork has him in for questioning again. It's clear Clark had expected he was going to escape.
Cork tries some subterfuge. Doris is found drowned, allegedly, and Clark is persuaded to come clean. Thus Cork beards Insp Fox dramatically in his home. "You'll not get away with this... I'll break you for this, Cork."
At least we are spared the platitude about bent bogeys. In fact, there's one entertaining moment in the police station with Doris complaining to the sergeant, when she gets flustered and her hat falls off

Sergeant Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of the Hooded Students
James Leather, headmaster of Leabridge College in Tottenham Hale runs the place with a rod of iron. He has just sacked the gardener Thomas (Windsor Davies) who fiercely utters the threat, "for two pins I'd wring your scrawny neck." Thomas' hints as to Leather's severity with his pupils are not exaggerated. Indeed one, Pirie, died recently, allegedly of natural causes.
Cork is preparing his speech for the police concert, Rodway getting ready his rendition of Two Lovely Black Eyes, so Bob Marriott is sent to the college to assure Leather that Thomas' threats will be investigated.
That night Leather is seized by some hooded students, who hold a mock trial. Leather is accused of the "slow murder" of Pirie. "I only meant to discipline," complains an angry headmaster. But sentence is passed, An Eye For An Eye.
Now Cork and Marriott have to investigate the head's disappearance. He talks to one senior pupil, Dalby, whom we know was the ringleader, as well as Hawkins (Laurence Hardy), the only master at the school. The jaded Hawkins declares that everyone hated Leather, including himself. He shows Cork round the premises, and Cork finds the hoods.
Leather is found shot dead in the river. In traditional fashion, puplis, such as they be, staff plus Thomas are gathered in the school for Cork to reveal the murderer. Dalby claims all the students were in their dormitory at night. But Cork cuts to the quick of the matter and turns to the subject of Pirie. Then the secret society. Cork leans on one weak student who admits, "it started as a sort of joke."
The series concludes with Rodway singing his song at the concert. Then Chalky White's turn, during which news arrives that Dalby is dead. A police report reveals that Leather had died of natural causes, even though I thought they said earlier he had been shot!

Cork Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Shadow Squad
Taped Shows Menu

2.3 Race Against Time 2.8 The Missing Cheese
If you wanted a really tough quiz question, it might be this- which TV series was originally made in London (by A-R) but then continued its existence in the Manchester Studios (of Granada)?
Shadow Squad would be the correct answer, a serial story, normally in two parts that began on 17th June 1957. For the early stories, Rex Garner starred as Vic Steele 'the Man with a Mission'. It was a typical studio bound series of the era, producer Barry Baker claiming the aim was to get "as near to theatre presentation as possible." This summed up A-R's general approach to programme making: "I won't be using a foot of film in the whole series... it holds up the action. I'm intending to shoot the majority of the scenes in close-up. The stories will be told on the actors' faces." Baker went on to write and direct a new series in the autumn of 1957, Murder Bag, which developed into the celebrated No Hiding Place.
On 7th October 1957, from the North now, it amazingly returned after only the shortest of short breaks. Peter Williams had already taken over the starring role as Inspector Don Carter. Other regulars in both series were George Moon as the perky Ginger Smart, who appeared in over 150 of the programmes, and then continued this role in Granada's Skyport which began in July 1959, John Horsley who played Supt John Whitelaw and Kathleen Boutall as landlady Mrs Moggs. Though now made in Manchester, interestingly Don Carter's address is given as 7 Mill Bank Mews, London SW1.
In June 1958, Don Carter finished this long series by going to Montreal to crack a big case. A new series began on 15th September 1958 as Don and Ginger solve some trouble on the liner home. The final story, Swan Song, was on 24th June 1959.
It seems that though the programme was originally made live, Granada must have recorded series three on to videotape as some of this series was repeated in their local late night slot during 1959. But it's most probable that after these showings the tapes were then wiped....

In all there were 93 stories, making up a total of 179 half hour programmes.
Information on other actors in the series- unfortunately TV Times rarely provided cast lists. Margaret Morris, head of Granada's casting department built up a nucleus of local talent of over 100 who were used, sadly not recorded for posterity. However Raymond Francis said he did appear in a Shadow Squad story as a blackmailer (possibly 1.10). Jimmy Hanley also appeared in an unknown story, playing a "tough type of detective." Others who stated they appeared in Shadow Squad, though I have been unable to trace in which story, are: John Barron, Maureen Beck, Richard Burrell, Fanny Carby, Sandra Caron, Stephen Cartwright, Rupert Davies, Ina de la Haye, Shelagh Fraser, Arthur Goullett (series 2 or 3), Melvyn Hayes ("guest lead"), Jack Howarth, Jill Ireland, Maurice Kaufmann, Ronald Leigh-Hunt, Alfie Maron, Bernadette Milnes, Newell Palmer, Ambrosine Phillpotts, Sheila Raynor, Rachel Roberts (series 2 or 3), John Ross, Cyril Shaps, Jennifer Jayne, and Michael Ward. One who made his tv break was John Barrie who appeared in about 10 stories between the end of 1957 and May 1958.
The theme tune was Soho Serenade, written by Steve Race.

The first series, made by A-R in London, up to story 1.13 starred Rex Garner as Vic Steele.
1.1 First Blood (17th and 20th June 1957, 7.30pm). The story of an unsolved murder mystery. Ginger joins the Bendix Gang. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Also with Kenneth Thornett (Steve Moray), Max Brimmel (Ferdy Black), Charles Farrell (Gus Gore), Elizabeth 'Liz' Fraser (Gilda). In the second part Frederick Schiller (Monty Judge) also appeared. Produced and directed by Barry Baker
1.2 Boomerang (24 and 27th June 1957). A visitor from Australia inolves Vic in an old feud with a new twist. What is the secret of Owls Holt, and who is trying to kill Bill Linton (Alex Scott)? Also with Neil Hallett (Phillip Buckland), June Thorburn (Janet Falconbridge), Harold Lang (Edwin Reece), Hal Osmond (Foxy Drake), Leslie Weston (George Thorpe), George Hirste (Gaffer Green) and Neil Wilson (Fred Armstrong). Produced by Barry Baker, directed by Bill Hitchcock.
Derek Hoddinott described these two opening stories as "a disaster to say the least." He lays the blame with "the scriptwriter who remains apparently anonymous. His dialogue has to be heard to be believed and how the actors managed to speak their lines, and some of them convincingly, I shall never know." But this critic had winkled out the better news that producer Barry Baker was taking over the editing of the stories and from #1.5 would be writing the stories himself, "assisted by Bert Chapman."
1.3 Soho Serenade (1st and 4th July 1957). Dan Cutler is out of jail and out for revenge on the woman who shopped him. With George Moon, also: Sidney James (Spinner Burke), Michael Golden (Dan Cutler), Patricia Burke (Goldy Finch), Roberta Woolley (Bonny Finch), Edwin Richfield (Joe Tracey), Neil McCallum (Link White), Charles Rolfe (Sgt Dean), Maggie McGrath (Elsie). Produced and edited by Barry Baker, directed by Jean Hamilton.
1.4 Murder in Mink (8 and 11th July 1957). A beautiful girl is threatened with murder, and then seems to commit suicide. With John Horsley, also: Leslie Weston (Harry Hoxton), Anthony Nicholls (Randolph Condor), Geoffrey Dunne (Adrian Curling), Vanda Godsell (Stella Curtis), Lewis Wilson (Sgt Hope), Michael Corcoran (Salty), Arnold Bell (Hotel manager), Barbara Archer (Receptionist), Penny Morell (Isobelle Hughes, 2nd episode only). Produced and edited by Barry Baker, directed by Bill Hitchcock.
1.5 Safe Bet (15 and 18th July 1957). A young man is betting heavily and Vic is called in to untangle him from crooked bookmakers. With Geroge Moon. Also with Arthur Lawrence (Richard Cross), Michael Meacham (Ronald Barnham), Brenda Hogan (Dulcie Martin), Richard Waring (Peter Sinclair), James Thomason (Monty Rix), Jack Melford (Fretwell), Harry Lane (Big Lew), and Charles Stanley (Barman). In first part only: John Dunbar (Estate Agent), Tony Cook (Race Commentator). In part 2 only: June Wyndham (Audrey). Director: Jean Hamilton
1.6 The Switch Trick (22nd and 25th July 1957).
1.7 Dead Letter (29th July and 1st Aug 1957). There are strange people in the village of Molton, and Vic Steele learns many secrets as he tries to find out who has written poison pen letters. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and produced by Barry Baker, directed by Jean Hamilton.
1.8 The Reverend Marcus Field (5 and 8th August 1957). Vic deals with a man who is not breaking the law, and yet his every activity is against the public interest. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and produced by Barry Baker, directed by Bill Hitchcock.
1.9 The Rent Racket (12 and 15th August 1957). Shadow Squad deals with a Rent Racketeer. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Bertie Chapman. Edited and produced by Barry Baker, directed by Jean Hamilton.
1.10 A Case of Blackmail (19th and 22nd August 1957). Vic unearths the identity of a blackmailer, but the dilemma is, will the revelation destroy his victim? He poses as an old lag to square accounts for the victim. With George Moon and John Horsley. Written by Bertie Chapman. Edited and produced by Barry Baker, directed by Bill Hitchcock.
1.11 The Happy Holiday (26 and 29th August 1957).
1.12 Smart Work (2nd and 5th September 1957). A burglary brings Vic's toughest case to date. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and directed by Bill Hitchcock. Produced by Barry Baker.
1.13 Marry in Haste (9 and 12th September 1957). Bitterness and misery not to mention financial ruin in a marriage. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Bob Kellett. Produced by Barry Baker, directed by Hugh Munro.
Note: Rex Garner as Vic Steele left the series, we were told he was sent off to America on a mission for the Prime Minister.
1.14 Judge Without Jury (16th, 19th and 23rd September 1957) -in three parts. The death of Frank Bennett is neither sudden nor unexpected, but only Vic Steele supects he's been murdered. A perfect crime? But murderers usually make a slip. Now starring Peter Williams as Don Carter. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and produced by Barry Baker. Director: Herbert Wise.
1.15 Robbery Without Violence (26 and 30th September 1957). When valuable furs are stolen, the insurance company calls in Don Carter. But desperate men fight hard for this sort of money, and danger lies ahead. With Peter Williams. Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and produced by Barry Baker. Director: Herbert Wise. A-R's final story before the showed moved north.

Series 2 now made in Granada's Manchester studios, all stories starring Peter Williams as Insp Don Carter.
2.1 Pearls of Great Price (7, 10 and 14th October 1957- in three parts). A valuable pearl necklace is stolen and when Don Carter investigates, he finds a body. To recover the pearls he enlists Ginger's help to set a trap. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley. Written and produced by Barry Baker, directed by Herbert Wise.
2.2 It's in the Bag (17th and 21st October 1957). June, a beautiful young model, has been kidnapped by agents of a smuggling ring. Don Carter searches for her mysterious chauffeur Jock. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon, John Horsley.
2.3 Race Against Time (24 and 28th October 1957). One man wins a great deal of money when an outsider wins a race. Don knows the race was fixed and has to turn the tables on the criminals, with Ginger coming in handy again. With Kathleen Boutall, George Moon and John Horsley. Written by Barry Baker. Directed by Herbert Wise.
2.4 Vicious Circle (31st October and 4th November 1957) The police are baffled by a series of daring robberies in tailors' shops. Don plans a trap for the crooks, using Ginger as bait. With Kathleen Boutall (whose final appearance is about this time), George Moon and John Horsley. Written by Barry Baker. Directed by Claude Whatham.
2.5 Needle in a Haystack (7 and 11 November 1957)
2.6 Let Sleeping Dogs Lie (14 and 18th November 1957)
2.7 Lost in a Shuffle (21st and 25th November 1957). In this game of chance the stakes are high. But as always the Shadow Squad holds an ace. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Alan Cooper, directed by Claude Whatham.
2.8 The Missing Cheese (28th Nov and 2nd December 1957). A broken window, a smashed tumbler, a piece of cracked plaster- little enough evidence to go on, but for Don and Supt Whitelaw it was the start of the trail. The petty theft of cheese from a saloon bar, provides a clue to a long series of unsolved robberies. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Lloyd Barclay, directed by James Ormerod.
2.9 The Mortimer Millions (5 and 9th December 1957). Don Carter has to discover who is the rightful heir to a fortune worth five million pounds. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Barry Baker, directed by Claude Whatham.
2.10 Double and Quits (12 and 16th December 1957).
2.11 There's No Place Like ... (19th and 23rd December 1957). Crooks have devised the perfect scheme for robbing a bank, but they overlook the element of chance. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Alan Cooper, designed by Stanley Mills, directed by Herbert Wise.
2.12 Double Exposure (26 and 30th December 1957). With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Lloyd Barclay, directed by Claude Whatham.
2.13 The Big Steal (6 and 9th January 1958). Small parcels of goods are disappearing from Hutchinson's, a big organisation of shipping agents. Don Carter tries to foil the Havelock Gang who are after bigger fry- gold bullion. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by James Ormerod.
2.14 Without a Trace (13 and 16th January 1958). A wealthy woman named Judith Lawson disappears from a London hotel. Her nephew is the one to benefit from her will, yet he asks Don Carter for help! In a dilapidated building in Richmond, Ginger Smart stumbles on the truth. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Herbert Wise.
2.15 The Female of the Species (20th and 23rd January 1958). A new carburettor will halve the costs of motoring! Only two men know the secret, but a rival firm abroad also have the formula. Don Carter's attentions turn on the only woman in the men's office. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Lloyd Barclay, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Claude Whatham.
2.16 Safe Conduct (27 and 30th January 1958). Ginger Smart's intimate knowledge of the underworld helps him tracks down the brains behind a series of safe robberies, Ricky Monahan, but Ginger is cunningly trapped by a mystery woman. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Alan Cooper, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
2.17 Vital Statistics (3rd and 6th February 1958). Whitehall asks Don Carter to stop the leak of secret information concerning ballistic missiles. Among the characters he interrogates are two pretty girls with heads for figures and a country parson who is sympathetic towards the plight of displaced persons. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Lloyd Barclay, designed by John Dilly, directed by James Ormerod.
2.18 Positive Proof (10 and 13th February 1958). Warren R Low, millionaire rubber king, has flown from America to London and immediately finds himself being blackmailed. Don Carter has to give up his long awaited holiday to solve this case. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Edward Dryhurst, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by David Main.
2.19 The Search for Linda Morgan (17 and 20th February 1958). A glamorous vaudeville dancer disappears, and is later found murdered. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Stanley Mills, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
2.20 A Trick Worth Two (24 and 27th February 1958)
2.21 The Man Who Wasn't There (3rd and 6th March 1958). Mysterious noises from an empty room terrify Betty Wilson in her boarding house. Ginger moves into the house and finds "the man who wasn't there" seems to have committed a murder! With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by David Carr, designed by Stanley Mills, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
2.22 The Artistic Touch (10 and 13th March 1958). Dud cheques flood into banks across London. With George Moon, John Horsley. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by John Dilly, directed by Herbert Wise.
Under the Counter (17 and 20th March 1958). With George Moon, and John Horsley (who left the series this month). Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Claude Whatham.
2.24 Clown for a Day (24 and 27th March 1958). Don and Ginger delve behind the glamour of the circus and discover sabotage in the Big Top. They have to hunt a killer to save Brady's tent show. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Maurice Askew, directed by David Main.
2.25 Where There's a Will (31st March and 3rd April 1958). Don and Ginger engage a secretary named Janet Beattie. But the correspondence is soon forgotten when Janet is charged with robbery, and perhaps murder. The evidence against her is overwhelming, but Don investigates, only hoping he can get back to his letters again. Written by Edward Dryhurst from a story by Glyn Davies, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Max Morgan Witts
2.26 Black Angel (7 and 10th April 1958). Ginger and Don are called abroad after mysterious outbreaks of sabotage in Germany. They are quickly involved with former Nazi wartime crooks, and The Black Angel. Don keeps his appointment with The Black Angel, but this is not the end of the case. Written by Dan Douglas, designed by John Dilly, directed by David Main
2.27 Gift Horse (14 and 17th April 1958)
2.28 The Profit Motive (21st and 24th April 1958). A "near van Gogh" painting is bought by Andrew Murray. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by John Dilly, directed by David Main.
2.29 Illegal Entry (28th April and 1st May 1958)
2.30 The Man on Top (5 and 8th May 1958). A big cosmetics firm finds that its trade secrets are leaking to their competitors. They call in a couple of efficiency experts to track down the spy. Behind the scenes, Don and Ginger witness a fierce struggle for control, with a little help, their side wins. Script: Philip Grenville Mann. Director: David Main.
2.31 Double Trouble (12 and 15th May 1958). Don and Ginger piece together a spilt glass of beer, a busybodying friend, a box of matches and an anonymous telephone call. Paul Fletcher is arrested for attacking someone and when Don is attacked also, Fletcher's blamed for this also, but Don isn't convinced. With George Moon. Written by George E Pepper, designed by Darrell Lass, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
2.32 Pillar of Society (19th and 22nd May 1958). First part: Wealthy Alan Thomas dies from an overdose of sleeping pills. The coroner's verdict is Misadventure. But Thomas's solicitor tells Don Carter that the dead man "never touched a pill in his life." Second part: Don and Ginger have found several cracks in their pillar of society which weaken the verdict of Misadventure. With George Moon. Written by Julian Bond, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by David Main.
2.33 Trouble in the Sun (26 and 29th May 1958). First part: Ginger is staying in a hotel on the Italian Riviera. It seems everyone is interested in "the little English detective" including a journalist and a lovely girl called Francesca. In this episode, though billed in TV Times, Don Carter does not appear. However he does so for part two, in which Ginger, having got into trouble, has to summon "his assistant," ie Don. What Don unearths is a flourishing counterfeit racket. The journalist disappears, then Francesca... Written by Peter Yeldham. Designed by Darrell Lass. Directed by Max Morgan Witts.
2.34 Mark of the Mantis (2nd and 5th June 1958) - Peter Williams not in this story which starred George Moon.
2.35 Lost and Found (9 and 12th June 1958) - this story marked the hundredth appearance of Ginger Smart. When young Bridie Muldoon lands at Liverpool, she has no friends and only one ambition- to be a nurse. But as she is too young, she has to work for a while as a maid. All goes well until an envelope containing money, which she is given to post, does not reach its destination. Accused of stealing, she runs away, Don and Ginger search for her. Written by HV Kershaw. Designed by Darrell Lass. Directed by James Ormerod.
2.36 Road to Nowhere (16 and 19th June 1958)
2.37 From Natural Causes (23rd and 26th June 1958). When Alfred Cole comes to London from Manchester, he first visits Scotland Yard and then Don Carter. Alfred Cole is not on a spree, nor on business. Jane Cole, his glamorous niece has disappeared. In their hurried search for her, Don and Ginger find proof that she is not lost but dead. But why does the one person who would like to see her dead swear that Jane is still alive, and that he has seen her? With George Moon. Script: Peter Yeldham, designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Max Morgan-Witts.
Note: in this script, Don and Ginger finish the series by leaving for Canada.
(Max Morgan-Witts said that both Peter Williams and George Moon were piano players, and pestered him into letting them play on the programme. "Maybe we can fix something.")

Series 3- all stories starring Peter Williams as Insp Don Carter.
3.1 Return Passage (15 and 18th September 1958). On the ship back from Canada, there are an odd assortment of passengers, plus a couple of racehorses, one of which is poisoned. The body of a small time crook is discovered in the hold. Questioned by the captain (central photo), Ginger is unable to explain his movements, and is suspected of murder. Don (lower photo) steps in to prove Ginger innocent. With George Moon. Also with John Allen as the ship's captain. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by David Main.
3.2 Sweet Poison (22nd and 25th September 1958). A young woman called Yvonne Seagrave is suspected by Don of having sent a box of chocolates filled with pepper to Marion, the matron of a small hospital. The matron feels she will hear no more from this "practical joker." However the unrepentant Yvonne plans to send her a bottle of poisoned wine. With George Moon. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Stuart Latham.
3.3 Beside the Seaside (29th Sept and 2nd October 1958). A party of friends are making their annual visit to a seaside boarding house, but this year jealousy and suspicion mar the atmosphere. and there's an 'accident.' A second accident causes Don and Ginger to try and find out who is attempting to murder Mary Dodds, and why. With George Moon. Written by George E Pepper, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.4 No Way Out (6 and 9th October 1958, rpt: Aug 25 and 26th 1959). Connie Sutton is anxious her teenage sister is getting in with the wrong crowd and asks Don and Ginger to help.They find a disillusioned daughter who wants revenge, as they uncover the brain behind a gang of teenage thieves. With George Moon. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Robert Tronson.
3.5 Rainbow's End (13 and 16th October 1958, rpt: 18 and 19th Aug 1959). £40,000 had been embezzled from a client of the American Insurance Company. Harry Pearce, the thief, had been convicted, and is now being released from prison after serving his four year sentence. The company asks Don and Ginger to trace the missing money. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.6 The Doll Merchant (20th and 23rd October 1958, rpt: 27 and 28th Aug 1959). As well as George Moon the cast included Leonard Sachs as Van Mers.
Diamonds, hidden in a child's teddy bear are smuggled through customs by Karl van Mers (top photo) who has brought his wife and young daughter from Amsterdam to London on a business trip. His family happen to move into the flat above the office occupied by Don and Ginger, who quickly become friendly with the bear, unaware that this teddy is a diamond's best friend! The little girl runs away on the night they arrive, taking her teddy bear. Don and Ginger search for her, little guessing that her teddy is filled with smuggled diamonds. It's a doll merchant who finds her and takes her home. While repairing the teddy he finds three diamonds... Written by John Warwick, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by David Main.
3.7 Double Shuffle (27 and 30th October 1958, rpt: 1st and 2nd Sept 1959). Lucy Sparling and a cousin from South Africa, whom she has never met, inherit a fortune. But Lucy claims the man claiming to be her cousin Jonathan West is a fraud. However a court upholds Jonathan's claim to a stake in the fortune and Lucy persuades Don and Ginger to continue their investigation. The man's wife provides a clue which leads to a team of confidence tricksters. With George Moon. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.8 Streets of Gold (3rd and 6th November 1958, rpt: 3rd and 4th Sept 1959). Shirley Gardiner is seventeen, with a steady job, living at home with her family. But she's restless and unhappy, and leaves home, disappearing in the middle of London. She has little money and does not want to work. Don and Ginger are hired by the girl's family to find her. With George Moon. Written by Tony Warren, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by David Main.
3.9 The Kovacs Affair (10 and 13th November 1958) Don receives a call for help from Philip Martin, a journalist in the south of France. When Carter arrives, he finds that Martin has apparently committed suicide. Anton Kovacs and Henry Mills his manager are involved in Martin's death, but what information had he uncovered to make him dangerous? Script by Peter Yeldham, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Max Morgan-Witts
3.10 Brought to Book (17 and 20th November 1958, rpt: 20th and 21st Aug 1959). Sylvester Lane, noted authority on old books, thinks he has found a priceless volume. He seems to have found a wealthy American buyer, but Don Carter suspects the book is a fake. With George Moon. Written by Basil Francis, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by David Main.
3.11 The Little Rebel (24 and 27th November 1958, rpt: 10 and 11th Sept 1959). An alsatian, the mascot of the SS van Druton, escapes as the ship docks in the Thames. The dog has rabies. Dick and Ginger try to track it down. But a kind old lady has befriended it... With George Moon. Written by John Warwick, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.12 Blind Corner (1st and 4th December 1958). The day Don Peterson returns from reform school, an ex-accomplice Eddie Wright, is beaten up. Peterson is accused, though Ginger Moon believes him innocent. Ginger listens to Ron's story (centre photo) and decides to tackle the case on his own. It is a visit to Eddie in hospital (bottom photo) which puts him on the right trail. Cast included: Robert Petters as Ron Peterson, and John Briggs as Eddie Wright. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by David Main.
3.13 Method in Her Madness (8 and 11th December 1958, rpt: 15 and 16th Sept 1959). Don's young cousin Valerie has been receiving anonymous letters and she asks Don to investigate. She's a student at a drama school, and finds herself in great danger. With George Moon. Written by Victor Gordon, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by David Main.
3.14 The Painting (15 and 18th December 1958, rpt: 17 and 18th Sept 1959). A thief steals a valuable painting in a country house robbery. Pavement artist buys it, neither of them realising its true value. Don and Ginger race with a mysterious stranger to retrieve it first. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Francis Coleman.
3.15 A Song for Christmas (22nd and 7pm on 26th December 1958) In Pentecost Road there lives a Scrooge, and the Young People's Association teach him the spirit of Christmas. With George Moon. Written by Philip Grenville Mann, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by James Ormerod.
3.16 You Can't Win All the Time (29th Dec 1958 and 1st January 1959, rpt: 22nd and 23rd Sept 1959). Bookie Brad Foster loses heavily, and resorts to blackmail in order to pay his clients. A scared ex-crook later walks into Don's office with a £1,000 diamond necklace. Trying to trace the owner, Don tangles with the blackmailer, while Ginger finds his old trade as a cracksman very useful. With George Moon. Written by Bevis Winter and Peter Cagney, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by David Main.
3.17 Lost, Stolen or Strayed (5 and 8th January 1959, rpt: 24 and 25th Sept 1959). Nicholas Boaz loses his umbrella and asks Don to find it. What a waste of time, thinks Ginger. But two shady characters are also after it. With George Moon. Written by Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.18 Cry Wolf (12 and 15th January 1959, rpt: 29 and 30th Sept 1959). A hysterical young blonde asks Don "Find out who I am!" The only clue to her identity is a business card, which leads Don to a frightened merchant named Seeler and an old friend Wolf. A packet of diamonds deposited by the girl in a left luggage office turns out to be the vital clue. With George Moon. Written by Keith Dewhurst, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Herbert Wise.
3.19 The Refugees (19th and 22nd January 1959, rpt: 1st and 2nd Oct 1959). Don and Ginger grapple with an organisation smuggling refugees into Britain With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Stuart Latham.
3.20 Car for Sale (26 and 29th January 1959, rpt: 7 and 9th Oct 1959). Don and Ginger are hired to prove the innocence of Tom Swinbourne, accused of stealing a car. Ginger puts his safecracking skills to use again, and Don meets a frightened man. With George Moon. Written by Jim Brown, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Max Morgan Witts.
3.21 The Smiler (2nd and 5th February 1959). Some members of the Pasco Street Social Club are distinctly anti-social, and policeman Sam Grogan fears for the safety of Rita, his girl friend, who works among them. He asks Don and Ginger to keep an eye on things, and they soon discover Sam's fears are justified when Rita disappears. Don and Ginger find that she has been in touch with The Smiler, a dangerous criminal. But who is he? Sam Grogan provides the clue. With George Moon. Written by John Witney and Geoffrey Bellman, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Michael Scott.
3.22 The Fatal Trap (9 and 12th February 1959, rpt: 13 and 14th Oct 1959). It looks suspicious when Ginger disappears after a crime. But the real crook Carter is finally cornered. With George Moon. Written by John Warwick, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Stuart Latham.
3.23 The Travelling Lady (16 and 19th February 1959, rpt: 15 and 16th Oct 1959). A firm of solicitors asks Don to find a lady who has been bequeathed a large sum of money. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by James Ormerod.
3.24 Solo for Ginger (23rd and 26th February 1959, rpt: 20th and 21st Oct 1959). Don is away and learns of these two "private detectives" who are doing him out of a job- their names are Don Carter and Ginger Smart! This makes the case of the blackmailed lady even more difficult to solve, especially when too many suspects spoil the broth. With George Moon. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Michael Scott.
3.25 The Dark Stranger (2nd and 5th March 1959, rpt: 22nd and 23rd Oct 1959). Van Blankenberg is so terrified when he sees The Dark Stranger that his daughter Elsa appeals to Don Carter for help. With George Moon. Written by Henry Marshall, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Stuart Latham.
3.26 One White Lie (9 and 12th March 1959, rpt: 27 and 28th Oct 1959). A white lie threatens Henry Adams with a heavy prison sentence. Don Carter is called in to be confronted by a tangle of evidence. Why are so many people supporting what he knows to be a lie? Can find he the one man in London who can break the lie? With George Moon. Written by John Warwick, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Claude Whatham.
3.27 The Directors' Dilemma (16 and 18th March 1959, rpt: 29th and 30th Oct 1959- the last story to be repeated). The theft of sugar begins a case which ends with attempted murder, ruining a good bottle of whisky with poison. With George Moon. Written by Victor Gordon, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Michael Scott.
3.28 The Last Letter (23rd and 26 March 1959)
3.29 The Silent Witness (30th March and 2nd April 1959). The death of company director Charles Corcoran poses an unusual problem. There are three suspects, but only one sitness, who must remain silent. Carter finds conclusive evidence that will unmask the murderer, but none of it is admissable in a court of law. Written by Ivor Dean, designed by Denis Parkin. Director: Michael Scott.
3.30 The Amateurs (6 and 9th April 1959). Don Carter's first meeting with his client brings him face to face with violence- the man has been coshed. Inquiries take Don to Spain for a big tennis tournament. Written by Peter Yeldham, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Claude Whatham
3.31 The Blind Gunner (13 and 16th April 1959). Don Carter and one other man know the secret which could wreck the marriage of Jack Parks, a blind VC. The other man threatens exposure, so Don is faced with a difficult choice- to play a waiting game, or reveal the secret himself. Eventually he shows that it is best to trust a loving wife. Written by Lewis Davidson, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Warren Jenkins
3.32 Hero on the Run (20th and 23rd April 1959). With Don on holiday, Ginger tries to discover how secret plans are reaching foreign countries. His inquiries take him to germany, where he has a close call with a knife thrower. Then he is locked in a safe, can he crack it from the inside? Script by John Warwick, designed by Paul Bernard. Director: Claude whatham.
3.33 The Reckless Motorist (27th April 1959)- remaining stories only one part.
3.34 Out of the Blue (4th May 1959). Is the painting Girl In A Market Place genuine, or a brilliant forgery? The artist, Christopher Hawthorne, is dead. But Don Carter, checking the picture's authenticity, uncovers a strange story. Script by Tony Wareen, designed by Denis Parkin. Director: Claude Whatham.
3.35 The Dark Years (11th May 1959). Hans Ribot recovers his memory, only to remember things that he would rather forget. Don Carter investigates his memories of The Dark Years. Script: Phillip Grenville Main. Designed by Denis Parkin. Director: Warren Jenkins.
3.36 The Amazing Mr Shane (18th May 1959). Carter matches his wits against a confidence man and, for once, is always a jump behind. Even when he catches up with his adversary, his problem is- how to bring him to book. With George Moon. Script: Peter Yeldham. Designed by Denis Parkin. Director: Herbert Wise.
3.37 The Wedding Dress (25th May 1959). There's a suspected case of witchcraft in an exclusive fashion house. With George Moon. Written by Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney, designed by Denis Parkin, directed by Graham Evans.
3.38 The Family Affair (3rd June 1959)
3.39 One Step to Murder (10th June 1959). To prove his point, Carter makes the criminal take one step too many. With George Moon, Written by Lewis Davidson, designed by Paul Bernard, directed by Graham Evans.
3.40 The Kick-Back (17th June 1959). Don Carter catches a thief who cannot describe what he has stolen. With George Moon. Script: Lewis Davidson, designed by Paul Bernard. Director Adrian Brown.
3.41 Swan Song (24th June 1959) - final story.

Details of George Moon in Skyport which started the following week on July 2nd 1959.

To Taped Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.3 Race Against Time (First part)
Stevens has taken over a bookmaker's business with a view to swindling fellow bookies and punters alike. The racket centres round the fact that he has found a ringer for a feeble horse called Mr Kelly, and his double, Hotpoint, is a real "flyer." In the Park Handicap, Hotpoint is going to be switched with the dud Mr Kelly and win the race. With noone betting on the outsider, Stevens gets the phone lines to the course to be cut to prevent any late bets reducing the odds, once he has placed his own. He'll be "the slowest horse to win any race," and Stevens anticipates raking in £20,000.
Don Carter's regular Saturday date is at the races. Ginger Smart and landlady Mrs Moggs have had a bet on Paradise Lost, "'e can't lose," though of course he does. Larry Hoyle, Stevens assistant, places lots of bets with different bookies on Mr Kelly, odds of 100-8 or 10-1. Stevens phones other colleagues, saying he wants to lay off bets on Mr Kelly.
Though Red Rose is the favourite, it's Mr Kelly, or rather Hotpoint, who wins easily, "somebody's made a fortune." Though there is no evidence of doping, Don is suspicious, sensing rather than being able to prove that a switch had been made.
However Vaughan (Richard Caldicot), one bookie who has lost a packet, is surprisingly phlegmatic. Don however is sure, and checks with Riley, Mr Kelly's owner, only to meet a brick wall. Don needs proof.
The racket works a second time, this time in reverse as it were. Mr Kelly is not switched, so the real horse is bound not to win, though punters bet on him after his last great victory. "Nice little racket, you when when he wins, you win when he loses." Poor Ginger is one of those benighted losers, against Don's advice, he'd placed a bet on Mr Kelly.
Perils of Live TV: Peter Williams forgets one line, Brian Oulton muffs several, but covers so well.
To my review of part two of this story.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Race Against Time (second and final part)

Watching eagerly the big race on tv are Don, Ginger and Mrs Moggs. Stevens happily listens to it on his radio. Mrs Moggs is pleased as she's a winner, but Ginger's bet lets him down again. The result convinces Don that a switch must have been made last time out, and the only way to prove it is find Mr Kelly's double. Ginger is volunteered to become a stable lad at Riley's stables.
Thus Ginger Cardew, ace Australian jockey, under a shadow down under, is offered a job by Lofty, Riley's chief trainer. He's placed in charge of "a brute of a horse," named The Maniac. Ginger hastily finds an excuse for not riding him.
Don talks more with Vaughan, the bookie who had lost a lot on Mr Kelly, but he is still sure of Stevens' bona fides. Not so Don!
At the stables, Ginger is asked to ride Mr Kelly, but the excuse of a bad back gets him out of that. Mr Kelly is to be switched again. "How are you going to stop them?" Mrs Moggs asks. It should be easy, for Ginger has now found Mr Kelly's double. He is ordered to get to know both horses as well as possible.
Stevens "stands to make a fortune" with this new switch, as long as Hotpoint, alias Mr Kelly wins. "I don't think he'll win this time," Don confidently informs Vaughan, for he is working his own switch, Ginger is going to switch the two horses back.
Stevens places his bets once again with other bookies, including £1,000 with Vaughan, who agrees to take the bet on, having faith in Don Carter's plan. The old cutting of the telephone lines is worked again, but this backfires on Stevens for at the course just before the race Lofty spots that Mr Kelly really is Mr Kelly," we're racing the wrong horse." His hurried phone call to warn Stevens can't get through.
Desperate, Lofty tells Riley who places a £1,000 bet on tick on Singing Cowboy the favourite, to cover some of the losses.
The race starts and by some miracle Mr Kelly makes good running, but as expected fades leaving Mastermind the winner. "A very tired Mr Kelly fourth." End of the swindle
There is some grainy film of horse races, but the story is mostly told via the characters in the studio sets, leaving viewers to imagine, as in a radio story

To Shadow Squad

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Missing Cheese - part 1
During a gale, a thief breaks into a house in Richmond. Col Winter, ex-Indian army, had been watching The Army Game at three minutes to ten, but when the programme ended, Mrs Winter had noticed the theft of their jewellery. (Strange that Granada didn't reflect their own tv schedules properly. The Army Game at this time started at 8.30.) Sup John Whitelaw sends Sgt Telfer (Robert Cawdron) to investigate.
At The Cheddar Cheese in Lensbury, an inebriated Harry (Robert Raikes) is admiring his new girlfriend Annette's diamond, before they drive off together to Brighton, where else? Don Carter happens to have been retained by the landlord of this pub, Mears, to track down a petty pilferer. Ginger has been assigned the job of barman.
Harry's car crashes, Annette killed. On her is found Mrs Winter's stolen diamond necklace, though this good lady takes ages to identify it, much to Sup Whitelaw's frustration. Harry doesn't know much about Annette but thinks she bought it off an elderly married man at the pub.
Police have worked out that the thief, who has committed several such robberies, must be based in the Lensbury area, as he uses a bicycle to make his getaway. One suspect is a customer at the pub, Meadows, who says he did know Harry and Annette, but can't recall seeing her wearing the necklace.
There's yet another robbery, and this time a clue. A passer by, Mr Wilson, had been knocked down by a cyclist, whose rear light had unusually been on the near side. Wilson had angrily exchanged blows with the cyclist and thrown his walking stick into the nearby river. Oddly, it sank, like iron
To review of part 2

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Missing Cheese (part 2, and last)
"Getting anywhere?" Don inquires of Ginger. Not as yet, he's trying to outsmart local policeman Wills at the present. Wills' suspicions centre on Meredith (Trevor Reid) a bookie who walks with a decided limp.
Inspector Smith has found no evidence at the scene of the latest robbery, indeed no sign of a break-in at all. But a clue is finally discovered after the nearby river is dragged. It's a cane, an unusual cane with a special contraption that can transform it into a ladder.
At the pub, we watch Henry Dixon Meredith nick a cheese at Ginger's bar, right under his nose too. Don later questions Meadows, who promptly shows Don the door. But this is a diversion to enable Ginger to insepct Meadows' bicycle, "the one we're looking for all right."
At a cleaners, an assistant hands Det Constable Wills a clue, some glass found in the turnup of a pair of trousers, and the owner is Meredith! The glass comes from some broken during a break-in. At a whist drive we see Mrs Meadows and Mrs Meredith win first prize, this establishes a link between the two families.
Sgt Telfer questions Meredith who denies everything. But it can be proved that the stick belongs to Meredith and when Mrs Scott identifies her stolen property the two crooks are under arrest. But why did Meredith steal the cheese? It turns out he's a kleptomaniac.
Ginger terminates his employment at the pub, his leaving present some none too welcome cheese
Back to Shadow Squad

.

.

.

.

.

Detective (BBC)
An anthology series, series 1 shown in 1964, then two further seasons in 1968 and 1969. Rupert Davies in his Maigret character introduced the first stories.
Thames recycled the idea in the 1970s with detectives of the Victorian/Edwardian era, in
The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes.

1.9 Frank Lieberman as Bob Race The Night of the Horns (May 25th 1964)

1.13 Patrick Troughton as Jasper Shrig The Loring Mystery (June 22nd 1964)

1.15 Peter Copley as Dr Thorndyke The Case of Oscar Brodski (July 6th 1964)

2.6 Bernard Horsfall as Nigel Strangeways The Beast Must Die (July 21st 1968)

menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Night of the Horns with Frank Lieberman as Bob Race.
A curious attempt at recreating a Raymond Chandler type story within the severe limitations of the studio. Lots of close ups and the action is mostly in the imagination.
Rupert Davies sets the scene, as he sits next to a tart and introduces Bob Race, a San Francisco lawyer.
The narration is pure Bogey-cum-Dick-Powell. Bob is working late at the office when racketeer Kresnick phones demanding Bob do a job for him. "He does nothing illegal through me."
Meeting at a low joint, Kresnick proves to be the awfully insistent type. $500 is Bob's if he merely collects a package. Though he's sure there might be something a mite fishy, Bob has no choice since Kresnick is leaning on him. Something about providing a witness who can bust Bob's recent defence in court of student Tony Fontaine.
In the bar Bob chats with an old girl friend, Ginny. Then Eve his wife (Barbara Shelley) joins him, she is accompanied by young Tony. In the best film noir style, Bob tells us he's worried about Tony.
11.30pm is the time for the pick up. Bob grabs the case and is promptly knocked out. He narrowly escapes when his car nearly tips over a cliff, in the studio. Not very convincing. They stole the suitcase, Bob tells Kresnick. A million was in it! Bob is beaten up for his pains, and faces worse, only Ginny the moll aids his getaway.
The truth dawns on Bob. Eve was the only one who knew about the pick up, she and Tony have nicked the money.
He traces them to Mexico, where he curiously wins $28,000 in a casino. He phones Eve and slags her off. Then he is grabbed at gunpoint. "What is going on?" he demands, very aptly. After gunplay, he gets away and goes to see his wife. He finds her, dead, and he is the one wanted for her murder. He dashes back to Ginny, to elude the murder rap.
Bob wants a showdown with Kresnick, "let me come with you," cries Ginny in the best noir style. She knows, "he'll kill you." He sure don't of course. 'Cos he's dead himself. Bob tracks down The Big Man. More death and mayhem
back

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Loring Mystery
With Patrick Troughton as Jasper Shrig.

Jasper Shrig of the Bow Street Runners owes his very life to a man who is covered with scratches, who cannot recall how he came to be in such a state.
The evil Sir Nevil Loring rules his Sussex estate with a rod of iron, and has deliberately brought up his red headed ward Anteclea (Katy Wild) to be "wild, savage, untamed." His brother Humphrey had been heir to the property but had been mysteriously throttled. Humphrey's son David is now technically heir, but he has not been found. However David now turns up, though he has no documents to prove his claim. In fact he is Shrig's saviour.
Anticlea arranges an assignation with him at sunset at a mill. "It's a trap," Shrig warns him. A gunshot! Who is on the spot? Sir Nevil of course, though he is doomed to disappointment since he finds no corpse. David, angry at his treatment, storms off to Loring Chase to have it out with Sir Nevil. But he finds him already dead.
Shrig helpfully outlines who are the suspects. 1 Mrs Belinda, Sir Nevil's long time housekeeper- surely not her! Oh as the most improbable one, surely it is her! 2 Miss Anteclea. 3 Marlborough, "quietly desperate," in love with Anteclea. 4 Thomas Yaxley, bastard son of Sir Nevil. 5 David, obviously.
The ghost of Sir Nevil seems to be haunting the house. Shrig devises a plan to catch same. A secret tunnel leads to the discovery of a new will by Sir Nevil, which would consign everything to Yaxley. That dark night, Shrig confronts the ghost and gets his confession, "I killed him because I loved him." The ghost is arrested also
back

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Case of Oscar Brodski
With Peter Copley as Doctor Thorndyke

Thorndyke and Dr Jervis are on the Harwich train, and have to share a compartment with Boscovitch (Warren Mitchell), an old acquaintance. To pass the time, Thorndyke shows him his 'box' full of his scientific instruments.
Boscovitch is a diamond dealer, and is meeting up with his partner Oscar Brodski en route at Artlebury. However just before they reach this station, the train judders to a halt. A man was on the track. Suicide is the obvious conclusion. Dr Thorndyke assists Det Sgt Dickens with his inquiries taking some samples as the bemused policeman watches impassively.
"This was not an accident," declares Thorndyke, he had been suffocated. Material between his teeth is proof of this. Further examination shows he has recently eaten an oatmeal biscuit.
The search leads to a house near the railway tracks. In fact we had seen Brodski here earlier. He had come to inspect a diamond offered to him by a man named Hickler. It had obviously been stolen. Brodski was not interested. But as he now knows Hickler's identity, and because he is rashly carrying diamonds, Hickler had silenced him.
Now the place is empty, though plenty of clues are strewn around for Thorndyke to be certain that murder had recently been committed here. Hickler is skulking in the coal cellar and takes his chance and runs off. Straight into another train. That's poetic justice.
A very straightforward story, well performed but bland
back

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Beast Must Die
with Bernard Horsfall as Nigel Strangeways.

George (Francis Matthews) is in a bad mood, quarrelling with his family. He goes out on the river in his yacht and argues with Frank aka Felix who is sailing it. George is sure Frank is trying to kill him.
Back in the house he rows with his wife over their son's education and with his sister-in-law with whom he has had an affair. No wonder he collapses and dies, poisoned.
Since he is a prime suspect, Frank calls in Nigel Strangeways (he lives up to his name). Frank is open about the fact that his young son had been run down and killed by a motorist. Moving heaven and earth, he had traced the driver, it was George.
Inspector Blount is convinced George did not kill himself. Phil, George's "highly strung" son, passes a key to Frank, so he can escape, the lad likes Frank and is sure he is the murderer. However his dour grandmother thinks it was Phil who killed his dad.
It turns out George had another mistress, wife of his business partner, and it is Blount who states the obvious, "there are far too many suspects."
Phil produces the bottle of strychnine that he had been asked to hide. He had been afraid that it would secure Frank's conviction.
In an unconvincing scene, someone attempts to bash Strangeways on the head with a golf club. Phil writes his confession then runs away.
After interviewing an army friend of Frank, Strangeways is able to solve the case. The trouble with this story is that the characters are not at all sympathetic, despite the fact the George had been an absolute "bounder." At the end the killer tries to kill Strangeways, but then gives him a written confession. Strangeways tears it up
back

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Corridor People

In 1966 the brilliant Edward ('Eddie') Boyd wrote this regrettably short series, one of several offbeat dramas he created for Granada. A stylish, self-confident programme, full of enigmatic characters. Eddie once said "it's the characters, not me, who decide what happens. Quite often they run away with the story. It's one long improvisation, almost." Yet it panned out jolly well!
The host of inventive and eccentric characters included: John Sharp as Kronk, head of Dept K at the Ministry of Defence. Miss Dunner (June Watson) is his nervous but eager secretary. His yes men are Inspector Blood and Sergeant Hound (Alan Curtis and William Maxwell), a double act, two minds that beat as one, as they enter and exit Kronk's office to do his bidding, "blooming messenger boys, that is all we are." On the other side is Elizabeth Shepherd as an enemy agent, the seductive Syrie van Epp ("I do everything very well")- she really exults in her role as a scheming alluring female, a hint maybe of how she played her role in the aborted Avengers film that was scrapped. Whatever her failings there, she makes this series. Acting as one of Kronk's agents, though he's not averse to money from Syrie, is private eye Scrotty (Gary Cockrell), as dingy as his name, in a backstreet office dominated by a giant poster of Humphrey Bogart. Some of his fine lines often reflect the Master too.
The sets were deliberately, if also conveniently, sparse, making for a theatrical mood, but also acting as a contrast to Elizabeth Shepherd's exotic wardrobe. Derek Hilton provided a fine jazzy score. It's a shame only four stories were made, as this series was certainly as way-out as the imminent The Prisoner, without any of that programme's obscure irritations. Offbeat this is, but it is performed with a gusto that proves everyone enjoyed making it and having a laugh at themselves, and at this level, this was, in retrospect, Granada's high spot, along with The Odd Man, in original drama.

Very sadly, these are the only stories made, but at least they are available on dvd.
1
Victim as Birdwatcher
2 Victim as Whitebait
3 Victim as Red
4 Victim as Black

Taped Series Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 Victim as Birdwatcher (25th/26th August 1966)

Capture of a birdwatcher (Tim Barrett). He had been watching the "greater crested train robber," when a glorious white vision had dawned on his binoculars and he had been knocked unconscious.
Syrie van Epp, now in black, has imprisoned this Christopher Vaughan. He owns a crucial share in Templar Cosmetics. "You have something I need," she explains to him. His answer is no.
Sir Wilfred Templar (Clive Morton) commissions Phil Scrotty to find his godson Vaughan, the son of his old cricketing partner. As Scrotty is working for both sides, he gets Sir Wilfred to talk to Syrie's prisoner, though his visit is not much comfort, "bite the bullet" he advises. But the singleminded Vaughan resists everything Syrie and her henchman Weedy throw at him, so Syrie resorts to the ultimate. Now she's in white again, and they are to get married...
Kronk of Dept K has had his minions searching for Vaughan. Sullavan (Windsor Davies) as well as Insp Blood and Sgt Hound. The reason for this fine attention to Christopher Vaughan is revealed by the flighty Candy, the girl friend of research chemist Pym, who had accidentally discovered a scent "that turned her into an imbecile for 24 hours." The effects wear off, though it seems Candy was always like that. Pym has destroyed all his files, and the bottles of the scent, though of course he might still fall into enemty hands...
Kronk has a job for Miss Dunner- shoot the double dealing Scrotty. She enjoys that enormously.
With the Templar share now due to Syrie on their marriage, Vaughan is freed. Yet now he falls into the hands of Kronk who demands that share "in the national interest." Vaughan is blinded by love and cannot accept Kronk's portrayal of his beloved as a future merry widow. So Vaughan is put on trial, charged with being "a wilful and contumacious enemy of the realm." Guilty. Bang! Thus the state inherits his share.
Syrie has had her own problems too. Her faithful Weedy is not so faithful, he's a stiff upper crust type, working for the other side. But Kronk still ain't got the drug and look, Syrie is now ravishing Pym. "I am wearing this--- that nightgown, in his memory," she tells him. Will he tell her his formula...?

To Corridor People episode details

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2 Victim as Whitebait (recorded 24 August 1966 for transmission the following week)

Hounds are baying, mist swirling as Elizabeth Shepherd camps it up on Graveyard Patrol at the empty grave of detective Phil Scrotty. Not that he was ever dead, an "elaborate hoax." Miss Dunner who had shot him, is hauled over the coals by Kronk her boss, though it wasn't her fault- she'd been given blanks.
The drunken "pet scientist" of Syrie's, Robag (Aubrey Morris), who has hit on this desirable scientific secret of bringing the dead back to life, knows it's "something to do with fish." That must be Whitebait, one genuinely dead body who has just been brought back to life, though it's unfortunate his young wife Abigail has wanted him dead. So she can be ravished by Phil Scrotty.
"My dead husband just walked in the door!" Mrs Abigail Whitebait ("high income bracket, low on IQ") tells Scrotty. He's the living proof of Robag's brilliant discovery. But Robag's not going to share his secret with anyone, for Syrie's henchman shoots him. Miss Dunner is another of their unfortunate victims, failing in her latest mission for Kronk.
"Why aren't you dead?" Kronk greets Scrotty, who is given his next job, to unearth recluse accountant Samson Whitby who can prove Syrie van Epp's employer de Farge is a swindler, doctoring the books to the tune of three million.
In a memorable scene in the park, Syrie pushes a pram containing the biggest baby you ever did see. For a toy, read machine gun. She aims to silence Whitby but "the poet of double dealing," Scrotty himself has the last laugh for it's Whitebait who has been lured to the park bench, who is shot dead for a second time, and all on account of the desirable Abigail. Ditto for Samson, and thus de Farge is immune from prosecution.
Kronk is in hysterics over Scrotty's double dealing, who is far too busy walking into the sunset with Abigail

OK, so the plot is a gigantic muddle with a lot of loose ends, but oh those characters, they really do make up for it all!

To Corridor People

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

3 Victim as Red
"A nut, a real nut" Scrotty tells us of his client who has been searching for his brother these past seven years. There is this manuscript, the blueprint for a fictional robbery that later took place. A train robbery (topical eh?), "how very very strange."
The author, missile expert Col Hugo Leeming (John Woodnut) has now allegedly lost his memory, but he once was in charge of a missile testing station, but disappeared seven years ago, and was presumed to have defected. He was even alleged to have been spotted in a Russian shop buying a record.
In fact he had been kept a prisoner in a seedy boarding house guarded by his landlady, a Mrs Winkle. But he's now escaped, and he has somehow landed up in Syrie van Epp's Rolls. She is keen to "look after" him ("business with pleasure") in a quest for two million quid.
But Kronk wants him and the cash too, since Mrs Betty Kempsford, her "show business career in pieces" (Betty McDowall) was the colonel's first wife and she's also on the trail. Her second husband, the late Abel Kempsford, had been one of the train robbers ("the colonel's lady married the convict's wife").
Scrotty is also engaged by her to find her first husband. Who will succeed?
Well it has to be Syrie, for she has him! She succeeds in unlocking Leeming's amnesia by playing him record after record, until a recording of Please Be Kind reminds him of his ex-wife's big hit.
It is Kronk of course who gets his man betrayed by Syrie: "some people are unlucky at cards, some with women and others with horses. But you, colonel, have been unlucky with gramophone records!"
In this Cold War story, there is of course plenty of double dealing, but Scrotty and Syrie finally corner "The Big Man." Betty has to admit to Kronk that "the party knows best."
Scrotty gets £5,000 for his troubles plus Syrie.

Although the script tails off slightly in the final act, it mostly sparkles as the cast ham it up with relish

To Corridor People

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

4 Victim as Black
"Shoplifter extraordinary" the Queen Mother Helena of Morphalia is back in town, incognito. Syrie van Epp is preening her peacock (literally) when the queen calls on her to ask her to help trace her "half-witted" son King Ferdinand XVIII who is chasing some girl called Pearl (Nina Baden-Semper). She's a black girl, and Phil Scrotty has also been retained by the king to find her- his only clue: one Cinderella-like slipper. when she's found the king wants to marry her. How nice.
Also after her is Theobald Aboo who offers to pay Scotty NOT to find her! To reinforce his point, his two henchmen beat up this "white rubbish." Scrotty winds up in hospital where Syrie comforts him, well at least she's more comfort than Inspector Blood.
From his sick bed, Scrotty persuades Syrie's maid (Pauline Collins) to conduct his search, but as it happens she is an old work colleague of Pearl's - they both were usherettes in a cinema. She tells Syrie where Pearl is, for more money, who tells Aboo.
"I'm not just a pretty face," the searched-for Pearl confides to us viewers in a mysterious monologue on racial tolerance.
Meanwhile of course, Kronk has been watching all of 'em. His department has an absurd machine which can analyse the data and summarise the plot: "The machine speaks... Aboo is after Black World Domination with a European Base." I should have guessed. So the solution is "Keep Morphalia White!" "This is ridiculous," cries Kronk, echoing our own thoughts- has the machine been wrongly programmed? Or has this programme?
For the first time Syrie and Kronk meet as they agree on how to resolve the situation, to Syrie's financial advantage. There's a final sequence as the characters explain their roles:
Syrie tells us "all I do is manipulate the moment," while Aboo tells us "the white man is yesterday." He explains he abhors mixed marriages. Kronk summons the Duty Assassin, to finish Pearl off. King Ferdinand enthuses at his return to his country: "they're even going to give me my own bomb!" A puppet of our government you feel. Rejoicing at this news is the queen. Now she can go shoplifting in her own country. Scrotty lies on his bed of pain, "who's losing, who's winning?" he raves. The last scene belongs to Pearl, a gun trained at her head, in this oddball finish. But I end with a line that sums up this fascinating series, "there are no mad like the sane mad"
Taped Shows Menu

To Corridor People

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Dark Number

Eddie Boyd (1916-1989) made his name as the creator of some eccentric drama series shown by Granada Television, firstly The Odd Man (1960-1963), then The Corridor People (1966).
The BBC prised him away from Granada's clutches at the end of this year, to write this five part series, starring Patrick Allen as Johnny Maxen. Here's a typical 1960s world weary character, summed up in his line, "if I had two watches, I wouldn't tell a policeman the time."

Part 1 (Dec 31st 1966)

Part 2 (Jan 7th 1967)

Part 3 (Jan 14th 1967)

Part 4 (Jan 21st 1967)

Part 5 (Jan 28th 1967)

menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 1

I like the noir opening in rainswept Glasgow, as the London train pulls in one night, and off steps Johnny (Patrick Allen). Why's he here? "I wish I knew," he remarks to Ellen, when he has made his way to Ellen's home. But he wants to help her, if he can.
She tells him that Julia, his estranged wife has been missing for three months. Even though mum herself admits the girl is "a trollop," she wants Johnny, who now lives and works in Paris, to find her. He agrees to help, only for Ellen's sake.
First call is on his former best friends, Bill and Rachel. After a warm welcome, they part unhappily, for the couple won't say anything about Julia. In a pub, Johnny meets the poet Tor (Archie Duncan) who saw her leave this pub three months ago on July 23rd "to meet a gentleman."
Reaching Julia's apartment, Johnny is confronted by the landlady who says the rent has been unpaid. She says Julia has not been there for twelve weeks. Johnny pays up, but when he goes in, he discovers a corpse. "Who are you?"
The cynical police Inspector Wardlaw (Roddy McMillan) interrogates him. One thing Johnny spots, is that a photo on the wall of the country cottage Julia used has been slashed. He returns to Ellen to find out if she knew this dead girl. Ellen is silent. Johnny refuses to help any more, unless she reveals to him what has happened to Sarah, his dead daughter

To The Dark Number part 2 or return to the start

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 2

Puffing his fag, Johnny peers over a bridge in the dark night, before grabbing a drink. A down and out lawyer confronts him, his advice is worth a small gift- from Inspector Wardlaw. With the rain pouring down, he reveals that the dead girl was called Sandra Bailey. Has Johnny heard of The Dark Number? These are criminal acts that never come to the attention of the police.
Returning to Julia's flat, Johnny is surprised to find a couple kissing. They are Jo-jo and Meg, who don't know where Julia is, she's "a gasser." But they do know that her latest boyfriend had been Tom Armstrong.
Two heavies call. They are looking for Tom, keen to duff him up. They have been sent by Dodds who believes "Armstrong killed her."
The inspector reveals quite a bit to Johnny about his daughter's death some years back. She had drowned, after going sailing in "a wee boat." Too many passengers, and it had capsized, and she and a boy named Walter had been drowned. Also in the boat were Armstrong, Sandra, Julia, and a girl named Louise Blake.
Ebenezer Armstrng is an old contact of Johnny's, he worshipped Julia once. He had last met her on July 23rd. Where had she gone after seeing him? He doesn't know, but reckons that if Johnny could trace the strange Louise, a man hater, there Julia will be. "You're on the hook for murder," Johnny warns Ebenezer.
Perhaps too many characters and complications to make an entirely satisfying drama. You know roughly what's going on, or think you do. Some memorable film noir type scenes cover the deficiencies

To The Dark Number part 3 or return to the start

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 3

"Julia never mentioned her," Ellen tells Johnny, of Sandra the dead girl.
Armstrong has been duffed up, and his secretary identified Johnny as having threatened him. "He was everything I despised," Johnny tells Inspector Wardlaw.
In a laundrette, Johnny meets up with yet another old pal, Dorothy. Once they had been close and make a date for that evening.
Then he asks a shrink who had treated Julia for some information about his wife. She had had guilty feelings about their daughter Sarah's accident. She was suffering persecution mania. She claimed it was Johnny who was causing this. The shrink last saw her on Friday July 23rd, when she said she had proof of Johnn's persecution. She had been receiving unpleasant letters. Wardlaw shows Johnny a few of them. "I'm being got at," Johnny realises.
At last "the truth," that's what Dorothy gives him. The accident had been Julia's fault. "She's sick, Johnny." With a promise of another date, they part.
Still looking for the elusive Louise, Johnny meets a Miss Stevens at Louise's art studio. She has not seen Louise for months, rumour has it she is in a nursing home. The funny thing is that she had been commissioned by a man named Johnny Maxen to paint Drowned Girl.
Very early next morning, Wardlaw phones saying he thinks he has found Julia

The Dark Number part 4 or return to the start

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 4

Off in a police car to a lonely cottage. Is it Julia's body? It had evidently been in the loch some months. Odd, since she was a good swimmer. However it turns out she had been strangled.
David Williams, reporter, has received a tip off about events on Friday July 23rd. In return for an exclusive, he tells Johnny his source is Bunty, a poacher.
Dorothy drives Johnny to Julia's cottage. On the journey, as they chat she perceives that he has not exorcised Julia's ghost. Once inside, they find the Drowned Girl painting. Johnny is furious when Dorothy credits him with commissioning such a sick picture. Their row is not entirely convincing, or comfortable, as she offers him some truths. "You can't go mad on purpose," he reflects philosophically.
Inspector Wardlaw interrupts their fun, and he is curious also as to who paid for the painting. "It's part of the persecution pattern" of Julia.
Then Wardlaw says he had found Johnny's passport here in the cottage- is this a second passport of his?
At Loch Darrock Hotel, Johnny talks with Bunty. He says he had seen Julia at midnight with another woman enter the cottage. A cry of "Johnny," then a scream. "You murdered her"

To The Dark Number part 5 or return to the start

.

.

.

.

.

.

Part 5

Ellen turns up at Julia's flat worried about all the deaths. Even though she had asked for Johnny's assistance, she has always believed Julia dead, and that Johnny was responsible.
Down another dark deserted street, Johnny strolls, meditating. He is being followed. It is Inspector Wardlaw, who still has unanswered questions. Who was the other woman with Julia that fateful night?
Dorothy works out that Bunty must have been the man who collected the painting. Johnny leans on him. Tom Armstrong had paid him. Johnny loses his temper and beats Bunty up, Dorothy prevents him from causing serious injury.
At last, Johnny traces Louise Blake: she is in a mental hospital. She had been found at Loch Darrock some months ago, identity unknown. "Hello Julia," is Johnny's greeting. She however claims she is called Louise, a sad pathetic figure. Who are you, she inquires of Johnny. She rambles on, clutching a doll as the picture becomes somewhat clear as to what happened the night of the drowning.
Inspector Wardlaw apologises for ever suspecting Johnny. Perhaps missing is Ellen's reaction to it all. The final shot is of Johnny on a bridge, holding Dorothy's hand

The Dark Number start

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Man in Room 17

Network dvd have issued all of these:
1.1. Tell the Truth
1.2 Hello Lazarus
1.3 The Years of Glory
1.4 Confidential Report
1.5 The Millions of Muzafariyah
1.6 The Seat of Power
1.7 Safe Conduct
1.8 A Minor Operation
1.9 Find the Lady

2.1 How to Rob a Bank and Get Away with It

2.2 Vendetta
2.3 The Black Witch
2.4 First Steal Six Eggs
2.5 The Catacombs
2.6 Where There's a Will
2.7 The Fissile Missile Makers
2.8 Goddess of Love
2.9 Undue Influence
2.10 Lady Luck's No Gentleman
2.11 The Standard
2.12 Saints Are Safer Dead
2.13 Never Fall Down
3.1 Arson
3.2&3 Inside Out (in 2 parts)
3.4 Wherein Justice Lies
3.5 The Golden Goose
3.6 Spindoe's Move
3.7 A Snatch in Time
3.8 The Domestic Diplomat
3.9 Final Demand
3.10 No Cage for this Bird
3.11 Violence
3.12 The Straight Way
3.13 The Solicitor
Room 17 was Somewhere in Whitehall, a secret centre handling cases that baffle the security services. This 13 part Granada series started on 11th June 1965 with Richard Vernon starring as Edwin Graham Oldenshaw ('EGO') an "ex-Oxford type with a superior IQ," and Michael Aldridge as Ian Dimmock ('ID'), "Oldenshaw's red-brick equal." Another regular in the first series was Willoughby Goddard as Assistant Commissioner Sir Geoffrey Norton. 'The Man' of the title was actually Oldenshaw, an immodest ex-Oxford type with a superior IQ. His partner red-brick-type Dimmock was more direct.
Director-producer Dick Everitt claimed the series was a mix of comedy thriller and pure adventure, "what it definitely is not, is neurotic or kinky." This perhaps to counterbalance some of Granada's other excellently individualistic Friday night dramas. Unusually, two teams of backroom staff made the series, one group for scenes outside The Room, and one for The Room, from which Dimmock and Oldenshaw never stray.
After 13 stories in 1965, 13 more followed in 1966. This time Oldenshaw was joined by Defraits (Denholm Elliott). Also Amber Kammer as Tracy Peverill invaded the all male Room 17 in selected stories.
A third series in 1967 now in the new location of a Cambridge college, was retitled The Fellows (Late of Room 17). Dimmock from series 1 returned in place of Defraits. He and Oldenshaw became Cambridge Fellows appointed by the Home Secretary to All Saints College. Also appearing in each story was Mrs Hollinczech who looks after their research data. Jill Booty, wife of the producer of this series Robin Chapman, played this part. James Ottaway as Thomas Anthem and Michael Turner as Nashe were other semi-regular characters. Roy McAnally, Roy Marsden and Allan Cuthbertson appeared in a sequence of stories which gradually become more surreal, almost 'kinky,' despite those original claims. For sure, they were now far too over the top to be viewable, the sequences with The two grumpy Fellows remote from the action, attempting an uncomfortable intellectualism.
I only wonder what a fourth series might have contained- perhaps Dimmock has disappeared again (no doubt with Mrs H) leaving an ageing Oldenshaw working in his broom cupboard, sorting out what on earth could be the plans of fiendish worldwide spies
Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Hello Lazarus
Business executive Mark Crawshaw has crashed into the North Sea, thus enabling his scheming wife Lynne (Adrienne Corri) to make eyes at Mark's deputy, yes-man George Henderson (David Langton). He ruthessly takes over the company, appointing himself new chairman, meeting with only token opposition from the other yes-men, including Harry (James Cossins).
Room 17 are surprised because Crawshaw had a well known abhorrence of flying. They also learn via some phone tapping that Mark had been feathering his own nest and that the business was on the point of collapse. George learns this a little late. Oldenshaw's educated guess is that Crawshaw is now in Yugoslavia and a plan is hatched to "lure him back." Dimmock uses his skills to invest funds in the company, thus boosting share prices at a critical period.
George cannot understand this change of fortune but takes full credit for it. But he rows with Lynne about the source of these new funds, and she flies off to join her late husband, who is of course alive and enjoying his "golden egg." Room 17 arrange for George to meet them in their Yugoslavian hideout. The two men row. Room 17's "coup de gras" is spreading a false news report on Crawshaw's expanding empire.
"I've got to go back," Mark tells his wife, and despite her pleas, he does so. He will be arrested on charges of fraud.

Nice line from Dimmock: "do you think what we're doing is ethical?"

To Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Years of Glory
A poignant episode in that Gene Anderson who played Violetta had died before this programme was first transmitted.

Robin is collecting the war memoirs of blustering General Colquhoun (Laurence Hardy), but is killed by an intruder. A cross has been taped on to his large portrait, posing in front of a foreign castle, scene of his finest hour.
David Maitland is despatched by Room 17 to find out more. The General claims nothing was stolen, though it is evident his war diaries are missing. Major Violetta Petrovich, an Albanian, is found in Robin's flat- it transpires she was a wartime acquaintance of Maitland's! In her rooms there is a photo of her late brother Orestes, an Albanian guerilla, involved in the same campaign as The General.
He and The Major hold a veiled discussion. The latter clearly believes Orestes had been betrayed by The General. At point of gun, she searches The General's room, but is overpowered by Maitland. She accuses Colquhoun, "after the war I saw the German records."
Room 17, even "at risk of destroying The General," tie up the loose ends. It had been The General's own wife who had hidden his memoirs, fearful the truth might emerge. "It wasn't a very famous victory, was it?"
Maitland grabs the incriminating documents and the final poignant long shot is of one broken general

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Confidential Report

The job- find a stolen report, which had been prepared by Miss Moon (Zena Walker) and now missing from her room in Paris.
Two men only knew it was there, Norman, Financial Adviser to the British Ambassador (Laurence Payne), and Guy, Miss Moon's boyfriend.
Room 17 work out the latter is their man. The former had written notes on the report which would apparently be most damaging to British interests. We see Guy approach The General, an ambitious politician, who will pay $100,000 for the report.
Miss Moon finds Guy's dead body. No sign of the document. Miss Moon is arrested, but then, on the orders of Room 17, released. She must, as a journalist, do an interview with The General, and secretly photo the layout of his expensive new villa.
Room 17 devises a detailed plan to break into the villa to retrieve the report. Norman however, tired of waiting, tries to do it on his own, and is caught. Miss Moon has to take over Norman's task, and once inside, sets off a smoke bomb, and in the chaos, finds the document exactly where Room 17 have surmised, and sets it alight.
The General seizes her, but Room 17 have planned for that. The British Ambassador turns up and The General's evil plan to take over France is thwarted

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Millions of Muzafariyah
The scripts of this series are always on the edge, but this one lurches pointlessly over the top.

Junior minister Charles Morrow has been attacked, the stabbing suggesting it had been performed by an Arab. Chief Supt Craythorpe investigates, the puppet of Room 17.
We meet an Arab, Osman, who is being trained in a new identity by the scheming Ursula. The scenes between these two border on the trite, hovering between corny plot, complicated scheme.
If you are interested, Ali is stabbed with the result that Room 17 is called off the case. Oh no they're not. Four Arab manuscripts are stolen, and apparently this tells Room 17 who the murderer is.
It is all to do with an unclaimed fortune worth £2 million, awaiting its heir by a London solicitor. Simple really.
Room 17 interview Morrow, who we now learn is half Arab- even though he certainly doesn't look it. He's the claimant to the loot, but prefers his job to the cash. Who wouldn't? The whole story stretches credulity, is thoroughly confusing and poorly executed, characters far too unconvincing.
Morrow is made to toe Room 17's line. He refuses Ursula's offer to collect the cash, but then he dies, if you care. But he's not dead, it's only a devious Room 17 plot to trap the pretenders to the fortune, or something

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Find the Lady

At an exhibition at the Coliman Embassy, a visitor is snatched and drugged. She says she is Penny Flower, though the ambassador, Don Diego, believes she is really Miss Amelia Cardenas, out to kill him. He himself is planning a coup- has she been sent by the current president to bump him off?
So whose body is found floating in the Thames? Oldenshaw thinks it must be that of Cardenas, and despatches reporter David Grant to find out more. Room 17 also need to know if Britain might be for or against this possible coup!
Don Diego is recalled to his country, and he takes Penny with him as she knows too much. Room 17 speculate how she will be smuggled out of Britain. But their main task is to divert the plane to make it land in Belize, on British soil, so Air Traffic Control takes on a whole new meaning. Dimmock feigns French and Spanish accents as he communicates with the pilot. On the plane, Grant is exposed, but so is Penny

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.1 How to Rob a Bank and Get Away with It
Suspicious characters at a bank! "Hand over the money now!" Manager George Horton (Brian Wilde) deals efficiently with the situation, only to be told it's a film, by the latest wave of Cinema Verite directors, the celebrated Saroya, who explains that head of the Wessex Bank, Sir Giles, had granted permission for the project. But Horton is fuming at his not being informed. However flattery convinces this amateur actor that he and his wife should agree to appear in this latest Saroya film. "A blueprint for a perfect robbery," is this film, and as a precaution Room 17 send Bob Henty to join the film crew.
Rehearsals at the Horton home are proceeding painfully slowly. But there's a frightening development, when Horton receives a phone call stating his daughter Christine has been kidnapped. Is it part of the film? Saroya isn't telling, but he does advise Horton to follow instructions and not contact the police. Another call from the kidnappers demands Horton opens the vaults of his bank, but to do that he needs the keys of his assistant, Davies, and he's not at home.
What to do? Saroya admits he's actually impersonating the famous director, it's his devious plan to rob the bank. Why such a charade is less obvious. Room 17 arrange for the police to call at the Horton's: "is this an amateur film?" asks the copper. "The Hortons look tense and frightened," is the report sent to Room 17. Henty has sent them rushes of the film shot at home and the penny drops: "this is a real bank robbery."
The robbery is now taking place as Davies has been contacted. "The climax of our film" as the vault is opened. Horton locks himself inside and demands to see his daughter. But it's a futile gesture, the keys are snatched from him, and he is forced to open the bank safe. Now the script describes the crooks making for the nearest airport, to a waiting private plane. But the police have read the script and Saroya is caught, though his scriptwriter Simpson (Mike Pratt) flies away with the loot. But at Gatwick Airport ("such an unimaginative place!") he too is arrested

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Vendetta

Man overboard!
Two days out of Boston, an Education Officer has been pushed off a ship to his death. The Captain sends Room 17 a list of the numerous contacts of the dead man. He comes from the small Italian village of Montecalcini, where there is an ancient village feud, origins lost in the mists of time.
Room 17 commission Lt Quatrand, an Italian in America to replace the dead man, contacting him via messages from an obscure Bellini opera. He questions crew about the dead man, the clear suspect being Fabbri, who is afraid, and won't open up. Eventually, Fabbri shows Quatrand how the dead man had been pushed overboard, by nearly pushing Quatrand over.
Room 17 try another ploy, threatening Fabbri's family. They interview Fabbri's sister, butas she speaks only Italian, it's hard to follow even with some explanation. She bursts into rapturous delight, not at all what Room 17 expected, when she understands what is wanted- she does not want her brother to confess.
More background on this bitter village feud reveals that Fabbri believes "I have the right to kill him." He tries to jump himself, but is stopped. The captain, with briefing from Room 17, sorts out the latest dispute, Fabbri going as far as admit he might be guilty

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

2.3 The Black Witch
Probably a disappointment to anyone wanting a story of black magic, for the first part sure looks like it is.

An American birdwatcher dies near Braunceston Abbey, owned by an ex-Russian prince now named Paragon (Terence Alexander). Room 17 are sent a figurine with human skin found near the scene of the murder. The dead man had "eyes popping out like he had been hunted to death by the devil."
Paragon's palatial home contains a library of the occult. Servants are preparing a weird room with occult markings on the floor. He is off to London "to get a girl."
Room 17 provide one. She's Tracy, "a gift from heaven ... or hell." She is briefed by Room 17 on a, er, "sex orgy," and given a two way radio.
But apparently she is only needed to make a tv commercial! A new supercar The Black Witch is to be launched. The birdwatcher had been an industrial spy, this new car is revolutionary! Tracy performs her part in the commercial, a weird scene with her as a witch on a broomstick flying about the new car with the devil aside it. Very effective visually. "You were great," Paragon's son the director of the film (Trevor Bannister) congratulates her.
However her walkie talkie has been discovered and she is suspected of being a spy. She is clamped in a neck lock, until she admits it. She is clever enough to spin a tale, not revealing anything about Room 17, and Paragon, who obviously is attracted to her, allows her to remain "as a guest," until the car launch date has passed. "We must get her out- quick," decide Room 17, when she fails to radio them. Whether she wants to leave is another matter. But snatched away she is, in a wild night scene.
No question of her being an industrial spy, no black magic either

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

1 Arson
The opening story in which Oldenshaw and Dimmock have been awarded the Sir Robert Peel Fellowship at Cambridge, so that they can study crime by collecting data on all crimes, with special reference to thirty of the "worst" criminals, including one, Spindoe. All the information is to be gathered on a standard punch card index run by a Mrs Hollinsczech.
Failing business premises are the first category to attract The Fellows' attention. They interest themselves in one specific fire, which we watch in more detail than they. Brierley's timber yard is sold for £45,000, but it was insured in more prosperous days for a much higher sum.
A fire is soon arranged. We watch it unfold, "that wasn't too painful." Well done the emergency is depicted, no expense spared, and once Granada has gone in for this amount of mayhem, cameras must linger on the conflagration. It is thus too lengthy for an hour's programme. The yard is "a complete write off," but the crooks also allow nightwatchman Simmons to perish in the flames.
The Fellows request further details on this fire. They perceive that Simmons' death must have been to cover up a crime. £480,000 insurance is to be paid to new owner Nashe.
Though The Fellows don't solve the case, after much intellectual tennis, they agree to dedicate their final Fellowship report to Simmons. But this is not an ending to savour, the crime itself is forgotten, the point of all the detail of it swallowed into nothingness

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Golden Goose

The Fellows discuss money and how to make it, either as Capitalist or as Criminal. How to recover stolen money, that is their brief.
Wallace and Robinson have just been released after serving their sentence for a 1957 robbery. They are spending money freely in a pub, though the scene is a very confusing one with much incidental chatter, real life I thibk it is supposed to be.
Oldenshaw has arranged for the crooks to be tailed, and a lot of time is spent observing said villains unwinding with a couple of tarts, in scenes that hardly move the plot forward and are at the most merely salacious. The Fellows spend their time in intellectual sparring, without moving the case forward. After little ado about anything, when Dimmock yawned, I sympathised. Perhaps writer Robin Chapman was trying to ape Pinter. After toying with the girls and with us, the two crooks decide they need more of their ill gotten cash. This is being held by the seedy Mather (John Nettleton), who had not been caught by police. He lives on a cheap caravan site. They help themselves to the loot, Mather protests and draws a gun. A fight and Mather has lost all his money. This is a stark portrayal of hardened criminals. They shop the down and out Mather.
Justice has failed to be fully done, as Dimmock admits. He should have added that The Fellows had contributed nothing at all, and the scriptwriter should have been arrested for providing even less

Room 17 Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Final Demand

Among Dimmock's mail today is a demand for £2,000- no date or address, but the veiled threat, "I know all about you."
Oldenshaw wonders if the actual demand isn't for £20,000. "You must lend me the money," begs Dimmock, in a trap to catch the blackmailer. But Oldenshaw will not agree.
Alec Spindoe is in a bad mood also, for he has received a demand to pay up £20,000. "I'm willing to pay," he tells Sherratt.
"I wrote that letter!" Oldenshaw admits to Dimmock. It was an experiment to find out how Spindoe might react to a similar demand. Dimmock is not amused.
"The poor man's Al Capone," Jerry is getting the jitters. For Spindoe is planning to "diversify," despite Major Astley's view that "protection's safe." But Spindoe needs cash, and is worried, for a police officer is patrolling outside his suburban house. Spindoe asks Jerry (John Gabriel) to pay him up front £7,000 for the proceeds of a robbery at Smith's the jeweller. "He's got some quite pretty things." After a long negotiation, it is agreed.
Even Spindoe is in on this job. In one of Sheratt's stolen cars, police watch as the gang perform a smash and grab, a bit of welcome action after so much talking. Police pounce and the gang are nicked. That pleases Oldenshaw, though relations with Dimmock are very strained, "don't expect me to congratulate you"

The Fellows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

It's Dark Outside

Fresh from The Odd Man, William Mervyn as Chief Inspector Charles Rose, teamed up again with Keith Barron as Det Sgt Swift. Other regulars in series one were the ever watchable John Carson as solicitor Anthony Brand and June Tobin as Brand's independent wife, on whom Swift has a crush. John Stratton has some great lines in his role of a jaded journalist.
This was stark Granada, simple sets, made on the cheap, but a televisual film noir, a genre entirely Granada's own, at its best brilliant!

1.1 The Grim World of the Brothers Tulk (Jan 1964)
1.2 One Man's Right
1.3 Speak Ill of the Living
1.4 More Ways of Killing a Cat
1.5 Wake the Dead
1.6 A Room with No View
1.7 A Case for Identification
1.8 You Play the Red and the Black Comes Up
2.1 The Guilty World of Hosea Pitt (Feb 1965)
2.5 A Slight Case of Matrimony
Taped Shows Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Grim World of the Brothers Tulk
Inspector Rose is at the scene of an horrific murder of nine year old Doreen.
Harry Tulk is arrested for loitering by a shop window, on his person is Doreen's purse. With his brother Arthur, they had once been on the halls as purveyors of black humour, and Harry dreams impossibly of reviving their modernistic act. But Arthur knows Harry is "out of his head," informing his brother in one telling line, "you wear perversion like an overcoat." But Arthur knows one other thing of his brother... he would never actually harm anyone. Aubrey Morris portrays Harry with his usual way-out brand of weirdness.
Harry awaits trial in a cell, the incarceration is driving him mad. He is discovered in his cell, strangled.
Sgt Swift is suspended as a result. He had questioned Tulk in that cell. Alice Brand seeks to interview Swift. "I hate reporters," he snaps at her, thus starting their edgy relationship. Anthony Brand is approached to act for Harry.
Swift goes to Arthur's house, to apologise and explain he did not kill Harry. Brand later calls at the house, and Arthur disappears. It's Brand he had been frightened of.
Calm as ever, Rose quickly solves the mystery of an actor wanting to save his brother from purgatory. Swift tracks down the killer before a final tense moment with Arthur sheltering in a derelict basement, befriending a young girl called Sally. Police arrive in time to prevent another killing.
Here's a simple story, grim indeed, tv noir, powerfully presented, touching on deeper issues

It's Dark Outside menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Wake The Dead
Outside the Green Man, an old biddy's handbag is snatched, property of Lady Geraldine Mosher, a titled woman but now down and out. She collapses and dies, poisoned, as it turns out. Swift is assigned to investigate. £50 in used notes was in that bag.
Alice Brand is investigating also, on the plight of prisoners when they are released from prison. She latches on to one born thief named Swallow, who seems to have fallen in a pleasant place, as a clairvoyant named Claud has offered him shelter, in return for acting as his receptionist.
Why was Lady Geraldine withdrawing large sums of money from her bank? In her flat are letters from her late husband to her. The most recent ones are dated after his death!
Alice tapes an interview with Swallow, and he is glad to accept payment of £2. As she hands hin a £5 note, he gives her £3 change. Claud evidently has an ulterior motive in employing Swallow, for he searches Swallow's possessions.
Swift demands to know from where Alice obtained these pound notes. "It might have been anywhere." But Swift puts two and two together, and arrests Swallow when more of the stolen notes are found on him. There is also an apparent suicide note from Lady Geraldine, "where did you get this?" It is what Claud had been after.
Another of the stolen notes turns up. It had been passed by a "bald, stout" gent, "with a rather pompous manner." Rose realises it's a description of himself! He'd won the money off Anthony Brand playing bridge.
Rose then samples one of the delicious chocs in Lady Geraldine's handbag. But they have been doctored, as Rose learns too late. Put there by Claud, whom the old lady had been consulting. It is Alice who exposes this charlatan in a seance. Claud realising he is found out, attacks her. Swift turns up just in time to prevent Claud's escape and discovers Alice tied up. "Stop rescuing me...." she complains irritably to him.
Swift visits Rose, recovering from his poisoning, in a hospital bed
It's Dark Outside menu

.

.

.

A Room With No View
Two contemporary issues are uncomfortably entwined, perhaps Granada felt that a whole story about racial tensions would be overpowering.
Swift questions de Souza, who has bad cuts, evidently bites from a dog. But he is too afraid to answer any questions.
Two old ladies had reported the attack on him, Julia Rossiter (Nora Nicholson) and her wheelchair bound sister Maude (Aimee Delamin). They live in a house rented out to black families, and Swift gets Alice Brand to chat with the old dears. The rents in the house are very high.
While Alice is thus occupied, her husband Anthony is attending a wartime reunion, along with Rose and many others. One guest is the dour Lt Miller, who had been in Greece during the war, at the same time as Brand, who had received a bravery medal here. Miller had been sentenced to death for allegedly executing guerillas, but had been rescued from the firing squad.
Swift returns with Alice to the boarding house, to meet a wall of silence. They go to a Soho club where de Souza is a drummer. It's run by the effusive Bobby. You've got rabies, Swift calmly informs de Souza. The dog in question is used as a frightener, according to de Souza it belongs to The Leopard.
Brand follows Miller to his cheap digs, to insist it was not he who betrayed him in Greece. Nevertheless a gift of £10 is left for Miller. Brand looks distinctly worried.
Swift makes for Sammy's pad, where he is told The Leopard is playing cards. It looks certain that Swift will be duffed up big time, except that Bobby has followed and renders him sterling assistance. The name of the dog's owner is forced from the beaten men
It's Dark Outside menu

.

.

.

A Case for Identification
Check! declares White in a game of chess- though when we are shown the board, this is clearly incorrect! Kletz is playing in his jewellery shop against one of his employees, both are foreigners. Another worker, Wilfrid (James Bolam), is chattering about checking up on aliens working in this country. Durty Furiners, he scribbles. "He lives in a world of his own."
Swift interviews Kletz, Wilfrid seizes the chance of nicking Swift's police card.
He goes to a launderette, staring at ladies' smalls, then following an attractive foreign woman to her home. He questions her, posing as Sgt Swift. These days we'd call it racial abuse, and he gets what he deserves.
Swift has booked into an out of the way pub, The Anchor, with Alice Brand. He notices his card has gone. It ruins their evening, though they chat about her past, and their future.
Wilfrid is back at the launderette, following another lady, a French girl named Annette. She is hiding a baby. "Please don't send me back," she begs the imposter policeman. He begins leering at her, and attacks her.
Rose is investigating a report that Swift has attacked a woman. At Kletz's shop he encounters Wilfrid. Rose treats the oddball with urbanity as he warns the inspector that the shop is "the underground centre for all foreigners." He does confess to teaching Annette "a lesson." He is taken away.
At The Anchor, Alice waits in Room 7. Enter Swift. A light kiss, but no more. He is unsure. Then Rose arrives to return his card, and they leave. She returns home. Anthony Brand apologises for neglecting his wife- he had been dealing with Harold Miller, in fact he goes off with Miller again
It's Dark Outside menu

.

.

.

.

.

Mr Rose (1967/8)
It is said that Cecil Bernstein "coveted" William Mervyn. His role as Charles Rose first came to our screens in
The Odd Man in 1963, then starred the following year in It's Dark Outside. He continued as a popular character in Granada's Friday night viewing in these 1967/8 series, though the character created by Eddie Boyd had retired from the police force, becoming considerably less acerbic. Producer Philip Mackie stated, "Inspector Rose was becoming too hard, ruthless, so I retired him. " Nevertheless the series still oozed style, thanks to Mervyn's polished performance. He enjoyed the high life in his classy Rolls Royce, 4267PP, for ever about to write his memoirs. These are to be typed by his secretary in series one, Drusilla Lamb (Gillian Lewis). His 'man' John Halifax (Donald Webster) is a reformed criminal. His memoirs finally published, in series 2 Mr Rose moves into a swish town flat, and oddly now chauffeur John drives his new Mini ETE328F. He is still working on more memoirs, typed by a succession of unreliable secretaries. Even John has deserted him in series 3, which introduces a new assistant, Robert Trent.


1.1 The Bright Bomber (February 17th 1967)
1.2 The Naked Emperor
1.3 The Noble Roman
1.4 The Black Beast
1.5 The Jolly Swagman
1.6 The Unquiet Ghost
1.7 The Tin God
1.8 The Bad Halfpenny
1.9 The Honest Villain
1.10 The Deadly Doll
1.11 The Avenging Angel
1.12 The One Woman
1.13 The Good Loser
2.1 The Frozen Swede (May 31st 1958)
2.2 The Fifth Estate
2.3 The Golden Frame
2.4 The Unlucky Dip
2.5 The Dead Commercial
2.6 The Heralds of Death

3.1 The Less-Than-Iron-Duke
3.2 The Bogeyman
3.3 The Missing Chapter
3.4 The Jolly Good Fellow
3.5 Free and Easy


Taped Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

Sherlock Holmes (1951)
starring John Longden as the immortal detective and Campbell Singer as Dr Watson

(For
the 1954 Sherlock Holmes series starring Ronald Howard . . For the 1965 Douglas Wilmer series . . For the 1979 Geoffrey Whitehead series)

The Case of The Man Who Disappeared
Based on the Conan Doyle story The Man with the Twisted Lip
Neville St Clair (Hector Ross), a patient of Dr Watson, has disappeared. A "very old friend" Marie had come to his home one day and insisted he obeys orders, or else.......
Kate his wife (Ninka Dolega), seeks SH's help. She doesn't know who the woman was, but she has found out her husband's alleged place of work does not exist.
SH examines the area around this address, and follows a mysterious match seller through a graveyard and on to Redmead Lane near Tower Bridge. Kate is brought there and spots her husband through a window. In rushes SH to find St Clair dead in the room. When the police arrive the corpse has of course disappeared from the match seller's room. But there is some clothing that belongs to St Clair, and his coat is found underneath the window on the bank of the Thames. The house is a shady opium den owned by Luzatto (Walter Gotell).
Against all this evidence, Kate still believes her husband is alive. "I ought to be kicked from here to Baker Street," jokes SH as he concurs with her. The key is in the bathroom of the house, he adds cryptically.
Kate's intuition seems to be substantiated when she receives an anonymous letter in printed letters cut from a magazine stating Neville is alive. SH of course can deduce much from this missive. It's from a woman.
He breaks into the property of this lady, Doreen alias Marie, at the opium den belonging to Luzatto, to ask her why she'd sent the note. Answer: "Neville told me to." Luzatto had been blackmailing Neville St Clair because he thought he had killed Doreen's husband. Neville had feigned death when SH had found his corpse earlier- incredible that SH was so taken in! Nevertheless, SH persuades her to set a trap.
The crooks break into Baker Street and capture SH. At least they think it's SH, though it's actually DrW. He's taken to Luzatto, who realising the error, orders DrW to write a note to SH ordering him to come to the den. But in breaks SH and there's a fight, during which, with typical sneakiness Luzatto creeps away.
When the fisticuffs are over, the match seller is shown to be Neville, who'd been a virtual prisoner of the evil Luzatto. He's exonerated of the crime he thought he was guilty of, so they all live happily etc etc

Crime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Jonnie and Me
A 1960 pilot made by Revue, filmed in Mexico. and starring
Richard Greene as Jonnie, and Robert Strauss as "me" (Hank)
with, in this story Hazel Court,
also Fernando Wagner, Jerome Cowan, Elsa Gardenas.
Teleplay: Danny Armold and Roland Kibbee. Directed by Danny Armold. Producer: Richard Irving.

This pilot was made but no series ever materialised from it. It introduces the main character, Jonnie, a wealthy playboy but secretly working for the US government, and his rival "me" aka Hank.They enjoy an uneasy relationship trying to spy out secrets and obtain the best price possible for them. This adventure has the added bonus of an appearance by Hazel Court.

It starts in Acapulco where Jonnie, relaxing on his luxury yacht with his latest conquest, rescues survivors from a stricken destroyer. The mystery is how it could have been sunk by a torpedo.
Jonnie stumbles on a note which shows that a millionaire named Karnak had had his ship fitted up with just such a torpedo. Jonnie invites himself to an exclusive party on this vessel.
A beautiful guest, Victoria, catches him taking photos so he chats her up and dances with her. Then he goes below to try and locate the torpedo and bumps into Hank. Behind a bulkhead he finds what he is looking for. He photographs the torpedo but they are discovered and dragged into the presence of Karnak. "You may die," he tells them. They are chucked overboard, which seems hardly murderous intent as the pair swim ashore.
Now Hank wants to share the vital photos, but Jonnie has to concede he hasn't got them. When he was searched he had handed them to Vicky.
When she comes ashore, she coldly informs Jonnie and Hank she has sold them to a higher bidder, ie Karnak. But later, at the airport, she kindly hands them to Jonnie alone, for a kiss or two. Hank however is wise to that and butts in to grab his share.
All very tongue in cheek, anticipating the mood of the 1960s spy genre, if this had been made a few years later it would surely have caught on. It's a very slight story, but interesting to watch Richard Greene attempting to throw off the shackles of his Robin Hood, alas, that was just impossible with the series ever being repeated

Crime Menu . . . Pilots' Menu

.

.

.

.

Boyd QC
starring Michael Denison in the title role, a well-respected, highly professional man-about-the courts. Richard Boyd QC is in demand by all kinds of clients. Some of his cases include murder, fraud, forgery, blackmail and poison pen letters.
One of A-R's big successes, the series ran from late 1956 until 1964, with time off, of course, for good behaviour. 83 stories were made.
Writer of all the stories was Jack Roffey. Introducing each story, and acting as narrator was Charles Leno as Boyd's clerk. However John Glyn-Jones played Boyd's clerk George in the first series only. Executive Producer series 1: Caryl Doncaster.
The set was an adaptation of Courts Three and Four at the Old Bailey, though this was never actually referred to, in the stories. Publicity claimed the programme's success was down to 1 authenticity coupled with suspense and excitement, 2 the court theme and 3 its authoritarian approach to the question of right and wrong in law. "The treatment of all cases is tough and realistic."

Note on actors in the series.
In addition to those listed below, the following have also stated they appeared in this series, though the actual story is not at present known:
Douglas Blackwell (series 1 or 2), Jane Downs (either series 1 or 2 or 3- she played a nurse), Jeremy Geidt, David Blake Kelly, Doreen Keogh (series 1), Paul Massie, Jill Melford, George Mikell, Jean 'Jill' Moore, Peter Stephens, June Thorburn, Susan Travers, Selma vaz Dias, Mavis Villiers, Lockwood West. John Horsley also made at least one appearance in Boyd QC before that listed in #4:1.

Series 1 ran for 13 weekly stories, commencing Christmas Eve 1956. All except 1:1, 1:2, 1:6 and 1:10 were being advertised for sale to other tv stations in the 1960s, so must have been filmed.
1:1 Her Father's Daughter
Designed by George Haslam. Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
Synopsis: what was the secret of Ruth Martin that turned the case for James Lavers?
The first ever episode.

1:2 The Greenstreet Girl
December 31st 1956.
Designed by George Haslam. Directed by Cliff Owen.
Synopsis: Judy Greenstreet, a secretary, endeavours to evade the amorous advances of her boss. The situation which ensues involves her in a charge of arson.

1:3 The Case of Casanova Jones
Monday 7th January 1957
Directed by Ronald Marriott
Cast includes: Junia Crawford... Ruby Wheeler.
To quote Boyd himself- "When is a bigamist not a bigamist?" The results of the marital adventures of a soldier, Pte Jones.
"There are four complete answers to a bigamy charge... proven absence of the marriage partner for seven years coupled with a genuine belief of death; dissolution of the first marriage and nullity of the first marriage. There is also a fifth which is not laid down by law, but which is equally effective. We meet it when Boyd QC defends a certain Private Jones, Casanova Jones as he became known in this case."

1:4 The Ordinary-Looking Man
Monday 14th January 1957
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
"Richard Boyd is by no means invincible nor is he intended to be a 'clever dick.' There comes a time when his client is not quite so fortunate- when evidence is stacked too strongly against him. As Boyd's clerk, George, points out, 'You can't build bricks with straw.'... In this episode the case against Hatton Garden's diamond merchant Rosenstiel is black indeed, innocent as he would appear to be. This is a story of diamond smuggling that starts when an Irish runner is apprehended at the airport and refuses to divulge the names of his accomplices. Police investigation leads to the diamond merchant who by a circumstantial twist of fate finds himself in the dock."

1.5 Final Night Alibi
January 21st 1957, 8pm.
Director: Cliff Owen.
TV Times synopsis: "A ring at the door... a night watchman answers it- and the next moment he lies battered and bleeding on the floor. The defence of those accused of the crime was an alibi, but to be effective an alibi must be unshakeable"
Rediffusion synopsis: "Boyd's clerk George quotes Mr Weller's advice on how to conduct the case of Bardell v Pickwick- 'Stick to the alleybi' says Mr Weller, 'a alleybi's the thing to get him off!' George ends the programme some 27 minutes later, 'An alibi is like a chain. The more links in it the longer it gets... the difficulty lies only in finding its weakest link.' Finding that weak link is Boyd's task. He is confronted with the seemingly cast iron alibi of two crooks plaintively protesting their innocence to a charge of breaking and entering an office and stealing jewellery and silver to the tune of several thousand pounds."

1:6 The Light Tackle Job
Monday 28th January 1957
Directed by Ronald Marriott.
A violent criminal on the run can be gentle enough with the woman who loves him, but to the public at large he is a potential killer.

1.7 The £10,000 Wash Out
February 4th 1957
Director: Michael Currer Briggs.
Cast includes:
Raymond Francis... Col Barlow
Margo Johns... Mrs Barlow
Noel Coleman... Mr Eastley, Defending Counsel
James Raglan... Judge ("once again")
Of nearly 4,000 cases of forgery known to British police in a year, two thirds are cheque forgeries and of the few odd ones, one would certainly have been the falsely time-stamped betting letter. Colonel Barlow, assisted by his wife perpetrates a simple but effective method of putting this fraud into operation. A £10 treble win placed on three outsiders would win the Barlows a five figure fortune. All the runners had of course come in first but Barlow's bookmaker smells a rat. So does the Post Office, so do the police; and so the colonel finds himself in the dock. It seems fairly obvious that he has engineered a betting swindle but it is going to be difficult to prove, and Boyd as Prosecuting Counsel begins to feel that the defendant is going to get away with it. But Col Barlow did not keep up to date with his racing and it turned out to be all a matter of time and a horse called Crumpet that unseated him

1:8 The Open and Shut Case
February 11th 1957
Director: Michael Currer Briggs.
Cast includes:
Richard Gatehouse... Blackmailer
Gladys Boot... Housekeeper
Honor Blackman
An American woman in her mid thirties is accused of murdering her aged husband. Blackmail by an old American friend of hers enters the plot... Jealousy by her husband's housekeeper complicates the issue. The accused pleads not guilty.

1:9 Both Sides of the Story
Monday February 18th 1957
Directed by Ronald Marriott.
'The Stage' reported the following were part of this cast:
Betty McDowall... Jill Harris (Defence Counsel)
Christine Pollon... Helen Porter
Boyd's clerk says, "A mean cowardly sort of crime, and quite rightly the courts come down on it hard. All the same there are always two sides to every story." This robbery takes place in a railway carriage and the young man, Peter Hayman, is arrested on the charge in which he is alleged to have been armed with an offensive weapon, a revolver, and robbed Helen Porter of a necklace. The accused pleads not guilty, and Boyd QC is briefed to prosecute.
Additional details: "... This time the hitherto invincible paragon of the law courts takes a beating from the defending counsel who has 'the face of an angel and a mind like a needle.'"

1:10 The Light That Was Dark
February 25th 1957, 8pm
Directed by Michael Currer- Briggs
Synopsis: Hate and blackmail provide important elements in this case, where Richard Boyd defends a fascinating and sophisticated woman who is accused of murder.

1.11 Hit and Run
March 4th 1957
Director: Cliff Owen.
Cast includes:
William Franklyn... Jack Main
Barry Keegan... Police Inspector Roberts
Frank Shelley... Mr Donkin, Prosecuting Counsel
The charges concerns a road accident. The case in question is an up to date one from the point of view that causing death by dangerous driving is a new offence in Great Britain created by the Road Traffic Act of 1956. Replacing the charge of manslaughter which hitherto covered the same cirumstances, death by dangerous driving is no longer a felony punishable by life imprisonment, but a misdemeanour carrying a maximum sentence of five years. However, when a man's car kills a cyclist one night, police find him intoxicated at home. Boyd QC defends. But even he finds this a tough nut to crack.

1.12 The Key of the Door
March 11th 1957
Directed by Ronald Marriott
Cast includes:
Philip Dale... Mr Black, Prosecuting Counsel
Meier Tzelniker
Jeffrey Segal
Delia Paton
Synopsis: Minks and sables, beautiful furs worth thousands of pounds are stolen on a Sunday afternoon. Only one person could have done it- according to the prosecution.

1.13 The Third Stroke
March 18th 1957 (note- this story is definitely still in existence)
Cast includes:
Victor Maddern... Lee Blake.
Synopsis: Lee Blake, the safebreaker is standing in the dock. This case, the last in this series, is one of breaking and entering. A safe is blown open so expertly that it points to only one man. Eventually arrested, he stands in the dock, but Boyd finds his alibi as tough to crack as the Bank of England vaults. However, even good witnesses are persuaded that the timings of a defendant's alibi can be wrong, even by ten seconds.
Boyd's clerk ends the series with these words, "The Guvnor is going to France for a holiday with his eyes looking like roulette wheels."

Series 2 with 12 stories started in April 1958.
2.1 The Up-and-Coming Man
Wednesday April 9th 1958, 7.30pm
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
Synopsis: A girl decides to end her relationship with a married man. He takes the decision badly and threatens her life. One night she is razor slashed by an assailant, and she accuses her ex-lover. Nevertheless, arrested and charged, his case seems certain to be dismissed. Boyd, as prosecuting counsel, has to work hard against strong evidence to get a conviction.

2.2 Mustapha- King of Reefers
April 16th 1958
In the second edition of Boyd QC, Richard Boyd acts as prosecuting counsel in a case of drug trafficking. An Indian, Mustapha, is caught in possesion of hemp.

2.3 The Shropshire Lass
Wednesday 23rd April 1958 7.30pm
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
Synopsis: Ken Morris pleads guilty to a charge of receiving stolen goods. Did his beautiful girl friend who is charged with him know the truth?

2.4 The Balance of her Mind
April 30th 1958
Says Boyd's clerk Albert, 'By the MacNaughton rules of 1843, no person can be convicted of any crime if it can be shown that at the time he committed it the balance of the mind was so disturbed that he didn't know what he was doing was wrong. And it is up to the defence to prove this...' The story opens with the murder of a middle aged lady by her twin sister, an epileptic. A next door neighbour hears the sounds of the killing and calls the police.

2.5 The Not-So-Civil-Servant
May 7th 1958
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs
Boyd QC finds himself defending an unpleasant character charged under the Prevention of Corruptiion Act. Richard Coote, a Licence Enforcement Officer, threatens a small Soho cafe proprietor with a traffic offence and suggests the matter could be glossed over for a small consideration. The cafe owner reports the matter to the police and Coote is arrested.

2.6 Two Wrongs
May 14th 1958
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
Synopsis: Armed robbery is a serious offence in the eyes of the law. In this episode, the Court's work is made difficult through a case of mistaken identity.
Storyline: Charles Woodman, a young tough is in the dock charged with robbing a jeweller at pistol point. Woodman pleads Not Guilty and Boyd takes on his defence though the evidence is strongly stacked against the accused.

2.7 The Other Half
May 21st 1958
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
"A young mother, Mrs Pearson, is in the dock after attempted suicide by gas poisoning. She is charged on an indictment containing two counts- attempting to murder her baby and attempting to commit suicide. Boyd defends."
Cast included Carmel McSharry as Mrs Pearson.

2.8 Subaltern Red
May 28th 1958
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
Although every possible detail is carefully checked by police, it does sometimes happen that the vital clue remains stubbornly elusive. In such a case the work of counsel is rendered doubly hard.
"Synopsis: A young woman is found strangled in an East End coalyard and her husband Edward Dixon is charged with her murder. Prosecuting counsel produces damning evidence of Dixon's guilt and Boyd has to use all his powers of defence." (Sounds like Perry Mason all over again!)

2.9 A Question of Type
June 4th 1958
"Did old Mr Maitland write the libellous letters to discredit his son or was Dr Tom Maitland's cunning responsible for his father's appearance in court? That is the question posed in this edition of Boyd QC. Boyd is briefed to prosecute Mr Maitland on a charge of publishing a defamatory libel. Opposing him across the court is defence counsel Emrys Williams. The libel takes the form of anonymous letters which allege that popular Dr Tom committed an illegal operation on a young girl. This the doctor heatedly denies. By some careful police work and a little bit of luck the machine on which the letters were typed is traced to Maitland's own house- to his father's room. But in court Counsel Williams insists it was planted there by the doctor, eager to gain long-awaited revenge on his father for something which happened in the past

2.10 Last Train Home
June 12th 1958
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
"Marjorie Nelson is a wilful spoiled girl, accustomed to getting her own way, and living in an atmosphere of Only The Best Will Do.
Her association with young Frank Atkins, eager to please her every whim but financially prevented from doing so, seems headed for unhappiness.
In this tenth story of series two the story has gone a step further, from unhappiness to tragedy. Frank is in the dock accused of Marjorie's murder. Returning home on the last train after an expensive night out, the problem of money again causes an argument. Marjorie becomes hysterical, threatens to kill herself and opens the door of the carriage. Frank attempts to save her but the girl slips and falls from the moving train. An obvious accident, but in a dying declaration, Marjorie accuses Frank of pushing her. At the trial Boyd defends Atkins."
TV Times add the explanation that the evidence of a deceased person can only be admitted if the judge is satisfied the deceased was aware of their impending death.

2.11 The £12,000 Fiddle
June 18th 1958
"Three men, Quentin, Martin and Milne, are charged with conspiring together to obtain £12,000 from an insurance company by false pretences. The first two plead Not Guilty, but Milne anxious to return to the path of honesty he has followed for nine years admits the crime and offers evidence to the Crown against his former accomplices. Upon Boyd falls the responsibility of proving that Quentin and Martin are indeed guilty of fraud. All he has is Milne's uncorroborated statement, nothing at all in writing to connect two seemingly innocent men with the crime. And Milne is a former criminal whose last conviction was for a similar offence to the one with which he has now pleaded guilty."

2.12 The Family Affair
June 25th 1958, 7.30pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
TV Times synopsis: "Richard Boyd plans to spend a weekend in Kent with his family, but soon finds that it is not as quiet as he had imagined."
A-R synopsis: "Richard Boyd finds himself in court defending a member of his household, German maid Putzi Weigel. Putzi faces a charge of child stealing and another of causing the baby grievous bodily harm. When the baby, bruised and beaten, is found in the wardrobe of her bedroom, Putzi at first denies hysterically all knowledge of it. Later she admits taking the child from its pram but vehemently denies cruelty, alleging that the baby's mother is to blame. She is brought to court where Boyd finds himself in the strange position of cross-examining not only Putzi, but his own father and sister, Joanna.
This is the first time Boyd's family have appeared in the series."

Series 3 ran for 16 weekly episodes from 30 December 1958.

3.1 A Couple of Macs
December 30th 1958, 10.15pm
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
"Two Scots go out on a pub crawl on New Year's Eve and become involved in a fight. They are charged with assault and causing an affray. Boyd is asked by an old friend to represent them under the Poor Prisoners Defence Act, does so, securing their release under two points of law. The results are highly amusing although based on actual law and authentic legal procedure."

3.2 Nylon Spells Murder
Tuesday January 6th 1959, 10.15pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
Synopsis: When a man has been killed and the case is being considered, a most important factor is time- that is, the time in which the intention to kill was formed. Without that intention, a killing is not murder; it may not even be manslaughter.

3.3 Old Tom
January 13th 1959
"Old Tom Brown, on the brink of receiving a life pension and £1,000 gratuity after 40 years with the post office, is charged with stealing three postal orders from a letter."

3.4 A Question of Talking Turkey
Tuesday January 20th 1959
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs
Synopsis: Three weeks after Christmas is the harvest time for a bumper crop of Christmas crimes. Why did Boyd take this case? Was John Wainwright really involved in the turkey racket?

3.5 Cheap Ticket
January 27th 1959
Directed by Tania Lieven
"A good alibi is a cheap ticket to an acquittal any day of the week- and the alibi Bill Minto cooked up was the cleverest in many a long day."

3.6 Confession of Murder
February 3rd 1959
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
"Was Pollard's confession voluntary, or made under pressure? How does a barrister reconcile his conscience to defending a man he believes to be guilty?"

3.7 An Inside Job
February 10th 1959
"Like many burglars, Harry believed in working with inside help, and, like many burglars, he was caught. It seemed an open an shut case. But Boyd was warned that Harry might still have a trick up his sleeve."

3.8 The Samurai Killing
February 17th 1959
Murder for gain and murder for revenge. Most cases of killing fall into one of these two categories, but murder for jealousy is not so common, and poses more difficult problems.

3:9 In Camera
February 24th 1959
Directed by Geoffrey Hughes
It is said the camera cannot lie. But when a photograph proved Elizabeth Wayne guilty of theft, there were some who thought the camera had made a mistake.
For my review
Cast:
John Welsh... Sgt Bolton
Peter Bull... Morley
Brenda Hogan... Elizabeth Wayne
William Abney... Robert Welsh
Charles Gray... Tickle
Also in cast:
Ronald Leigh-Hunt... Braber
Ronald Cardew... Judge
Graham Leaman... Clerk of the Court
Malcolm Watson...Usher (recurring)

3.10 Escape
March 3rd 1959
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
It is not generally known that a Queen's Counsel can sit in a judiciary capacity as well as continuing his normal work. In this episode, Boyd, as Commisioner of Hasleford Assizes, is confronted with the tragic case of Olga and Eva Kristof (my review).

3.11 Rope's End
Tuesday March 10th 1959
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
Murder on the high seas. Cragg always picked on Gaston Ledoux, until one day he went too far.

3.12 The Crooked Path
Tues March 17th 1959 10.15pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
Synopsis: 'It worked in the film so it must work in real life' is an attitude encountered in the courts all too frequently.
This week, Boyd defends a case of attempted murder- a case which need never have happened if Bill Whelan had faced up to life's problems.

3.13 In A Manner Dangerous
Tuesday March 24th 1959
A famous French actress was injured in a car crash and a pedestrian killed. Was Yvonne la Fayette guilty of driving 'in a manner dangerous'?

3.14 Flat to Let
Tuesday March 31st 1959
This story deals with a phoney estate agent who induces people to pay registration fees as a condition of obtaining particulars of available flats. In fact he has no list of flats, but keeps his clients dangling until the fee expires.

3.15 Matrimony Wanted
Tuesday April 7th 1959
In this final episode of the series, Peter Donovan, a confidence trickster, tries to defraud Valerie Frinton of her life's savings with an illegal marriage certificate.

Series 4 started in June 1960 and ran for 13 stories.
4:1 A Case of M'Shimba
Wed 29th June 1960 8pm
"Martha, an African girl, intends to marry a coloured American GI. Odapi, to whom she had been betrothed by a tribal custom, comes to England to take Martha back. A row develops, a policeman is called and Odapi attacks him with a knife. Odapi is arrested. In defending him, Boyd explains that Odapi believed the policeman to be a 'blue devil' sent by a witch doctor to punish him. (Odapi had been chosen as a vehicle for a dead chief's spirit, a belief known as M'Shimba, and had broken tribal custom by leaving his village.) The High Court Judge believes Odapi and orders the jury to acquit him."
Cast:
Dan Jackson... George Albert Memorial Odapi
Barbara Assoon... Martha Shimboko
Millard Williams... Tom Bates
Malcolm Keen... Judge
John Horsley... Mr Fraser
Lawrence James... PC Shaw
Edward Harvey... Mr Hornham
Malcolm Watson...Usher
Weyman MacKay... Clerk of the court
Corinne Skinner/Zoe Adams... African girls
Benny Nightingale/ Slim Harris... African men

4:2 Hell Hath No Fury
Wed 6th July 1960 8pm
Synopsis: Take two women, one man, a pinch of jealousy, a blade of malice- but do not stir these ingredients or you will have a first-class explosion.
"Helen Laird, Paul Soames' secretary and mistress, is charged with blackmailing him. She employs Boyd to defend her and convinces him she has been framed by Soames' wife. Mr Waring, the Prosecuting Counsel, has a strong case. However Boyd finds irrefutable evidence which convinces the court that Helen Laird is not guilty, and that she has been the victim of Mrs Soames' jealousy"
Cast:
Gwen Cherrell... Helen Laird
Alfred Burke... Prosecuting counsel
Noel Johnson... Paul Soames
Annette Kerr... Mrs Soames
John Dunbar... Mr Howarth
Peter Collingwood... Mr Moate
Geoffrey Denys... The Judge
Weyman MacKay... Clerk of the court
Owen Berry... Usher

4:3 The Hard Way
Wed 13th July 1960
"De Viani, a notorious confidence trickster, is in prison awaiting his trial. He decides to employ Boyd to defend him and to this end he commissions Green, a representative of Chetty and Winthrop to employ Boyd in his defence. Green denies all knowledge of De Viani and his request. De Viani claims that he told Green to collect a suitcase containing £250 so that there would be enough money to cover the brief. Green is charged with stealing the money and Baird, another employee of Chetty and Winthrop, is accused of receiving stolen goods. Boyd's prosecution reveals that Baird had disguised himself as Green, had visited De Viani in jail and had subsequently stolen Case and money. Green was acquitted"

4:4 One for the Road
Wed 20th July 1960 8pm
Directed by Pat Baker
TV Times Synopsis: A car in the hands of a drunk can be a lethal weapon and 'one of the road' can lead to sudden death as quickly and surely as the hangman's rope.
A-R Synopsis: A young pop singer, Peter Dalton, is arrested and charged with unlawful killing of a woman while being drunk in charge of a car. His manager, Lewis Gorman, is the only witness who can enlighten the court about Peter Dalton's condition on the night in question. He testifies that Dalton was extremely drunk and that his driving was dangerous on the journey home. In Dalton's defence, Boyd cross-examines Gorman and casts doubt on his version of the story. Further questioning proves Gorman to have been the culprit and shows that he deliberately framed Dalton so as to avoid a prison sentence.
Cast:
Bill Kerr... Lewis Gorman
Leonard Sachs... Prosecuting Counsel
Peter Rosser... Harry Bennett
Glyn Houston... Det-Insp Brown
Jeffrey Segal... Dr Martin
Peter Fraser... Peter Dalton
Ronald Cardew... The Judge
Claude Jones... Knowles
Trevor Maskell... Det-Sgt Smithers
Arthur Lawrence... Grindley
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of the Court
Owen Berry... Usher

4:5 Jellied Eeels They're Luv'ly
Wed 27th July 1960 8pm.
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs
Storyline in TV Times- Rosie's eels and pies are 'doing very nicely,' but her ambitions grow too large against the better judgement of her crafty accomplice Willie.
A-R Synopsis: "Rosie Gould runs a cut price meat stall. Willie provided 'cheap' meat for Rosie, who then made meat pies which she sold on her stall. The meat used had been stolen from local farms by Willie. Eventually they were caught, but, however, this possibility had been foreseen and they had provided themselves with an alibi. Lottie Machin, who was known to be scrupulously honest, staunchily upheld their alibi. She said that they could not be responsible for the paricular theft in question because she was with them at the time having her picture taken; in the background of the photo was a clock showing the time and date which apparently 'verified' what they said. At the last minute, Boyd for the prosecution, finds a flaw in the alibi and the case is proven against Rosie and Willie."
Cast-
Megan Latimer... Rosie Gould
George Tovey... Willie Walters
Sheila Ballantine... Lottie Machin
Molly Lumley... Old woman
Geoffrey Hibbert... Alf Parker
Patrick Newell... Bert
Geoffrey Denys... Judge (in several of this series)
Donald Eccles... Mr Limpkin
Anthony Sagar... Dt-Insp Douglas
Owen Berry... Usher (also in other stories)
Betty Cardno... Mrs Painter
Mignon O'Doherty... Mrs Toogood
Louise Stafford... Mrs Noakes

4:6 The Decoy Chick:
Wednesday 3rd August 1960 8pm
directed by Pat Baker.
The Homicide Act of 1957 divides murder into two categories: 'capital' murder- punishable by death; and 'non-capital' murder- punishable by life imprisonment.
Sometimes as a result, a man's life depends on nothing but a pure technicality. Jim Lyons is a case in point.
A-R Synopsis: "Helen Mackenzie is murdered. Her fiance James Lyons discovers that Helen had somehow been mixed up with a gang of criminals; she had wanted to leave the gang but the boss, Benjamin Turley, threatened to kill her if she did. Helen left them and Turley shot her. In a blind rage, Lyons goes to Turley's flat, shoots him once, and stabs him twice, then gives himself up to the police. In defending him, Boyd points out to the court that it is not known whether Turley died from the bullet wound or the stab wounds, and on this fact would depend whether Lyons was to be sentenced to death or life imprisonment. Dr Lifford, who examined the body, could not say from which wound Turley had died. This doubt over a technical point, caused the judge to sentence Lyons to life imprisonment."
Cast:
Bryan Coleman... Prosecuting counsel
Barry Warren... James Lyons
John Barrie... Det-Supt Knott
Diane Clare... Helen Mackenzie
George Howe... Dr Lifford
Harold Goodwin... Stent
Gordon Whiting... Benjamin Turley
Brian McDermott... Snaith
Reginald Smith... The Judge
Lionel Gamlin... Mr Lermitt
Ian Clark... Standish
Michael Oxley... Webster
Anthony Dawes... Mann
Weyman MacKay... Clerk of the court
Owen Berry... Usher

4:7 Uncle George
August 10th 1960 8pm
The story: Every so often someone will try to pervert the true course of justice, and such was the case when Boyd was sitting as Special Commissioner at Springfield Assizes.
A-R Synopsis: "Joanna Harriden, Jonathan Courtenay and Caroline Swinden have an argument. A fight develops and Caroline is accidentally killed. In desperation, Joanna turns to her uncle, George Pack, who agrees to help. Pack decides that in return for a sum of money, he will accept responsibility for the accident. At the Assizes, Pack is charged with manslaughter. Boyd, who is sitting as Special Commissioner and Judge, decides that Pack's story is inconsistent and suggests to the police a further search for another witness. This is successful and important evidence comes to light which causes Pack to confess to the court the full story. The Case is dismissed and Pack, Joanne and Jonathan are imprisoned for perjury."
William Squire... Mr Corby
Redmond Phillips... George Pack
Leslie Weston... Mr Martin
Mary Watson... Joanna Harriden
Barrie Cookson... Jonathan Courtenay
John Kidd... Dr Sullivan
Colin Tapley... Det-Inspector Fuller
Edna Petrie... Miss Ralton
Frank Pemberton... Usher
John Boddington... Clerk

4.8 Fiddlers Two
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
August 17th 1960
Synopsis: Every now and then a case has the fascination of a jigsaw. No violent passions, no banner headlines, but, all the same, a fiddle that has been worked on the public by clever rogues.
A-R Synopsis: "Kenneth Martin and Gordon Nicholls are charged with defrauding the public by selling a useless hair tonic, and with rigging a competition which is part of their sales campaign. However Nicholss' true identity is revealed by Biron, a blind man, and subsequent examination by Boyd proves that the setup is a 'fraudulent device.'"
Colin Keith Johnson... Henry Stevens
Lucy Griffiths... Mrs Austin
Douglas Ives... Mr Austin
Ronald Fraser... Kenneth Martin
David Nettheim... Gordon Nicholls
Charles Morgan... Supt Latham
Philip Leaver... Mr Borland
Arthur Lowe... Mr Biron
James Raglan... Judge
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of Court
Owen Berry... Usher

4.9 The Little Man
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
August 24th 1960
Synopsis: Boyd is entrusted with the defence of John Parsons, but Parsons has confessed that he killed his wife. Boyd seems faced by an impossible task.
A-R Synopsis: "John Parsons is accused of strangling his wife Connie. He had intended to ask her for a divorce so that he could marry Florence Twiss, the woman he really loved. He and his wife had quarrelled, and in a scuffle Connie is killed. When he hears that the police are looking for him, Parsons gives himself up and admits to the killing. Boyd defends Parsons, and his thorough investigations reveal the true facts of the case. Boyd shows the court that Dr Attard, who conducted the postmortem, was inexperienced with death by strangulation and had inadvertently but wrongly diagnosed the cause of death. The correct diagnosis is given by Boyd's surprise witness Dr Burton. The jury returns a verdict of Accidental Death and John Parsons is acquitted."
Mervyn Johns... John Parsons
Ann Wilton... Florence Twiss
Doris Yorke... Connie Parsons
Edwin Brown... Milkman
Denis Holmes... Dr Foote
David Phethean... Supt Smith
Ronald Masters... Simpson
Martin Lawton... Det Sgt North
Ian Parsons... Prison Officer
Bryan Pringle... PC Nutting
Leonard Osborn... Mr Blackerler
Jessica Dickinson... Buffet Attendant
Richard Vernon... Mr Trottman
James Raglan... Judge
Michael Bates... Dr Attard
Robert Sansom... Dr Burton
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of Court
Owen Berry... Usher

4.10 New Lamps for Old
August 31st 1960
A-R Synopsis: "Aristotle Loukis is charged with the forging of hallmarks on antique silver, and also with intent to defraud Arnold P Kriebel of £5,000. In defending Loukis, Boyd explains that the antique silver had been left in the shop safe since before the war. He also explains how a set of modern hallmark punches came to be left in the safe. Boyd's defence appears strong, and it seems the case will be quickly wound up. However Mr Burton, the prosecuting counsel, produces further evidence which convinces the judge and jury that Loukis is guilty."

4.11 The Time of Day
Director: Pat Baker
September 7th 1960
Synopsis: Family loyalty and the love of a father for his son have been two essential elements of social behaviour. Unfortunately these very same qualities sometimes become warped, and that means trouble for everyone, especially the police.
A-R Synopsis: "James Sprott is accused of murdering his ex-girl friend. Boyd, the prosecuting counsel, establishes the approximate time of the murder at around 3pm to 4pm. Casement for the Defence calls as a witness a Mr Lewis who swears that the girl was alive between 3.30 and 4pm on the day of the murder. Casement also proves that Sprott was at the local hospital from 3.15 until 7.45pm. Boyd is convinced Sprott is guilty. Investigation proves that Lewis had perjured himself in order to repay Sprott's father for saving his (Lewis') son's life a year before. Boyd presents this new evidence to the court. Lewis confesses that he had not seen the murdered girl on that day. This fact along with the police evidence of fingerprints and bloodstains convinces the judge and jury of Sprott's guilt. He is sentenced to life imprisonment."
Robert Flemyng... Defending Counsel
Michael Brennan... Lewis
Joyce Barbour... Mrs Rumbold
Norman Bird... Mr West
John Wentworth... Dr Spiller
Reginald Smith... Judge
Mona Bruce ... Miss Nelson
Douglas Muir... Mr Sprott
Raymond Mason... Detective
John Dunbar... Mr Howarth
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of Court
Owen Berry... Usher

4:12 The Dog with a Bad Name (this was to have been the last of this series)
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
September 14th 1960 8pm
A-R Synopsis:
"James Burriss, an old lag, is charged with breaking and entering a garage and stealing tools. He pleads not guilty, and is defended by Boyd. His defence is that his car broke down and that, as he was close to a friend's garage, he thought he would borrow the necessary tools. However he did not know that the garage had changed hands and he swears that he got in through an open window. The garage owner, Arthur Todd, insists that all the windows and doors were locked. Evidence substantiating Burris' story is revealed when Todd's daughter is found to have been secretly courting and had used the open window in question as an exit. The window had stuck and she left it open all night. His case is proved not guilty, and Burriss is discharged."
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of Court
Leslie Dwyer... Jimmy Burriss
Margaret Bull... Miss Manners
George Bishop... Mr Huckle
Reginald Smith... Judge
Peter Vaughan... Sgt Curtis
Peter Howell... Mr Borford
Michael Harrison... PC Moss
Bert Platt... Charlie Barker
Cameron Hall... Arthur Todd
Leon Garcia... Ernie Etchingham
Owen Berry... Usher

4.13 Ada's Daughter
September 21st 1960
Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
A-R Synopsis: "Ethel Courtenay, the daughter of Boyd's sister's housekeeper Ada, is arrested and charged with sending poison pen letters to people in her village. Vera, the wife of Dr Ticehurst, who is Ethel's employer, tells the police that she found a bundle of the letters in Ethel's room. Boyd defends Ethel and almost proves to that court that Dr Ticehurst was responsible for the libel. However Vera stands up, stops the case, and admits to having written all the letters"
James Raglan... Judge
Maureen Pryor... Ethel Courtenay
Helen Jessop... Penelope Boyd
Joan Young... Ada Courtenay
Oliver Johnston... Dr Ticehurst
Nora Nicholson... Vera Ticehurst
Margot Bryant... Mrs Cooper
Geoffrey Denton... Inspector Halpin
Martin Wyldeck... Mr Shoreham
Weyman Mackay... Clerk of Court
Owen Berry... Usher

Series 5 ran for 13 episodes, commencing 24 May 1961.
5:1 The Needle Match
Wed 24 May 1961 8pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
David Spencer, international football star, is accused of killing an opposing player by deliberately dangerous play during a needle match.
Pete Murray... David Spencer
Maureen Connell... Ruth Hanson
Sheila Raynor... Mrs Spencer
Wensley Pithey... Mr Wodhurst
John Miller... Judge
Richard Wakeley... Lewis
Peter Welch... Monro
Kent Walton... Commentator
Ronald Mayer... Mr Straker

5:2 The Old Flame
Wed 31 May 1961 8pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
Boyd defends a young doctor who is brought before the General Medical Council accused of improper conduct with a woman patient.
Cast:
Barrie Cookson... Dr Matthews
Hal Dyer... Mr Matthews
Fred Hugh... Mr Stunt
Owen Holder... Mr Hakin
Christine Finn... Marion Shaw
Ralph Nossek... Geoffrey Shaw
Alan MacNaughtan... Mr Walton
Langley Howard... President

5:3 Treasure Trove
Wednesday 7th June 1961 8.55pm
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Synopsis: The finding of buried treasure at Staddon Hall involves Boyd in the defence of its owners, the Carpenters.
Cast:
Charles Carson... Oswald Carpenter
Barbara Leake... Phyllis Carpenter
Peter Elliott... Peter Day
Edward Higgins... Dt-Supt Brooks
Ronald Ibbs... Edward Rickard
Leslie Weston... Sam White
Robert Webber... Mr Clark
Horace Sequeira... Judge
Terence Woodfield... Richard's junior

5:4 Out of the Frying Pan
Wed 14 June 1961 8.55pm (this had originally been announced as the first of this series)
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Synopsis: Boyd QC, acting as Commissioner at the County Assizes, gives a young junior a chance to act for the defence in a case of bigamy.
Cast:
Gillian Raine... Miss Robins, barrister
Noel Howlett... Mr Corby QC
Carl Lacey... Clerk
Pearl Nunez... Emmeline Davis
Dan Jackson... Johnson
Lionel Ngakane... Davis
Donald Hoath... Dt-Sgt Roper
William Douglas... Prison officer

5:5 Family Business
Wed 21 June 1961 8.55pm
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs
Synopsis: Boyd's father is sued for breach of contract over the sale of a collection of jade.
Cast:
Austin Trevor... Brig. Boyd
Phyllida Law... Susan Boyd
Campbell Singer... Col Berringer
Bay White... Mrs Berringer
Donald Stewart... Steinbeck
Moira Kaye... Secretary
Avril Elgar... Valerie Hodges
Nigel Davenport... Meadows QC
Noel Dryden... Solictor
Brian Hayes... Judge
Colin Rix... Court attendant
Malcolm Watson... Associate
Roger Williams... Usher

5:6 Messing about in Boats
Thursday 29 June 1961 8pm
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Synopsis- Steven Blackford and Alexandra Haydon are sentenced to life imprisonment. To Boyd QC something appears wrong with the case and he finds grounds to bring them before the Court of Criminal Appeal.
Cast- Gillian Raine... Miss Robins
Henry McGee... Parker
John Wyse... President
John Boyd Brent... Mr Baker
Richard Clarke... Steven Blackford
Julie Paul... Alexandra Haydon
Ann Tirard... Harriet Haydon
David Evans... Paul Haydon
Frank Seton... Barman
Keith Pyott... Simpson
Jeremy Geldt... Dr Bassett
Pamela Hewes... Miss Trevor

5:7 Findings Keepings
Thursday July 6th 1961 8pm
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs
Synopsis: Once more Jimmy Burris is in trouble- and once more Boyd agrees to defend him. But this time there is a ten year sentence hanging over Jimmy's head if the jury finds him guilty. Note: unusually in this tale, the accused confessed in court to previous convictions.
Leslie Dwyer... Jimmy Burris
Margaret Bull... Miss Manners
Erik Chitty... Mr Prendergast
Jean Conroy... Barmaid
Chris Carlsen... Reg Carpenter
Manning Wilson... Billy Hilder
Edmond Bennett... First henchman
Max Miradio... Second henchman
Edward Dentith... Police sergeant
Allman Hall... Mr Gregory
Reginald Smith... Judge
Weyman MacKay... Clerk (recurring)
Owen Berry... Usher (recurring)

5:8 The Runabout
Thur 13 July 1961 8pm
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Synopsis: A pretty girl is 'had up' for speeding- a twist of fate finds Boyd defending her at the Old Bailey on a far more serious charge.
Cast:
Penelope Horner... Kathleen Ewen
Ivor Salter... Dt Insp Courtenay
John Wentworth... Mr Ewen
Weyman MacKay... Clerk (recurring)
Barry Sinclair... Mr Fleet QC
William Kendall... Mr Blake
Michael Bangerter... Jonathan Blake
Brian Hayes... Judge (recurring)
Owen Berry... Usher (recurring)

5.9 Sunday's Child
Thursday 20th July 1961 8pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
An elderly couple are charged with abandoning a baby in a country church. There is no doubt that they are guilty but the problem is- whose child is it?
Eileen Devlin... Mrs Douglas
Elsie Wagstaff... Mrs Davis
Oliver Johnston... Mr Davis
Bryan Coleman... Insp Burton
Daniel Thorndike... Mr Barclay
Eric Elliott... Clerk of the court
Anthony Bate... Desmond Francis
Virginia Maskell... May Davis

5.10 Roast Chicken
Thursday 27th July 1961 8pm
Directed by Sheila Gregg
Boyd goes to the country for a weekend's golf- but finds himself helping some friends involved in a case of arson.
Cast:
Ronald Leigh-Hunt... Tom Venning
Annabel Maule... Hilda Venning
Jack Carlton... Martin Vale
John Woodvine... Mr Clovier QC
Reginald Marsh... Dt Insp Holland
Charles Houston... Peter Dunn
Frank Gatliff... Magee
Brian Hayes... Judge (recurring)
Norman Atkyns... Barman

5:11 Death on Tap
Thur 3 Aug 1961 8pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
Synopsis: James Wilson is committed for trial on a charge of murdering his wife. Richard Boyd is briefed to defend him.
Cast:
Laurence Hardy... James Wilson
Patsy Smart... Mrs Wilson
Ann Lynn... Betty
Catherine Woodville... Susan
William Devlin... Mr Stanley QC
Tony van Bridge... Inspector Dalston
Geoffrey Denys... Judge
Laidlaw Dalling... Bob Craddock
Sydney Wolf... Usher
Ronald Meyer... Mr Fry

5:12 The Headmistress
Thur 10 Aug 1961 8pm
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Synopsis: To the world, Marion Westbury, headmistress of a school for handicapped children, is a deeply religious and dedicated woman.
When Boyd QC defends her on a serious charge, he soon realises that it is going to be difficult.
The cast:
Gladys Boot... Marion Westbury
Aimee Delamain... Gladys Westbury
Bruce Wightman... Marriott
Dannis Handby... Lever
Ronald Adam... Mr Noel
Reginald Jessop... Inspector Rae
Trevor Baxter... Mr Austin QC
Donald Bissett... Judge
Carl Lacey... Judge's clerk
Billy Milton... Clerk
Hedger Wallace... Customs man
Lionel Wheeler... Prison officer

5:13 The Season of the Year
Thur 17 August 1961 8pm
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
Synopsis: General Braithwaite cannot resist the temptation to poach salmon on his neighbour's estate. But his weakness leads him into deeper water than he bargained for.
Cast:
Roger Livesey... General Braithwaite
Austin Trevor... Brigadier Boyd (recurring)
Michael O'Halloran... McBean
Norman Bird... Police sergeant
Derek Tansley... Mr Draper QC
Brian Hayes... Judge (recurring)
Norman Shelley... De Silva
Harry Littlewood... First poacher
Frank Pendlebury... Second poacher
Owen Berry... Usher (recurring)
Weyman MacKay... Clerk of Assize (recurring)
John Waite... Jury foreman
Alan Tucker... Keeper

The final series 6 had been taped starting in December 1962. Originally it was scheduled for a network release for the following spring, but for reasons unknown, this never happened and A-R showed it to parts of the network from autumn 1963. Where known, the dates planned for the original video tape recordings are shown.
It seems to have run for 16 stories, announced by Associated Rediffusion as: 1 Fishy Story, 2 A Conspiracy of Silence, 3 Parlez-vous, 4 What the Eye Doesn't See (see 6.3 below), 5 Pictures in the Fire (see 6.9), 6 By Gas That's Murder, 7 The Fourteen Hundred Dollar Question, 8 Thread of Evidence (see 6.7 below), 9 No Hoper (6.14), 10 A Little Learning, 11 Square Peg (see 6.13 below), 12 The Reluctant Persecutor (sic- see 6.15 below), 13 The Case of the Lazy Eye (see 6.16 below), 14 The Hurricane, 15 The Simple Question, 16 End of Term (see 6.10).
Some 'leading actors' announced to appear in this series were Dulcie Gray, Edgar Wreford (see 6.13), Guy Deghy, Kenneth Connor (see 6.3), Leslie Dwyer and Carl Bernard (6.9).
TV Times stated that in 1963 Boyd QC was screened in six countries abroad, and that included Australia, where according to Michael Denison it was "immensely popular."

6.1 The Hurricane
Taped December 24th 1962. Original transmission date had been scheduled for June 4th 1963, but only shown on
Friday October 18th 1963, 10.15pm.
Director: Richard Gilbert.
The sinking of the SS Loveday in a hurricane 150 miles off the coast of San Moy means a journey for Boyd to Hong Kong and his appearance at the Queen's Bench on behalf of an insurance company.
Mark Dignam... Captain Adams
Andrew Crawford... Captain O'Reilly
Hugh Latimer... Mr Quentin
Robert James... Lucas
Tom Bowman... Petersen
John Boxer... Saunders
Yolande Firmin... Receptionist
Wemay Mackay... Judge
James Goei... Barman
Leslie Weston... Old Seaman
Joe Ritchie... Insurance Broker
Ronald Falk... Naval officer
Jimmy Gardner... Waterfront Man

Fishy Story
Taped January 14th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for March 5th 1963, thus this would have been the first of the series.

6:3 What the Eye Doesn't See
Friday 8 November 1963 10.5pm
Directed by Pat Baker
The story- As Chairman of the Appeals Committee at Springfield Magistrates Court, Boyd patiently hears Case of Bajendra Singh who was found guilty of serving Dins Dog Food in his Indian curry.
Cast: Kenneth Connor... Bajendra Singh
Roy Dotrice... Mr Jacobs
Jeffrey Segal... Mr Victor
John Woodnutt... Mr Jackson
Patrick Newell... Mr Pyecroft

A Conspiracy of Silence
Taped January 21st 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for March 12th 1963.

Parlez-vous
Taped January 28th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for March 19th 1963.

6.6 By Gas That's Murder
Probaly taped on February 11th 1963. Shown on November 22nd 1963

6:7 Thread of Evidence
Taped on March 4th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for April 23rd 1963, but only shown on
Friday 6 December 1963 10.5pm
Directed by Pat Baker
In the Civil Court, Boyd has a hard task defending a young couple, until his Junior comes to his assistance with her superior knowledge- not as a barrister, but as a woman.
Robert Brown... Adrian Marshall
Howard Douglas... Stationmaster
Bill Treacher... Arnold
Frank Littlewood... Clerk
Richard Bebb... Mr Eadey
Mary Yeomans... Mary Dunnett
Richard Thorp... Tom Dunnett
Joy Shelton... Ann Marshall
Kenneth Henry... Judge
Gilliane Raine... Sheila Robins
John Citroen... Douglas Aldwyn

The Fourteen Hundred Dollar Question
Taped on February 25th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for April 16th 1963.

6:9 Pictures in the Fire
Taped March 18th 1963, the second on this day. Shown on
Friday 20 December 1963
Directed by Richard Gilbert
A fire at the countess's London art salon, and Boyd finds himself defending her in court.
Isa Miranda... Contessa Anna Maria Villaresi
Carl Bernard... Tarquin Eley QC
Windsor Davies... Mr Wood
Brian Badcoe... Mr Price
Keith Pyott... Judge
Frank Seton... Shopkeeper
William Job... Adrian Marley
Martin Cookson... Usher

6:10 End of Term
Taped: January 7th 1963. Original transmission date scheduled June 18th 1963 as last of series, but finally shown on
Friday 27 December 1963
Directed by Pat Baker
Boyd accepts a dock brief from Bessie Mann, accused of stealing nine cage birds.
Clifford Mollison... Judge
Leonard Trolley... Clerk
Margot Boyd... Bessie Mann
Walter Sparrow... Prison Officer
Patricia Hayes... Miss Twiss
Peter Gale... Policeman
Ernest Clark... Mr Hinson
Owen Berry... Usher (recurring)
Barbara Bruce... Florrie Moss
Robert Hunter... Joshua Ireland

A Little Learning
Taped March 18th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for May 7th 1963.

6:13 The Square Peg
Taped March 25th 1963. Original transmission date had been scheduled for May 14th 1963, but only shown on
16th January 1964
Directed by Richard Gilbert
Boyd has recollections of his army days when he finds himself Defending Counsel at a district court martial.
Richard Warner... Sir Hugh Adair
Edgar Wreford... Major Alsop
George Tovey... Smudger Smith
Cavan Kendall... Private Adair
Patrick Connor... CSM Frazer
Hugh Morton... Mr McDermott
Stuart Nichol... President of Court Martial
Edward Phillips... Judge advocate's rep
John Maynard... First Recruit
Martin Appleby... Second Recruit
Clive Marshall... Third Recruit
Shane Rogers... Fourth Recruit
Martin Cort... Fifth Recruit

The three final programmes had originally been announced for series six, but evidently there had not been time to screen them, and they were shown to fill in odd slots.
6.14 The No-Hoper
Director: Richard Gilbert.
Taped on March 4th 1963 (2nd on this day). Shown on
March 5th 1964.
Synopsis: Joy Tyson, a successful model, pleads guilty to a serious crime and comes before Boyd QC who is Recorder at Springfield Assizes. Her refusal to talk puzzles him, but Boyd discovers the reason for her silence.
Rest of cast:
Ian Macnaughton (Det Insp Burtenshaw),
Walter Brown (Peter Blandford),
Daniel Thorndike (Mr Pitcairn),
Janine Grey (Joy Tyson alias Alice Springer),
John Flint (George Ireland),
Hamish Roughead (Clerk) and
Peter Hutton (Usher).

6.15 The Reluctant Prosecutor
Directed by Richard Gilbert.
Taped December 3rd 1962. Original transmission date had been scheduled for May 21st 1963, but only shown on
16th September 1964
Synopsis: Boyd defends an American driven to crime by his hobby
Natalie Kent... Bessie White
Frederick Leister... Major General Boyd
Charles Carson... Toby Bailey
Terence de Marney... Hiram P Gruber
Derek Nimmo... Mr Barden
Donald Bisset... Magistrate
Cyril Wheeler... Magistrate's clerk
Fred Ferris... Sgt Wilkes
Christopher Wray... Court police officer

6.16 The Case of the Lazy Eye
Taped December 17th 1962. Original transmission date had been intended to be May 28th 1963, but only shown on
23 September 1964.
Directed by Raymond Menmuir.
In the last ever story, Boyd finds himself defending Halfern's Holiday Camps Ltd in a damage claim against them. As he thinks the company is clearly in the wrong it seems an open and shut case - until one witness makes a slip.
Cast:
Jack Melford... Mr Caston
Ernest Hare... Judge
Bert Brownshill... Mr Halfern
Leslie Sarony... Mr Grogan
Eric Dodson... Mr Ormeroyd
Derek Martinus... Mr Cox
Lavender Sansom... Nurse
Joe Gibbons... Mr Western
Anne Pichon... Mrs Western
Sarah O'Connor... Ann Western
Richard Longman... Mr Beresford
Richard Wilding... Usher
Derek Jones... Boy
---

To Boyd QC

.

.

.

.

.

Murder Bag
Brief details of some of these live stories:

1.1 CASE 1: SEPTEMBER 16.
Monday September 16th 1957 9pm
Written and produced by Barry Baker
Directed by Jean Hamilton
When a Scotland Yard detective sets out to solve a murder, he takes with him a 'Murder Bag.' This exciting new series will show viewers how the contents of the bag are used to trap a murderer. The bag contains rubber gloves, small boxes of various sizes and shapes for holding clues like hair, cigarette ends, dust etc, a small but powerful magnifying glass, pliers, tweezers- everything the detective needs for his first survey of the crime.

CASE 2: SEPTEMBER 23
September 23rd 1957
Written and produced by Barry Baker
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
Viewers will see how the whole force of the law can be brought to bear on one case.

CASE 4: OCTOBER 7
October 7th 1957
Written and produced by Barry Baker
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
When investigating a murder, things are not always what they seem, and an innocent face does not guarantee an innocent person.

CASE 6: OCTOBER 21
October 21st 1957
Written and produced by Barry Baker
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn
Murder by poisoning can be a very difficult
crime both to trace and to prove,
but it's harder to escape the evidence which
can be provided by using the Murder Bag.

CASE 7: OCTOBER 28
October 28th 1957
Written and produced by Barry Baker
Directed by Jean Hamilton
Supt Lockhart is faced with the most difficult type of case to prove- one in which the body of the victim cannot be discovered.

CASE 11: NOVEMBER 25
November 25th 1957
Written by Peter Ling based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Jean Hamilton
There are more ways than one of telling a story, but when Supt Lockhart investigates a murder, he has to find the truth behind the story.

CASE 12: DECEMBER 2
December 2nd 1957
Written by Peter Ling, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
According to the local police,
this is an open and shut case,
but when Supt Lockhart arrives on
the scene, he thinks differently.

CASE 15: DECEMBER 23
December 23rd 1957
Written by Peter Ling, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by David Boisseau.
Supt Lockhart investigates the theft of some turkeys. It's always happening at Christmas- but this time a man is killed.

CASE 17: JANUARY 6
January 6th 1958
Written by Barry Baker, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by David Boisseau.
In a quiet country village, a man has been murdered. There are plenty of clues for Supt Lockhart to work on, but it is village gossip which gives him a definite lead.

CASE 18: JANUARY 13
Jan 13th 1958
Written by Barry Baker, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by John Moxey.
Supt Lockhart uses the records department as well as the Murder Bag to track down a killer.

CASE 19: JANUARY 20
January 20th 1958
Written by Barry Baker, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Fredric Pusey.
Directed by David Boisseau.
Colonel Boulton is found murdered. The obvious supect is an escaped convict named Lofty Potter. But Supt Lockhart knows Lofty of old, and does not want to prefer a charge just yet.

CASE 20: JANUARY 27
January 27th 1958
Written by Peter Ling, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by John Moxey.
A murderer of unusual cunning matches his wits against the combined forces of Supt Lockhart and the Murder Bag.

CASE 21: FEBRUARY 3
February 3rd 1958
Written by Peter Ling, based on a story by Glyn Davies. Designed by Fredric Pusey.
Directed by David Boisseau.
Amy Carslake, American heiress, is found drowned in her bath. The bathroom door is locked, and it looks like a case of death by misadventure. But a photograph gets publicity, and the affair takes a different turn.

CASE 22: FEBRUARY 10
February 10th 1958
Written by Barry Baker, based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Jean Hamilton.
Even the rich can be involved in murder. Supt Lockhart- with the Murder Bag is called in to solve an unusual case.

CASE 23: FEBRUARY 17
February 17th 1958, now at 9.30pm
Written by Peter Ling, based on a story by Glyn Davies. Designed by Fredric Pusey. Directed by David Boisseau.
A night watchman is attacked, and a valuable consignment of nickel stolen. During the investigation, a case of robbery with violence becomes a double murder.

CASE 24
February 24th 1958
Written by Barry Baker
based on a Story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Jean Hamilton.
To a tramp, two crossed arrows means 'go anywhere away from here,' but to Lockhart they can point the way to a murderer.

CASE 25: MARCH 3
March 3rd 1958
Written by Peter Ling based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by David Boisseau.
An old bicycle pump and the obduracy of a Swiss shipwright, seem to be the only clues in what Scotland Yard calls The Stolen Anchor Case.

CASE 26: MARCH 10
March 10th 1958
Written by Peter Ling
based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by John Clements.
Directed by Jean Hamilton.
Somebody in the gang talked too much, and the police are able to make a swift arrest. This adds up to a motive for murder. But as Supt Lockhart discovers, things are not always what they seem.

CASE 27: MARCH 17
March 17th 1958
Written by Peter Ling based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer.
Directed by John Moxey.
In the grim atmosphere of a prison, murder is committed. Supt Lockhart is presented with many suspects among the convicts.

CASE 28: March 24th 1958
Written by Glyn Davies
Designed by Frank Gillman
Directed by Jean Hamilton.
When Supt Lockhart encounters the dread of all police officers, the 'sticky' murder inquiry, he meets also an old police trick put to a new use- by the murderer.

CASE 30: MARCH 31
March 31st 1958
Written by Glyn Davies
Designed by Michael Yates
Directed by Jean Hamilton.
Jeslousy, greed, love- these three emotions mixed with plain water equal the hardest case of Lockhart's career.
Note: this plot is advertised in TV Times for the above date, though the case number should be no 29, and it is possible this programme went out as Case 30 the followuing week (ie April 7th)

2.2 (Case No. 32) LOCKHART BUYS A BROOCH
July 7th 1958 8pm
Written by Barry Baker based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Nerini.
Directed by Cyril Coke.
Unpremeditated and senseless killing is one of the most difficult types of murder to solve.

2.6 LOCKHART SETS A TRAP
August 4th 1958 8pm
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies
Designed by Frank Gillman
Directed by Cyril Coke.
There are no two people exactly alike; no two people do anything exactly alike, from tying a shoelace to committing a murder. Watch Lockhart follow this line of thinking in an unusually difficult case

2.7 LOCKHART COUNTS THE SHOTS
August 11th 1958
Written by Barry Baker based on a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Fred Pusey. Directed by Cyril Butcher.
A man is shot dead on an upper floor of a block of flats. How did the murderer enter and leave without being seen?

2.8 LOCKHART FINDS A NEEDLE
August 18th 1958
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman. Directed by Cyril Coke.
Usually in a case of murder, the victim at least is known. But what if a body has been in the river for six months? How can its identity be established?

2.10 LOCKHART LISTENS TO THE BIRDS
September 1st 1958 8pm
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
When criminals play for stakes high enough to make it worthwhile to take any risk, they are dangerous. For Supt Lockhart, it becomes another case of murder

2.13 LOCKHART WATCHES THE CLOCK
September 24th 1958 7pm
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
Three people could not see the railway station clock which caused their death

2.16 LOCKHART PICKS A WINNER
Wednesday October 15th 1958
Written by Barry Baker, from a Story by Glyn Davies
Designed by Henry Federer
Directed by Roger Jenkins
The prospect of easy gains on the race track has often led men to back more heavily than they can afford. But when luck is against them their despair may lead them to violence, perhaps even suicide.

2.17 LOCKHART PROBES THE PAST
October 29th 1958 7:30 pm
Written by Barry Baker, from a Story by Glyn Davies. Directed by Roger Jenkins, designed by Henry Federer.
In the eyes of the law, there are few motives which extenuate murder. In the eyes of the public however, a distinction may be made between some cases, which seem more deserving of the maximum penalty, than others where the motive is revenge

2.19 LOCKHART PLAYS WITH FIRE
Wednesday 5th November 1958
Written by Barry Baker, from the Story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
Please to remember the Fifth of November, Gunpowder Treason and Plot. The plot is untangled by Supt Lockhart, who has occasion to remember a particular Guy Fawkes night when the guy was not made of straw.

2.20 LOCKHART MISSES THE PLANE
Wednesday November 12th 1958 7.30pm
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer.
Directed by Roger Jenkins.
Did she fall, or was she pushed? A stock question in murder mysteries perhaps, but when a body is found beneath a balcony, it is the question Lockhart has to answer

2.21 LOCKHART PULLS THE TRIGGER
Wednesday November 19th 1958 7.30pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
There is always something sinister about an anonymous letter. In this case, a tip off had a quick reply- one that the writer certainly did not expect.

2.22 LOCKHART READS A MAP
November 26th 1958 7.30pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer. Directed by Roger Jenkins.
Supt McWeaver's irritability has grown worse during the two years he has been trying to catch Stockingfoot, a successful sneak thief. In this case, Stockingfoot is tracked down, but hardly to McWeaver's satisfaction

2.23 LOCKHART CALLS THE TUNE
December 3rd 1958 7.30pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
Joe Coote 'sings' to the police, but the tune doesn't seem to please some of the boys. Lockhart visits their favourite night club and makes them face some unexpected music

2.25 LOCKHART MEASURES A MILE
December 17th 1958 7.30pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Peter Robinson.
A suburban council estate, a boxer's training camp and a nylon stocking make up the pattern formed by Supt Lockhart's investigations

2.26 LOCKHART COINS A PHRASE
December 24th 1958 (not fully networked)
Written by Peter Ling from the story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Roger Jenkins.
"Boodle of queer and snide" - the jargon of making counterfeit money has a suitably odd ring about it. But, even at Christmas, passing dud florins may lead to murder.

2.27 LOCKHART FINDS A GUN
Thursday January 1st 1959 10.15pm
Script: Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Sylva Nadolny.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
The case begins in a timber yard, where a man is killed. There is no weapon, but when Supt Lockhart has collected all the clues, he finds the murder weapon in his hands

2.28 LOCKHART FOLLOWS A DOG
Thursday January 8th 1959 10.15pm
Written by Peter Ling from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by William Brodie.
Directed by Michael Currer-Briggs.
A torso on the river bank, a wet blanket, and the hairs of a dog are the main factors in Supt Lockhart's murder investigation.

2.29 LOCKHART FINDS A FLAW
January 15th 1959
A team of country house breakers plan a robbery, but murder intervenes.

2.30 LOCKHART FITS THE SHOE
January 22nd 1959
Written by Bill Hitchcock Directed by Daphne Shadwell
In the early hours of the morning Supt Lockhart is called in to solve a murder.

2.31 LOCKHART BREAKS EVEN
January 29th 1959
Written by Bill Hitchcock From the Story by Glyn Davies Directed by Jonathan Alwyn Designed by Frank Nerini
A prisoner escapes, £20,000 is stolen and Lockhart finds himself with a double murder on his hands.

2.32 LOCKHART VISITS A HOSPITAL
February 26th 1959 10.15pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer. Directed by Graham Watts.
When the nurses in Ward Four go off duty, one of them makes a date- with murder.

2.35 LOCKHART SEES THE PM
February 26th 1959 10.15pm
Written by Peter Ling from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
PM here means Post Mortem! When Supt Lockhart is called on official business to the village of Clinton Priory, his visit is a matter of life and death

2.36 LOCKHART MISSES A CLUE
March 5th 1959
Written by Barry Baker from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Michael Wield.
Directed by Graham Watts.
A literary agent is getting his clients' manuscripts published in his own pen name, and when murder is committed, Lockhart has a wide field of possible suspects

2.37 LOCKHART WATCHES A FILM
March 12th 1959 Written by Peter Ling From the Story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Michael Wield.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell. An arrest is made; the murderer is charged; and another of Supt Lockhart's cases comes to an end. But when does a murder case begin?

2.38 LOCKHART SEEKS A DRIVER
Wednesday 18th March 10.15pm
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Directed by Graham Watts.
Albert Fox is out on bail. Within 24 hours he is dead. Was it murder or suicide?

2.40 LOCKHART MAKES A TALLY April 1st 1959 10:15 pm
Written by Peter Ling From the Story by Glyn Davies
Designed by Frank Gillman Directed by Penny Wootton
Rose's Cafe means cheap food and a night's lodging for long distance lorry drivers. But for one man, it means ... death.

Crime Sheet starring Raymond Francis as Chief Det-Supt. Lockhart.
The title was changed from Murder Bag so that cases other than murder could be investigated by Tom Lockhart.
Introduction read by Redvers Kyle: "Crimes like these can happen at any hour of any day. Crimes against you, the citizen. The Crime Sheet is the official police record of all crimes as they are reported. The first step in bringing criminals to justice. This is London, a city of ten million people in 750 square miles. Metropolitan Police District 5, the area under Chief Supt Lockhart, 150 square miles of streets in which any crime can happen now."

2 LOCKHART FOLLOWS A LINE
April 15th 1959, 10.15pm
Written by Peter Yeldham.
Director: Penny Wootton.
To many people the theatre means excitement and glamour, but for those working behind the scenes it is often a different story

3 LOCKHART PLAYS SAFE
April 22nd 1959, 10.15pm.
Written by Peter Yeldham from the Story by Glyn Davies
Designed by Bernard Goodwin, Directed by Roger Jenkins.
A skilful gang will organises a safe cracking job witht he meticulousness of a military operation. But the unexpected always happens, in this case, a few blood stains provide Lockhart with the esential clue.
Note-this may be the first story in which Gerald Case replaced Raymond Francis- see below.

4 THE SUPERINTENDENT HEDGES A BET starring Gerald Case as Chief Supt. Carr.
April 29th 1959 (Raymond Francis had gone down with mumps, so Gerald Case replaced him for this and a few other stories.)
Script: Peter Ling from the Story by Glyn Davies
Director: Penny Wootton.
Also in this cast:
Ronald Leigh-Hunt... Insp Nick Clarke
Helen Shingler... Hilda Maclean
Dorinda Stevens... Carol Betterton
William Kendall... Major Lucas
Shay Gorman... Hector Grey
Frank Hawkins... Waites, receptionist
Philip Leaver... Mr Abercrombie
Brian McDermott... PC Gittings
Victor Charrington... PC Harris
Clive Chapman... Page boy
John Nicholson... Waiter
Brenda Haydn... Barmaid

5 THE SUPERINTENDENT FINDS THE ANGLES
May 6th 1959, 10.27pm
starring Gerald Case.
Written by Peter Ling From the Story by Glyn Davies
Designed by Frank Nerini, Directed by Roger Jenkins
The police are baffled when they find that the man they believe responsible for an assault is lying in the hospital bed next to the victim.

7 LOCKHART CHOOSES A WEAPON
Raymond Francis definitely returns to the series.
20th May 1959 10.15pm
Written by William Hitchcock from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Henry Federer.
Directed by Roger Jenkins.
For the law to be upheld, citizens must be prepared to give evidence against an accused person. In this case, the accused seeks revenge.

8 LOCKHART FITS A UNIFORM
Wednesday 27th May 1959 10.15pm
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Michael Weald.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
When the postman arrives with a special delivery for George Spennet on his early closing day, he finds himself involved in a crime of robbery with violence

10 LOCKHART GOES BACKSTAGE
Tuesday 9th June 1959
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Michael Wield.
Directed by Daphne Shadwell.
The scene is set, the actors know their cues. But when Lockhart walks on stage, it is not for applause

11 LOCKHART VISITS A PAWNSHOP
Tuesday 16th June 1959 10.15pm
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by John Emery.
Directed by Roger Jenkins.
A hooligan breaks into a shop, carrying a knife, with overwhelming consequences

14 LOCKHART SEARCHES THE RECORDS
Wednesday 8th July 1959, 8pm
Script: Peter Yeldham from a story by Glyn Davies.
Director: Daphne Shadwell.

16 LOCKHART LOSES A WITNESS
Wednesday 22nd July 1959
Script: Peter Yeldham from a story by Glyn Davies. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
A confidence trickster has to win the friendship of his victim- but in this case friendship is repaid by death.

20 LOCKHART VISITS A LAUNDRY
August 19th 1959 9.30pm
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Bernard Goodwin.
Directed by Penny Wootton. A girl is murdered in a night club. Lockhart has a small clue- a laundry mark.

21 LOCKHART KEEPS AN APPOINTMENT
August 26th 1959 8pm
Written by Edward Dryhurst from a story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Geoffrey Hughes.
An old man dies from natural causes. But then the will is read, and Chief Supt Lockhart is in the thick of it again.

22 LOCKHART MEETS A ROMEO
September 2nd 1959
Written by Peter Yeldham from the story by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Frank Gillman.
Directed by Graham Watts.
'A nice friendly pub' it seems to Chief Det-Supt Lockhart, but just what is the connection between it, the Romeo and the poison pen letters?

23 LOCKHART CLOSES A DOOR
September 9th 1959
Written by Glyn Davies.
Designed by Bernard Goodwin.
Directed by Ian Fprdyce.
Lockhart sets out to find an escaped prisoner, but instead finds a murderer.

24 THE SUPERINTENDENT TAKES A TRIP
Interesting, this was shown on November 8th 1961. Possibly it was one of the episodes made during spring 1959 when Raymond Francis was ill- it was screened over two years later. Script: Raymond Marshall. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Gerald Case... Chief Supt Carr
Reginald Marsh... Insp Nicholson
Paddy Joyce... Teddy
Victor Charrington... Desk Sergeant
Charles Gray... Jimmy Bellamy
Maureen Pryor... Maureen Morley
Ewen Solon... 'Dreamy' Daniels
Warren Mitchell... Bob Green
George Tovey... Sam
Keith Faulkner/ Tony Ford... Police Constables
When a chief superintendent meets a sandwich board man, he finds that more than sandwiches are at stake

Notes: Ian Hendry was in three Murder Bag stories, as well as one Crime Sheet.
Bill Fraser was in a story of Murder Bag series 1.
Sarah Lawson was in one Murder Bag in Jan or Feb 1958.
Douglas Blackwell appeared in one Murder Bag.
Richard Thorp also appeared in Murder Bag, in an unknown story.
Others who have stated they appeared in unknown editions of Murder Bag: Angela Browne, Tom Chatto, Harriet Johns, Noel Johnson, Duncan Lamont, Ronald Leigh-Hunt, Myrtle Reed, Sally Ann Shaw, and Peggy Thorpe-Bates.
Others who have stated they appeared in Crime Sheet: Robert Henderson, Harriet Johns, and Vic Wise.
Roger Jenkins stated he directed fifteen stories in Murder Bag/ Crime Sheet.
Hugh Munro stated he had also directed Murder Bag.

To No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

No Hiding Place - A-R synposes of some series 5 stories:

5.1 Alibis Are Fixed (July 2nd 1963)
Ben Jordan (Patrick Jordan), international thief, is brought from Paris by Robbie Robinson (Ferdy Mayne). Police notice his arrival, and he is kept under observation. After arranging an alibi, Jordan with the aid of associate Archie Martin, eludes police by slipping out of a taxi. During the robbery, Martin, who is looking after the getaway driver, decamps.The robbery is unsuccessful, and Jordan and George Kean hurry after Martin.
It is discovered that a woman named Patricia Dunn had gone away with Martin. Because nitroglycerine in a certain form had been used, the trademark of Ben Jordan is recognised, and Baxter is sent after him. In Patricia's flat, Jordan is found, but he has an alibi.
Martin is murdered, and police connect him with the robbery. Lockhart learns that a light coloured shooting brake was seen near where the body was found. He has a tyre imprint photographed.
George Kean, armed with a false passport, joins his wife. Both are taken to the Yard, where they learn that the passport had been supplied by Robinson. This crook however denies knowing Kean or Martin. But Baxter finds a blood stained towel, Kean claims he had cut himself shaving off his moustache. Lockhart taxes Robinson with the towel and the tyre imprint. Robinson tries to tell the truth, thus breaking Jordan's alibi by saying that Pat Dunn was with him

5.6 Alexander's Ragtime Girl
Alexander Alexander, a shy young graduate training to be a barrister, takes Jennifer Buckley, the girl he wants to marry, home to meet his mother. Mrs Alexander (Pauline Letts) is shocked and tries to dissuade them. At a party Jennifer gets into an argument with Gary Benson, Pete Gonzales (Gerald Harper) and Ricky about her forthcoming marriage. There is a scene when Mrs Alexander breaks in, she leaves, then Alexander with jennifer. Next morning Jennifer is found murdered.
Time of death is established at 2.30am, and it is also found that she was two months pregnant. Lockhart and Baxter break the news to Jennifer's father Dr Buckley, who is shocked. Mrs Alexander is upbraiding her son as Lockhart and Baxter turn up to inform them of Jennifer's death. Alex says they left each other at midnight, but cannot account for his movements afterwards. Baxter interviews those at the party, and learns that Pete left soon after Alex and Jennifer.
A wooden chair leg, the murder weapon, is found. Lockhart and Baxter discard the idea of the murderer being one of the party guests, since they all seem to have alibis. Therefore they return to the Alexander house. Alex admits that Jennifer did go out with other men, but he doesn't know about that particular night. As he is obviously under suspicion, his mother comes forward to admit killing Jennifer

5.7 Pay as You Earn
"Tregunter, Clarke and Palmer plan to steal a safe from the office of a building firm. They spray a yellow van with grey paint, cover the number plate with mud, cut the lock at the rear of the premises and substitute a new padlock. While Tregunter keeps watch outside the office, the others, using a battery operated fork lift truck, steal the safe. The only clues are the marks of the truck and the substituted padlock. The grey van is seen leaving the scene of the crime and a general call is put out, but by this time the thieves have reached Palmer's garage, washed off the grey paint, and managed to get away through the road blocks. Lockhart returns to his office with the padlock which was issued by a government department, but which department? Had he seen Clarke and Tregunter at that moment, he would have known the answer, as they were returning to prison, being parolees on a rehabilitation course.
Baxter and Lockhart get a lead on Tregunter and depart for the prison, but by the time they arrive, Tregunter and Clarke have been released. However a prisoner tells the governor that he heard Joe Dean, Palmer and Clarke discussing a burglary using a fork lift truck. The police go to Palmer's garage, but when they arrive they find the body of Palmer beside the empty safe.
Clarke is found, and detained on a charge of stealing the money, which he admits. Tregunter is found at the house of a girl called Frances, a secretary at the building company. The police find the proceeds of the robbery there, so Tregunter is taxed with the murder of Palmer, but he proves that he was not there at the time of the killing. Attention is then focussed on the girl, who admits that she killed Palmer to prevent him getting away with all the money"

5.9 Peggy
"Anne Cassett is assaulted by John Clint. He is charged, found guilty and sent to Northmoor Mental Hospital, but escapes one year later. Baxter visits the hospital and finds the walls of Clint's cell covered with drawings of cats, panthers and lions, and is given samples of poems written by Clint to someone named Peggy.
Clint gets to London and telephones an attractive model Joanna Simpson (Catherine Woodville). She anwers the phone, but he does not speak. The same night, Clint attacks a motorist near Joanna's address in Chelsea. Lockhart sees the injured man in hospital, who identifies Clint.
Baxter visits Clint's mother, but the only information he gets from her is that Clint had been employed in a gown shop, and that he had loaned an amount of money he had won on the pools to one of the girls. That night Joanna returns home with her fiancee, and after he leaves she goes into the kitchen to call her cat. Clint is there.
Following the information that Clint had worked in a gown shop where models were employed, special attention is given to models called Peggy. Eventually a girl named Peggy Dawson is found, but although she knew John Clint, she denies receiving money from him, and names Joanna as the person who did. It is then discovered that Joanna had previously occupied the same address as Anne Cassett.
Joanna, alone in her flat with Clint, has succeeded in convincing him that she had intended to marry him and had kept his money for this purpose, but a telephone call from her fiancee changes the situation and Clint rounds on her. The police arrive and Clint, in attempting to run away down the fire escape, falls to his death.
Baxter picks up Joanna's cat, on the collar is the name Peggy. John Clint, in his mental illness, had thought that the cat had come between him and Joanna"

5.10 Statement to the Press
When Baxter is told by an informer that Alan Klein, a wireless engineer, is going to be 'sprung' from Dartmoor, Lockhart plants Benson, of the Special Branch, in the cell with Klein. Benson talks Klein into taking him with him on the breakout. They escape safely and drive to a derelict flour mill owned by John Pentelow. Here they are met by Lee Gilbert and Lofty Rogers (Jack Watson), who need Klein for a crime their boss has planned. Benson receives a cool reception, it is made plain that he is not to be trusted. Lee Gilbert goes to see Mr Big, Bryan Fellows (Hugh Manning) in his office, to complain about Benson's introduction. Gilbert returns to the mill and after being bested in a row with Benson, says that Klein will be responsible if Benson comes with them on the job.
Benson works on Klein, who finally tries to phone his wife because he is worried about her, but he is stopped by Rogers. Baxter tries to trace the call, but is unsuccessful. Meanwhile Rogers is given the briefing for the job, a raid on a security van. Fellows takes a plane to Paris with his secretary Wendy. The raid now takes place, and is successful.
The van used by the raiders is found, and inside is a piece of plaster with a phone number, left by Benson. The number is that of Lee's girlfriend. Baxter sees her and by playing on her greed for money by mentioning the large reward, is given Fellows' phone number. Lockhart connects flour found on Gilbert's trousers with the miller's van which had gone through a road block earlier. The van is traced to John Pentelow and searched.
Benson contacts police, but in so doing, is found out. The gang are about to deal with him, when Lockhart and the police burst in to arrest them

5.11 Scaremonger (Sept 10th 1963)
Ben Morland (Barry Keegan), just released from prison, has a message for his cell mate's widow, Jane Hobbs. But when he visits her, she won't listen to him.
Lockhart receives a call to tell him that there is a bomb at Paddington Station, and another in a pillar box in Pimlico. Both bombs are found, but neither has a fuse, and Lockhart suspects that it is the work of a hoaxer, and forbids any publicity.
Next morning, the lab reports on the newspaper wrapping around the bombs. Cut into the second page of one, there is the number 21, followed by the letters C and L. An article appears in the Evening Citizen, which denigrates police, and Lockhart in particular.
After inquiries, Lockhart interviews Harvey, Wand and Morland. Another bomb is found in a library, and Lockhart finds another, this one with a fuse, on the back seat of his car.
Police keep watch on Morland, and he is followed to Jane's house. Baxter enters, finding Morland unconscious.
Lockhart keeps a rendezvous with the Bomb Man in a mews garage, arriving early to find Jane Hobbs with her brother in law and a dummy wearing an old raincoat. The message Morland was to have given Jane was to tell her to disperse a load of gelignite. She has found this and tries to kill Lockhart, whom she blames for her husband's death

5.16 Two Dreams in a Fire
Pearce uses an ingenious method of fraud, and has had success with it for some time, but police are almost on to him. He decides to run away with the week's takings, approximately £700, planning to go abroad, abandoning his girl friend Nell Burroughs. Five miles from Dover, he passes a garage run by Sean McMurdoch (Eddie Byrne), but then gets a puncture.
Sean is called out to repair it. He drives there in his little van, and notices a bag with the stolen money. He strikes Pearce on the head, puts him in the van, drives it down a steep slope and sets fire to it.
Bowman and Baxter, who are on to Pearce's crimes, have obtained information about his car and the amount of money stolen. Next morning Lockhart is told about the body in the burnt out van, and travels to Dover. He quickly establishes that the body is not that of Sean, and it is identified as that of Pearce. On the car radio, while he is near Liverpool, McMurdoch hears a broadcast calling attention to the car he is driving. He abandons it, and sets off for the docks, carrying the stolen bag of money.
A letter found in McMurdoch's house intimates that he might go to a pub in Belfast, so the quest moves to Northern Ireland. The publican, apprehensive of his position because it is murder, reveals that McMurdoch has left for the border. Just short of here, McMurdoch's car breaks down. he spots the police car in the distance, and attempts to rush across the border, but is felled by Baxter, and arrested for murder

5.17 An Eye on the Kings
Berry who is planning a jewel robbery, employs 'Petty' Smith to recruit assistants. With Harry Matters (John Junkin), Petty engages two men, Wills and Petrie, and together with ex GPO man Swallow, they plan the job. Lockhart is informed of the plan, so a watch is kept on Berry. The raid is carried out, and a broken window sets off an alarm in the security office. It is arranged that security men meet up with police at the jeweller's, these men are Petrie and Wills.
The plan works- the security van arrives and the guards are deceived. Matters, also in uniform, sits out of sight, monitoring police radio calls. When the guards open the vault, they are attacked and their keys stolen. A quarter of a million pounds worth of jewellery is stolen.
Seen by Baxter in his home, Berry explains where he has been, and blames Godfrey for the job. Continuing his pressure, Lockhart instals Det Sgt Bowman outside the door of Berry's house, and has Berry's phone tapped. The stolen jewels are hidden in Wills' room. But Berry is unable to move the stolen property. He is nervous, and gets angry when Petty Smith calls at his home. There is a row and Baxter is waiting with a car when Berry emerges from the house.
Lockhart interviews Godfrey, and is given an account of his movements, then purposely lets Godfrey know what Berry has alleged about him. He pinpoints in this allegation that the information could have started at a billiards hall owned by Berry, and frequented by Petty Smith. Godfrey swallows the bait, and sends his right hand man Wally to see Petty. After some intimidation, Petty talks. Wills becomes nervous, and after talking with Petrie, phones Berry. This call is traced so Lockhart obtains the address of the hideout. Wally and a strong arm man get there first. Wills is beaten up, the jewels taken. But police arrive and they are all arrested. Berry is picked up later

5.18 Requiem on a Typewriter
Archie MacLaren, an ex police officer turned private investigator, is shot dead in his office. Lockhart, an old colleague of Maclaren, is called in. With Baxter, he investigates the scene of the crime, and finds a piece of torn off paper stuck on the typewriter, indicating that something had been typed has been pulled from the machine. The only thing the police have to work on are MacLaren's address book, and his bank statement, and they find his three most recent clients were a Mr Littleton, Westbrook and Sons, and a Mrs Anstruther.
Baxter sees Mrs Anstruther (Dandy Nichols), who employed Maclaren to get divorce evidence against her husband, a womaniser and a violent man. Baxter obtains a photograph of Anstruther from a newspaper, which is circulated to the police and the press. Det Sgt Tandy investigates Littleton, and establishes that he could not possibly have been to MacLaren's office.
Lockhart starts on the third client, Westbrook and Sons, and finds this company had not used MacLaren for over two years. It is decided to see the person who drew MacLaren's cheque, a Mr Oliver Westbrook, at his private address in Sussex.
Anstruther, located at a hotel with a woman known as Mrs Anstruther, is taken to Scotland Yard, coincidental with the arrival of his real wife, who produces a letter from MacLaren returning her documents, thereby clearing her husband of all suspicion. However as a result of Lockhart's investigations, Anstruther is arrested for bigamy and fraud.
This leaves one remaining suspect- Oliver Westbrook, but when Baxter arrives at his Sussex home, he is informed that Westbrook has died during the night. Baxter goes back to Lockhart with the news, and he applies to the Home office for a post mortem.
Lockhart examines the clues on the typewriter revealed by Forensics, as a result of which Westbrook's nephew Julian is accused of murder

5.19 A Hole in the Head
Joey Beeble (Aubrey Morris), a tramp, finds a human skeleton in the Epping Forest. The man had been shot. Dr Penton finds some granite dust and gunpowder on the clothes and in the hair of the skeleton. Graham Crowley (Andrew Faulds), a sculptor, is called in to reconstruct the man's features, and a photograph is taken and circulated. Through this the police are led to a stonemason's yard, where a man named Begg works. His wife screams when she sees the photo- she knows the dead man.
Lockhart and Baxter visit Mrs Grace Begg at her home. She tells them that the dead man's name is Rinaldo Sarto. He was an Italian and used to work at the yard. She had become friendly with him, but her husband disapproved. A report on the gunpowder is received: it is known as black powder. Lockhart thinks Rinaldo might have blown a safe just before he was murdered, and checks on recent safe blowings using this method. A result soon comes, and Sgt Plimmer of the Essex police, provides the information. A man named Redding, with an address in King's Cross, has been arrested in a stolen car containing some of the proceeds from the safe blowing. Also found in the car: a cartridge case, and some blood stains. Baxter returns to the office- he had been to an address in King's Cross where Sarto lived, along with another man who answers to the description of Redding.
Redding is sent to prison for five years. When he is faced with a possible charge of murder, he blames Joe Rezkowski. Joe's premises are searched, and police find odds and ends of jewellery settings, and an automatic pistol. The settings are identical with some stolen in the safe blowing, though the gems have been removed. Ballistic tests show that the rifling on the bullet was different to that on this gun barrel, but a further test shows that the impression on the discharged shell case was the same. Rezkowski is arrested for murder

5.20 The Gamblers
The story opens in the Crucible Club, where a chemin-de-fer game is in progress. There are seven players, fashion model Raine Smith (Gabriella Licudi), Harvey Hale (Gerald Campion), Nigel Carpenter (Terence Longdon), Arnold Hurst, Johnnie Lightman, Frank Drover, and the owner of the club Suzie Dart (Petra Davies). The game ends when Carpenter, who has won £500, leaves.
Next morning Carpenter is found dead. News of the murder appears in the morning papers. At Carpenter's flat, Lockhart and Baxter find that a sum of money has been stolen, and they also find a £5 gambling chip with the name Crucible on it.
Lightman's girl friend Claire, reads the report of the murder and rings Lockhart's office. She also speaks to Frank Drover who works with him. When Lightman comes into the office, he is told about the phone call. He denies that he killed Carpenter, though Frank says, 'what exactly do you want Arnold and me to say?'
Lockhart and Baxter meet Suzie Dart at the Crucible, where they learn about the game and all those who played it. They all seem to have some sort of alibi, icluding the croupier, who implies that he had been with Suzie. That night, Drover walks into the flat of Raine, and asks for a false alibi. He is refused. Arnold Hurst tries a similar thing with the croupier, and he also is refused.
A reconstruction of the previous night's game, with everyone except Carpenter present, takes place. Following this, all the people except Drover, Lightman and Hurst, establish concrete alibis, but the latter three alibi each other. Drover and Lightman's stories do not tally, and Lockhart decides to see Hurst, the third man in the alibi. They find him at The Crucible, and after Lockhart has asked several questions, a flaw is found in his story. Hurst admits murder

5.21 No Previous Convictions
Frank Evans, Harold Slessor and Stanley Bridges, all men with clean records, are enlisted by Bill Warren to rob a wages car. They net a quarter of a million.
After the share-out, Bridges drives to London and on the way is involved in a motor accident and is killed. When police find the money, Lockhart and Baxter are called in. They examine with fingerprint expert Fellows, the unusual mark on Bridges' hands. The marks were caused by playing golf. His photo is circulated to golf courses, and three days later Bridges is identified by a professional in Gloucester. Lockhart and Baxter see him, and he names two associates in golf, Evans and Slessor. The following Saturday, the pair visit the course, and are followed by Baxter and Hodgkins. Later two cases of money are discovered in a railway station. Observation is kept here.
Barbara Green, Bill Warren's mistress, has a boyfriend, an ex-con named Alfred Jackson. After the raid, she tells him what has happened, and that Bill plans to cross the Channel to France in a cabin cruiser. Warren gives Barbara the name of the mooring place and of the vessel, and as soon as he has left, she phones Jackson.
A car park attendant who saw Warren at the races, identifies a photo of him, this concentrates the search on the Brighton area. A policeman stops Warren, accompanied by Barbara, and he produces a false driving licence.
A box of tablets marked Bethnal Green has been issued to her, and she pretends she has lost them to delay Bill's departure. He finds these tablets she has hidden, and realises that she has deceived him. He takes his money and leaves. Barbara, unable to get any of her tablets, collapses. Semi conscious, she phones the police. She is brought out of a coma and informs on Warren and Jackson. The police dash after them and find the vessel Fair Maid stranded with the two men on board. It had missed the tide

5.22 Always a Copper
Charlie Gibbons (Leslie Dwyer) has a stepdaughter April who works at the Emerald Club. Derek Patterson, owner of this club, is infatuated with her, so for this reason she keeps her friendship quiet with Colin Hartley.
Ex Det Sgt Leyland is employed by Colin's dad to watch whom he meets. Lockhart, on a routine visit to the club, sees Leyland outside. When Colin arrives at April's flat, Leyland reports the infornation to Colin's dad. Later he challenges Colin about his relationship with April, Colin's response to to say that he is going to marry her because she is pregnant.
Next evening April does not show up at the club, and Patterson is told she is leaving to get married. He leaves the club hurriedly.
Lockhart and Baxter are called to April's flat. Murgatroyd the porter had found her body. He gives information about Patterson and Hartley. Lockhart finds Colin at the Emerald Club. He has an alibi, but Lockhart breaks it. He then admits he went to see April at her flat, at her request, but he had found her already dead.
Patterson also admits going to her flat, but says that on seeing Colin's car, he had driven away. He had gone to a bar and drunk steadily.
Lockhart then talks to Charlie Gibbons, who says he knew about the baby, because she had written to him about it. However it is established that he cannot read, and eventually he admits to murder

5.23 Death of Samantha
Samantha Grey (Hariette Johns) runs a photographic studio with her partner and lover Simon McCowen. The story opens with a photo session in progress, which Samantha is directing. She sees model Vicky West (Nyree Dawn Porter) and orders her to leave the studio. In her office she has a row with Simon, and slams the door, and makes for home. But that night she is found murdered.
Lockhart finds her place has been expertly burgled. He obtains a list of property stolen, mainly jewellery, and has it circulated.
Tony Harris, a burglar, gives his girlfriend Marcia a watch. She sells it to a jeweller who takes it to Scotland Yard. Opening the back, Lockhart finds an inscription, To Samantha All My Love S.
The Method Index at the Yard turns up several thieves using the special technique of burglary, one being Tony Harris. Baxter finds Marcia in a pub, but she is called to the phone. When she runs off, Baxter goes to her address to resume his questions. Tony shows up and is detained.
He claims he bought the watch from a man in a cafe. Lockhart sends for Simon McCowen.
McCowen is married, and the burglar Jimmy Humphries tells his wife of her husband's affair with Samantha, after Humnphries falls out with McCowen. Lockhart forces Humphries to admit to a charge of burglary, and later finds Simon at the opened safe in Samantha's house. Simon gives himself away and is arrested

5.24 Solomon Dancey's Luck
Solomon Dancey (Harry Locke) is released from prison just before Christmas, and having no money, steals a handbag. But the contents are worthless so he throws it away. The owner of the bag refuses to prosecute him, and he then attempts to obtain a loan from bookmaker Charlie Monkton (Sydney Tafler). He is ordered out of Monkton's house, on the way he steals their Christmas tree.
He returns home carrying the tree to find that his wife Sheba (Liz Fraser) has not only been given a turkey, but their lodger Alexander Mudgeon (Bob Grant) has produced whiskey and a necklace for her.
A parcel arrives from prison, from an old associate of Dancey's who has died and left him clothes, a banjo and the lease of a house, which has only ten days to run. This annoys Sheba, who throws it all into the dustbin. In a temper she picks up the stolen tree, and crashes it to the floor. The pot breaks and they find £3,000 inside.
Thus they look forward to a merry Christmas, buying new clothes, and Solomon purchases an identical tree which they return when Charlie and his muscle man Alfred (Danny Green) call for it. After they go, Solomon, worried what they will do when they find the money gone, reveals the source of his wealth to Mudgeon. When Solomon goes off to play bridge, Mudgeon phones Lockhart.
The bookmaker discovers his loss, and is on the point of searching for Dancey when Lockhart turns up to question him. Charlie denies any loss of money. Then Solomon asks Lockhart for protection, his story is that he found a lot of money in the garden of the house left to him. Lockhart wants to examine it, and they find a note from Sheba saying she has got the money and has run away with the lodger.
Without the money, it is not possible to prosecute Solomon. When the police have left, Solomon finds Sheba locked up in a cupboard, Smudgeon had done it and taken the cash. They know he is on his way to London Airport, so Sheba informs Charlie what has happened, and he and his wife settle down to the turkey provided by Mudgeon

5.25 Formula for Death
Lockhart and Baxter, investigating a wages snatch, have only one lead, a grey saloon car.
Ginger Smith (Howard Pays), who organised the snatch, is now planning another at the North Wickham government research station. A second group are watching the station: Adrian Melius, Peter Westbury, and Eugene Milo, but they are only waiting for the delivery of a certain advanced isotope formula. In fact they are watching the station when Ginger with two men and a woman start their raid. As they are taking the money from a security van, Melius sees through his binoculars, that they have got the canisters containing the new formula. They send Milo after the car on his motor bike, but he crashes and is killed.
Lockhart visits the research station and learning about the isotope, arranges for a warning to be put out.
Back home, Ginger has managed to open one of the canisters, only to find a slug of metal. When he hears the police warning, he goes straight to hospital. The doctor phones the police who search Smith's house where they find the canisters and the money.
Police believe Milo to be connected with the crime, but they also need the names of the others involved, so Ginger's name and address appears in the press report as the one mixed up in the raid. This gets the gang to swallow the bait and all are arrested

5.26 A Car Is Stolen
The Assistant Commissioner of New Scotland Yard's car is stolen. Though Lockhart is on the case, it is Sgt York of Bow Street who arrests the thief, Charles Newell. Bail is opposed, but a surety from Janet Nelson, wife of Harry Nelson (Alan Tilvern) enables Newell to be remanded on bail. Lockhart sets Baxter and York to make further inquiries, after examining a marked map found in the stolen car.
Newell realises this map must have been found by police, and skips bail, going off with a Charlotte Ryan. But when he switches on the ignition of the car, it blows up and he is killed.
With York and Baxter and Inspector Morrison, Lockhart goes to the scene of the murder. Saunders and Owen admit lending Newell money, but deny trying to kill him. Joseph Ryan had threatened Newell because he knew his daughter intended to run away with Newell. But though he intended to thrash him, Ryan says he had changed his mind. However he has no alibi.
Examining the shattered car, Morrison finds evidence to identify Nelson as the killer. But in the office of Nelson's automart, police find him dead. Time of death is established at between midnight and one o'clock. Joseph Ryan admits that he murdered Harry Nelson, because they had argued about money. On the murder weapon are found traces of a face powder which matches that found in Charlotte Ryan's handbag

To No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

No Hiding Place
Rediffusion synopses for series 9 (1966)

9.1 A Bottle Full of Sixpences. VTR made 13th April, transmitted 4th May 1966.
Act 1: Opens: Brighton station. A young man, Tom in a wheelchair travels up to London in the guards van. He attacks the guard and steals some of the mail. The guard is seriously injured and Lockhart investigates, using the abandoned wheelchair and a travelling rug as his clues. Tom has carried out the crime in order to obtain money for his parents, owners of a small cleaning shop which is doing very badly. His father Fred had been a small time criminal years ago, but has gone straight, and all the family hopes centre on Tom's future as an engineer. Realising what Tom has done, in the shop parlour, Millie Connor pleads with her husband to get enough money so Tom can get away.
Act 2: In his office Lockhart interrogates Smithy the dining car attendant who had pushed the wheelchair into the guard's van. Smith has a record, and Lockhart thinks, mistakenly, that he may be an accomplice. Following up markings on the rug, he sends Perryman to Connor's shop and discovers the rug is missing from there. Further information suggests the criminal may be Fred, who Millie says has gone up north. Fred is wandering round searching for a suitable place to rob, and eventually settles on his friend the local publican.
Act 3: Fred breaks into the pub that night. He opens the safe where the night's takings are stored but bungles the whole thing and is chased from the premises by Mrs Parson's the publican's wife. Fred manages to reach home and hand some of the money to Tom who now runs away. Police arrest to swoop Fred who tries pathetically to give them the slip. Fred is questioned by Lockhart and confesses to the train robbery also. But Lockhart doesn't believe him and Fred is shattered when he learns the train job now carries a murder charge since the guard has died. He still insists on his guilt in order to shield his son, but Tom decides he must give himself up. Final scene shows Millie in the shop parlour throwing a bottle of sixpences against the wall.
Note: Jim Gardner was scheduled to play Mr Parsons but not in TV Times credits

9.2 Ask me If I killed Her (VTR made on April 29th 1966, screened May 11th 1966) - click for my review of this surviving story

9.3 The Old Pals' Act
VTR made 6th May, transmitted 18th May 1966.
Act 1: Jay Parry's body is found floating in the Thames while a party is in progress on his barge. Lockhart is called in when it is discovered that Parry had been drowned elsewhere. Parry had been a partner in a factory run with Godfrey Bailey, an old war chum. Amy Fairfax, Bailey's secretary, knows a great deal about their private lives, and Lockhart soon learns Parry's wife Lucy had been having an affair with a Dr Mason. These two were together at the party though Mason arrived just before Jay's body was found. They are both under suspicion when Lucy discovers Bailey was planning to sack Jay and had advertised his job. To remove suspicion from herself, Lucy suggests Bailey may be the murderer.
Act 2: At Bailey's office, Bailey admits to Lockhart that he had decided to replace Jay, but denies knowledge of the advert. From Amy, Lockhart learns that Mason and Jay had had a row in which Jay had threatened to have Mason struck off if he did not stop seeing Lucy. She confesses that she had placed the advert to try to bring Jay to his senses. Lucy, knowing that Mason and Bailey were due to meet on the night of the murder, now fears that Mason did kill her husband, but tries to excuse it to Lockhart by saying Jay was unbalanced, had tried to kill her once and had never been the same man since the war during which he had been tortured. Mason denies it. Amy reveals to Bailey her discovery that Jay had a blackmail hold over him because they had both been involved in killing a German war criminal after the war.
Act 3: Mason is tricked into revealing the address of his bungalow where he and Lucy used to meet. Evidence points to the bath having been the one used for the murder. Mason admits that he saw Bailey and Jay coming to the bungalow but he left by a back door before they came in. Lockhart deduces that Jay had brought Bailey there to kill Mason, thereby increasing his blackmail hold over Bailey, but instead Bailey had killed him. Amy, spending the evening with Bailey, tries her own blackmail and is nearly murdered herself. Police arrive. Bailey is arrested for the murder of Jay

9.4 You Never Can Tell Till You Try
VTR made 13th May, transmitted 25th May 1966.
Act 1: Lockhart receives anonymous information that a James Paterson is the big receiver who lives in a large house in North London. He has just discovered that his wife Sarah is strangely interested in his assistant Philip Munro, whose house is the first scene in this story. Paterson decides to throw suspicion by arranging a robbery of valuable art works from his house. The plan has a double purpose, for having used Munro, Paterson and his right hand man and chauffeur Doyle, will frame him so he gets sent to jail. Sarah persuades Munro to play along with them, but to steal Paterson's valuable jewellery haul as well. The act closes with Sgt Russell watching Munro's flat at night.
Act 2 opens in Lokchart's office. Police have discovered one of the art works at Munro's flat. It had been planted by Doyle. Munro is arrested. But Paterson discovers to his horror that the jewels hidden in a vault in the basement have gone too. When Sarah visits Munro in prison, Munro tells her to relay to Paterson his terms. Fifty thousand pounds for the jewellery. Paterson has to agree to help Munro get out of jail.
Act 3: Paterson stands bail for Munro, saying the theft might have been a misunderstanding. Lockhart agrees, since he wants to get at the truth about Paterson's role as a big receiver. He receives an anonymous call to go to outside Paterson's house. Munro, planning to leave the country with Sarah, goes to the house and is taken down to the cellar. The money is handed over, whereupon Munro reveals that the jewels are still in the house, hidden in a sawdust bin. About to leave with Sarah, she trips on the stairs causing him to fall. Paterson seizes Munro's gun but Doyle takes it from him. Sarah had planned a neat twist, but Munro sets off the burglar alarm, Doyle shoots, and police burst in to arrest the lot of them

9.5 Charlie Come Lately
VTR made 20th May, transmitted 1st June 1966.
Act 1: Opening scene: a break-in at a furrier's. Lockhart investigates and discovers the thieves broke in through the floor from the offices below, which belong to a travel agency. Charlie Bamber, an ex-cop who now runs an unsuccessful private detective agency, is hired to follow June Tarrant, wife of Mr Tarrant. She works in the travel agency. Charlie follows and sees her meet a man called Mackay, and in following him, he is led to Nicky Peters, big time receiver. In a cafe Charlie reports back to Sgt Russell.
Act 2: In his office, Lockhart is getting closer to June Tarrant's involvement with the thieves. Mackay rumbles the private detective, and tries to buy off Charlie with £1,000. Charlie plays hard to get. Charlie then informs Lockhart that he is determined to get the glory for himself on this case and thus restore his reputation.
Act 3: In Charlie's office at night, Mackay increases his offer but Charlie refuses the bribe. Later Charlie is knocked down by a car and badly injured. But even now he will not tell Lockhart anything as he wants the insurance reward. Charlie goes to see June and tell her the truth about Mackay. June had believed Mackay was in love with her, and when she hears what Charlie tells her, she goes straight to the police, having had it out with her husband. Charlie is too late in bringing the case to Lockhart, who has now tied the case up

9.6 It Isn't Just the Money...
VTR made 27th May, transmitted 8th June 1966.
Act 1: In an attempt to trap a suspect protection racketeer, a Greek Cypriot named Fergathis, Inspector McHugh has arranged for numbered notes to be among the pay-off from a Greek cafe owner. But when police arrive at Fergathis' home they are beaten to it by an unknown assailant who attacks the suspect and makes off with his cash box. Lockart takes over the case, but Fergathis refuses to make any charge against his attacker. Mrs Fergathis clearly knows more than she is telling too. Sgt Russell visits the cafe owner and gets the impression that Fergathis' hold over the Greek community rests on something more than fear. Lockhart is summoned to MI5.
Act 2: Lockhart learns that during the Cyprus troubles, Fergathis secretly aided the British forces. In return he had been brought to Britain where has was guaranteed safety. So Lockhart must get absolute proof before making any charges. The marked money is reported as having been paid in at a country bank by a Dr Reynolds, headmaster of a private school for retarded children. Reynolds claims the money arrived in a parcel with no name. Lockhart decides to check on all the parents, and eventually comes to the lodging of Jim Donovan, whom we had first seen in the opening sequence. He is one of the parents, and as Sgt Perryman leaves after interviewing him, he sees a car draw up, the driver is Mrs Fergathis.
Act 3: It turns out Mrs Fergathis had once been married to Donovan and the child at the child is hers. She fears her husband may harm Donovan in order to recover the cash box which contains valuable private papers as well as the money. Police watch Donovan's home and Mrs Fergathis tells her husband that Donovan was the attacker and insists he pay £1,000 to get those papers back. Reynolds appeals to Donovan to go to the police, but instead as Lockhart arrives, Donovan dashes off with the box, determined to get the money to help the school. As he crosses the main road, pursued by police, he is knocked down. He is taken to the Greek cafe, where he dies. Greeks in the cafe find the box and inside papers which prove Fergathis was a traitor. That decides them on telling the truth about the protection racket, and Fergathis is arrested

9.7 The Night Walker
VTR made 3rd June, transmitted 15th June 1966.
Act 1: Opening scene outside Westminster Coroner's Court. Lockhart is investigating the murder of a tramp found strangled on the Embankment. Not the first such murder of late. Sgt Russell finds one tramp, Bowdler, garrulous and cantankerous, with a passionate interest in shoes, who had met the dead man just before his death. He had been at Waterloo Station trying to beg from an immigrant. A freelance journalist, Dilke, persuades his editor to let him do a story on these tramps. His photographer Dennis accompanies him. When Bowdler tells Lockhart that he's now certain the immigrant was an Indian, Lockhart recalls the pathologist's opinion that the type of strangling was similar to that use by the Thugee Sect in India.
Act 2: Ships' crews are checked, but Russell finds out the Indian is staying at the same hostel as Bowdler. Dilke, disguised as a tramp, with Dennis and their girlfriend Penny Tusker have started their night quest. He gets into an ugly argument with another tramp Mahoney. The latter falls down stairs and cracks his skull. Dilke returns to his flat, but realises he had left his cigarette letter with Mahoney. Through an interpreter, Lockhart interviews the Indian, Ghomboos. It is a confusing interrogation. Lockhart then receives a report of the death of another tramp.
Act 3: The pathologist informs Lockhart that the latest tramp did not die by strangulation, and that the ligature was applied afterwards. The lighter is also found. Dilke's editor, horrified at what his team have done, informs Scotland Yard. Sgt Perryman arrests Dennis, and Lockhart questions him and Dilke, who had used the accident to make up a good newspaper story. But they did not murder Mahoney. Ghomboos goes missing, and is found murdered in the same way as the other tramps. Bowdler is spotted running off, and is chased across railway lines where he is killed, still wearing sandals he had stolen from Ghomboos

9.8 The Smoker
VTR made 17th June, transmitted 22nd June 1966.
Act 1: In his living room, Harry Nelson enters with two beer bottles. Pete Voss, a loud mouthed South African is in Harry's flat which he shares with his girlfriend Helen. They had once been cell mates, and now they are planning to rob a Hatton Garden jeweller. But to set it up, they need to do a small job to raise a few hundred pounds. They break into a bakery where Helen worked, and steal £400, but as they leave they are surprised by the manager and Voss hits him on the head, killing him. Harry wants to cry off the Hatton Garden job, but Pete persuades him not to.
Act 2: Following a clue of some prison tobacco found at the scene of the crime, and the fact that Helen used to visit Harry in prison, the police interview Harry. Voss takes Helen to the room they have hired as the hideout for their big job. They get back to Harry's flat just as he is being taken away for questioning. As the police have nothing against Harry, he has to be released. In their hideout, Harry sees that Helen has fallen for Pete, that makes him definitely decide to break away. He attempts to take Helen with him, but Voss knocks him aside, and he falls over hurting his chest. He leaves. Voss decides to go ahead on his own. With Albert, the driver, the diamond merchant is robbed. But when Albert demands his cut, Voss runs him down with his Mini.
Act 3: Police know Albert was an old mate of Harry and pull Harry in again. However Harry has an alibi, for he can prove he was in Paddington Hospital having his chest attended to at the time of the killing. But angry at Albert's death, Harry promises to lead police to the murderer. However he gives a police sergeant the slip and makes his own way to Voss' room. He is determined to kill Voss, but police, having traced the address through an Overseas club, arrive in time to stop him

9.9 The Killing
VTR made 10th June, transmitted 29th June 1966.
Act 1: Jack Woods, a pupil at a Greek night class, is found stabbed to death in a layby. His beautiful teacher Katrina Polyannis, arrives at the scene just after the murder, followed by Tony, another pupil who is keen on her. Earlier a Greek had called at the school saying he was Katrina's husband then he had left giving the school secretary a lift home, then being involved in a minor car accident. Mr Woods is a quiet living commuter, his wife is devastated, and bothered about the sudden appearance at her house of Arthur Johnson, who has univited, come to comfort her. Sgt Russell interviews Katrina in the restaurant owned by her husband, but learns nothing. But as he leaves, we discover that the 'husband' who had called at the night school is in fact the chef at the restaurant.
Act 2: Tony, having taken Katrina home, tells her in a funk he wants nothing to do with it. Lockhart questions Arthur and learns Jack was a dreamer who longed for the day when he would have enough money to go back to the Greek islands. Lockhart warns him to keep away from Mrs Woods. Tony is questioned, lying madly, but does reveal that Jack Woods was acting strangely the day before his murder, as if he had won the Pools. Polyannis knows that Tony is the one person who might give the police a lead, and sends some men to intimidate Tony. When Lockhart visits Mrs Woods, he finds Arthur there. In Jack's papers, they find out he had had a hefty win on the horses. The bet had been laid by Arthur Johnson, but before police realise the implications, Arthur has done a bolt.
Act 3: The police search the layby for a knife. Arthur had been in grave financial difficulties. If he had wanted to keep Jack's winnings, he would have had a motive for murder. Tony is visited by two hoodlums and faints with fright. Arthur hides in Mrs Woods' house when Lockhart calls to tell her that her husband was planning to elope with another woman. Katrina, her husband, and the chef are brought in for questioning. Arthur is found by Lockhart and admits he hung on to the money, but only after learning about Jack's death. The school secretary reveals the phoney alibi set up by the chef on Polyannis' behalf, and so Polyannis is arrested for murder

To No Hiding Place

.

.

.

.

.

Sergeant Cork: regular cast details, and transmission times
John Barrie starred in the title role, alongside William Gaunt as his assistant Bob Marriott, who appeared in all stories except 5.12.
Theme music: Philip Green. Producer: Jack Williams.

Charles Morgan, as Supt Rodway starting with the third series, eventually received star billing alongside Barrie and Gaunt. He first appeared as a different character in #10, but made his bow as Sgt Rodway at the end of series 2 (#21), becoming a regular as Supt Rodway in all series starting with series 3 (in all stories except #32, 47, 58).
It was announced that AJ Brown was to join the final series in 1966 as Assistant Commissioner John Thor(!), he pops up in 5.1 and had also been in #4.35.
Other slightly regular characters appearing in some stories were: Freddie Fowler as Chalky White, the caretaker at the Yard, who was in all the series, but not every tale, on a semi-regular basis. Arnold Diamond as Insp Bird in later stories of the first series only. John Richmond as Supt Nelson ialso series 1. Carmen Silvera as Mrs Fielding in 2, 9 (she is also in #61 in a different role).
In the second series, Edward Ogden appeared as Sgt Gardner and Barry Raymond was PC Evans.

1.1 Case of the Reluctant Widow (Saturday June 29th 1963, 10pm)
Note- viewers pointed out one error by Ted Willis, Major Bradnock's decorations were stated on his office door, OBE and MC. However neither of these could have been awarded before the twentieth century

1.2 Case of the Girl Upstairs (July 6th 1963)

1.3 Case of the Two Drowned Men (July 13th 1963)

1.4 Case of the Knotted Scarf (July 20th 1963)

1.5 Case of the Stagedoor Johnnie (July 27th 1963)

1.6 Case of the Respectable Suicide (August 3rd 1963)

1.7 Case of the Slithy Tove (August 10th 1963)

1.8 Case of the Persistent Assassin (August 17th 1963)

1.9 Case of the Sleeping Coachman (August 24th 1963)

1.10 Case of the Soldier's Rifle (August 31st 1963)

1.11 Case of the Public Paragon (September 7th 1963)

1.12 Case of Ella Barnes (September 14th 1963)

1.13 Case of the Gold Salesmen (September 21st 1963)

Second series:

2.1 (14) Case of the Fenian Men (Saturday December 28th 1963, 7.10 or 7.25pm depending on ITV region)

2.2 (15) Case of the Fourth Visitor (January 4th 1964)

2.3 (16) Case of the Ormsby Diamonds (January 11th 1964)

2.4 (17) Case of the Medicine Man (January 18th 1964)

2.5 (18) Case of the Bristol Mail (January 25th 1964)

2.6 (19) Case of the Silent Suffragette (February 1st 1964)

2.7 (20) Case of The Self made Man (Feb 8th 1964)

2.8 (21) Case of the Stricken Surgeon (February 15th 1964)

Third series:
3.1 (22) Case of the Two Poisons (April 4th 1964, 10.10pm)

3.2 (23) Case of the Six Suspects (April 11th 1964)

3.3 (24) Case of Big Ben Lewis (April 18th 1964)

3.4 (25) Case of the Amateur Spy (April 25th 1964)

3.5 (26) Case of the Elegant Mistress (May 2nd 1964)

3.6 (27) Case of the Hangman's Noose (May 9th 1964)

3.7 (28) Case of the Dumb Witness (May 16th 1964)

3.8 (29) Case of the Monk's Hood Murder (May 23rd 1964)

3.9 (30) Case of the Penny Plains (May 30th 1964)

3.10 (31) Case of the Hero's Return (June 6th 1964)

3.11 (32) Case of the Great Pearl Robbery (June 13th 1964)

3.12 (33) Case of the Killer's Mark (June 20th 1964)

3.13 (34) Case of the Cynical Traitor (June 27th 1964)

Fourth series:
4.1 (35) Case of the Vengeful Garnet (August 22nd 1964, 10.05 or 10.20pm according to ITV region)

4.2 (36) Case of the Wounded Warder (August 29th 1964)

4.3 (37) Case of the African Murder (September 5th 1964)

4.4 (38) Case of the Dutiful Murderer (September 12th 1964)

4.5 (39) Case of the Pious Patriarch (September 19th 1964)

4.6 (40) Case of the Merry Widower (September 26th 1964)
Note- This was the final story in this series, ending with the happy celebration of Bob Marriott's engagement. There was now a break of over one and a half years before the final series was made.

Series 5 (and last)

5.1 (41) Case of the Fellowship Murder (Saturday April 9th 1966, 9.10-10.5pm- this was the London transmission date- some other areas like ABC premiered the series as late as 1968. The Network dvd is a little confused over all this.)
At the beginning, Bob Marriott returns from his holiday in Paris, though any honeymoon (see 4.6) is not mentioned.
Unlike the previous series, there was no case number attached to the on screen titles of the individual episodes.

5.2 (42) Case of the Wayward Wife (Saturday April 16th 1966)

5.3 (43) Case of the Missing Cabinet Maker (Saturday April 23rd 1966)

5.4 (44) Case of Horseless Carriage (April 30th 1966- London, January 2nd 1968- ABC Midlands/North)

5.5 (45) Case of the Prominent Thespian (May 7th 1966)

5.6 (46) Case of the Dutiful Bride (May 14th 1966)

5.7 (47) Case of William Huckerby, Platelayer (May 21st 1966)

5.8 (48) Case of The Notorious Nun (Saturday May 28th 1966, Friday March 29th 1968 in Granada region)

5.9 (49) Case of the Rogue Regiment (June 4th 1966)

5.10 (50) Case of the Travelling Texan (June 11th 1966)

5.11 (51) Case of a Lady's Good Name (June 18th 1966, July 7th 1966 9.40pm Westward TV, February 6th 1968 ABC)

5.12 (52) Case of Albert Watson, V.C. (June 25th 1966, 9.10pm) (No William Gaunt in this story.)

5.13 (53) Case of Vanishing Victim (July 2nd 1966)

5.14 (54) Case of the Threatened Rajah (July 9th 1966)

5.15 (55) Case of Devil's Daughter (July 16th 1966, 9.20pm ATV London, March 12th 1968 ABC)

5.16 (56) Case of the Unpopular Judge (July 23rd 1966)

5.17 (57) Case of the Painted Boat (July 30th 1966)

5.18 (58) Case of the Strolling Players (August 6th 1966 London, but shown on Sunday June 9th 1968, 3.50pm in ABC Midlands/North)

5.19 (59) Case of the Chelford Changeling (August 13th 1966 London, December 23rd 1967 on ABC Midlands/North)

5.20 (60) Case of the Silent Bell (August 20th 1966 London, March 26th 1968 Midlands and STV)

5.21 (61) Case of the French Mademoiselle (August 27th 1966, ATV London, December 17th 1967 ABC Midlands/North 3.50pm)

5.22 (62) Case of the Simple Savage (September 3rd 1966)

5.23 (63) Case of the Fallen Family (September 10th 1966)

5.24 (64) Case of the Crystal Ball (September 17th 1966 ATV London, October 14th 1967 ABC)

5.25 (65) Case of the Silent Policeman (scheduled for August 20th 1966, but postponed to September 24th 1966 on ATV London, shown on October 28th 1967 on ABC)

5.26 (66) Case of the Hooded Students (October 1st 1966) - the final story ever

My thanks to Alan Collins for his help in unravelling the ATV London transmission dates for Sergeant Cork

To Videotape Crime menu
Sergeant Cork

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

10

back