TV Advertising in the Black/White era

Regional admags

Sample ITV advertising rates
Top 20 Advertising Products, December 1959
To March 1960 ITV ad revenue
May 1960 ITV ad revenue

The first television advertisement
Long Running Campaigns

Sample of famous names in early ads
Early TV ads (some reviews)

Picture: Bristol cigarettes from 1964

Dinosaur TV Menu

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Long Running Campaigns
PG Tips ads began in 1956 with some chimpanzees holding a tea party in a stately home.
This innovative series was surely the most successful and popular and longest running on British tv, running into the 1970s, only finally ending as recently as 2002.
Of the other black and white stories, memorable were: The Jazz Band, The Roman Chariot Race, The Western, and The Delivery Man.
Look elsewhere on the net for a lot more about these ads.

Oxo had the Life with Katie series, which began in 1961 with a young Katie played by actress Mary Holland.
Such was the appeal, soon she was married to Philip, then followed the arrival of baby David in 1964. We watched him grow up until in 1969 there was his first day at school.
In 1970 the series moved into colour and became more exotic with a long visit to America before returning to Britain, with ideas running out the campaign ended in 1974.
In truth, the ads were mildly enjoyable, but never had any enduring humour, simply the quiet appeal that Mary Holland exuded. However thirteen years was an impressive achievement!

Joan and Leslie Randall made a long running Fairy Snow series in the 1960s.
Most had a smattering of humour, perhaps the best is The Randalls and The Traffic Cop, with Harry Locke as the policeman. The New Neighbour has a nice punch line too.
Others were: The Randalls And The Window Cleaner, The Randalls And The Super Salesman, The Randalls and The Headmistress, The Randalls and The Gym Instructress, The Randalls and The Bank Clerk, The Randalls And The District Nurse, The Randalls And The Wardrobe Mistress, The Randalls' New Daily, The Randalls and the New Mum, The Randalls and The Doting Mum, The Randalls And The Handy Husband, The Randalls Visit Grandma, The Randalls and the Know All, The Randalls and the Nosey Parker, The Randalls and The Cadger, The Randalls' American Friend, The Randalls and The Intellectual, The Randalls and The Optimist, The Randalls and the Tablecloth, The Randalls and The Tea Shoppe, The Randalls' Country Holiday, The Randalls Free Sample, The Randalls Meet New Fairy Snow, and Facts About Fairy Snow. Do you know of any others?

Katie Boyle promoted Camay
Some black and white ads in this long running series were: Katie Boyle and the Fashion Models, Katie Boyle and the Air Hostesses, Katie Boyle at Selfridges, Katie Boyle at Richard Henry, and the European Soap Contest.
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ITV Advertising Revenue

The Television Press Agency announced the following gross spending by advertisers during March 1960.
6,757,644 was the total for March 1960, compared with 5,236,928 in March 1959.
Comparisons with the same month in 1959 showed an increase in revenue, not entirely accounted for by the introduction of two new regions.

The regional figures were (March 1960 figures first, then those of the previous March):
A-R London........ 1,483,405 / 1,178,129
Granada ............. 1,363,062 / 953,024
ATV Midlands .... 704,714 / 555,632
ATV London ...... 556,186 / 586,200
ABC North ......... 541,909 / 419,657
STV Scotland ...... 418,621 / 361,636
TWW Wales/West.407,531 / 320,506
Tyne Tees .......... 347,236 / 246,687
Southern ............ 328,681 / 310,446
ABC Midlands..... 321,250 / 305,011
Anglia** ............. 198,082
UTV Ulster** ...... 86,987

(**Note: these two regions opened in October 1959, so the figures only apply to March 1960)

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ITV Advertising Revenue The Television Press Agency announced the following gross spending by advertisers during May 1960.
6,777,071 was the total for May 1960, compared with 4,886,082 in May 1959.

The regional figures were (May 1960 figures first, then those of the previous May):
A-R London........ 1,424,067 / 1,054,858
Granada ............. 1,305,016 / 888,809
ATV Midlands .... 691,150 / 541,330
ATV London ...... 652,595/ 570,630
ABC North ......... 521,889 / 421,205
Southern ............ 430,320 / 288,919
STV Scotland ...... 394,154 / 302,821
TWW Wales/West.393,440 / 298,516
ABC Midlands..... 357,270 / 289,379
Tyne Tees .......... 332,625 / 229,615
Anglia** ............. 191,506
UTV Ulster** ...... 83,040

(**Note: these two regions opened in October 1959, so the figures only apply to May 1960)

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The first television advert in Britain

Of course the honour goes to SR Toothpaste, on ITV's opening night, September 22nd 1955.
It was a little later than scheduled, since the live opening ceremony overran, but soon after 8pm, Britain had seen its first ever television ad.

In fact, technically, the distinction of screening the first ever tv advertisement goes back a lot further.
At the 1928 Radio Exhibition, John Logie Baird gave a first public demonstration of his television system.
The press reported this as "the first advertisement to be sent by television in the world." The reason was, that part of the transmission, even though only seen on nearby reception screens, showed the contents bill of a national newspaper- the wording was clearly readable.

To start of the Adverts page

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Top Twenty Products advertised on ITV during December 1959, according to expenditure:
1 Hotpoint Washing Machine (108K),
2 Stork Margarine (83K),
3 Daz (66K),
4 Alka-Seltzer (57K),
5 Butlin's Holiday Camps (50K),
6 Philishave (49K),
7 Omo (49K),
8 Camay Toilet Soap (49K),
9 Remington Razor (46K),
10 BabyCham (44K),
11 Players Medium Cigarettes (43K),
12 Persil (42K),
13 Maxwell House Coffee (42K),
14 Dubonnet (37K),
15 Beechams Powders (37K),
16 Rowntrees Dairy Box (37K),
17 Esso Blue Paraffin (36K),
18 Rowntrees Black Magic (36K),
19 H Samuel Jewellers (35K),
20 Oxydol (34K)
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ITV Advertising Rates
A few samples to illustrate the wide variety of fees.
TWW Rates in January 1958 included 7 seconds Market Place 15, 15 seconds at peak viewing 100. On Oct 2nd 1957 potential advertisers were shown a programme of adverts at the Tatler Cinema Bristol. Apparently those invited fell into two camps, some surprised at the low standard, others how reasonable charges were.
March 1959: 7 second announcement in sound and vision for 10 to include production cost. Aimed at small local retailers, who were then given a window plaque in gold, black, grey and red stating "Products advertised on TWW stocked here."
In 1965, the 7 second rate was 13, but 6 cost only 10 each.

Summer 1959 Rates (June 22 to August 28): A-R. 15 seconds 700 for a guaranteed two million homes. This meant that commercials were repeated until this guaranteed audience target was reached. For small advertisers A-R offered a five second slide with musical background but no commentary... 45. Ten of these were placed together with a brief introduction 'Arcade,' and finale. Music by Steve Race, with additional sequences by Ronnie Aldrich, Tommy Watt and others. A sample half minute was first shown at 10.15pm on May 20th 1959 with explanation from Brian Henry, A-R Controller of Advertising. This proved a "phenomenal success." 415 15 second ads were transmitted in this quarter. In fact the total revenue was 35% up on the equivalent period the year before. In all from June 22 to August 28 1959, A-R transmitted 2,211 commercials, including 579 half minute ones, 116 45 second ads, 91 minute long ads, and 10 lasting 90 seconds.
In 1960 for the Wimbledon Tennis fortnight, A-R offered a cheaper rate than the previous year. Commercials were rotated during the afternoon, block bookings for two commercials in ten slots were priced as follows: 15 seconds x10= 320. 30 seconds x10= 470. 45 seconds x10= 610. 60 seconds x10= 700.

1959: Anglia announced its local advertising rates, 15 second spot was 9 off peak, 64 at peak viewing.

Autumn 1959: Southern. 'Town Crier'- ten local advertisers under specific towns and areas in five second slide flashes, backed by a Town Crier with music and sound announcements by two alternating announcers. Shown in a Monday to Friday slot between 6 and 7pm. Offered on a 13 week package, the block charge was 10 per spot.
At the other end of the scale, the rate from May 1st 1960 was 260 for a 60 second spot in the peak viewing time period, defined as 7.25 to 10.35pm.
90 was the charge for a 15 second spot in their six live motor cycle outside broadcasts (May 28th, June 6th, June 11th, July 16th, Aug 6th, Oct 1st 1960), and Southern reported that the local motor trade quickly snapped up the spots.

1960: Ulster TV. A monthly series of features on provincial towns (in June 1960 it was Bangor) was included as part of the Roundabout programme. Immediately after the programme there followed 'Shop Window,' eight local traders, a seven second spot each, cost 8, plus production of a slide.
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Regional Admags
To
my review of one surviving admag

The ITA directive stated that admags were not allowed to be "good entertainment," whatever that meant!
The first ever British advertising magazine was ATV's Home with Joy Shelton, produced by a subcontractor to ATV, Advertising Features. This was screened on Saturday September 24th 1955, from 4.00 to 4.20pm.
The Pilkington Report in June 1962 recommended these programmes be scrapped, as "they blur a crucial distinction intended by the (1954 Television) Act." So the genre died at the end of March 1963. Of course they have now resurfaced in the digital age, but these 'Teleshopping' programmes are completely different.
A comprehensive study of admags is rewarding for it reveals the many well known names who appeared in such fare, if only occasionally, such as Robert Beatty, Sid James, and Mr Pastry. Then others, like Christopher Trace, made early appearances in admags, while behind the scenes, you can find such names as Lloyd Shirley and Ted Childs (The Sweeney etc).
Associated Rediffusion
Associated Television (London)
Associated Television (Midlands)
ABC
Granada
Showcase (A joint ABC/ATV venture)
TWW
Scottish Television
Southern Television
Tyne Tees Television
Anglia Television

STV's Between Ourselves with Elaine Wells (pictured).

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Going Shopping with Elizabeth Allan (ATV)

This early advertising mazagine has survived almost intact, partly perhaps because it is nearly all on film.

Elizabeth Allen introduces it in the studio. She had made a trip to Harrod's, and we watch her tour of the store.
Firstly she watches how not to make a pot of tea, it's supposed to be slightly funny. Then she shows us the convenient way using a Tetley Tea Bag, "just look at all the trouble you save."
Our journey takes us up the "first moving stair in England," for a brief spot for Martell's 3 Star Brandy.
Then a longer promotion for Bex Housewares, "very attractive" and almost unbreakable. Elizabeth interviews a salesgirl with a very posh accent who takes over the sales pitch, if she wasn't an actress I'll eat my washing up bowl

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ABC admags
In 1960, Lloyd Shirley, head of SBC TV admags, wrote: "at ABC, we find that the straight approach works best. There is no reason to be apologetic about a good magazine, and certainly no reason to half-twist it in to some other type of show. The result of this approach is invariably a compromise that pleases noone. In a way it is surprising that this sort of situation occurs when one considers the clarity of the magazine's object. Drama must be dramatic, light entertainment must entertain, and magazines must sell."

ABC, with limited air time, did not embrace admags for a while. Their first was introduced in the autumn 1956 schedules, and was a series that ran throughout the life of ABC's admags:
What's In Store had a following all its own.
The hostess was always Doris Rogers. It was first aired on Sunday September 16th 1956 5.55-6.10pm. With Doris on this first mag were, uncredited, Frank Preston and Brenda. Script: Sally Kenrick. Later in spring 1957 scripts were by Lloyd Day, Shirley and John Mears. Directors included, for the first admag SE Reynolds, then usually Ben Churchill, though Pat Phillips also directed some 1957 shows. From June 1957 Marjory Ruse was producer. This first series included "a wonderful new painting competition" announced in the Oct 12th 1956 programme. The Dec 23rd 1956 show had Philip Harben with "how to stuff a turkey."
For 1958 it was still on Sundays about 5.35pm Scriptwriters included John Mears, Dorothy Bremer, Lawrence Hughes, Sally Kenrick. Directors included Janice Willett, Pat Phillips, Malcolm Morris, Lloyd Shirley.
The teatime Sunday slot continued in 1959 with Doris Rogers as ever. Scriptwriters included Lawrence Hughes, Sally Kenrick. Directors included Marjory Ruse, Lloyd Shirley, Anthony Finigan. (Margaret Worsley introduced the show on Aug 23rd 1959.) The Aug 30th edition was titled Back to School. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Marjory Ruse. The 150th edition was celebrated in October 1959. The Nov 15th 1959 edition was on Festive Fare. Brian Nissen was one of the many uncredited presenters of goods at this period.
The Sunday 5.45pm time continued in 1960. Scriptwriters included Lawrence Hughes. Directors included Lloyd Shirley, Anthony Finigan, Reginald Collin. Doris was joined by Philip Harben on June 19th 1960 for Summer Food Fare. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Geoff Ramsey. Then the show took a summer break, returning in the autumn. Scripts: Lawrence Hughes. Directors included Helen Standage.
The teatime Sunday slot continued in 1961 for more "armchair shopping." Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Kim Mills. In summer 1961 scriptwriter: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoff Ramsey. After a summer break, the programme returned, normally about fortnightly, in the Sundays 5.50pm slot. Script: Ted Childs. Later: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Pamela Lonsdale/ Marjory Ruse/ Joe McGrath/ George Roman.
One special on Sun Jan 14th 1962 at 5.50pm was subtitled Holidays in Britain. Doris was joined by Julie Stevens. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Mike Vardy. The edition on Sat Jan 20th 1962 5.30pm was subtitled Where Shall We Go? No 9, with script by Mike Hodges, director Mike Vardy, this was more a programme from that series. Another edition on Sat Feb 24th 1962 at 5.05pm was also more a one-off, subtitled How to Win on Washday, about Hotpoint washing machines. A new competition was announced. Director: Kim Mills. Doris was on hand again on April 1st 1962 for Getting Married, script: Lawrence Hughes, director: George Roman.
The slot was changed, horror of horrors, from its traditional slot to late Saturday nights from June 1962. Director: Laurence Bourne. Sanity returned when it reverted to Sunday afternoons in autumn 1962. This was shown most weeks, but occasionally replaced by a 'special.' Often the show advertised its own special edition,
Sat July 21st 1962 11pm also with Christopher Trace who visits the garage.
Sun Oct 7th 1962, 3.50pm including "a special mannequin parade" compered by David Jacobs. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Margery Baker.
Sun Oct 28th 1962, 3.50pm on The Motor Show Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Margery Baker.
Sun Nov 11th 1962, 5.5pm Fun and Games, also with Jimmy and Margaret Hanley of Jim's Inn fame. Director: Margery Baker.
Sun Nov 25th 1962, 5.5pm Toyfair, also with 'Mr Triang the magician.'
The final programme of this long running series was on March 10th 1963 with the script by Kenneth Watson. Director: Margery Baker.

Other ABC admags included:
Where Shall We Go? (first programme: Sat Jan 5th 1957 5-5.20pm) presented by Peter Butterworth "and his charming wife" Janet Brown. A series of four shows on holidays at home and abroad, the final one being on Jan 26th 1957. Scriptwriter and Producer: Patricia Latham. Director: Eddie Kebbell.
Another series of 3 came on Saturdays Dec 28th 1957, Jan 4th and 11th 1958, 5.20-5.38pm. Presenters not known. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Janice Willett.
A third series, this time of four programmes, commenced on Sat Dec 27th 1958, 5.15-5.36pm. Script: Dorothy Bremer. Director: Malcolm Morris.
The fourth series began on Boxing Day Sat Dec 26th 1959 at 5.15pm. Rex Garner gave "the facts." Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Lloyd Shirley. The fifth and final programme was on Jan 23rd 1960 at 5.25pm. This was also screened in the ATV London area.
Another series began on Christmas Day 1960 at 5.25 to 5.45pm. With Margaret Worsley, Richard Grant, Marie Sutherland and James Drake. Script:v Sally Kenrick. Director: Margery Baker. Second programme on December 31st 1960, with same personnel as hosts. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Margery Baker.
It returned on Saturday December 23rd 1961, 11-11.30pm. Programme 1: Belgium. Script: Mike Hodges. Director: Mike Vardy. Programme 2 was on Christmas Eve 1961, 5.20-5.50pm. Script: Ted Childs. Director: Mike Vardy. No 3 was on Saturday December 30th 1961, 5.25-5.45pm. Script: Mike Hodges. Director: Mike Vardy. No 4 was on Dec 31st 1961, 4.50-5.20pm. Script: Ted Childs. Director: Mike Vardy.
The seventh and final series had a galaxy of ABC admag stars in late 1962/early 1963. Doris Rogers, Marie Sutherland, Richard Grant, Isobel Greig. Script: John Mears. Director: Margery Baker.

Quick on the Draw (first show: Saturday Mar 16th 1957, 6-6.20pm, later the start time was 5.25pm) with Rolf Harris. "Each week Rolf starts a mystery picture and leaves viewers to draw the right conclusion." Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Eddie Kebbell. The series was revamped in May 1957 (5.20-5.45pm, then in June 6.45-7pm) with Rolf who "draws the amusing cartoons." By solving his puzzle picture you could win a cash prize. The hosts were Sheila Matthews and John Blythe. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Ben Churchill. Final programme June 22nd 1957.

Drive In (first aired Saturday July 13th 1957 6.45-7pm until end of August 1957) With Peter Carver as The Garage Man. Script: Lloyd Day Shirley and John Mears. Producer: Ben Churchill.
The series returned in summer 1958, Saturdays at about 11.30pm (depending on length of previous feature film) With David Morrell as The Garage Proprietor. Interviews by McDonald Hobley. Script: Lloyd Day Shirley and Lawrence Hughes. Director: Janice Willett. There was a special guest on each show: July 12th 1958: Sheila Van Damm. Aug 16th 1958: MJ Wilson, driving examiner. By now Lloyd Shirley was directing. Aug 23rd 1958: special guest: an AA legal representative. The series ended in early Sept 1958.
A third series began in the summer 1959, same late night Saturday slot. Introduced by David Morrell. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoffrey Nethercott. until August 1959.
The fourth series began once again on Saturday nights, first programme July 9th 1960 at 10.55pm. Introduced again by David Morrell. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Ronnie Taylor. Thereafter the starting time varied slightly as the programme followed a feature film. On August 7th 1960 only it moved to Sunday 11pm, one-off director: Lloyd Shirley. Then back to Saturdays from Aug 13th 1960. There was a Christmas Special of sorts, on the unlikely date of Christmas Eve 1960 at 11pm. The ten year test, used car prices, and a special visit to the Brocklehurst Motor Group. Host: Christopher Trace. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoff Ramsey.
A fifth series saw a one-off programme in a Saturday teatime slot (5.23pm) in spring 1961. Introduced by Christopher Trace. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoff Ramsey. But in the summer 1961 schedules it moved to its familiar late evening slot, Saturdays, 11pm starting on July 8th 1961. With Christopher Trace. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoff Ramsey/ Lloyd Shirley/ Helen Standage. It ended in August 1961.

Let's Go Shopping (Saturdays starting September 7th 1957, 6.45-7pm but quickly moved to a 5pm slot). First hostess: Ruth Dunning. From April 1958 with Elizabeth London. Including Name-the-Products Competition. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Marjory Ruse. Ended that summer.

Meet the Experts (shown monthly on Saturday Sept 21st 1957 5-5.20pm/ January 25th 1958/ Feb 15th 1958/ March 15th 1958) introduced by Jack Hulbert. Presented by ICI.

Looking Around (first edition: Saturday Sept 20th 1958. 4.25pm) With Sheila Matthews, Pauline Clifford and David Morrell. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Janice Wtllett. After a 4 week break over the Christmas season, it returned with David Morrell, Pauline Clifford and Hazel Douglas. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Marjorie Ruse. One related programme was called Look and Listen (Saturday Aug 29th 1959. 5.30pm) With Pauline Clifford and Hugh David. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoffrey Hethercott.
Then Looking Around returned on Sat Sept 5th 1959 at 4.50pm, with Pauline Clifford, Peter Tuddenham and Margaret Worsley. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Studio Two (first edition Saturday Sept 19th 1959. 5.05pm) was a new name for Looking Around, with Pauline Clifford, Margaret Worsley and Peter Tuddenham. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Geoffrey Hethercott. By November the team varied, and also included a rota of these three and Marie Sutherland and Richard Grant. Themes includes Heating and Lighting (Sept 19th 1959), The Nursery (Oct 31st 1959). There was a break over Christmas, before the series returned on Sat Feb 6th 1960 at 5pm. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Lloyd Shirley. The programme was shown most weeks. The May 28th 1960 programme with "the Studio Two team" answered the question What Shall We Do At Whitsun? Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Geoff Ramsey. Then there was one more programme on June 25th 1960 at 10.50pm. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Geoff Ramsey. After this the show had a new Sunday 5.50pm slot. December 4th 1960 was a special from the Tri-ang Toy Fair with Margaret and Jimmy Hanley. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Geoff Ramsey In 1961 (Sats 5.45pm) it came back with the same team: Margaret Worsley, Marie Sutherland and Richard Grant. Script: Michael Hodges. Director: Kim Mills. What Shall We Do At Whitsun? was a special with the team on Sat May 13th 1961, 5.25pm. Script: Mike Hodges. Director: Pamela Lonsdale.
For summer 1961 it filled the Sunday 5.50pm slot, same team and scriptwriter. Directors included Helen Standage, Joe McGrath. After a short break in August, it was back on Saturday September 9th 1961 at 5.35pm with the same trio. Director: Michael Vardy.

Clever on Mondays (Sats 5.25pm Spring 1961) with McDonald Hobley, Elizabeth London and Marguerite Patten. Producer: Bill Stewart. Second series in autumn 1961: first programme Sat Sept 16th 1961 5.30pm, second October 21st 1961, third on Nov 25th 1961. With McDonald Hobley and Sylvia Peters. Director: Michael Vardy It continued in 1962: the fourth programme was on Sat Feb 10th 1962 at 5pm. The fifth programme was on Sat Mar 10th 1962 5pm with McDonald Hobley and Sylvia Peters. Theme: Brighter washdays. Script: Terry Green. Director: Kim Mills.

Toytime (Sunday Nov 19th 1961, 4.30-4.45pm). This was the first of three admags with Tri-ang toys, electric trains, model motor racing, dolls' prams, Pedigree dolls etc

ABC special one-off admags included:
A Fine City, Norwich (Sunday Dec 30th 1956, 5.55-6.10pm) presented by the Norwich Union Insurance Societies. A travelogue of Norwich, the Broads and seaside resorts.
What's In Store for 1957 (Sunday Jan 6th 1957, 5.50-6.10pm) with Doris Rogers. Ideas for brightening up the home, and for holidays. This was in effect What's In Store, since the script was by Sally Kenrick, and the producer was Ben Churchill.
Your Pets and You (Saturday Mar 2nd 1957, 6-6.20pm) with John Yates assisted by Sheila Matthews. Script: Patricia Latham. Director: Eddie Kebbell.
Fare Play (Sunday Aug 17th 1958 5.45pm) with Jane Sothern and Ken Haward. How to deal with unexpected Sunday evening guests. Devised by Neil Tyfield and John Pechey. Director: Marjory Ruse.
Full Cycle (Sat May 30th 1959 11pm) introduced by David Morrell. On Motor cycles. Script: Geoffrey Stephenson. Director: Lloyd Shirley. Another programme of this name was screened on Sat Apr 30th 1960, 10.50 to 11.08pm, with McDonald Hobley. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Autumn Fashions (Sat Sept 12th 1959 5.05pm) introduced by Marguerite Patten. New fashions, how to care for the latest fabrics, warmer day clothes, and romantic cocktail dresses. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
ABC Motor Show (Sat Oct 24th 1959 5.45pm) host David Morrell. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Winter Fashions (Sun Dec 27th 1959 5.45pm) with "three beautiful models." Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Girl in White (Sun Jan 30th 1960 5pm) Fashions with Rosalind Critchlow and "three glamorous models." Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Home and Fashion (Sat April 16th 1960 5pm) Elizabeth London and Teddy Tinling discuss the latest trends in tennis clothes. Summer fashions with "six glamorous models" (!)
With Style Sunday May 15th 1960, 5.45pm with Doris Rogers (in effect then, a What's in Store special). "A look at fashion and beauty and shopping news, and an invitation to meet Jonathan Miller." (Wow!). Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Nurseryland Sunday July 3rd 1960, 5.45pm with Doris Rogers (in effect another What's in Store special). For National Baby Week. Script by Daphne Padell. Director: Geoff Ramsey. There was another programme on Sunday June 4th 1961, 5.45pm with Doris Rogers. For National Baby Week. Director: Pamela Lonsdale.
Focus on Fashion Sunday July 31st 1960, 5.50pm with Elizabeth London and designer Samuel Sherman and fashion writer Sylvia Lamond.
The Factory Equipment Exhibition Sat Sept 24th 1960, 5.45-5.55pm, David Morell at Belle Vue Manchester. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Lloyd Shirley.
Present Day Sun May 21st 1961, 5.50pm. Washing day, keeping food fresh, and an anniversary. Director: Pamela Lonsdale.
A Name to Remember Sat May 27th 1961, 5.25pm. Richard Grant "invites you to join him on a filmed tour of a famous Reading biscuit factory to see behind the scenes and to meet some of the personalities." Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Pamela Lonsdale.
Summer Food Fare Sunday June 18th 1961, 5.50pm with Doris Rogers and Philip Harben. (In effect another What's in Store under a different title.) Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Kim Mills.
The Washing Machine of 1975 (Sun Sept 3rd 1961 5.50pm) A film dmeonstrating the most advanced washing machine in the world. Script: Bryan Lloyd. Director: Terry Bishop.
Break Through to Comfort (Sun Sept 10th 1961 5.50pm) In effect a Studio Two special, as their trio of presenters investigated "a quiet revolution in the home," ie central heating. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Marjory Ruse.
Looks and Lines from Paris (Sun Sept 24th 1961 5.50pm) Autumn Collections by Revlon and Harper's Bazaar. Script: Dorothy Bremer. Director: Mike Vardy.
The Life of Mrs 1970 (Sat Sept 30th 1961 5.35pm) Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Marjory Ruse.
Index Sunday Mar 4th 1962 5.50pm with Julie Stevens. Script: Ted Childs. Director: George Roman.
ABC's Motorway (Sat Mar 31st 1962 5.05pm, Sun Apr 22nd 5.50pm and Sat Apr 28th 1962 5pm) with Geoffrey Stone. Script: Lawrence Hughes. Director: Geoff Ramsey/ Roy Battersby.
A Dream Holiday (Sat May 19th 1962) A look at Kenkast garages and how to enter a competition to win a dream holiday, presented by Robert Beatty and Lisa Page. Director: Roy Battersby.
Building for You (Sat Sept 8th 1962 11-11.20pm) presented by Robert Beatty. Script by A Perkins and DM Butterworth. Director: Margery Ruse.
ABC's last Saturday admag was Feb 23rd 1963 at 11pm, Building '63 presented by Victor Brooks. Script by A Perkins and DM Butterworth. Director: Margery Baker.
Getting Married (Sunday March 17th 1963, 5.20-5.35pm) with Elizabeth London and Richard Grant. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Margery Baker (not the first such title!)
The Get Away People (Sunday March 24th 1963, 5.20-5.35pm). Steve Race and Patrick Gregory with features on fuel, garage service and road maps. To whet the appetite, also shown was unique film of John Cobb driving his Napier-Railton at Utah Flats. Script: Bryan Oakes. Director: Margery Baker.

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Showcase
This was a unique project, a monthly networked admag, "an inter-regional roundup of shopping news and views." ATV and ABC produced the programmes alternately:
The first programme was on Saturday March 5th 1960 at 5pm with hostess Josephine Douglas. Written by David Rees. Producer: Dinah Thetford (ATV).
Programme 2: Saturday April 2nd 1960, 5pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Sally Kenrick. Producer: Lloyd Shirley (ABC).
3: Saturday May 7th 1960 at 5pm featuring Josephine Douglas and John Warren. Written by David Rees. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV).
4: Saturday June 4th 1960, 5.30pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Lawrence Hughes. Director: Reginald Collin (ABC).
5: Sat July 2nd 1960 at 5.30pm with gardens, fashions for men, and good eating and drinking, featuring Josephine Douglas, John Warren. Written by David Rees. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV).
6: Saturday August 6th 1960, 5.30pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Sally Kenrick. Director: Lloyd Shirley (ABC).
7: Sat Sept 3rd 1960 5.30pm with Josephine Douglas, John Warren. Men's fashions, brighter homes and schooldays. Written by John Warren and John Singer. Producer: Francis Coleman (ATV).
8: Saturday Oct 1st 1960, 5.40pm with Doris Rogers. Script: Sally Kenrick. Director: Margery Baker (ABC).
12: Saturday Feb 4th 1961 at 5.40pm. Ways of saving time in the home with Josephine Douglas and John Warren. Written by John Warren and John SInger. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV)
14: Saturday April 1st 1961, 5.25pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Sally Kenrick. Director: Geoff Ramsey (ABC)
16: Saturday June 3rd 1961, 5.25pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Lawrence Hughes. Director: Kim Mills (ABC)
17: Saturday July 1st 1961 at 5.25pm. Television, toothpaste, care of clothes, furniture, gardens and good things to eat and drink, with Josephine Douglas and John Warren and John Singer. Written by John Warren and John Singer. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV)
19: Saturday Sept 2nd 1961 at 5.25pm. Home decorating, toothpaste, and long playing records with Josephine Douglas and John Warren and John Singer. Written by John Warren and John Singer. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV)
21: Saturday Nov 4th 1961 at 5.30pm. Cookery, home comfort, bicycles and housecraft, with Josephine Douglas and John Warren and John Singer. Written by John Warren and John Singer. Producer: Bill Stewart (ATV)
22: Saturday December 2nd 1961, 5.25pm with Doris Rogers. Written by Lawrence Hughes. Director: Joe McGrath (ABC)
23: Saturday January 6th 1962, 5.30pm A holiday edition for planning a 1962 holiday. Written by Lawrence Hughes. Director: Mike Vardy (ABC)
24: Saturday Feb 17th 1962 at 5pm. Beauty, baby care and home luxury, with John Warren and Pauline Clifford. Written by Ronan O'Casey. Producer: Jon Scoffield. (ATV)
25: Saturday March 3rd 1962 5pm, with Doris Rogers. Written by Lawrence Hughes. Director: Kim Mills. (ABC)
26: Saturday Mar 17th 1962 at 5.05pm. Decoration, home care, fashion and entertainment with John Warren and Pauline Clifford. Written by Ronan O'Casey. Producer: Jon Scoffield. (ATV)
27: Saturday Apr 7th 1962 5pm introduced by Doris Rogers. Script: Ted Childs. Director: Roy Battersby (ABC).
28: Saturday May 5th 1962 5.30pm introduced by Doris Rogers. Director: George Roman.
With admags facing extinction, the programme ended soon after this edition.

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ATV admags LONDON
Alan Tarrant head of ATV's Production Unit wrote after several year's experience with admags in 1960: "they must present an attractive format that will keep the advertisers delirious and the twitching hand of the viewer away from the Off switch. I have a sneaking suspicion that clients are not concerned with the flow of programme ideas but only their valuable seconds. Inevitably this introduces jargon straight from the small print of newspapers. One doesn't altogether blame them, it is their hard cash. But it does make life difficult for prodcuers, who are not basically salesmen.
I sometimes think that producing Advertising Magazines that please everyone is as easy as getting a Summit Conference that works... Basically ATV's policy is to create an atmosphere so that all advertisers love us. To give our clients programmes which will hold viewers and attract advertisers. A good presenter is essential. Recently we have been using name artists like Arthur Haynes, Joan and Leslie Randall, Jo Douglas, Jean Kent etc."

ATV's first titles were not exactly inspiring:
Home with Joy Shelton (September 1955) has the distinction of being the very first admag. Director: Alan Tarrant. Saturday December 3rd 1955 was "a Christmas shopping edition." The series must have done well, as it returned for a second series in early 1956, and a third in autumn 1956. Programme 3.1 on Sat Sept 15th at 4.15pm also included Joy's husband Sydney Tafler and Libby Morris.
Going Shopping with Elizabeth Allan (from September 1955). Director: Dicky Leeman.
Do It Yourself (1955- early 1956). The programme on Nov 12th 1955 was with William 'WP' Matthew on Winter Hobbies. Various variations of the title occurred, WP always the host. eg on Saturday afternoon January 14th it was Man's World on holidays at home, January 21st 1956 it was It's a Man's World- the subject matter do it yourself.
Shopping with the Stars was an occasional 1956 Sunday 15 minute series shown in the blank 6pm slot.
On February 19th 1956 it was a visit to Marshall and Snelgrove, the London store. Host was Greta Gynt, director Alan Tarrant.
On Sunday August 26th 1956, it was on Pye products. A star line-up included Harry Secombe, Valentine Dyall and the McKell Twins. Producer: Peter Glover.
Fortnightly Fair was another 1956 Sunday 15 minute series shown in the blank 6pm slot. On May 27th 1956 it was An English Home- furnishing and decorating. Another on July 8th 1956 was titled simply Have You Remembered To Buy?
Saturday Showcase (starting autumn 1956, then on Saturdays 4.55pm spring 1958, continuing periodically until 1959) usually with Patricia Dare and James Drake. Pamela Duncan also hosted occasionally. The first host was Marion Clarke Canada TV's Cinderella Girl (up to about May 1957) with scripts by Mary E Shoup. The first mags of 1957 offered a prize of a bottle of Riche's champagne, the finals being at the end of March. Director: Dinah Thetford. Later scripts in 1957: Betty Quin, some later ones were by Stewart Ruttledge. Directors: Michael Style, John Cooper, Michael Jeans, Anthony Flanagan. The final programme, number 117, was on Sat May 9th 1959.
Family Magazine (Sunday afternoons 1956-1958) edited by Daphne Padell, assisted by Barrie Gosney. Directors included Dinah Thetford, Raymond Joss. In one small spot in 1956 on curry, over a thousand letters were received for the recipe, demonstrated by chef Vencatachellum.
Slater's Bazaar (Sundays teatime from 1957). "a high spirited action in search of things for viewers." One of the more memorable admags with John Slater. First director: Alan Tarrant. Also on February 24th 1957, Raymond Cooney as "a rock 'n' roll schoolboy." Also on March 24th 1957, Bert Weedon, April Olrich and Tony Hilton: how a young man's fiancee turns to thoughts of marriage. On Feb 23rd 1958 there was The Tony Hilton Story with John Slater, Bert Weedon, Hermione Harvey and Tony Hilton. Producer: Alan Tarrant. Also appearing on May 18th 1958: Bert Weedon, Hermione Harvey, Tony Hilton, Raymond Cooney. Director: Raymond Joss. Also appearing on Nov 2nd 1958: Bert Weedon, Mavis Sage, Tony Hilton, Ray Cooney. Director: Dinah Thetford.
Send for Saunders (first Midlands edition noted January 3rd 1958, first London edition noted Feb 22nd 1959, Sunday afternoon) normally fortnightly, with John Warren assisted by John Singer, who played George Saunders head porter and his assistant Fred. Producers included Jock Watson, Colin Clews, Dinah Thetford, Dilys Howell, Fred Wilby, Rita Gillespie, Bill Stewart. However for one edition on July 10th 1960, 4.30pm: "Beryl Mason keeps the pot boiling while Fred and the guv'nor are off on holiday." The show continued until 1962.
Counter-Points (Sundays 4.40pm in autumn 1958 to spring 1959) with Charmian Innes and Stanley Black/ Bill McGuffie at the piano. Directors included Dinah Thetford, John Cooper.
Day with Edana (Saturdays in summer 1959, 6pm) Edana Romney is at home in her cottage, May Day Farm in Kent. Script: Pamela Duncan. Producer: Anthony Flanagan.
Setting up Home (Saturdays in summer 1959, 6pm) Individual programmes included: Aug 22nd 1959: Is There a Bathroom in the house, with David Jacobs. Producer: Dinah Thetford.
Get This! (autumn 1959 to July 1962). This was another admag that started in the Midlands but also later had a London edition. It featured Josephine Douglas, with David Rees who also wrote some of the scripts. Other writers included Peter Johnston, Jim McDonald. Producers included Francis Coleman, Bill Stewart, Fred Wilby, Gordon Reece.
A.D.S. (Sunday afternoon Spring to Autumn 1960, also shown ATV Midlands, Thursdays 10.35pm autumn 1960) featuring Arnold Doodle "the witless wonder of television, also thank heavens, Valerie Singleton." The Midlands edition featured Sheila Bernette, she also appeared in later London editions. Cartoons by Nicholas Spargo. Script: Peter Johnston. Later by Brad Ashton and Dick Vosburgh. Directors included Bill Stewart, Francis Coleman, Dilys Howell.
Fancy That! (Sundays 1960, then in September 1960 at 4.30pm, moving to Saturdays 5.45pm October 1960 continuing into 1962) a programme about homes and gardens featuring Pauline Clifford, David Rees (most). Jean Kent had been a presenter in early 1960. Christopher Trace was a later addition. Script: Robin Dalton/ Kenneth Watson. Producer: Fred Wilby. (Not directly related to the earlier series of this name on ATV Midlands)
Top Gear (Saturdays spring 1961, 5.30pm) with Tony Hilton and Ray Cooney who also wrote the script. They invite viewers to drop in to their service station. Producer: Fred Wilby. Definitely no connection with the later BBC series!
Stand By (September 1961 - March 1963) with Ronan O'Casey (who also wrote some of the scripts) and Louie Ramsay. Producers: Dilys Howell, Rita Gillespie.
Auto-Suggestions (Sundays 5.30-6.05pm Oct 15th 1961) At the wheel: David Rees (who wrote the script). Navigator: Rodney Crouch. Director: Fred Wilby.
Home and Away (Sundays 5.50pm 1962) with Pauline Clifford. She was joined each time by a guest. Feb 25th & Mar 24th & Apr 14th 1962: John Warren. Mar 11th & 18th 1962: Raymond Bishop with a gardening section. Script: Ronan O'Casey. Producer: Fred Wilby/ Dilys Howell. It returned in 1963 with John Warren and John Singer with Louis Ramsay. Note: an ad mag with this title had also been shown in 1959 with Joan and Leslie Randall.

Specials:
Canine Quiz (Sunday Oct 21st 1956, 5.55-6.10pm) presented by Spratts Ltd
Toy Fair (Sunday Dec 2nd 1956, 5.55-6.10pm) presented by Trian Tys and Pedigree Dolls
Sunday Paper (Saturday Jan 26th 1957, 10.30-10.46)- advertsising feature by News of the World, with drama, sport, women's features and general interest.
Fashion Time (Sunday Mar 3rd 1957, 5.55-6.10pm) on Bear Brand
Travellers Yarn (Sunday Apr 14th 1957, 3.30-3.40pm) by Courtaulds
Come Out to Play (Sunday August 14th 1960, 4.30pm) John Warren and John Singer (obviously a Send for Saunders special!) show interesting things at the Boys and Girls Exhibition. Producer: Dinah Thetford.
Land of the Lur (Saturday September 10th 1960, 5.45pm) featuring Pauline Clifford. Denmark, her produce, industries and people. Script: David Rush.
Washer Carry On (Saturday September 15th 1962, 11-11.15pm) a networked magazine featuring Kenneth Connor and David Jacobs. A light hearted look at a popular brand of washing machine. Script: Dick Vosbrugh. Director: Rita Gillespie

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Advertising Magazines on
ATV MIDLANDS
The first Midlands ATV admag was at the improbable time of 4.30pm on Mondays and Fridays: News and Views (starting Mon Feb 20th 1956). With Kay Hudson. Director: Patrick Barton.
Midweek Miscellany (1956) was at 4.30pm on Wednesdays. With Patricia Dare, who was first billed as "the Joy Shelton of the Midlands." She became a viewer favourite, "I love every moment of it," she said, "I talk to the camera as though I am talking to mummy." The director was Alan Tarrant.
That afternoon starting time was abandoned by May 1956 when it transferred to the later time of 10.30pm, still on Wednesdays. with presenter Patricia Dare. Then at 10pm, it included It's Your Idea, a viewers' competition. This ran into the autumn of 1956. Scriptwriters included Bruce C Fisk. Directors included Dinah Thetford (usually), Peter Lloyd, Rex Firkin, Arthur Lane. In May 1957 new presenter was Marion Clarke, and script and production were by Betty Quin. In June 1957 the programme was renamed Miscellany since it moved to Tuesday 9.30pm, still presented by Marion Clarke. September 1957 saw Patricia Dare return, aided by Philip Latham and James Drake. Script and production by Mary E Shoup. The title remained the same when the show went back to Wednesdays at 10.30pm featuring Patricia Dare with James Drake, and occasionally also Philip Latham. Script and production by Mary E Shoup. Director: Dinah Thetford. It was back on Tuesdays, earlier at 6.40pm in February 1958 again with Patricia Dare and James Drake, backroom staff same also. However scripts from April 22nd 1958 were by Edward D Joffe with a special section for the under 25s. Director: Dinah Thetford. (NB for Aug 12th 1958 programme only, James Drake was the only presenter.) In the summer 1958 schedule, the series was shown at 10.45pm on Tuesdays. In the autumn 1958 it moved to Wednesdays at 6.40pm. Director was normally Dinah Thetford. For 1959 it moved to Thursdays at 6.40pm on and from Jan 8th 1959, director John Cooper. A new feature was the mystery recipe competition. It ended in the summer of 1959 after running for over three years.
From early 1956 Tuesdays at 4.30pm, then from May 1956 Thursdays at 10.30pm, It's a Woman's World director: Gilbert Coventry. Later directors included Peter Lloyd and Raymond Joss. May 17th 1956- I Am A Car. May 24th 1956- Beauty Preparations and Accesories with Daphne Padell. June 7th 1956- Summer Cooking with Daphne Padell. June 21st- Children's food with Daphne Padell. By that August you could join the Daphne Padell Club, anyone recall that? One idea that caught on with viewers was a competition in which you had to invent names of products out of initials of people on the programme. In the autumn 1957 schedules, the show switched to Mondays at 10pm. From April 1958 Daphne was assisted by Adrian Cairns. The Club seems to have closed in the summer of 1958.
1956: Fridays at 10pm was Fancy That! Directed by Reg Watson. This had been begun earlier in 1956, not billed as an admag however! The programme included competitions, one organised by Rowland Hartrick Ltd, makers of Lush furniture, had a huge response: names of two streets in the Midlands were drawn at random, all residents invited to give their reasons for liking a suite of Lush furniture. Later in the same slot in June 1956 Noele introduced About Homes and Gardens with Raymond Bishop, not stated as an admag, but later it was revealed as just that. Director: Alan Tarrant. This ran until Feb 1957 when Beryl Mason took over from Noele's role, and Peter Lloyd then normally Alan Tarrant directed. Peter Vaughan joined the series in May 1957 until the programme came off at the end of November 1957 but returned for a few more editions in January 1958 fortnightly, with new producer Jock Watson.
Sauce for the Gander (Tuesday December 3rd 1957, 6.45-7pm- it ran until the end of the month) featuring Mary Malcolm, with Eleanor Summerfield and Kenneth Horne who hold definite and often opposing views on food, plus Peter Cockburn, on film, who talks to housewives as they shop. A cookery mag. Director: Alan Tarrant. The first edition included a documentary on how spaghetti is grown.
Counter Attractions (Fridays at 6.40pm from March 1958, Fridays 10.45pm from summer 1958) featuring Lynne Bretonn, "a girl with an eye for a bargain." Also in some programmes was David Rees. Director: Jock Watson.
Take a Note (Mondays 10.45pm summer 1958) featuring Charmian Innes, with Stanley Black on the piano. Director: Raymond Joss. For the autumn 1958 the time was Tuesdays 6.40, directors included John Cooper, Alan Tarrant, Anthony Flanagan. From that October the presenter was Pamela Duncan. At the start of 1959 the presenters were Pamela Duncan, Jack Sears, Peter Harper and John Gott. Director: Anthony Flanagan. It ended soon after. (Compare COUNTER-POINTS ATV London)
In the Bag (Tuesdays 6.45pm autumn 1959) featuring Maureen Pryor. Script: Diana K Watson. Producer: Bill Stewart.
Make a Note (Fridays 10.35pm autumn 1959) With David Jacobs. Producer: John Cooper. It resurfaced in the autumn 1961 schedules again with David Jacobs. Script: Dennis NacManson (sic). Producer: Fred Wilby.
How About This? (July - Sept 1961) with Shaw Taylor Script: Maurice Kanareck. Producers: Dilys Howell, Bil Stewart.
Top o' the Shop (Feb-June 1962) with Pamela Duncan. Script: Charles Moore. Producer: Jon Scoffield.
Specials:
British Motor Corporation (Sun Oct 12th 1956, 4.15-4.45pm networked). Commentator Leslie Mitchell. Producer: Stephen Wade. Preview of new cars for 1956/7.
An Advertising Magazine (Thur Dec 5th 1957, 10.30pm) with Alan Melville (no further information)
Jewel Box (Fri Dec 6th 1957, 10pm), Christmas shopping featuring Beryl Mason, Geoffrey Palmer and Charles Hodgson. Producer: Jock Watson.
Oh, I Forgot... (Tues Dec 22nd 1959, 6.45pm), Christmas shopping featuring Josephine Douglas. Last minute Christmas presents. Script: Peter Johnston. Producer: Francis Coleman.
Friend of the Family (Tuesday Dec 6th 1960 6.45pm), with a "cosy cat" about Philips, "the friend of the family." With George Moon. Script: David Rees. Producer: Bill Stewart.
Some Chicken (Wednesday Sept 20th 1961 6.10-6.35pm) Introduced by Wensley Pithey and Beryl Mason, with AR Pendry of Buxted Chickens. Director: Pauline Shaw.
Jewel Box Fri Dec 1st 1961. Another visit in November 1962. Birmingham's jewellery centre with Pauline Clifford and Philip James (2nd admag). Producer: Bill Stewart (1st), Fred Wilby (2nd).
Spring Time (Sunday April 2nd 1962) with John Warren and Pauline Clifford. Script: Edward D Joffe. Producer: Fred Wilby. Script: Jim McDonald. Producer: Dilys Howell.

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Associated Rediffusion Advertising Magazines
More on
Jim's Inn - A-R's most popular admag.

Joe Garwood, head of A-R Ad Magazines explained company policy as at 1960: "to provide a regular series of magazine formats which offer variety of presentation and which are sufficiently elastic to be able to include almost any product. (Incidentally, there are a few products which we do not consider suitable for magazine presentation. Although there is nothing shameful about such things as personal deodorants or depilatories, foot powders, or lavatory seats, it becomes distasteful to hear these things discussed in public by people you have come to know.)
We have two story-line magazines, Jim's Inn and Shop In The Corner. Besides these, there are three straight selling productions, On View, By George, and Shopping for You... In addition we run specialised editions or separate formats dealing with subjects such as gardening, motoring etc, and giving coverage at exhibitions such as The Ideal Home, Radio Show, Motor Show, and The Furniture Exhibition."

A-R's first admag was in September 1955, but at the improbable time of 11.00, that's am not pm! The fifteen minute programme was Design for Living with Margot Lovell. First programme: Thursday 29th 1955. It continued about monthly into 1956, Producer: John Lemont.
In the same slot on Thursday October 6th 1955 was Fashion in the Making (see photo), "a playlet in which four characters present various dressmaking products, together with interesting facets of design and fashion creation." This first programme featured Mary Ward as Mrs Scarsdale, Joan Henley as Mrs Exeter, Wendy Perschky as Ginny Scarsdale and Helena de Crespo as Barbara Lawson. The edition on Jan 19th 1956, 4.15pm had only Joan Henley as Mrs Exeter and Mary Ward as Mrs Scarsdale. In the programme on Feb 23rd, the pair pass on dressmaking tips to Lois McLean who plays Erica Lang. Mrs Exeter also shows snapshots of her niece Wendy in Madeira. Script: Zita Dundas. Director: T Reid Burnett
Pounds Shillings and Sense was the witty title of an early evening series. First shown on Tuesday Oct 4th 1955, Party Dish- introduced by Pat Fender, about bachelor girl parties- not actually identified in TV Times as an admag. However this was- the Tuesday Nov 5th 1955 edition was titled Girl with a Date, introduced by Pat Fender, directed by Robert Evans. The February 21st 1956 programme was again called Design for Living with Margot Lovell. The April 5th 1956 edition was again Girl with a Date, this time with Anne Valery of glamour and fun. Director: T Reid Burnett. May 1st saw another Girl with a Date, with Anne Valery and Muriel Young, in Muriel's flat. On Dec 3rd 1956 Anne's friend was again Muriel Young with "a quarter-hour of glamour." The last edition I have found of Girl with a Date was on April 4th 1957, with Muriel Young. Script: Diana Noel. Other directors included Daphne Shadwell. Producer: John Lemont.
Mail Call with Genine Graham and John Witty was a popular weekly late evening programme during 1955 and 1956. It wasn't initially billed as an admag, but such programmes weren't always labelled in the early days. As it was a programme answering viewers' letters, it may not have been an admag, but some 1956 programmes were definitely described as "An Associated-Rediffusion Advertising Magazine."
Same comment for Mr Marvel in 1956. On Wednesdays at 10.30pm Hugh David explained "the mysteries of science in the home."
Hello- Come In (1956 Tuesdays 7.16pm, 1957 Thursdays 7.16pm, later 10pm) with Margot Lovell. Scriptwriters included Mary Hill, later Vivian Milroy. Directors included Pat Baker, Daphne Shadwell, Philip Dale.
What's New (some Mondays 6.30pm 1957) at the Furnishing Centre (16 Berkeley Street) with Kenneth MacLeod. Guest on the March 25th programme was Helene Cordet, and prizes of 200 worth of furniture were on offer. Script: Diana Noel. Director: Bill Perry. On Thursday Nov 28th 1957, 10.30pm, it was introduced by Catherine Boyle. Script: Hazel Adair. Director: Ian Fordyce. This included a competition to win 100 worth of furniture.
The Mayflower Project (Mondays April 1st, April 15th 1957, 6.30-6.45pm). Script: Michael Green. Director: Ronald Marriott. This filmed programme introduced viewers to those behind the replica of the original Mayflower including Warwick Charlton. This was filmed, and was actually an admag, "a gesture of Anglo-American goodwill and an attempt to turn the spotlight in America on British-made goods."
Fun in the Sun (July 16th 1957 10pm) with Garry Marsh, Sylvia Marriott, Ronald Wilson and Jennifer Browne, including the final of Miss Swimsuit 1957. (June 26th and August 7th 1958) with Garry Marsh and The Marsh Family ('The Family' not in the last). Scripts: David Edwards. Director: Ian Fordyce (16/7/57), Bill Turner (26/6/58), Bill Freshman (7/8/58). Also: Fun in the Snow (Fri Dec 27th 1957) Director: Ian Fordyce
For Pete's Sake (about 6.45pm in autumn 1957) with Peter Butterworth and Janet Brown. In one programme Peter did a nice impersonation of Charlie Chan! Sept 25th: Moving In: Amusing situations develop as Peter and Jan move into their new flat above a shop. Script: Dick Vosburgh and Brad Ashton. Director: Christopher Hodson. Feb 25th 1958: Jungle Madness, in which Peter and Janet "take the Michaela out of husband and wife jungle stories." Mar 25th 1958: Fish Face- Son of Scar Face, "come with us to gangster ridden Chicago of the 1920s, where in every dark alley lurks a commercial."
On View (1957-1962) again introduced by Margot Lovell or Sheila Matthews, introduced later by Jane Maxwell. Scriptwriters included David Edwards, John Craig, Mary Hill, Barbara Gillies. Directors included Christopher Hodson, Tig Roe, Jim Pople, John Oxley, William Freshman, Marion Radclyffe, Penny Wootton, Cyril Butcher. It was renamed In My View in autumn 1961, thrice weekly with different presenters each day Sheila Matthews, George Martin, Jane Maxwell, Daphne Padell. The Craddocks later joined the rota. It spluttered on into 1962. Other presenters: Nola Rose, Margaret Mitchell, Geoffrey Stone.
It's The Tops- three programmes noted: Friday Feb 28th 1958 6.44pm, Fri Mar 28th 6.40pm, and Friday Nov 3rd 1961 6.13-6.21pm. Presented by Fanny and Johnnie Craddock.
Do It Yourself also Home Decorating (Mar 27th 1958, 10.30pm) featuring Garry Marsh and the Marsh family. Script David Edwards, director: Bill Perry. A later edition in 1959 with Buck Braynard and Nicolette Roeg. Director: William Freshman
Pets' Programme (Tuesdays 6.40pm in autumn 1958) with Peter Butterworth and Janet Brown, and George Cansdale. Scriptwriters included Bernard Kennedy. Scriptwriters included Bernard Kennedy. Directors included Bimbi Harris.
Please Note (Thursdays 10.30pm or Fridays 6.44pm autumn 1957 to spring 1958, Fridays 10.45pm in autumn 1958). Scriptwriters included Diana Noel and Neil Bramson. Directors included John Oxley, Ian Fordyce, Pat Baker, Marion Radclyffe. 1957 editions included Nat Temple and his band, with Nat answering some "very unusual questions." On Feb 27th 1958 at 10.30pm, Norman Hackforth first introduced GEMMA, the great music making apparatus! This continued until Autumn 1958, with music by Steve Race.
Open House (some Mondays/ Fridays 6.44pm autumn 1957) with Terence Alexander (first few editions), Juno Stevas, Nigel Arkwright, Roger Maxwell and Madoline Thomas. Script: Tony Coustow. Director: John Oxley.
Holliday House (Tuesdays 6.40pm spring 1958, Wednesdays 6.40pm in autumn 1958) Directors included William Freshman, Tig Roe, Marion Radclyffe.
Motoring Club (1958-1959) with James Tilling. Script: David Edwards. Director: Marion Radclyffe. 1959 with Neville Lloyd. Script: David Edwards. Director: Bill Turner.
Here is a contemporary review by HD of one Motoring Club- "Script by David Edwards and directed by Bill Turner, was the 'busiest' magazine I remember seeing. It gave the same impression as those pages of a printed magazine which are covered with boxes of type, and bits here and there all over the place. One gets the impression there's a lot there, and all very interesting stuff, but it's just a little hard on the digestion. Nevil Lloyd was boss of the outfit, and he was helped out by John Watson, Geoffrey Denton and Tony Hilton. Smart cutting took us from Nevil Lloyd to the two garage hands, back again to Nevil Lloyd, then on to an interview, another quick look at the garage hands, and so on. The garage hands were a little unconvincing in that their accents were rather West-Endy. The most natural and apparently at ease person on the programme was Mr Kidd, assistant editor of The Motor"
Flair (1958/9) was a regular admag on fashions, some specials were also run by A-R. An early programme on July 3rd 1958 at 10.45pm was introduced by Catherine Boyle, directed by John Rhodes. Fashion editor: Patricia Godfrey. Producer: John French. On March 4th 1959 at 10.45pm Nola Rose and Derek Waring introduced the latest Parisian and Italian fashions. Fashion editor: Patricia Godfrey. Director: Bill Turner. Joan Kemp-Welch directed the June 10th 1959 programme.
Over the Hills (January 1957 7.16pm, January 1959 10.45pm, Tues Dec 29th 1959 6.40pm also Jan 5th and 12th 1960. Also January 1963 6.45pm) Another holiday magazine. Early editions with Peter Haigh and Joy Stewart, script: David Edwards. Later with Kenneth Horne with Pamela Selden and Geoffrey Stone. Script David Edwards, with additional material by Kenneth Horne. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Shopping for You (Thursdays 6.40pm early 1959, Wednesdays 10.40pm spring 1959) introduced by Peter Haig and Jane Maxwell. Script: David Edwards. Director: Bimbi Harris/ Rosemary Hill. Later there was a special on November 9th 1960 6.45pm. with Jane Maxwell and Tom Mullis showing there is more to buying a shirt than meets the eye. Kitty Bluett and Pat Coombs are also on hand. Script: Diana Noel. The title was also used in autumn 1961 with George Martin. Script: Peter Ling. Director: Kane Archer
Gardening (1959) with Raymond Bishop
Mainly for Men (Wednesday June 17th 1959) with McDonald Hobley. Script: David Edwards. The series resurfaced in 1961 with Kenneth Horne and Tom Mullis.
By George (Thursdays early 1959 at 6.45pm, periodically to 1962). With George Martin. Directors included Pat Baker/ Peter Moffatt/ James Sutherland. The programme on July 27th 1962 had George with his guest Nola Rose looking at products "in spite of Mrs Shufflewick's interruptions." Script: George Martin. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Shop on the Corner (Mondays 7pm about monthly in summer 1960 into spring 1961). A visit to the Jacksons' local store near Kingsford. Later programmes indicated the shop was run by Brenda Jackson and her assistant Harry Stone. Actress Barbara Brown was to have featured in all episodes, but only actually appeared in two. Scripts: David Edwards. Directors included Christopher Hodson/ Cyril Butcher/ James Sutherland.
Lovely to Look At (Mondays 7pm spring 1961) A lighthearted revue of fashion and beauty featuring Naomi Chance, Mike Hall, Jill Carson and Jean Graziani. Staged by Alex Morrow. Script: Peter Ling. Director: John P Hamilton. A later edition on Fri May 4th 1962 featured Nola Rose and Molly Love.
Choose (autumn 1959 to summer 1961 Weds 6.45pm) "The first fully networked weekday advertising magazine" shown monthly. The presenters varied, the first programme on September 28th 1959 had Frances Bennett and Rex Garner (see photo). April 1961: Terence Alexander and Juno Stevas. Director Peter Moffat. May 1961: Catherine Boyle and Rex Garner. Script: Lew Schwarz. Director: James Sutherland.
Just The Job (Jan 21st, Feb 4th, Feb 18th and March 3rd 1960) a series of four fifteen minute admags presented by Peter Haigh
Picnics (August 1960). Eating out of doors with Fanny and Johnny Craddock. Director: Eric Croall
Tea for Two (1962) with George Martin and George Cansdale.
Fair and Square (Fri Feb/Mar 1963 6.45pm) with Kenneth Horne with Sheila Matthews. Holiday suggestions. Script David Edwards, with additional material by Kenneth Horne. Director: Daphne Shadwell.

Specials:
Guy Fawkes Party (Thursday Oct 25th 1956, 7.16-7.30pm) how to make the most of your Nov 5th celebrations and "save yourself a lot of trouble and expense." Script: Mary Hill. Director: Pat Baker.
Treat In Store (Thursday Dec 7th 1956, 7.16-7.30pm). Francis Coudrill and his puppet Cassy make an amusing visit to "a famous London store." Plus an opportunity to win a gold watch. Script: Zita Dundas. Director: Joan Kemp-Welch.
Ideal Homes (Monday March 4th 1957, 7.30-8pm) with Ben Lyon at a preview of the Daily Mail exhibition. Script: Mary Hill. Director: Alan Morris.
Margot Lovell Reports... (Tuesday March 5th 1957, 10-10.15pm) with items of interest from the Ideal Home Exhibition. Script: Vivian Milroy. Director: Daphne. Shadwell
Motoring Holiday (Tuesday July 30th 1957, 10pm) with Dennis Lotis. Script: Barry Pevan (his first admag script)
Television Beauty Salon (Monday Sept 23rd 1957, 6.44pm A-R London. Shown on Granada Tues Oct 1st 10pm, and Scottish TV Wed Oct 2nd 6.45pm) Commere: Honor Blackman. Demonstrations of professional beauty care by Ponds. With fashion journalist Iris Ashley, beauty specialist Clair Wallace, and teenage hostess Damon d'Este with special things for teenagers.
Street Music (Thursday October 31st 1957 10.30pm) with Rolf Harris who brings his busking friends to London. Script: Diana Noel. Idea and lyrics by David Dearlove. Music: Ron Grainer. Director: Marion Radclyffe.
Christmas Ahead (Tuesday Nov 26th 1957, 6.44pm) Script: David Edwards. Director: Marion Radclyffe.
PC Flower Investigates (Wed Feb 25th 1958, 10.30pm)- script: Neil Bramson. Director: Ian Fordyce.
Gardening Club (Friday Apr 4th 1958) introduced by Sidney James with Miriam Karlin. Script: David Edwards. Director: Marion Radclyffe.
Summer Ahead (Thursdays from May 29th 1958) featuring Garry Marsh, with ideas for the summer season. Script: David Edwards. Director: Macdonald Martin. One contemporary comment: "the script was very strained... and strained to breaking point where a series of swim, suits had to be advertised. The only way this could be dragged into the outdoor setting was to get the men to bring a tv set out and watch a conventional commercial spot!... Underehearsed, some of the characters weren't even sure of their words. Garry Marsh forgot (I presume) to repeat the name of the product, Fison's Tomorite, and said something like, How much is It?"
Storegazing (Friday May 30th 1958, another on June 27th 1958) introduced by Paul Carpenter. On furniture. Script: Bernard Kennedy. Director: Marion Radclyffe.
Focus on Fabrics (Friday June 13th 1958) Script: Verrall Dunlop. Director: Marion Radclyffe.
Christmas Ahead (Friday Dec 5th 1958, 10.45pm) introduced by George Martin. Director: Pat Baker.
Ideal Homes (Mon Mar 2nd 1959, 7-7.30pm) Another visit, this year with Jimmy Hanley and "his friends from Jim's Inn." They came to London to visit the Ideal Homes Exhibition which was due to open the next day
Go Modern This Christmas (Nov 30th 1959) - advertising ten different Philips Electrical Ltd goods. This programme was networked and was viewed in an estimated 2,690,000 homes.
Fashion News (Thurs Feb 4th 1960, 10.45pm). Ex model Nola Rose, helped by Derek Waring, introduces new English fashion designers. Director: Bill Turner.
Ideal Home (Monday Feb 29th 1960, 7-7.30pm) this was networked, with Jimmy Hanley, who also co-wrote the script with Bob Kellett. Others appearing included Kenneth Horne as well as a couple of Jim's Inn regulars, Margaret Hanley and John Sherlock. Director: Graham Watts.
Fashion Time (Fri May 20th 1960, 10.35pm also networked to Granada. ATV Midlands showed it on May 24th at 6.45pm) Marks and Spencer exhibit their St Michael merchandise, this was the first time the firm had commissioned an entire admag. Script: David Edwards and Mary Hill. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Friends of the Family (Tues Aug 23rd 1960, 6.45pm). New clothes made with Acrilan. Script: Peter Ling. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Take One Kookaburra (Wed October 12th 1960, 6.30-6.45pm). Alan Freeman with a guided tour of Australia, showing some Aussie products available to the housewife. Alan was assisted by Tom Mullis and Juno Stevas. Director: Peter Croft.
Christmas Fare (Mon Dec 12th 7pm). Jane Maxwell and Peter Haig with Kitty Bluett and Pat Cooms. Script: Diana Noel.
Christmas Gifts (Tues Dec 13th 6.45pm). With Sheila Mathews. Director: James Sutherland.
Christmas Pie (Wed Dec 14th 1960 6.45pm). With "shoppers extraordinary" Hermione Baddeley, Kenneth Horne, Richard Murdoch, Beryl Reid and Tommy Trinder, with Michael Rathbone. Script: Diana Noel. Director: Cyril Butcher.
Mark of Quality (Mon Feb 6th 1961, 7pm). Introducing Danish food products, and the story behind the 'Lurmark' brand. The cast list was:
Philip James... Lecturer
Chares Rea... Artisan
Margot Lane... Housewife
Jane Cain... Hostess
Julie Paul, John Gayford... Guests
Sheila Matthews, Tom Mullis... Voices
Director: James Sutherland.
House of Fashion (Wed Mar 22nd 1961, 6.45pm) Some of the latest ready-to-wear fashions from London's leading designers to be seen at Berkertex House. Staged by Michael Whittaker. Script: Peter Ling. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Mother and Child (Thurs Mar 1st 1962, 6.11-6.20pm) with Nola Rose.
The Pollsters (Aug 19th 1962, 11.12pm)- life assurance
Last Minute Buys (Fri Dec 21st 1962 6.45pm) with Kenneth Horne (who also wrote the script) with Nola Rose and Geoffrey Stone. Director: Peter Yolland.
Ideal Home (Tuesday Mar 5th 1963, 7-7.30pm) the very last annual visit, with Kenneth Horne, Sheila Matthews and George Martin. Plus a special item with Fanny and Johnnie Craddock. Script: David Edwards. Director: Bimbi Harris. Additional film direction by Richard Sidwell. Producer: Cyril Butcher.

In February 1960 Associated Rediffusion threw a party in a London hotel to celebrate the 600th admag produced by the company. Guests were welcomed by Joe Garwood, Head of Advertising Magazines and his assistant Anstice Shaw.
Thus it can be calculated that A-R must eventually have made around one thousand such programmes

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Jim's Inn
One of A-R's best remembered and longest running admags which opened in 1957.
With Jimmy Hanley as Mine Host and Maggie his wife. Other regulars:
Jack Edwardes a pipe smoking farmer who joined the series very early on.
John Sherlock as absent minded Ron who runs the village hardware store. He was in the first programme, and in nearly all others; He has twins and is married to Mary, though she is never seen.
Roma Cresswell/ Denville as Roma runs the local beauty salon- she claimed never to have missed a programme.
Diane Watts as Peggy, wife of
Dennis Bowen as Dennis, a commuter with a City job. He has an Army-type moustache. He joined in February 1960.
Director of 98 of the first 100 shows was Pat Baker. Scripts were by Bob Kellett.
For the programme on March 2nd 1959, the inn was closed, so the gang could go en masse to the Ideal Home Exhibiton. Unusually, this was shown in other regions, Granada, ATV, TWW, and Southern, with increased advertising charges to match= 1,325 per minute.
The hundredth programme was on May 8th 1959. It was stated that the show had been directly responsible for more than 230,000 worth of business.
Programme no 150 was on April 20th 1960. Picture: 200th edition, April 6th 1961, with Pat Baker directing after a long absence.
The final series of programmes began on April 24th 1962, and with admags banned, the final programme was on Wednesday March 27th 1963 10.45 to 11pm, directed once more by Pat Baker. There was quite of regulars for this final edition, as well as mine hosts Jimmy and Margaret Hanley, also appearing were Jack Edwardes, Roma Cresswell, John Sherlock, Diane Watts, Dennis Bowen, Ken Haward, and Eric Spear.

Here's a contemporary account by James O'Toole of the programme broadcast in March 1960.
"A hardy perennial.. it's got so that viewers switch over as much for this programme as they do Late Extra.
Watching a particular edition is to obtain an academic lesson in how to hard sell without twisting an arm...
Jim showed us an Austrian Beer Mug- made in Japan. From then on, compulsive viewing was the order of the night. It would be difficult to find a cast more attuned to the needs of the sell. They have the commonplace taped to a remarkable degree, and might well be playing in the Cherry Orchard such care is lavished on their performances. All the products get a good showing and included, among others, Araldite, Frood, Fablon and Duresco Paints. Jimmy Hanley has an uncanny knack of making up for anything that goes slightly wrong on recording, so that the product gets another mention- or something. The effect is that Client and Agent are more than pleased. It takes a good deal of talent to say to camera, after having a leaflet thrust into your hand, "isn't it nice to have customers like that." And the viewers think what a nice person."
The programme was always coming up with fresh slants. For example, the April 13th 1960 programme came from Jimmy Hanley's own garden in Fetcham. Joe Garwood, Head of A-R Advertising Magazines stated, "we believe that a lot of its (Jim's Inn) success is due to the fact that we have never allowed the programme to stand still. We have constantly strived to improve it through the use of new ideas and new faces at the inn."
A-R Admags

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Of Southern's ADMAGS, the first was probably
The Quiet Revolution in Shopping, director Terry Yarwood.
1959 admags were
1 Shop in the South The first host had been Daphne Padell, with Roy Hepworth and Jean Burgess. Then in 1959 it was hosted by Frances Bennett and Ray Brown/ Tom Mullis, Thursdays at 6.40pm until July 1st when it moved to a new slot at 10.45. Mary Malcolm was a later host, before the programme ceased towards the end of the year.
2 Counterwise with Lisa Rayne and James Drake on Fridays 10.45pm. Scripts for both were by Michael Hastings, director Patrick Barton. Leonard White also directed some programmes. Liaison Officer Biddy Martin. This programme finished at the end of the year, replaced by
3 Value for Money began a trial run in November 1959, with Gerald Campion as resident compere using a script by Diana Noel, later by Bob Kellett. Campion of course was celebrated for his portrayal as Billy Bunter, so was the main theme FOOD?! Certainly the early themes were seasonal ones. After a break, from Feb 7th 1960 it was shown weekly in the Sunday 5.50pm slot until the start of July 1960.
Also in 1960: In a Thursday 6.45pm slot, replacing Shop in the South, came Buy Lines, scripts by Diana Noel. Jess Spencer was resident commere. A Sixty second participation cost 160, but for the summer this price was reduced to 100, or a 15 second mention was priced at 35. Special editions included Australian products (Aug 2nd 1960 edition) and Danish products (Aug 9th). This programme to run that autumn, on Tuesdays at 6.45pm.
Kenneth Horne had been hosting Trader Horne on Tyne Tees, as from Thursday September 15th 1960 at 6.45pm, Southern Television took over this admag.
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Scottish Television
January 1959 saw STV with the highest number of commercial spots on ITV. They screened 138 of 7 secs, 719 of 15 secs, 725 of 30 secs, 93 of 45 secs, and 225 of 60 secs.
Fashion In Store on April 22nd 1959 at 6.45pm was a company first, the whole show promoted the department store of Copland's of Sauchiehall Street. A one-off admag as part of Scottish Week: Pathway to Prosperity
Thursday September 10th 1959, 6.50 to 7.05pm. Recorded in Kelvin Hall at exhibitors' stands at the Scottish Industries Exhibition, before editing at STV's Theatre Royal studio. There were about ten spots "from carpets to confectionery," each 60 seconds long, costing advertisers 100 each. Each spot included interviews, shots of the stand, close-ups of products. Preceding this on Sept 7th at 7pm was a half hour advertising world famous Scottish firms, including Colvilles Ltd (steel), Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co, and J&P Coate (cotton). Introduced by Peter Cookman.
Happy Holidays was a series of three mags for the 1960 season. Programme 1 had spots by the Northern Ireland Tourist Board, Travel Trips, the Anglo-Yugoslavia Tourist Service, and the Isle of Man, this last had a voiceover by Robert Beatty. More unusually Lambretta Ltd promoted a 'do-it-yourself' holiday. Presenter was Elaine Welles. Programme 2 was on Feb 11th, the final programme on Feb 21st 1960.
In 1960, STV were running three 15 minute advertising magazines:
Armchair Shopping (Tuesdays 6.45pm) Presenters Buddy Logan and Dorothy Dean.
Between Ourselves (Thursdays 6.45pm) with Elaine Wells.
Friday Fare (Fridays 10.35pm) with Doris McLatchie. Director: John Pullen.
STV admag writers were David Fisher, Ninian Gibson and Catherine Tidd.

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Granada admags
In 1957 Granada was screening Talking Shop, a fifteen minute series hosted by Maureen Pryor, who "invites viewers to come and meet her friends at No 99, where they are talking about many things." The cast of "her friends" were Brenda Ralston as Helen, Simon Merrick as John, and Hazel Humby as Anne. Director: Mark Lawton.
In November 1957, Granada announced that their admags would be ending at the end of the year. So 1958 was admag free on Granada! However in 1959 there reappeared an emaciated Talking Shop, Thursdays at 6.08pm, later once a week on different days at 6.33pm. As the length was now a mere 5 minutes, this was little more than an extended ad break, certainly by today's standards!
The autumn 1959 schedules saw three such programmes each week squashed in an early evening slot. By October they had infiltrated on a daily basis! Director: Pamela Brown. In this period, it was reported that on one occasion 7 programmes were pre-recorded in the space of two days, featuring 37 products.
For the Monday Dec 28th 6.30pm programme, the name was altered to Holidays Ahead director: Pamela Brown. But then, after a few seasonal days' rest, Talking Shop was back on New Years Day 1960 (7.00-7.05pm). However there was another Holidays Ahead on Jan 14th at 6.45pm. Talking Shop was now advertised only for two or three editions per week, though I suspect a few of these programmes were not advertised in TV Times. In March 1960 Pauline Shaw took over direction. Another variation on the title came on Tues Mar 22nd at 6.45pm, it was Spring Fair. Pamela Brown return to direct on and from March 31st 1960. Eric Price directed a few editions on and from Apr 18th 1960, Pamela Brown returned on Apr 22nd 1960. Directors in April included Wilfred Fielding as well as Pamela Brown. The short programme continued until about the end of the year with the same rota of directors. It resurfaced intermittently until March 1961.
However in the autumn of 1960, Granada launched ten minute admags with slightly more inspiring titles.
Go To Town (Mondays 6.30-6.40pm spring 1961) with Anita Prynne and Michael Behr. Director: Pauline Shaw. Mar 13th 1961: spring wallpapering.
Home Today (1961). Director: Pauline Shaw. In summer 1961 the presenters included James Drake and Kathryn Greenaway, Pamela Seldon. Later directors included Eric Harrison, Marilyn Russell, as well as Pauline Shaw. This long running admag continued intermittently until November 1961, returning briefly on May 25th 1962, presented by Chris Trace and Isobel Grieg. Director: David Rea.
Wheels (Thursdays 6.10pm spring 1961) a five minute motoring slot with John Braban and Nevil Lloyd. Director: Pauline Shaw.
Out and About (Mondays after the 6.05pm Granada Newsbrief Apr/May 1961). As All Our Yesterdays began at 6.10, this was a typically short Granada admag! It was "a seasonable series for summery days ahead with the accent on outdoor pursuits." Presenters: Sylvia Bidmead and Mervyn Pascoe. Director: Pauline Shaw.
Supper Club (Thursdays after the 6.05pm Newsbrief until 6.15pm, summer 1961). Introduced by your happy host Tony Veale. Viewers could write for the Recipe of the Week. Director: Pauline Shaw.
Poppy's Pantry (Thursdays 6.06pm or Wednesdays 6.30pm June/ July 1961. Then in September 1961) presented by James Drake and Kathryn Greenaway. or Pamela Seddon with Poppy in her kitchen. Directors: Eric Harrison, Pauline Shaw, David Rea.
For Eve (May 1961- May 1962) - modern aids to beauty. Presenters included Margaret Neale, Susan Franks. Director: Pauline Shaw but also David Rea.
Production of Granada admags ceased with the Equity strike towards the end of 1961. First admag to return may have been a special with Mr Pastry in April 1962 (see below).
Key (June - October 1962). A monthly mag, firstly with Shaw Taylor and Pauline Clifford, then with James Drake and Katherine Greenaway.

Specials:
Radio Show Time (Tues Aug 30th 1960) directed by Pamela Brown. A 5 minute mag on the Radio Show Earl's Court
Manchester's New Store Friday June 2nd 1961, 6.40-6.55pm (Channel 9 only) Lady Barnett at the new Marks and Spencer store in Market Street. At the same time on Channel 10, there was Money Magic, which included a recipe for raspberry sponge. Director: Pauline Shaw.
Keep Young and Healthy (Fri Aug 11th 1961, 6.06-6.15pm) with June Dawes. Send for a free sample! Director: Pauline Shaw.
A Sparkle in your Eye (Fri Sept 1st 1961, 6.06-6.15pm) with Dorina Brown (Channel 9 only). Right from the Start introduced by John Braban. On motoring (Channel 10 only). Both programmes directed by David Rea.
Fare Comment (Mon Sept 11th 1961 6.06pm) Food and kitchen equipment at a Manchester exhibition. Director: David Rea.
Curtain Call (Wed Sept 13th 1961 6.06pm) - on curtains in the home. Director: David Rea.
Winter Comfort (Mon Sept 25th 1961 6.06pm) A happy family talk about comfort in the home. Director: Marilyn Russell.
All My Own Work (Tues Sept 26th 1961 6.06pm) Home improvements. Director: David Rea.
Mr Pastry Plays It Cool (Granada Channel 10 only Monday April 16th 1962, 6.08-6.20pm) with Richard Hearne and Philip Harben. Director: Eric Beecroft.

Granada's heart was never in admags and the company was the first of the main contractors to ditch them before the ban on admags in 1963. One of their last was Let's Go Shopping in November 1962

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Tyne Tees Television
The first admags in 1959 were: Information Desk, the first ever TTT admag, on Sunday Jan 18th 1959 a 4.40pm, with Vincent Goodman and Laura Hedley with information on holidays. Producer Bernice Dorskind. Kenneth Horne was in charge. The final programme was on June 28th 1959. It continued as Trader Horne, Kenneth joined by Ann Croft- Sundays 4.25pm. In spring 1960 she was replaced by Elaine Wells. This programme transferred to Southern TV in September 1960.
Ned's Shed began on Monday Jan 19th 1959 at 6.40pm, producer David Croft. Lisle Willis played Ned, assisted by Dan Douglas as next door neighbour Knocker Brown and Maud Foster as the wife. This later moved to Thursdays at 6.40.
Mary Goes to Market with Mary Malcolm, replaced this Monday admag, it ran until July 27th 1959, then returned running into 1960.
Come Shopping with Daphne Padell Tuesdays at 6.40 from Jan 20th 1959, producer Raymond Joss. This continued until July 28th 1959, but returned and ran into 1960.
Two Christmas specials were shown in December on Saturdays at 5.15pm, Trains for Christmas and Model Christmas, both presented by Tom Mullin.
Hi There!

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Sample of a few Famous names making ads
1955: Frank Muir/Denis Norden- Capstan (Oct), John Betjeman- Shell ('Discovering Britain' series); Terry Thomas (Oct 19th, Nov 10th & 30th 1955, others included Feb 2nd 1956) & David Nixon (Oct 5th & 27th, Nov 16th 55, also Jan 19th 1956)- BP.
1956: Leslie Phillips- Cadbury's Chocolate; Alma Cogan, Lita Roza, Joan Regan, Jill Day- Silvikrin. Irene Handl- Mansion Polish: her roles included a charlady, an MP, a trapeze artist, a duchess, and a female Victorian detective. Shirley Abicair- voiceover for Kit-e-Kat. Joan and Leslie Randall- Quaker Oats.
1957: Carole Carr, Patti Lewis, Jill Day- Palmolive, Charlie Drake- Lyons Quick Brew, Alexander Gauge- Walls Pork Sausages, Bernard Miles- Bramley Apples, Cy Grant- Week End Mail, Wilfred Pickles- Fynnons Salts.
1958: Cyril Fletcher- Quality Street (Feb/March), Eric Sykes - Charrington's (June 1958), Gilbert Harding- Maclean's Indigestion, Charlie Drake- Lyons Quick Brew, Gordon Harker- Electoral Registration.
1959: Alec Bedser- Coleman's Mustard, Beryl Reid- M&B beer, Una Stubbs- Dairy Box, Thora Hird- Mother's Pride (voiceover), Arthur Askey- Gray Dunn Caramel Wafers (cartoon with voiceover), Ruth Trouncer- Tide, also Nutrex. Sooty- Foster Clark jellies (from Apr 12th). Jimmy Hanley- Harlene Hair Tonic (ATV Midlands only, from April 24th), James Robertson Justice- Frigidaire (June), Bernard Miles- Lion Eggs, Whitbread's Beer (Southern TV first screening Oct 1st), Hylda Baker- toffee (Nov 1959), Stanley Holloway- Alka-Seltzer (December 1959), Billy Wright- Shavex, Freddie Truman- New Remington Shaver, Hughie Green- Mac Throat Sweets, Bob Monkhouse- Mars.
1960: Bernard Miles- Eggs,
Nicholas Parsons (Jan 1960)- Blue Cars Ltd, Danny Blanchflower (Feb 1960)- Shredded Wheat, Julie Andrews (Feb 1960)- Ryvita, Benny Hill (March 1960)- Schweppes Bitter Lemon, Dora Bryan - CWS Biscuits, Jimmy Hanley- Kwench Orange Squash, (May 1960)- Terry Hall & Lenny the Lion- Bowyers Sausages, Elsie and Doris Waters- Suncrush, Hughie Green- White Tide, Arthur Haynes Alka-Seltzer, Janette Scott Lux, Wilfred Pickles (Aug 1960)- Eno, Claude Hulbert (Sept 1960)- Aero.
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Nicholas Parsons
Blue Cars Ltd- The two ads were described by a pernickety J O'T: "In one filmlet he is seen against a Venetian backdrop. In another he is outside a chalet in the Alps. They both start with a female tourist trying out her phrasebook on Parsons. Then- silly girl!- she realises who she is talking to. From then on it becomes nothing more than a variety turn with Nicholas falling into a canal, popping up later quite unwet without a hair out of place. The second situation has him blowing an Alpine Horn, which brings a snowfall on their heads. He pops up again obviously unhurt. Certainly it's different to anything else on the air. A better script would have made the spots funnier. And if the direction had been a little more controlled, Nicholas might have come over a little better. As it was, I wasn't left with any clear picture of what was special about Blue Cars."
He was also involved with these commercials in the 1950s:
Dubonnet, Erasmic, Crosse and Blackwell, Fox's Glacier Mints.
With his wife Denise Bryer, they were associated with: Terrylene, and Lyons Mousse.
Denise also did voiceovers, including:
Kelloggs- 'the Sunshine Boy,' Sunblest Bread - 'Sammy' the boy friend of the flirty Susie, Tetley Tea Bags - 'Alice,' Rowntrees Fruit Gums - 'the Young Boy,' and Brooke Bond Tea- one of the famous 'chimpanzees.'

As well as the Blue Cars Ltd commercials, Nicholas and Denise also appeared in a 15 minute admag for the firm on January 19th 1960, shown on Associated-Rediffusion.

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Milk Marketing Board (1956)
A series made by Crawfords. The one pictured shows child actor Jimmy Ray making a heartfelt plea for a drink of milk at bedtime, but his mother (Jennifer Aylmer) hasn't ordered enough, so next day she must order an extra pint.
In another from this series, a gardener (Derek Tansley) leaves his flowers and goes to the kitchen and opens the fridge, only to find the same problem. PS wrote, "his face, with its unspoken comment, is a sheer joy. Poor mother you really had better order that extra pint right away!"

Mackeson had been regularly advertising on commercial tv since its inception, and for Christmas 1957, produced two seasonal specials. These were the 29th and 30th of their puppet cartoons, made by Dutch puppeteer Joop Geesink. They were made for Whitbread and Company by the Walter Thompson Agency.
These Mackeson commercials came top of the monthly popularity poll six times during 1957.

Terry's Fruit Pastilles were promoted in four adverts weekly in the ATV Midlands area during April 1958. The fifteen second cartoons were produced by Geoffrey Rigby of Basil Butler TV, designed by top animator Peter Sachs. Accompanying the action was the jingle set to the tune Cherry Ripe, with a twist on this to Terry Ripe!

Walls Steak and Kidney Pie (January 1959)
Actress Benita Lydal is seen looking at her warming pan before she moves to camera to talk about her pie. "Benita Lydal is perfect for the part," in promoting "you can be old fashioned and yet use the modern labour saving ways...with the just like mother used to make complex." Though "it is most difficult to portray the homely yet authoritative housewife," Benita succeeds.

Kraft Cheese Slices (January 1959)
Actress Pamela Barrie played an unusual but attractive lady, awaiting visitors. The commercial starts with the sight of an old crock noisily arriving, the dishevelled occupants noisily shouting out, "we know we're early but..." The housewife waves, and then very expertly and quickly makes the sandwiches with Kraft slices.

"The Esso Sign Means Happy Motoring" was one catchy jingle that began in the 1950s. Here's one
Esso ad (January 1959):
An opera singer is on his way to perform when his car conks out.
Of course, it can be revived, but only by Esso.
Thus the great singer gets to his performance on time, and we hear him singing, opera style, the well known Esso jingle.
According to Harold Darton in Television Weekly, the voice of the singer was none other than Dick Emery.

Kellogg's All Bran (January 1959)
Actress Meriel Hunn plays an attractive young shopper who is having to listen to a very talkative old lady (played by "a very convincing" Doris Gilmore) in a self service store. The old woman chatters on while the younger one tries to lose her, moving away while conversation is in full flood. But there is no shaking her off and the conversation veers to singing the praises of the cereal.

Daily Sketch (January 1959)
Bill Shine is at Bertram Mills Circus in search of a happy reader of the Sketch. He gets knocked, kicked and ducked. Harold Darton wrote, "the circus sequence is particularly funny. It is bubbling with ideas, not just the obvious ones, take that piece of film run backwards at the end, it is fast moving and it shows a nice but unsubtle brand of humour. Bill Shine is perfectly cast as the interviewer, one laughs with him, and at the same time there's no call for pathos in this sort of knockabout comedy. I also noticed him doing a Rollo ad last week."

Palmolive (February 1959)
Actress Rosalie Ashley received a brickbat from Harold Darton: "this spot opens with a most beautiful blonde snuggled in a cheek to cheek embrace with a young man, the sort of thing that should set every young heart a-flutter, and make every girl envy her. But Rosalie looks as comfortable as a dead fish on a fishmonger's marble, and about as cold. It is no doubt difficult to bring a real warmth into a pose like this, set up in a studio with the sale of soap as the object of the exercise

Shell Lubrication (March 1959)
In this one of many Shell ads, Jeremy Cox plays a nephew with Gerald Case as his uncle who are listening to a mechanic who is expounding the virtues of using Shell. The latter is played by an employee of Shell, but his voiceover is by actor Sydney Vivian. Oddly Case's voice is not his own but supplied by actor Stephen Jack.

Bass Beers (first screened April 13th 1959)
A 60 second spot made by Screencraft in a City pub using nine actors, leading characters played by Colin Fry and Mark Eden, both in their first commercial. The bar was constructed at Halliford Studios by producer/director Gerald Landau, who is seen at the bar.
"Bass for Men" was the slogan in another ad in this series, with "just ordinary men" forming a "rapidly increasing crowd at the bar, all ordering Bass."

White Tide (April 1959)
John Blythe played 'The White Tide Man,' who steps from behind an enormous packet of the detergent to introduce himself, and says he might be calling and, if you can produce a packet of Tide, give you a 5 grocery voucher.

Rice Crispies (May 1959)
HD wrote: "Arthur Askey is doing the latest of the Rice Crispies spots, and he has very fortunately been blessed with an Arthur Askey script, including a Busy Little Bee tune. He sweeps a crowded table clean, and twists the top over to reveal a well-laid breakfast spread. He winds up the milk with a well-like wheel and handle, gets the Rice Crispies from an enormous safe - they're handed out to him- and ends up by listening to the snap crackle and pop, and saying, "ah, they're playing our tune!"
This is one of those near perfect ads using a 'name' character

Players Cigarettes (July 1959)
Reginald Marsh "looking more like a tobacconist than a tobacconist, puts this one over. This," wrote HD, "is a good example of how simplicity can be more effectve than complicated production techniques, even if it woudn't win a Cannes prize. There is just the one main point, that Players give you pleasure. Reginald Marsh puts it over with conviction and authority, and he even manages to say 'Players Please' as though it were an original thought"

Fray Bentos (November 1959)
Director: Peter Sims. JO'T wrote: "here is a competently lit, photographed, edited and directed commercial. The film features a housewife in a supermarket, who has a rosette presented to her, by some bearded character, for having the good sense to buy Fray Bentos. 'Be a winner of a wife,' the viewers are told. I can just imagine what would happen if the average housewife were approached by a bearded gent, with or without a rosette. If she didn't run away screaming you could be sure that she would either a) call a policeman or b) hit him with her brolly. There's a far cry from selling Schweppes in America to selling canned meat in Wigan... The viewing housewife dare not identify herself with the housewife in the spot, because it's not the sort of spot she would like to be in. So much depends on women viewers thinking the gimmicky idea rather amusing. Too much"

Stork Margarine (December 1959)
JO'T: "There is a couple outside a theatre queuing for the Gallery and strolling along the Embankment. They are as always interrupted by a middle-class know-it-all. This woman is very interesting because she can tell the difference between Stork and butter. I wonder, as I watch, if she's just a lonely old spinster trying to make friends, or whether, having driven her husband to desert her, she resents the young people being together, and has to get her oar in. The believability factor is altogether too weak. A square optical, a la Brian Tesler, is very effective in taking us to where the woman is using Stork in her kitchen. The boy on the Embankment gives, I feel, the most impressive performance, throwing away his lines with great skill. Post-synching is excellent, but the sound man might have pulled down the female interrupter a little so that she wasn't quite so piercing"

Lucozade (January 1960)
JO'T: "It opens on a charming view of the countryside. We pan to bring into frame a lane up which a worker is pedalling his bike. There is a cut, and we track in close-shot with the man backed by the lovely countryside. We see the man arriving at the grimy factory. We see him working at the furnaces, not looking too well. Later we see him picking flowers for his wife during his convalescence. There is time for a closeup of him making a posy. The end shows the worker leaving his mean terraced house to go off to work. He's taken his Lucozade, and looks better. The location chosen couldn't be better. Grim factories and charming rural setting make an excellent counterpoint for each other. Even the house which is atop a hilly street is perfectly located. Composition plays a big part in this filmlet- the lighting cameraman's contribution is apparent throughout, nowhere more than in the wonderful depth. There are two well cast actors. More yet, the jingle set in waltz time perfectly matches the film, giving it an extra touch of warmth"

Birds Eye Fish (January 1960)
JO'T: "I am always impressed by the high level of creativity to be found in a Birds Eye spot. This commercial is announcing price reductions. There's been a drop of a penny off the cost. The imaginative way they show the penny off particualrly appeals to me. It is shown spinning and coming to rest. But somehow this means much more than merely showing a title which says 'a penny off.' There are no people in this spot, nevertheless, there is a firm impression that thought was given to determine the best way to say it; of saying it in a way most likely to succeed. Having taken all this trouble, it seems a pity that more time wasn't given to choosing a more suitable voiceover."

Shredded Wheat (Feb 60)
J O'T: "Well photographed, well directed, well recorded and dubbed... firmly a team effort, and this team effort stretches to the copy writer who wrote the payoff line, 'pass the hot milk, please.' Indeed to whoever wrote the whole script.
The young footballers are seen playing the game under the guidance of Danny Blanchflower. The approach is that Sporting Shredded Wheaters get their energy from Shredded Wheat. A series of well placed shots skilfully cut together make up the opening. Each time a ball is kicked there is a loud knock on the track supported by the voiceover's 'energy.' We see the lads after the game with their idol, and we track past them. The camera pans over their eager faces. The last shot is of the pack on the end of the table where the boys are sitting. The shot moves from being slightly above and zooms into a tighter position on the pack. Blanchflower is a very professional performer- for an amateur"

Players on the Sea Front (Feb 60)
J O'T: "For good or ill this commercial will set a new pattern in cigarette advertising. There is only one mention of the product's name by the heroine in the sixty second running time. A strong romantic atmosphere is created from the start. Empty sand dunes, a young couple run towards the camera pausing to light their cigarettes. He pulls his mac over his head to shelter the flame from the wind. They run on. There are very effective tracking shots, in front of the couple's legs, pulling away with a medium 2-shot. The camera wanders over the footsteps in the sand, and the final camera movement, a track sideways past wild grass and then in on the couple, sews the film neatly together. Casting, lighting, operating and direction are outstanding. On the debit side, the first shot seems framed for the cinema, and noticeably the hero goes from one shot with his coat open, to another where it is buttoned up. Stroking the hand that holds the pack looks good on paper... on film it attracts the attention away from the product. The music and titling are particularly appropriate to the mood of the commercial. One thing is certain, there wasn't much more they could have got up to but smoking what with the wind and everything..."

Ryvita (Feb 60)
J O'T: "Here is a piece of testimonial advertising by implication. It is a day-in-the-life-of type of spot. Julie Andrews is the artist involved and she must have cost the sponsor a great deal of money. Different hours of the day are put on screen at the same time as it shows the many activities of the star. Up in the morning early, off to the recording studio. From this to a fitting for costumes. Next to a tv studio. Nine o'clock in the evening and she is still full of energy dancing in a club. The film is extremely well done. Settings are authentic. Direction is good. Camera movement and photography defy improvement. But the picture could have just as easily been for Lucozade or Citroze. What the product needs is a strong identification which will repel imitators. What it has here is something that, with a different pack shot and commentary, could be any one of a number of products. Did they really need a star name? As it is, it would not be unfair to infer that one reason for Miss Andrews' slimness and fitness is a good diet. She wasn't shown eating lunch or dinner in the commercial"

Alka Seltzer (this was one of a series with Stanley Holloway, this shown in March 1960)
Here's a contemporary review by JO'T: "Although infanticide sickens the heart of civilized man, Speedy is one child I could cheerfully strangle. Here the little horror is involved with charming Stanley Holloway. And Holloway couldn't do anything wrong if he tried. I only hope he got well paid for appearing with Speedy. Stanley is feeling out of sorts when he has a call from New York. The All-American Ogre tells him what to do to get better. After taking Alka Seltzer, Stanley is well enough to sing 'relief is just a swallow away.' The fantasy takes a bit of swallowing too. On the credit side, there's a very pleasing shot of the product foaming in the glass. But Speedy makes me foam at the mouth. He is the best advert for child beating I've ever seen. It is a pity there is no similar product on the market: then the advertising value of a whining child teaching its elders could be measured"

Kwench Orange Squash (March 1960)
JO'T: "Jimmy Hanley does a very good job for Kwench in Jim's Inn. He does a very good job in this spot too. But whoever gave him so many words to say? Great professional that he is, Hanley somehow avoids the pitfall. He walks down an unreal cellar to deliver his sales pitch about Kwench Orange Squash. He has to say things like, 'gosh what a squash!' There are two strong packshots which are very dramatic. They are both when Jim's hands hold the bottle straight to camera. Instead of relying on talent to see it through, this spot should have had a good script- so that the impact was greater. The squash may be cheaper than many others; but it would be cheaper in the long run if, when using a personality, more attention was given to the reason for employing him in the first place"

Dairy Box (April 1960)
J O'T: "Dairy Box keeps a weather eye on the calendar. At Christmas time there was a snow show, now it's time for their Easter Parade. The camera cranes down past spring blossom to discover the inevitable, the Dairy Box Girl. She dances forward in the same old way. And if anything, better than for a long time. Meanwhile something imaginative is happening. An optical Easter Egg comes towards the camera, bursts, and displays a box of the product. A good idea, well carried out. Dairy Box Girl's boy friend pushes on a gigantic Easter Egg. After a bit of business with boxes he finds not surprisingly a box of Dairy Box. The couple end up by jumping into the Egg. A very good place to return to. The film is directed with great charm. One of the best of the series. The director knows he is framing for television, and it works. Still, heaven preserve us, looking to the future, from the Dairy Box Girl sitting in her old rocking chair, feeding her grandchildren Dairy Box"

Eggs (May 1960)
J O'T: "Surely one of the best sellers on the air must be any film Bernard Miles appears in for the Egg Campaign. In this particular film he's telling us how much the little girl on his lap has grown since we last saw her. He tells us what he feeds her to produce all this solid woman we see. All the more acceptable because we appreciate that eggs are good for us. 'Get in there,' he says, as he pops the spoon into the baby's mouth. 'An egg a day, that's what to give your kids,' is his final advice. To crown it all, the Little Lion is shown with a baby Little Lion which he feeds. But the charm, the whole charm, and nothing but the charm comes from Bernard Miles' superb performance. He is matched by the direction, cutting, and camera operating and lighting. The set design is also very convincing. What this type of commercial does, more than anything else, is prove that you don't really need a sledgehammer except for breaking stones"

White Tide (May 1960)
J O'T: "Hughie Green is the good choice of presenter. He interviews people with interesting jobs, for example an air hostess about to take off. This time he isn't interviewing but 'eaveswatching' in a supermarket. A very popular advertising situation at the present time. Hughie is giving a commentary on the behaviour of shoppers. Their tendency not to make up their minds is the talking point. The camera tracks with one woman who mightn't be the type to make up her mind. Then we pan, as Hughie says, 'she's coming over here.' She walks boldly over to a gondola and picks up a packet of White Tide. The spot is superbly done. Lighting, camerawork, direction, everything. The idea to prove that some women can make up their minds is pretty good too. Hughie Green is all set to disprove the old saying about comedians wanting to play Hamlet- what they want really to play is Richard Dimbleby. Hughie does this with startling effect, showing what an excellent performer he is. But won't Mum and Dad expect the other personality, the one he exhibits on the quiz show?"

Suncrush (May 1960)
J O'T: "Elsie and Doris Waters have popped up again to do a spot for Suncrush. And if possible, they are even better than they were in the Schweppes commercial. For one thing, there's an excellent script, and for another there is excellent teamwork between the stars and a woman who interrupts their conversation. Scene is a supermarket where the sisters are doing their weekly shopping. When people are talking and doing an automatic action they tend to overdo it, and this makes for comedy. Like putting too much tea in the teapot, or salt in the cooking instead of sugar or vice versa. Here one of the sisters, I think it's Gert, fills up her steel basket with Suncrush. They are discussing the merits of the product when another woman tells them how good it is. This piques Gert who repeats the name Suncrush time after time. Finally saying it over the pack shot. It would be difficult to find a more natural way of fulfilling the adman's dream of just coming n and repeating the name of the product. Direction, camerawork and lighting are first rate. And, if I've left out Daisy, it doesn't mean she wasn't as good as Gert. They're both such good artists"

Lux (May 1960)
J O'T: "Peter Noble does the voice-over, and also appears in this spot which features the features of Janette Scott, another Lux user. So far, all sorts of people have been to interview British stars who like the soap, but Peter Noble does it best. He is immediately associated with film stars and has a warm personality and the sort of manner that puts the viewers at their ease. These spots are interesting because they take us behind the scenes of a studio and for once there's no faking. Peter arrives on the set where Janette is shooting. He peeps through the view finder at a close-up of Janette and we see the shot. It is framed with the viewfinder markings and puts us in Noble's shoes. There is a charming exchange between the principals as to exactly why Janette has such a beautiful complexion. Then there's the nine out of ten stars bit, spoken over the packshot by Peter. The series done over here is so superior to the Hollywood import that it's difficult to understand why it's taken them so long to get round to making them in England"

Gibbs SR (June 1960)
J O'T: "The 'tingle in your mouth puts the twinkle in your eye' series has progressed to a point where a clock zooms optically through the girl's face. And where previously the girl's own twinkle carried the film, now an optical twinkle takes the place of the real thing. Proof of the maxim, that if you have something real, fake it anyway. Notwithstanding, these are outstanding films and well deserve the Venice award they won. Their hallmark is first class cutting to a first class soundtrack, together with imaginative directorial touches. One of these is the dissolve shot of the girl's head that starts with the head lying down and finishes with it upright. Superimposed over the girl's face later is the flickering block of ice containing a tube of SR. The final shot is of a tube thrust across the screen to give a dimensional effect. Behind, flickering spots carry the eye away from the pack. What started off as something very human has become machine turned"

White's Speedicook Porridge (August 1960)
J O'T: "Made for Northen Ireland, it features character actor Joseph Tomelty. The opportunity to use him as a straight testimonial is missed. Instead, he plays a labourer complete with appropriate accent, incomprehnsible to those outside the country and maybe even to some living in it! He talks about his 'inside lining,' obtained from the product. What the product doesn't get from the film is the support it needs. With such a talented artist, more trouble should have been taken to write a better script."

A Dickinsons (Printers) (September 1960)
J O'T: "With works in Lancashire, this firm are on air with a 45 second commercial telling people who run draws all about their experience and skill at printing tickets. We are introduced to a man sitting behind a desk on which a sign reads Club Secretary. He talks about draw tickets but we see them later, instead of seeing them from the start. As this spot is as much about Dickinsons as about raffle tickets, you'd have thought that when the name was mentioned it would appear on the screen. Nothing of the sort happened. The 45 seconds were almost thrown away"

Aero (September 1960)
J O'T: "Aero has a problem showing all those bubbles, to say the least a hard animation job to tackle, but the lighthearted bit is put over most effectively. Nice to see Claude Hulbert back on the screen. In this spot he plays a company director with an old car; the mischievous way he tweeks his car horn and later strides into his office building is a joy to watch"

Lucozade (October 1960)
J O'T: "Object here must be to get the same emotional response as Wilfred Pickles obtains. But there is no substitute for Pickles. Here, however, is an imitation. A character wearing a coat (like Pickles), with a voice (like Pickles) interviews a Scottish housewife, about the product. Copied camera setups merely pinpoint where the idea came from in the first place. People who love Pickles will feel cheated when they realise their hero is an 'actor'"

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