THE . . . CHEATERS
39 films were made. In the 1960's I audiotaped the stories off the telly, and here are my reviews of them, though only one of my audiotapes now survives; sadly I must admit I fell victim to the spirit of the age and wiped the rest! Well, tapes were fearfully expensive in those days.

Click for my story reviews:
1 The Fine Print
2 Intent To Defraud
3 The Weasel
4 The Man with the Ticking Head
5 The Authentic McCoy
6 The Legacy
7 For the Price of Two
8 Man who wouldn't be Paid
10 The Schemers
12 Fire
13 Obituary For A Champion
14 Lamb To The Slaughter
16 A Case of Larceny
17 Slope of Death
18 Mighty Warrior
20 Killian's Cut
22 The Safe Way
23 Flash in the Sky
24 Single or Double Indemnity
26 The Bite
29 Time To Kill
30 The Dashing Major
31 Legs 50,000 Each
32 Case of George Peterson
33 Green for Danger
34 The Hands of Adrian
35 Back of Beyond
37 Carnival Case
38 Knight of the Road

This is my tribute to the final crime series by Danzigers. It's my favourite, mostly because the stars John Ireland and Robert Ayres obviously hit it off well together. 39 films were made about the cases of Eastern Insurance investigator John Hunter and his claims manager Walter Allen. Shooting commenced in May 1960. Among the first six episodes to be shot were #21 Murder Fugue, #25 Affairs of the Heart, and #31.
But sadly, although ATV bought it up, it was never given any network time and so didn't receive the attention it deserved. The series hasn't been screened on any UK TV station since the enterprising Channel TV (who had to transmit in black and white until 1976) showed the series long after everyone else had ditched it! This shot shows John Ireland doing the latest dance craze in #26.

The external shots of the Eastern Insurance office were taken outside number 3 Belgravia Square London.
Apart from the stars, the only semi regular was Ann Hanslip as the Eastern secretary. She is variously called Ann, and Miss Jones. Numerous Yard police inspectors are featured, including Colin Tapley, Reginald Marsh, Valentine Dyall, Jack Melford and John Stuart. Hunter's car is a 1960 Vauxhall Vanguard 38SMC
Best story: I like #4 Man with the Ticking Head. In #31 Legs 50,000 Each, the stars are at their witty best.
Worst: #35 Back of Beyond is very slight

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The Fine Print
Mary Logan (Jill Melford) asks old friend John Hunter to help. Her late father had taken out a policy with the Cranston Insurance Company, but they are refusing to pay up. The crux is whether a salesman's verbal assurances are worth anything. As it is, she's been told the fine print of the policy contained a clause stating a ten year period has to elapse for the policy to be valid.
Now we meet the Cranston salesman, Simmons, with another client, a dear old lady Mrs Agnes Little (Nora Nicholson). She's assured her relatives will receive ten thousand pounds immediately, in the event of her death. But she seems worried over the policy, even though no medical is required. Amazingly she draws a gun and tries some blackmail. While Simmons denies actually ever saying 10,000 would be payable in any circumstance, she threatens to tell the police he broke into her house! A "cut" is what she wants. "You don't have to wear trousers and shave in order to be interested in making money," she tells him. She offers to introduce Simmons to some of her aged friends. His solution? He kills her. He panics, quickly exiting the home, but Cranston, his boss, orders him to go back and clean any fingerprints and destroy the policy.
George Thomas was Mrs Little's brother. He now lives in an old people's home in Farnham. He admits he had recently argued with Agnes over her insurance policy. He informs the police inspector (Jack Melford- Hunter calls him 'Jack') she had been in prison twice for robbery and blackmail.
John Hunter is called in. Cranston is interviewed. of course he denies any knowledge of Mrs Little. So George is persuaded to "act a little scene." He contacts Simmons over arranging a life insurance. He gets verbal confirmation that no medical is required. Listening in are John Hunter and the inspector. Simmons is arrested. And as he's found to have Agnes' pen on his person, he's up for killing her too.
Note- Robert Ayres not in this story. Uncredited speaking extra: A uniformed policeman. Simmons' Ford Consul is 483XMX
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Intent to Defraud
Temperamental leading playwright Eugene Calder has just died of a seizure, aged 56. His wife Mary (Heather Chasen) claims his 25,000 life insurance.
John Hunter probes into the writer's background and learns of his extra marital romance with actress Mrs Vivienne Charles. Was Eugene going to divorce his wife to marry Vivienne and how much of the affair did her husband Randolph (Philip Latham) know about it all? But Mary tells Hunter that she wouldn't agree to any divorce. However she's unwell herself. Although noone yet knows, she is going to die within the next six months. Also living with Mary is her brother Paul (Ralph Michael), a daydreamer who grows roses.
Mary's son Peter Calder had died a few months previously. Having gone of the rails in France he had committed suicide.
John Hunter calls on Vivienne, who tells him that she had put all her money into his latest play Autumn Harvest: "my husband was furious." Oddly, she had taped their quarrels in which he boasts he could commit the old perfect crime. But he claims it was only an audition tape for the part he was hoping to get in the play.
An autopsy shows that death was actually caused by poisoning. Randolph confesses to the murder. Hunter believes it is a publicity stunt.
A quick trip to Paris clears up the cause of Peter Calder's death. He died of poisoning too. The real murderer is forced into a confession.
Footnote- A good example of the style of John Roeburt's script. They're talking about varieties of rose bushes-
John Hunter: "How do you go about getting a Brigitte Bardot?"
Reply from expert rose grower: "Brigitte Bardot? The name is unfamiliar."
Hunter: "It's a new species. Bedroom variety. Or haven't you been to the movies lately?"
Uncredited on film speaking extras: 1 Vivienne (Jan Holden). 2 A police constable in the inspector's office

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The Weasel
On the eve of a top fashion show, Madame Orlette's spring collection is destroyed by fire. She accuses her jealous rivals of sabotage.
But is her fashion house still a class act? John Hunter questions the rivals, and Joe Petrie claims Madame Orlette was in debt. Hunter's ex girl friend Jane Robbins reveals Orlette is a past number. Only her model Mona, who has been with her for years, is any good, and she is extraordinarily loyal to the firm.
Hunter talks to this "beautiful chick,"and gets a shock when he is told that she's married, surprisingly, to a "Quasimodo" handyman at Orlette's nicknamed The Weasel (Vic Wise), "you're kidding!"
Jane helps locate Mona's kid sister who says it was The Weasel who had paid for Mona's training. Mona is scared of him.
Hunter gets Jane to sketch the dresses that Mrs Wilson, Eastern Insurance's appraiser, had been shown before the policy had been approved. They are last year's designs, claims Jane. Hunter has these recreated and hides them in a cupboard. Madame Orlette is amazed and delighted to find them, but The Weasel, who owns the salon, is less pleased. He admits he burned the originals. His confession overheard, he is arrested.
Walter Allen takes a token of his appreciation to Mona, only to discover that his colleague John Hunter has beaten him to it.

Dawn Beret plays the silent model Mona. Uncredited speaking parts: 1 A forensics expert. 2 Police Inspector Richards. 3 Mrs Wilson. Ann Hanslip appears as the secretary but does not speak

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The Man with the Ticking Head

Caspar Higgins, aka Caspar the Cat (Graham Starke sic), has a most unusual alibi. He claims he can hear ticking in his head. He is suspected of the murder of Jake Fry, a jewel thief, murdered in a hotel room. His alibi is, that at the very moment the crime was being committed, he was winning the TV show 'What Worries You.' With a complaint like that, the audience vote him this week's winner! (Presumably the show had gone out 'live,' this being the era before widespread taping, which might have knocked this alibi dead!)
Caspar had been identified at an ID parade as the jewel thief by Mr Price and his wife (June Thorburn). Caspar and his accomplice had held them up in their home at gunpoint. Too late Walter Allen has discovered that the Prices were a bad risk, since they had previously made three other claims with other insurance firms, so naturally Walter's anxious to get himself off the hook. He gets John Hunter to do some probing, which includes breaking into the Price home, where the murder weapon is found.
Caspar's prints are found in the dead man's room, but his story is that he had been there, burgling the place when he overheard the "prince of jewel thieves" argue with another unseen man who murdered him. All that noise starts the ticking in his head again.
John Hunter gets Caspar to identify this other voice. The case is solved. And Caspar? He decides he's going to reform and become a "professional contestant."
A nice little fun cameo from Graham Stark.
Uncredited extras with small speaking roles: 1 Inspector Jack Wilson's assistant. 2 the hotel manager (Richard Bebb). 3 The tv producer. 4 A policeman in Wilson's office
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The Authentic McCoy
Old Henry McCoy's body is found in his cheap lodgings, dead from natural causes. His will leaves only 10 plus some private papers. But also he had taken out an insurance policy for 50,000 in the more prosperous 1920s, and had fully paid up in 1929 so Eastern Insurance will have to pay up. But who to? His executor Joseph Hardy (Ralph Michael) is charged with locating the benficiary, David McCoy, current whereabouts unknown.
In fact John Hunter is besieged by claimants, all hopeful of getting the fortune. Another crook (Neil Hallett) approaches Hardy, for he really is named David McCoy, coincidentally, even if he is not the genuine McCoy. The pair cook up a swindle.
Another who tells John Hunter that he is David, is a sailor (Bill Nagy) who has photos of himself with his dad years ago. He'd argued with his father and left home. He shows the photo to his landlady, who takes the photo to show Hardy, hoping for a reward. He brushes her off, for he has found his own treasure hunter. Hardy shows Hunter his manufactured evidence. It seems convincing, all that is needed is a birth certificate.
The real McCoy, the sailor, bursts into Walter Allen's office at Eastern Insurance and is surprised to learn the claim is all but settled. The pair end in a punch up, McCoy being taken away by police.
'Ingemar' is the nickname the fight earns Walter from his colleague John Hunter. The latter goes to McCoy's cell to question him. McCoy explains the reason why he'd fallen out with his dad, over a marriage. Those snapshots he has are interesting, but not convincing enough. But McCoy explains why he cannot produce any proof of his birth.
That discussion makes Hunter convinced Hardy is part of a swindle. Thus when Hardy arrives with his forged certificate he is arrested, and Hunter explains why.
In prison, Hunter takes his cheque to the sailor, who is happily set free.
Uncredited speaking extras: 1 A policeman. 2 An inspector. Cars: XYL412. Police car is UUV133. Taxi RGF579.
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The Legacy (1960)
George Connell (Richard Caldicot) is a gentle confidence trickster, working in league with his friend Tim Finch (Peter Butterworth). But he's very unwell, and living with his devoted nephew Jack (Francis Matthews), a penniless chemistry student, and Jack's wife Ella (Ann Lynn). They know nothing of his swindles.
Because he knows he is going to die, George devises a way of repaying all Jack's kindness. He has saved no money, so arranges with Tim to take his place at an insurance medical. Dr Erikson (Peter Howell) declares him fit, and insurance to the value of 10,000 is taken on George's life. Soon after, Ella finds George dead in bed. "Mighty coincidence."
John Hunter picks up a discrepancy between the height of the man who passed the medical, and George Connell. The fraud looks clear cut, so Walter Allen and John Hunter consult Scotland Yard. Connell's shady past as a conman is uncovered, plus the name of his accomplice, Tim Finch.
Jack and Ella are amazed, shocked even and utterly disbelieving, when Walter Allen tells them about Uncle George. John Hunter tracks down Tim in a pub but can't get him to talk. Later however, after he has done some thinking he gets back to the Insurance Company...
After a few drinks, Tim pops round to Jack's home and takes a watch his friend had promised him. He also takes one bottle to John Hunter, a bottle that contains a drug known to feign heart attacks. As Jack is studying chemistry, it is he whom Tim accuses of murdering his uncle. Surprisingly he's right and Jack and his wife are arrested in this rather neat twist.

Uncredited speaking parts: the doctor (Arnold Bell). The Eastern agent Sims. Dr Erikson's nurse. Barney the inspector's assistant. A barman. A uniformed police inspector
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For the Price of Two
Rosemary Dorken has a dual role, as Laura Desmond, professional society photographer, and her wild twin sister Jane. At the beginning she's at her room in Worth Square, arguing with her twin sister Jane, who is "dressed to kill," storming out of the building. Jane grabs a taxi, and is next seen floating in a lake, strangled.
The police inspector (Reginald Marsh) investigates, though Eastern Insurance are also interested since both twins were insured for 25,000, double indemnity. First job, find the shadowy boyfriend Jane was planning to meet. John Hunter's the man to find out, "what's wrong with beatniks?" he asks his boss Walter Allen, "I used to be one."
Laura tells of her childhood to Walter and admits she and her sister often had violent arguments. Jane had been thrown out of her Chelsea flat for making too much "racket." Laura had paid Jane's rent.
In Markham Square, John Hunter pops into the disreputable 14 Club where Jane hung out. When he asks about her, the barman knocks him out. When he comes round, there's an apology, it was a misunderstanding. He is not from Lady Gavlon, whose son Richard is engaged to Laura.
At Somerset House, Hunter checks out "a curious thing," the birth certificates of the twins. In a neat twist, which I won't spoil, he solves the murder

(Jane's taxi is VLK132. Her address is seen as 43 Worth Square. The 14 Club is in Markham Square, which is off the King's Road.
Uncredited speaking extras: 1 Jane's landlady. 2 Barman at 14 Club (John Bennett). 3 Girl in the club. 4 Dolly (Gwendolyn Watts), 5 Richard Gavlon, Laura's fiance. 6 Monica, Laura's model. 7 Inspector's assistant. Ann Hanslip also appears, non speaking, in her usual role as Walter's secretary
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THE MAN WHO WOULDN'T BE PAID

At Brixton and Son auctioneers, a rare Guthenberg Bible is knocked down for 1,000 to a white haired gentleman, Ben Clarke (Ian Fleming). It is actually worth more like 20,000, as Clarke's chief rival, a dealer called Miller knows only too well.
Ben enjoys spending much of his fortune on old books, but his niece Alice (Wendy Williams) and especially her husband Henry have "got to find a way" of stopping the eighty year old spending all his money before he dies. Ben has been upset by Miller who tells him his Bible is only a fake
So Alice and Henry take Uncle Ben for a fortnight's holiday to Brighton. Although he has carefully locked the bible in his safe, on their return they have to phone the police. Inspector Benson (Reginald Marsh) takes up the case of the theft of the bible.
But Ben has taken it very badly, he looks a sad and broken man.
"Pretty straightforward," decides Walter Allen of Eastern Insurance, and he takes the insurance cheque to Ben Clarke. His surprising response is to tear the cheque up! "Plain crazy," Walter tells John Hunter when he returns to his office. Ben must be scared of something. John Hunter is sent to find out what. The auctioneer, very sorry he failed to spot such a valuable item, sends Hunter to meet Clarke's main rival, Miller. This dealer thinks the theft is very funny. But why? "Get Clarke to tell you," is all he can say.
Now Henry and Alice take their chance. They get their uncle declared senile, for tearing up the cheque. They starte sellintg many of his old books, making the powerless Ben very angry his collection is being sold to Miller. So Ben goes to Eastern Insurance to tell the whole story.
"Why did you refuse payment?" is the key question he's asked. It's because he was told the bible is a forgery, not worth a fortune at all. But there's one more surprise, for Henry, when selling out to Miller, also offers him that bible. Miller however calls in the police, and Henry is caught red handed with the bible. And Miller provides one further laugh- he'd been lying, that bible is genuine after all!

Nice little tale, notable for the typical sympathetic part played by Ian Fleming as the old man.
Taxis: Walter uses TLR161 and later VXX669. Uncredited speaking extras: 1 Benson's sergeant. 2 Miller's charlady. 3 Miss Jones the eastern secretary (Ann Hanslip)

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The Schemers

Dr Ulrich has gone missing on a cargo ship, a steward says he had seen him stargazing, then later heard a scream from the direction where he had been.
Eva (Margot Vanderburgh) is suing a film company for half a million. John Hunter finds her at The Flamingo Club, living with actress/singer Bertha (Kitty Bluett), learning that Tower Productions had made a film which although fictional, bore a striking resemblance to her life story. She had been orphaned, but the film made libellous, according to her, statements about her royal family history.
Walter Allen checks with the ship's captain (Robert Raglan) and learns that Ulrich was old and short sighted. He had been Eva's mother's physician and was gonig to testify in her favour. Eva's lawyer Alastair Barlow believes Eva is "a born loser," and without Ulrich appearing in court, her case will be difficult to prove, although he does have Ulrich's written testimony.
Walter Allen interviews an odd man who traces ancestry, without learning anything. It's an odd scene with the man sweeping the floor the whole scene, Walter continually getting in his way. No doubt a time filler.
Another passenger is unaccoutned for on the ship, one Dolly Powers. She had provided a false address, but the steward is able to describe her. She wore a lot of makeup. A photofit is made of this Dolly by Yard man Heller. Handwriting analysis of Ulrich's testimony reveals it was written by a young hand, probably a woman's.
Having checked Eva's scrapbook, Hunter gets the steward to identify 'Dolly' who had been in disguise, and the scheme is exposed

Police cars seen are 894FPC and UUV133.
Uncredited speaking extras: 1 Sandy the steward (Larry Noble). 2 The owner of the ancestry tracing service. 3 Barlow. 4 Heller (who, from what is said, is in at least one other story).
Uncredited non speaking parts: The inspector (Colin Tapley). Eastern Insurance secretary (Ann Hanslip) whom Hunter variously addresses as "Sunshine" and "Ann"

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Fire (1961)
A familiar Danziger theme, why even the title is repeated from an earlier Saber of London episode!
This Brian Clemens story starts with us riding on board a fire engine, with no background music or commentary. It is attending the third warehouse fire in the London Borough of Stepney. The arsonist's method is to start the fire with a lighted candle, using woodshavings and gasolene to ensure the fire spreads quickly.
John Hunter's only answer to the problem is Wait for Another Fire. Walter Allen his boss ain't impressed! However John's wish is soon granted- "quite a fire," he remarks to a bystander as they admire the latest conflagration. Watching is Sammy Peters (Peter Elliott in a good character role), who "loves to watch them burning." As he is holding a box of matches, the least suspicious mind might be on the alert! It turns out he has had nine convictions for arson between 1947 and 1953. But this rather pathetic figure maintains he is innocent, he'd only come to watch this fire. "You'll have to do better than that, Sammy," argues Inspector Martin (Reginald Marsh) as he arrests him.
But John wants to believe Sammy. For one thing the method of starting the fires with a candle isn't Sammy's style. Yet another fire sees boss Walter even more distraught, either because this proves Sammy is innocent, or because he might have to pay out yet again. Whatever the case, the picture of Eastern Insurance's founder falls off the wall when the news breaks.
"There's more to this than the work of a pyromaniac," comments John Hunter. Checking on the files of the fires he notes all warehouses had smashed windows, except that at Burnham and Hamilton's. Was it an inside job there?
"The trouble with Sammy is that he's been guilty so often, that now he's clean, he wants to make the most of being persecuted." We watch him after being released, call on Verney, the accountant at Burnham's. He knows Verney has done it to cover up his cooking the books. He patiently explains to the accountant how a proper fireraiser would have started the fires.
Eastern Insurance arranges an inspection of Burnham's second factory, which has so far escaped the attentions of the firebug. Only just in time, as the candle has already been lit to torch the place! The surprising arsonist is caught, and the truth finally comes out. Case solved. Walter looks relieved and gets a fag out. "Got a match?" he asks John. Calmly John strolls over to use the still lighted candle.

Uncredited speaking roles: A woman at the first blaze. Mrs Burnham. Verney. His secretary. A prison officer

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Obituary for a Champion

"Boxing idol" Kirk Carter is found drowned by the side of a lake. He had been preparing for his forthcoming bout against a South American challenger. Fight promoter Quinlan (Howard Marion-Crawford) had taken out 50,000 insurance against any cancellation.
No indication of fraud, but as a fan, John Hunter attends the funeral where he meets Kirk's grieving ex-fiancee Verna Matthews (Jennifer Jayne) with whom Carter had recently split up. Why, she still doesn't comprehend. Yet Carter's manager Sam Harvey (Kenneth J Warren) claims she was "poison" to the boxer.
Quinlan appears above board since he stands to lose on the deal. But is the fact that Carter was about to undergo his pre-match medical significant at all? Surely not, as Quinlan says he was in tip-top condition.
Hunter gets to the bottom of why Carter had broken off his engagement to Verna. He kept talking of death, she says, and suggests Lily (Olive Sloane) Carter's loyal ex-housekeeper might know more. She'd been sacked by Harvey and when Hunter visits her in her home at 37 Cumberland Street the reason is evident. She's on the bottle. However a closer inspection shows she's also been worked over recently and is now far too scared to talk.
While Kirk Carter's country retreat is being sold off (an agent's board is from Uxbridge), a return visit to the "slobbering alcoholic" gets her to admit Carter had been ill. But she is able to reveal no more since Hunter is knocked unconscious and when he awakens the sad woman is lying on her bed smothered to death.
Hunter calls on Carter's doctor, Dr E Henshaw, but he's now only another dead body, shot to death. The killer is searching through the medical records when Hunter interrupts him, a large stick in his hand, and he promptly phones for Inspector Max Davies, who does not appear in this story, though he does appear a several others.
Fraud is established. Case closed.

Uncredited extras who appear but do not speak: 1 Ann Hanslip as the secretary. 2 Dr Henshaw.
Hunter is seen alighting from taxi SXA37 at the start, but later drives his usual car

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Lamb to the Slaughter

Peter Reynolds is typecast a villain Gene Walker. He hires burglar Rudy Lamb to steal his wife Helen's valuable jewellery while the two of them are out at a show. At 10pm Rudy breaks in, then at 10.30 Gene returns with Helen as planned. But though what follows is what Gene has planned, it's not good news for Lamb, as he is shot along with Mrs Walker.
John Hunter is relaxing at home to a 78rpm record when he's summoned. Gene's story is that they had come home to interrupt a burglar, and his wife for some reason had attempted to grab the burglar's gun. Gene rushed for his own gun in his desk and shot the burglar.
At the County Morgue the burglar's seductive widow Gertrude (Sandra Dorne) identifies her late husband. She phones Walker, who has put his feet up at home, to say her husband had told her all about "the deal" so she knows he has been framed. Walker has to agree to meet her. Come round, he suggests. But she insists they meet in a hotel lobby "where there are plenty of people."
At the Bayswater Hotel she explains her husband had promised her "a hatful of jewellery." She knows what Walker has been up to. Walker does some smooth talking himself in a sparkling scene superbly enacted by two veterans of such B film dialogue. He makes some suggestions like they "both need companionship," while she realises "being without a person of the opposite sex can be pretty dismal." 25,000 Double Indemnity will come in handy for the pair of them!
They plan to go away together, but Walker follows her home to Ashton Court, and there he strangles her.
Hunter does a spot of breaking and entering himself at Gene Walker's, entering via the library window. A bullet hole in Walker's overcoat is a dead giveaway. Now how come Inspector Davis missed that clue? He discusses with our man at the Yard how to get enough evidence to convict Walker. It's the old entrapment method. He pretends Mrs Lamb had phoned him on her deathbed, accusing Gene of the deed. Walker gives himself away by saying she had been strangled, though how could he have known this? Waiting in the wings is the inspector, waiting to escort Gene off to jail.

Notes- No Robert Ayres, despite the screen credit, in this story. Uncredited speaking extras: Rudy (Sam Kydd), a police constable with the inspector. A plain clothes man at the crime scene. An assistant of the inspector in his office. Several times the inspector is addressed as Inspector Davis, though in the credits he is named Inspector Barry

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A Case of Larceny

A lightning fast robbery of the cash till at the shop of old Dave Russel. The two crooks, Bill (Sean Kelly) and Ralph Nixon (John Bennett) divide the loot, but Ralph then returns to the shop, as he realises Russel had recognised him despite his mask.
Russel has phoned his old pal Walter Allen at Eastern Insurance about the robbery and that he had recognised Ralph. But when Walter gets to the shop with Inspector Hawk (Colin Tapley), Russel has been strangled.
Bill knows nothing of such a dreadful crime and kindly hands the proceeds, all 45, to his pregnant wife Ethel (Sally Bazely). They are interrupted by Ralph Nixon who privately informs Bill of the murder. Bill advises him to lie low in a local hotel. He then returns to his work at a garage though Ethel is sure he is involved in the crime. He does confess to her and she orders him to tell the police. Reluctantly, Bill agrees to confide in Walter Allen who does nearly all the legwork on this case.
Once Walter is in the picture, he makes for Nixon's hotel. But Ralph Nixon isn't there for he has gone back to see Bill, but Ethel stupidly tells him she knows all about it. She's taken as hostage, leaving a note for Bill warning him to lay off, and in pouring rain, the two return to the now empty garage.
John Hunter makes a belated appearance to guard Bill, but when Bill reads the note, he dashes to the garage for a showdown with his former partner. Hunter watches idly by as Ralph gets what he deserves, then promises to put a good word in for Bill to the police

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Slope of Death

Some lively Bill le Sage jazz music starts us off as we watch skiers in action. On 'The Pancake' Joy Allington "is terrified" according to her husband Philip. "But she'd rather die than show Gregg," adds Molly. Skiing instructor Gregg Stewart (Maurice Kaufmann) is the latest "harmless flirtation of Joy's," while Molly is Philip's secretary, but obviously more than that for they are kissing, just waiting for his divorce from Joy. Off skis Joy, she is indeed scared. "My skis are loose!" she screams as she speeds downhill and into a tree.
At Eastern Insurance, John Hunter is arriving for work with a kiss for the secretary and a cup of coffee for Aloysius, one pet name for Walter his boss. He has received a letter from the seriously injured Joy accusing her husband of attempted murder. Walter goes to confront Philip Allington, owner of Allington Chocolate Manufacturing Company. He arrives in time to spot him kissing his secretary.
Gregg needs to be located: he can be found in some beatnik joint in Soho, so Hunter and Allen tour all such clubs until they find the right one. While Walter discusses the case with Gregg, John gets distracted and chats up one of the attractive clientele, Rose. Gregg believes Philip tampered with one of the skis. Why? Gregg alleges divorce was one reason, and he also thinks Allington is a smuggler, smuggling diamonds in his chocs. John is sent off to interview Joy, while Walter finds time to jive entertainingly with another young customer, "crazy man!"
Joy has died, so with Inspector Hook (Colin Tapley) they all go to confront Philip with Gregg Stewart's story. Philip reveals his wife could not possibly have written any letter accusing him as both her hands were severely injured. To make sure he's telling the truth, an enjoyable time is had by all sampling the chocs, which are indeed chocs and not stuffed with diamonds.
Off to London Airport Central where Gregg is flying out to Switzerland. Some diamonds are discovered hidden in one of the skis, which leads to the final pun, "looks like Stewart's done with she-ing!"
Performed with some fun by the stars. Peter Williams as Mr Allington gives some sobriety and integrity to a slight but enjoyable story.

At the start, Hunter is seen alighting from taxi SXA37, a shot used in other stories. Police car is KXR761. Uncredited speaking extras: 1 Eastern secretary (Ann Hanslip): "good morning." 2 Rose at the club. 3 An office messenger at the club. 4 An airport policeman

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Mighty Warrior
A champion horse falls in a steeplechase and has to be destroyed, leaving Eastern Insurance facing a payout of 20,000 to his owners Jefford (Ballard Berkely) and O'Shea.
Stablehand Dooley affirms Mighty Warrior was a top horse, but Hunter becomes suspicious when he learns a temporary trainer, Miss Betty Fuller, accompanied the horse on the journey up north for the race.
She seems to have disappeared. Watching a film of the race, Hunter is convinced Johnny Vincent the jockey has thrown the race, even though he denies it. Dooley tells Hunter that Vincent had not obeyed orders, by pushing the horse unnecessarily hard early on in the race.
Walter Allen has tracked Betty down, and calls at her room, to find her packing. She is obviously scared, refusing to answer questions.
The police are called in and an inspector (Reginald Marsh), with John Hunter and Walter Allen, tail Jefford. He is planning to fly Mighty Warrior, who is not dead after all, to Ireland. The inspector finds Mighty Warrior, and arrests the gang of villains carting them away in his police car. There's no room for Hunter and Allen who have to make it home on the back of Mighty Warrior.

One typical joke, as John Hunter informs Walter he has been to the cinema to see the film of the race. Walter: Did you want to watch Marilyn Monroe? Hunter: She wasn't running.
Hunter drives his 38 SMC. Taxis used are RYK445 and Walter uses YJJ427. Uncredited speaking roles: 1 The race commentator. 2 A barman. 3 and 4 Two heavies. 5 Betty. 6 Clerk at airport. The Eastern secretary is not seen in this, despite the credits

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Killian's Cut
Two masked men are robbing a jewellery store, Mack (Raymond Young) and Arthur (Larry Noble). They are interrupted by a new employee Killian (Peter Howell).
John Hunter is in the office practising his golf swing when the call comes through about the robbery. Walter Allen takes the helm... at the golf, while John walks to the store. Here a police inspector is questioning the employees. But Killian says he cannot identify the thieves.
Mack knows he was recognised and knows what's coming. Killian has told his girl friend Milly that he is expecting his "cut" and phones Mack telling him to come to Milly's flat. Killian demands 25,000 but on learning that the crooks are likely to make less than 10,000, he moderates his demand to 5,000. It matters little for Mack shoots him dead.
Hunter has returned to the office to see his boss tidying up some smashed ornaments, victims of his errant golfing prowess. News of the murder takes them to Milly's flat, no sign of the police!
Mary (Ann Lynn) is used as "live bait," since Walter works out that the robbers are bound to need to find out how much Milly knows. Mary, posing as Milly, feeds Mack some story about her hiding Killian's body because she doesn't want police involved. Eventually he falls for her story, and admits he is the jewel robber, but when Art shows up, he sees through her and knows she is a copper. She is about to be shot when John Hunter, listening in, prevents another killing.
Uncredited speaking extras: 1 the inspector's assistant. 2 Harry an employee at the store. 3 Another older employee. Uncredited non speaking role: Walter's secretary who helps tidy up the office (not the usual Ann Hanslip)

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The Safe Way

Opening scene- a gloved hand helps itself to 5,000 from a safe.
While Inspector Martin questions the owner Robert Filow (John Carson), Eastern Insurance is facing a huge bill, for this is the latest robbery from this type of safe. Filow tells Walter Allen he'd been recommended the March Double Action Safe by his brother. A connection is spotted between the crimes- for all the safe owners are related.
The brother, Hugh, in Manchester, questioned by John Hunter, admits recommending this type of safe. The reason? By introducing six customers, he had his own safe installed for free! Hunter decides that he cannot be behind the robberies.
So he calls on the March Safe Engineering Manufacturing Company, and learns that Tom Stacey (Peter Vaughan) had overseen the installations, and his boss believes he is completely trustworthy. The now retired Stacey is aggressive when Hunter questions him, warning that he was not the only person in the company who could find out the safe combination numbers. But Hunter notices he lives in a rather nice house, "nice car you have too."
Another employee who worked on the safes was Martin Stafford. He has now emigrated to Canada.
One other possible employee is Bart Tompson, now retired, but when Walter Allen visits his home, his wife explains her husband had recently died.
The case is reaching a dead end when Walter Allen receives an anonymous threat addressed to "Walter Aloysius Allen." This gives him a lead, as his business card, which contains this, his full name, he has only handed out recently to Mrs Tompson. So police set up a watch on Mrs Tompson and on the only other March safe installed recently as a result of Hugh's introduction. Day Four of the stakeout and Mrs Tompson leaves her house for a phone box. At the office, Tompson is observed breaking in, and opening the safe without any difficulty. Enter Inspector Martin to effect the arrest.
Final scene is John Hunter teasing poor Walter about that middle name.... Aloysius!

Cars: 38 SMC: John Hunter. Walter's taxi: VXX669. Hunter's taxi: LYL914. Police car: UUV133. Uncredited speaking extras: 1 Inspector Martin (Reginald Marsh). 2 Marsh. 3 Mrs Tompson (Patsy Smart) 4 Mrs Stacey. Non speaking extra: Ann Hanslip as secretary. The external scenes outside Stacey's house must have been filmed in early autumn 1960 as a few leaves are falling

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Single or Double Indemnity

Engine driver Leon Little is killed when his train is derailed. He was insured with Eastern Insurance and Mrs Little claims Double Indemnity since death was accidental.
John Hunter inspects the scene with Inspector Stevens, and Supt Potter of the Railway Police. Angle bars on a rail had been removed proving that this was a deliberate derailment. Hunter finds a bag hidden on the embankment with the name Stark.
From Mrs Little, Hunter learns that Harry Curtis had a grudge against Little. Nine years previously, Curtis had been a railway guard, but was demoted to track walker, when Little claimed he had been being drunk on duty. When Harry hears that Hunter has been talking to her, he goes and threatens her.
Hunter returns the bag to the owner Paul Stark, who has an alibi for the time the sabotage had taken place. In turn, he goes to threaten Curtis. Another prowler comes to Mrs Little's home, and she winds up in hospital. For this Curtis is arrested, though he claims he is innocent.
The Yard's main suspect is Joseph Costa, who has a history of wrecking trains. But he cannot be traced. However it turns out his new name is Stark. We see him attacking Curtis with a gun, but police swoop in time to prevent murder.
For once Eastern Insurance does have to pay out, to Mrs Little, in this unsubtle time filler of a tale.

Uncredited speaking extra: the policeman in the inspector's office. Police cars include 894FPC

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The Bite
Alice Jordan (Jill Ireland) is to be widowed, with the connivance of her husband Tom. He is going to seem to kill himself by drunkenly driving far too fast, though in fact, it won't be his body in the car. Then he will disappear, she follow later.
In a club, Tom dances with Fern Malone, an ex-flame, he gets drunk and abusive and stages a row with his wife. He drives home to Brighton alone, but never gets there. The body in his car is burnt beyond recognition. Alice is set to inherit insurance to the tune of 50,000.
Walter Allen visits the advertising agency where Tom worked, and a friend and employee Jimmy Taylor gives him some useful data on the dead man.
John Hunter's task is to interview the widow, a very pleasant task. He asks her if she is positive the corpse is Tom's. She identified him by the possessions found on the body.
Hunter also talks to Jane, a friend of the family. She had given Alice a lift home from the party.
Walter's theory owes a lot to a movie he has seen, at least acording to John Hunter, who has faith in Alice, and is thus given the job of staking Alice out. It must be admitted that she is exhibiting surprisingly little grief.
Walter finds the evidence to back up his theory, in the shape of a missing sailor, who is likely the corpse. The case is solved not very obviously.

Hunter drives 38 SMC. Walter takes a taxi VXX669. Uncredited speaking extras: 1 George a barman (Ian Wilson). 2 Dennis Cunningham a guest at the party. 3 Another barman. 4 Jimmy a daughtsman at Bruton Advertising Limited (Clive Dunn). He enjoys one scene being interviewed by Walter Allen. 5 A janitor at Jordan's flat. 6 Ann, the Eastern secretary in two very brief scenes. 7 A doctor. 8 Fenton an Eastern agent. 9 Kovacs at the Missing Persons Bureau
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Flash in the Sky
An interesting assemblage of actors on that downward career ladder, including Hy Hazell, as Jane, once a star of British B films, Mary Kenton playing Mrs. Burns who five years previously had starred in a number of tv shorts, and Humphrey Lestocq as Grimes, former shining star of BBC children's telly.

Packing her suitcases to visit her sister in New York is the garrulous Mary Burns. Her dutiful husband Philip (William Fox) thoughtfully purchases her travel insurance, "goodbye dear."
Then the bad news. A radio newsreader announces her flight has crashed into the sea.
Tthere's nothing to investigate, as none of the 56 passengers survived and the wreckage has not been found. But insurance agent Grimes and Police Inspector Hook (Colin Tapley) introduce Eastern Insurance agents Walter Allen and John Hunter to the captain of a passing ship (Steve Plytas) who though badly injured is now able to recount the "sudden flash" he saw, a disintegrating plane plunging to the sea below. Clearly a bomb, but without evidence how to prove it?
All the next-of-kin are visited. Walter Allen meets Philip Burns' landlady, who sourly comments that Mr Burns seems hardly grief stricken. He's a lady's man, she says, and a civil engineer working for Zenith Highway Construction, currently building a new tunnel, "the Kent by-pass" (is this an early version of the Channel Tunnel?). Circumstantial evidence is a little stronger when it comes out that some dynamite went missing recently at the site. But it's nothing like proof! What's needed is a "personal confession."
So a good old fashioned entrapment is planned. There's a new maid cleaning Mr Burns' home, "a pretty one at that!" Jane is soon being invited to dinner. A friendship develops and soon there's some kissing. He tells her of a recent windfall. The critical moment is finally reached. Jane confesses she's already married to a globetrotting husband, who's returned home "suspicious." Jane's key line follows, "I wish he were dead." Philip tells her not to worry and suggests she buys a suitcase exactly like the one he usually travels with. "All our troubles will be over."
But it's the career of Mr Burns that's over. After nicking some more explosives, he prepares his bomb and the case swap is made at the airport. The aptly named Inspector Hook swoops.

John Hunter drives 38 SMC as usual. Burns' car is 7312 AR. Uncredited speaking roles: 1 The landlady. 2 A worker at Zenith

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Time to Kill

Body washed up on a river bank at Littlebourne. Name of George Barker. Local police inspector Anderson (Peter Butterworth) wants a bit of glory himself, so doesn't call in Scotland Yard. The man was insured with Eastern Insurance, so John Hunter is invited to help, though his role is very much to watch, and admire the local police at work. It pans out pleasingly in this Brian Clemens story.
The beneficiary of Barker's 35,000 insurance had been his business partner Charles, but recently the policy had been altered in favour of a pretty young lady whom he'd met in a local hotel. She goes under numerous aliases, as Alva Martinez she's chatting up another middle aged man, one Albert Pine, in another hotel. She works in conjunction with her husband Ferba. She lures Albert to a lonely road where Ferba knocks Pine out and robs him.
He's not dead, but police don't reveal that to the press, instead they wait to pounce. Ferba's next victim is already lined up, retired Yorkshire mill owner Harold Marsh. She tells him she'd like to take him to meet her family. Innocently, he is driven away by her to his fate.
But police are tipped off that a woman fitting the conwoman's description is at the hotel. She has just driven off in a Vanguard with Marsh. John Hunter ought to be suspicious for it is the very car, 38 SMC, that he usually drives in this series! With Marsh's demise imminent in an isolated house, police swoop resulting in a satisfactory end to Inspector Anderson's case.

Note: I don't think the conwoman was identified in the screen credits

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The Dashing Major
A most interesting one-off story. "Old Ironhead," boss Walter Allen that is, is away at St Andrews, we are told, for the golf, so John Hunter is left in charge at the office. We only see him for one scene near the start and at the end when Walter returns. All the footwork for Eastern Insurance is done by another Eastern employee, Bob Keen.

Speedway Airways Flight 704 to Tangiers. Major Henry Randolph (Ralph Truman) is a late booking, he takes out a travel insurance policy with Eastern Insurance before he boards the plane. A spiv, Jim Bates, stops him, demanding the money he's owed. The major promises to send him it. But he can't for his plane crashes into the sea. He's the only person not to survive, he's presumed drowned.
Mabel his sister (Joan Newell) is not consoled by a tactless vicar (Robert Dorning) who puts it down to God's Will, though as the major had caused her nothing but grief, maybe it was for the best. Consolation comes in the form of the 10,000 worth of insurance the major had taken out, but even that seems closed to her when the major quietly returns home, admitting he had never caught the plane. She angrily kicks him out, but says nothing about his return.
Bob Keen investigates the claim when Jim Bates tips off Eastern Insurance that he had seen the major at the airport after the flight had departed. Jim also tips off Duncan (Willoughby Goddard) to whom the major owed gambling debts.
Mabel is certainly flustered when Keen questions her, and reminds her of her brother's criminal record for embezzlement. More surprising is that Mabel is employing a bodyguard, Willie (Howard Lang), though we soon find out that he is only there on Duncan's behalf to collect what is owed.
Some detective work leads Bob to the elusive Jim and the squeeze is on.
"Ridiculous, you're dead," cries the poor vicar, who'd just put the finishing touches to the major's memorial service. It's a fun scene with the major retorting, "don't you believe in the power of prayer?" He demands sanctuary in the church.
Duncan is putting his own pressure on the unfortunate Mabel as Bob comes back with more questions. But spotting Willie leaving, he follows him. Mabel has admitted her brother is alive, and that Willie is off to get him. In the church a gunshot. Willie is dead, the major also.
Case 3987 closed, rather abruptly to be frank, in an otherwise neat story by David Nicholl. Walter Allen returns with his clubs from St Andrews. How was it, asks John Hunter. Wet, replies Walter

Uncredited speaking extras: most notably Bob Keen played by Robert Arden. Also: 2 an airline reception clerk. 3 A lady passenger. 4 A tv newsreader. 5 A choirboy. 6 Ann the Eastern Insurance secretary. Bob Keen drives John Hunter' car. Duncan's car is 491RMP

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CASE OF GEORGE PETERSON

Friday 10am and Simpson (Kevin Stoney) is collecting his firm's 5,000 payroll from the bank as usual. He tells the cashier that he can protect himself, when he's asked if he worries about being robbed. But on this occasion Simpson disappears, along with his hire car driver, burly George Peterson. Boss Mr Jardine has one of the keys to the case with the money, and he's not too concerned as the money is insured.
A battered Simpson is found alive. He informs the inspector (John Stuart) that he had been robbed at gunpoint, the money bag cut from his wrist. He's not certain whether the man driving him was George Peterson, his regular driver, as he never saw his face.
Walter Allen orders John Hunter to investigate. He starts at the Cuthbert Car Rental Co where owner Mr Cuthbert (Robert Dorning) recounts how he likes the "thoughtless" Peterson, even though he never maintains his vehicle properly. Mrs Peterson is "worried sick" over her missing husband, admitting he had money worries.
The inspector and Walter Allen are convinced Peterson is the robber, but Hunter isn't so certain. And he seems to be justified in his opinion when Peterson's body is found shot dead, "it didn't improve the landscape." Nearby is his car, but no sign of the money.
So the inspector surmises Peterson had been killed by his accomplice- but who was that? Walter Allen locates Jim a barman (Anton Rodgers) who knew Peterson was pally with a weightlifter called Freddy Ogilvy (Michael Balfour). He works at Draper's Gym. Freddy says he had lent George some money recently and this is found hidden in his home.
"This changes things," a pleased Hunter tells the grieving wife.
The robbery is reconstructed, Simpson required to go over his story in detail. Hunter is able to spot a flaw in his account and the crook is arrested, "it's the little things people overlook that cause them the most trouble."

Police cars: NLN820, and later the more modern UUV133. Uncredited speaking parts: 1 Grove, the cashier at the bank. 2 Bellamy, chief cashier. 3 Jardine his boss (Peter Bathurst). 4 Mrs Peterson (Patsy Smart)- in two scenes

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Green For Danger
An emerald necklace belonging to Mrs. Osborne (Margaretta Scott) is stolen, the latest in a series of thefts in which fake phone calls are used to distract the victims while their jewellery is stolen.
Harry Flash (Michael Balfour) is the chief suspect, but as yet no proof can be found to convict him. As John Hunter on behalf of Eastern Insurance checks out other possible fences. Flash is getting greedy and asking for a bigger cut from his boss. As he walks across a strangely quiet Hyde Park, Harry Flash meets his demise.
It is Walter Allen who works out that the man doing well out of these robberies is Bond Street jeweller David Aker (Steve Plytas), who is selling replacements to clients who had had their property stolen. So John Hunter calls there in his best bowler and pin stripe suit. A new consignment of emeralds will be here soon, promises Aker.
Mrs Osborne is also being offered some to replace her stolen ones, but she tells Aker she is hoping Eastern Insurance will recover her originals. Then John Hunter receives a tip off, go to Speakers' Corner. The park is again mysteriously deserted as someone attempts to knife our investigator. Hunter grabs the knife but his assailant escapes despite a lengthy chase. That knife proves to be the one that killed Flash.
Back at the jewellers, Aker is preparing to make a run for it when Inspector Hook (Colin Tapley) shows up with John Hunter and Walter Allen. Although all the emeralds have by now been broken up, Hunter exposes Aker by means of an infra red lamp, which reveals invisible dust that Hunter had sprinkled around, which is now all over the guilty Aker.
Mrs Osborne never gets her jewels back, but she thanks John and Walter for the replacements, and invites them both to dinner.
Police cars: 894FPC and UUV133. Hunter drives 38SMC, he is also seen alighting from taxi SXA37 outside the Eastern office. Ann Hanslip is in the credits as the secretary, but is never seen or heard, though at one point Walter Allen does mention 'Ann'

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Legs 50,000 each

As a showbiz publicity stunt, the shapely legs of Miss Anita Faraday (Jackie Lane) are insured for 100,000 pounds. When she slips two days later, her right ankle has a hairline fracture, which means a huge payout by Eastern Insurance.
However, her potential earnings compared with this are peanuts.
From the doctor that saw her after the accident John Hunter learns that although the Xray showed a simple hairline fracture, shadows can appear making it only appear to be broken. However, in Miss F's case there was swelling, suggesting a fracture.
Dr B.G. Mills was Eastern Insurance's new doctor who had seen Miss F before the policy had been approved. He says he saw no shadow. However Hunter becomes suspicious when he learns Mills unusually took the Xrays himself, and also developed them.
So Hunter is ordered to check it out and look at just 10,000 pounds worth of Miss F. "Don't limit me dad," Hunter shouts as he rushes off to see her, "I'm going to see the whole hundred thousand." Posing as a reporter he enjoys himself asking about her career. So will the accident affect her career? In true show biz style, she responds that her only concern is her dancing.
Backstage gossip from Phil is that Miss F is finished. "You've got more of a career in Hollywood," he tells John Ireland, surely tongue-in-cheek! Dropping of her film contract is apparently imminent.
Now we see Dr Mills. He's getting cold feet. The crooks force some sleeping powder on him. Then they escort Anita off to New York. She leaves, she says, with the happiest of memories, and her 100,000 of course. But here comes Hunter at the airport! He's got his proof that Dr Mills must have faked the Xrays. I didn't want to take part in the swindle, claims the pathetic Miss F.

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The Hands of Adrian

Why has "the great Felix Adrian" (Robert Rietty) flown all the way from America to his home town of Rushmere in England to give the first in a series of violin recitals?
When his hands get stuck in the lift of the Royal Albert Hotel, his concert of "classical music made easy" has to be cancelled. Eastern Insurance will have to shell out 50,000.
"I'd rather hear Jack Benny play the fiddle," jokes John Hunter at Eastern hq. "You'd never know the difference," retorts his boss Walter Allen, who, at his wife's insistence had purchased two tickets. As Adrian's last concerts in America had been a flop, Hunter is ordered to investigate.
A sympathetic doctor (Ian Fleming) sees Adrian's problem as partly psychological, and his expert opinion is for immediate payment.
Mrs Ruth Adrian (Delphi Lawrence) is pleased, but Mr Paul the hotel manager is convinced Adrian is trying to pull a fast one, since there is too much room in the lift space for a hand to get crushed. But the doctor won't budge from his view, refusing even to permit another x-ray of Adrian's hand as it is "far too sensitive."
John Hunter has booked a hotel room with a great view of Adrian's room. Walter watches the fiddler while John chats with Mrs Adrian in the bar. But she proves too cunning for him. Though the sound of violin playing is heard, when John Hunter bursts into Felix's room, his wife claims it was she who was playing. But only we know it wasn't.
Hunter trails her when she goes shopping. She enters Rosemount Hats, and after she leaves, John Hunter talks to Mrs Dean who runs the place. She is able to reveal some vital information that seems to have been omitted from Adrian's original application for insurance, that is, his mother had been crippled with arthritis.
The Adrians are faced with their fraudulent declaration. Claim dismissed.
Back at the office John presents secretary Ann with a hat he was obliged to buy in the shop. She was going to hear Adrian's concert. "You'll have to go down to Brixton Jail," Walter quips.

Uncredited speaking extras: 1 the bellhop. 2 Mrs Dean

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The Back of Beyond
The slightest of storylines by the otherwise reliable James Eastwood.

Professor Kayle (Joseph Tomelty) has been missing seven years, so his wife Mildred wants him declared dead so she can claim the 50,000 insurance. The professor had become infamous when he had predicted the end of the world. He had asked his wife to go with him to a remote island one thousand miles from Singapore, but she had refused.
Walter Allen listens politely to her story, and promises to investigate. It so happens John Hunter is off on holiday to Switzerland today, but he winds up in the Far East!
It proves an easy enough job to find Kayle, he is on his island and refuses to leave. In fact he still believes the world will end- it will be when man lands on the moon causing it to fall to Earth and destroy it. John Hunter is stranded on the isle, while Walter Allen waits for his report- no mobiles or anything in those days. Mildred is becoming more and more impatient. Hunter builds fires to send smoke signals, but with no success,
Harry Manston (Ballard Berkeley), a top New York executive, and his wife Gail are shipwrecked and seek refuge on the isle. She gets "chummy" with John, and that brings on an argument between Manston and his young wife. She shoots him accidentally.
Rescue arrives and John reports back to Walter. To the latter's amusement, it seems Hunter's middle name is Theodore. Anyway, Theodore can finally leave for his St Moritz holiday- with Gail Manston for company

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Carnival Case
Fortune Teller Madame Orsini is reading the cards. She sees jewel thefts being perpetrated by the owner of a amusement park-cum circus (Paul Eddington). She is shot dead.
Vincent Simpson is the owner, assisted in his crimes by Tony Morgan (John Gabriel) and the exotic Zelda (Ann Lynn).
Since Eastern Insurance is forking out compensation to punters who are suffering thefts while at the amusement park, Walter Allen volunteers John Hunter to obtain work there. Since Hunter appears to have a criminal record, Simpson is happy to take him on, and Hunter, known at the circus as 'Smith,' starts work as a pitcher, pulling in the crowds to watch a boxing match. In a quiet moment, he rummages in Simpson's office, but is caught in the act. He begs Simpson not to call the cops, and promises to help in the illegal goings-on. He watches on as a lady called Dorothy has her diamond necklace and bracelet nicked, and Simpson promises that the insurance company will reimburse her, even as the stolen property lies concealed in his desk.
The show moves on, and on the boat over to Northern Ireland, Sgt Stevenson is briefed on the racket. When another theft takes place, Simpson and his gang are confronted in his office. During the operation there has been no sign of John Hunter, who turns up in disguise as a clown, to Walter Allen's surprise.
There are a lot of interesting shots filmed at an unnamed circus, with long sequences showing clowns and numerous animal acts.

Uncredited speaking parts: 1 Madame Orsini. 2 Inspector Lee (Colin Tapley). 3 An employee who shows Hunter the ropes. 4 The pitcher at the fire eaters

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Knight of the Road
The last Danziger script by Brian Clemens, plenty of incidental humour makes this a great little story.
Ken Northwood (Richard Vernon) has devised a neat insurance racket. He inspects a luxury car in a showroom, noting down its chassis number as well as the numberplate, then registers it as his own.
We first meet him at Derby Road Police Station reporting his 6,000 car as stolen in the Finchley Road. But the theft of such an expensive vehicle naturally arouses Eastern Insurance's suspicions, so Walter Allen grabs a taxi in order to interview Northwood. As the stolen vehicle has not been recovered, naturally, Ken Northwood's claim has to be met. But what turns Walter's suspicions into certainity, is when an old Korean war buddy, Tom Finch, turns up. He's in insurance too, and knows of two thefts of this same make of luxury car. This time, John Hunter takes the train down to Plymouth to check it out (stock shots of modern Plymouth), the local insurance agent believes it was a legitimate claim. However the description of the claimant certainly fits Northwood! He's now in Manchester admiring another car, with its "wonderful workmanship." While the dealer isn't looking, he makes a careful note of the chassis number.
John Hunter and Walter Allen bribe a young lad to knock on Northwood's door so they can surreptitously take his photo. This they show to various dealers, and one recognises him. Yes, he said he liked the car, but never returned to follow up his interest.
An inspector at Scotland Yard (Colin Tapley) is brought in at this point, but he seems to want more proof. (Hunter calls him Inspector Hook, though very oddly he also happened to be the inspector at the local police station. Further confusion in the credits where he's labelled as Marsden!)
John Hunter questions Northwood's neighbours. When Eastern Insurance learns Northwood has registered another car, they ask him about it, he asserting he's given it away as a wedding present. But the log book gives him away, "it was fun while it lasted"
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