SCOTLAND

YARD

1 The Drayton Case 7*
2 The Missing Man 4*
3 The Candlelight Murder 6*
4 The Blazing Caravan 8*
5 The Dark Stairway 5*
6 Late Night Final 4*
7 Fatal Journey 6*
8 The Strange Case of Blondie 7*
9 The Silent Witness 4*
10 Passenger to Tokyo 7*
11 Night Plane to Amsterdam 6*
12 The Stateless Man 3*
13 The Mysterious Bullet 2*
14 Murder Anonymous 3*
15 Wall of Death 5*
16 Case Of The River Morgue 4*
17 Destination Death 5*
18 Person Unknown 6*
19 The Lonely House 8*
20 Bullet from the Past 6*
21 Inside Information 5*
22 The Case of The Smiling Widow 6*
23 The Mail Van Murder 4*
24 The Tyburn Case 7*
25 The White Cliffs Mystery 6*
26 Night Crossing 5*
27 Print of Death 5*
28 Crime of Honour 5*
29 The Cross Road Gallows 5*
30 The Unseeing Eye 6*
31 The Ghost Train Murder 6*
32 The Dover Road Mystery 7*
33 The Last Train 5*
34 Evidence in Concrete 6*
35 The Silent Weapon 6*
36 The Grand Junction Case 5*
37 The Never Never Murder 6*
38 Wings Of Death 1*
39 The Square Mile Murder 4*
1 The Guilty Party 2*
2 A Woman's Privilege 2*
3 Moment of Decision 3*
4 Position of Trust 1*
5 The Undesirable Neighbour 2*
6 Invisible Asset 5*
7 Personal and Confidential 2*
8 Hidden Face 4*
9 Material Witness 8*
10 Company of Fools 6*
11 The Haunted Man 5*
12 Infamous Conduct 1*
13 Payment in Kind 6*

SCALES OF

JUSTICE

"Scotland Yard" was a series of 39 films made at Merton Park Studios from 1953 to 1961 as cinema second features hosted by Edgar Lustgarten. From 1962 he narrated 13 courtroom dramas under the title "Scales of Justice," the series ending in 1967 when the studios closed.
Scotland Yard was retitled Casebook, slightly cut to a 25 minute running time and shown on tv in the early sixties. Channel Four repeated much of the series with its original title Scotland Yard in the 80s, and also premiered for British TV, Scales of Justice. Bravo screened the same episodes of Scotland Yard in the 1990s.

The first introduction to Scotland Yard was pronounced in a dramatic voice thus- "Scotland Yard! Nerve centre of London's Metropolitan Police, headquarters of its Department of Criminal Investigation. Scotland Yard! A name that appears on almost every page of the annals of crime detection. Scotland Yard! Where night and day a determined body of men carry on a relentless unceasing crusade against crime. . . Stored deep in the heart of Scotland Yard are the records of thousands of cases, histories of every breach of the law from larceny to murder, stories of human weakness, of greed and envy, of cunning and stupidity."

A second more sober introduction coincided with new pictures shot in daylight of the area round the Yard: "Scotland Yard- nerve centre of London's department of criminal investigation. Here brains, science, routine and determination join forces in the constant war against crime. In the vaults beneath Scotland Yard are the histories of thousands of cases, evidence of the department's long standing and successful battle with the criminal."

A later introduction, was this- "London- greatest city in the world, and home of the oldest democracy. A city whose worldwide reputation for honesty and integrity is firmly based on a thousand years of the rule of law, enforced and safeguarded by a police force, whose headquarters is as well known as London itself- Scotland Yard! .. Filed in the Records Department of Scotland Yard are the histories of thousands of cases, evidence of the long standing and successful battle with the criminal."
The detectives seen in Scotland Yard
To my Merton Park page . . . . TV Crime Menu

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THE DRAYTON CASE (1953- release date March 23rd.)
With John Le Mesurier as Supt Henley.

"Have you ever murdered anyone?" asks a playful Edgar as he highlights that age-old problem: "what do you do with the body?" Christmas Eve 1941, during the blitz was a pretty useful time to dispose of a corpse.
In the cellar of a bombed schoolhouse in 1944, a skeleton is uncovered. "The murderer always overlooks something," declares Edgar, stating the obvious. A pathologist spots that this corpse has a fractured larynx, so can't have been a victim of Hitler's bombers. Supt Henley is given more details on this 40 to 45 year old woman, height about 5 feet, wearing a dental plate, hair colour brown going gray. "Is that all?" he asks hopefully.
Henley's first task is identify the woman. At the Missing Persons Registry one candidate matches the description- Elizabeth Drayton., missing for two and a half years. Husband Charles(Victor Platt) is eventually traced, but he "don't care" about his wife no more. But it's surely not a coincidence he stopped paying her maintenance around the time of her likely death. He does look guilty, though Henley throws a note of caution, "my wife's always nagging me about money, but I haven't murdered her!"
The caretaker of the old school remembers a fire in the cellar caused by arsonists on Christmas Eve 1941. Charlie Drayton was the firewatcher who tried to put it out before finally calling the fire brigade. Henley speculates on the probable scenario in a flashback. But facing arrest, Drayton flees. He's spotted at the underground. With the platform crammed with refugees from the bombs, he's chased up an emergency exit and into the arms of Supt Henley.... no- he turns and tumbles down the steps. "better get an ambulance."
Edgar concludes with speculation on why Drayton killed his wife, "not a very intelligent man," he decides. This is a very basic story but some clever camera shots help turn this into a quite classy little film.
Scotland Yard Menu

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THE MISSING MAN
(1953 - released July 20th)
The Neil Case written and directed by Ken Hughes.
Rather unusual case, with hints of the paranormal, "never satisfactorily solved," a vicar doing most of the sleuthing!
The Yard is represented by Inspector Johnson, though it's Supt Wainwright and Insp Rogers who wrap the case up.

Spring 1938 - Gerald Neil's parents come to visit their engineer son in London. He's not at his digs. His landlady says he was called away to Paris "on urgent business." A "dark friend" had called later to collect his belongings. With £3,000 transferred from his English bank to his French account, he's probably enjoying himself! The Surete are contacted by the Yard and his father Rev John Neil (Tristan Rawson) spends his savings in his search in the French capital. Friendly relations with the French law are established at the outset:
"Bonjour," commences the English policeman. The Frenchman of course speak viz ze French English: "'E vizdraws all 'is monnay.... oui... Monsieur Neil." Case seems closed.
After a futile three week search, the vicar returns to his Highgate flat. "I can't help feeling he's in some sort of trouble," he declares in an understatement. Then Neil's mother has a dream. In negative, she sees a gnarled tree at a farm, destroyed by fire. Her son is dragged to a well and thrown down it.
John follows the vision up. He meets a friend of his son, Peter, who had been due to "pop across" to Paris with Gerald that fateful day. Neil never turned up. Conclusion: someone took his place. The vicar learns of Neil's business friend, small time criminal James Wilson, who lived at Oaktree Farm, Oldbury Kent. He had been arrested for arson at this farm but in resisting arrest had committed suicide. The vicar visits the rubble of this now deserted farm, uncannily like his wife's dream, and then summons the Yard. The well is excavated and the inevitable follows. The vicar sadly identifies his son's remains.
Even Edgar Lustgarten says he can't explain this story. "Whether Wilson murdered Neil or not, nobody was ever able to prove it."

(Note- Katharine Page as the landlady is billed here as Kathleen Paige.)

Scotland Yard Menu

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THE CANDLELIGHT MURDER (1953)
(The Bramlington Murder)

featuring Gerald Case as Chief Supt Carron, with a little assistance from Sgt John Baker. Also with Supt Rawson of the Sussex police (Jack Lambert).
Script and direction by Ken Hughes.

The narrator says the story "might have been from Edgar Alan Poe." Edgar describes this notorious April 1937 case and threatens a surprise "in a nice quiet little spot in Sussex." The village of Bramlington has 2,000 inhabitants, a pub "and of course a police station." No "of course" about it these days!
In a culvert is found a corpse, battered about the head by "the proverbial blunt instrument." Dead for at least a week. So who was he? "Not a very salubrious sort of chap," but identification is problematic, as most traces of identity have been removed, his face had been bashed in. The local detective thinks he must be single as his clothes are poorly darned! Clothing from a shop in Horsham six miles away is a clue, but gets nowhere. Forensic evidence suggests he had been dragged downstream. On his clothes are traces of a fine metal powder, which was supplied to James Parrish, the local blacksmith.
Possibly the dead man is old Sam Thomas, "he's a bit peculiar altogether," though he's only been missing a couple of days. The local bobby knows Tom was alive until recently as on his rounds he heard him playing the organ in his isolated shack. The vicar confirms he'd spoken to him recently too. However neither of them had actually seen the old man. A plaster cast reconstruction of the face proves beyond doubt that he was the victim. Upstream from where the corpse was found are discovered deep footprints, by the bottom of Tom's garden! The prints are those of Joe Hawkins (Denis Shaw) who admits fishing in the vicinity.
The police explore Tom's isolated home. The floor's been "scrubbed!" There's also a box of candles, only one left. Inspector Carron reconstructs a possible scenario. Rawson asks:" why should anyone want to bump off a harmless old man?" The answer must be that he was looking for something. The rumour of old Tom's fortune is an attractive theory. The used candles support the idea that the murderer has been looking for the treasure each night. The police await his Final Visit. He's promptly arrested.
Later the 'treasure' is found, sovereigns worth a mere £6, hidden in the very candlestick that knocked out the old man

Scotland Yard Menu

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THE BLAZING CARAVAN (1953 - cinema release date Feb. 15th 1954)
The CASE AGAINST GEORGE BUXTON

briefly featuring Alan Robinson as Supt Ellis.
A stylish thriller with a novel approach written and directed by Ken Hughes. The enthusiastic Edgar Lustgarten is on top form.

"The Almost Perfect Murder" states the announcer, it would have been the Perfect One, Edgar continues, except for "a trifling oversight."
This 1938 case began at 3am on a lonely road near Edgware, a blazing caravan. In the ashes is later found a briefcase with the label George Buxton 69 Prescott Road Clapham. A motor cyclist had talked to a man running away from the conflagration, a "big fat chap." A charred appointment book is also discovered, not quite destroyed by the blaze, which includes one name Arthur Cox of "24 Monnery Road Tufnell Park, N19". (This, unlike Buxton's address, is a real road.) Too late, the killer remembers that he had left that inside the caravan.
Arthur Cox (Alexander Gauge- the description does seem to fit) is now staying at the Royal Court Hotel by the sea at Shingleton. He's just won the pools and takes his £30,000 cheque to the local bank (in reality a bank near to Merton Park Studios, as we see two shots of Rothesay Avenue SW20, once with a London bus in the background!).
So when the police call at Arthur's lodgings he's not there. In a flashback, narrated by Edgar as though talking to the killer, we learn how Arthur Cox was cleverly murdered by travelling rep Buxton. After celebrating his pools win at Ye Olde Leather Bottel, the inebriated Cox had been escorted home by Buxton to be murdered to the accompaniment of Edgar's dry commentary. Cox was then placed in the caravan and George Buxton had taken on Cox's persona, plus of course his cheque.
Edgar now reaches his juicy moment- the one thing Buxton has overlooked! It's an inadvertant slip in fact. A Ted Holloway had a signed agreement stating he and Cox were to go 50-50 on any winnings. Holloway complains to the police and when Buxton alias Cox calls at the bank to collect his money he's arrested.

Note - uncredited is Howard Lang as a publican

To Yard Menu

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THE DARK STAIRWAY (1953 - release date April 12th 1954)
The Greek Street Murder
Story and direction by Ken Hughes
Inspector Jack Harmer (Russell Napier), assisted by Sgt Gifford (Vincent Ball).
(Harmer has a jolly but patronising attitude to his "junior" calling him also "my lad,"sonny" etc).

Soon after midnight on Friday 4th January 1952, there occurred the murder of Harry Carpenter, "small time criminal and petty gangster," who as Edgar poetically informs us, was "a man without a future." We hear him shouting to his killer, calling him Joe. Old Mrs Morris overhears the argument, then on the stairway, sees a blind man crouching over a man, stabbed to death.
In Harry's flat police discover the picture of Molly (Gene Anderson). Edgar tells us that Carpenter had been a "Squeaker," testifying against Joseph Lloyd (Edwin Richfield), his partner in a mail bag robbery. Lloyd had recently been released from jail.
Hidden in a toilet cistern in Nic's Social Club, Inspector Harmer finds the murder weapon, and he can prove Lloyd had been to the loo there on the night of the murder! But there are no fingerprints on the knife, so he needs more proof. And he still has to find Lloyd. One of those hunches leads him to Brixton and a fellow lag of Lloyd's, who puts him in the direction of Molly, who is a night club singer. Harmer and Gifford don't appear to enjoy searching for her in Charlie's Club and numerous other low spots of London life.
"My feet are killing me!" is the complaint. At last she is found, and skulking with her is Lloyd.
Blind man George Benson who was at the killing couldn't possibly be much use as an eyewitness. There follows "one of the strangest identity parades ever enacted within the walls of any British police station." Benson succeeds in identifying Lloyd, but it's not done visually of course. The "sweet smell like scent" that Lloyd uses and his voice lead to "Lloyd's blurted confession."

Note - the use of negative pictures to show a blind man's perception of murder isn't innovative, but it's impressively done by director Ken Hughes

To Scotland Yard Menu

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These inspectors feature in more than one story (numbers refer to the story number)-
In 5 and 8 Russell Napier is Inspector Harmer while in 17, 18, 19, 22 , 25, 26, 28 , 30, 31, 33, 34 , 36, 37 Russell Napier plays Inspector Duggan (a total of 13 stories).
The next most active actor is in 24, 27 and 29 in which John Warwick plays Supt. Reynolds.
Gerald Case (Inspector Carron) appears in two- 3 and 11.
So does Geoffrey Keen in 32 and 35 but with different names: Supt. Graham/Carter.
Similarly in 9 Kenneth Henry is Inspector Baker, while in 10 he is Inspector Ross.
In 21 Ronald Adam, in 23 Dennis Castle and in 38 Harry H. Corbett all feature as Inspector Hammond!
Other police officials in charge of cases only make one appearance each: in 1 is John Le Mesurier (Supt. Henley), in 6- Colin Tapley (Inspector Turner), in 7- Gordon Bell (Inspector Durrant), in 12- Frank Leighton (Inspector Parry), in 13- Robert Raglan (Inspector Dexter), in 14- Ewen Solon (Inspector Conway), in 15- Cyril Chamberlain (Inspector Harris), in 16- Hugh Moxey (Inspector O’Madden), in 20- Ballard Berkeley (Inspector Berkeley), and in 39 John Welsh appears as Supt. Hicks.
In Story 2 there is no main investigating police officer, while in 4 he appears very little.

The first 26 Scotland Yard stories were produced by Alec Snowden.
Jack Greenwood took over for the final thirteen stories, continuing his association with Merton Park by producing nearly all the Edgar Wallace series.
The theme music in the Scales of Justice series, issued on Decca F11662, was recorded by The Tornados.

Scotland Yard