` TV Documentary

BBC Programmes Opening Nights ITV ATV Programmes Southern TV Programmes Other ITV Docs Programmes on Films Religious
Dinosaur TV Documentaries and other Serious Programmes
About Intertel

ITV documentary programmes in the Wednesday night slot (1959-1966)


Journey of a Lifetime
My review of Baptism in the Jordan
Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: Frederic Goode.
John takes Anne to the "fabulous" area around a monastery set in a cliff. Then they follow the conduit that is water supply to the area, Jericho's main source of water. They decide to picnic by this river.
So John goes off to buy food, while Anne reflects on the story of Zacchaeus: like many such tales in this series, it is dully told with visual stimulus provided by seemingly unrelated pictures of the area.
John buys bread, oranges and other supplies in a market, then joins Anne again, and they find a pleasant spot by the very quiet Jordan. John recalls the story of Jesus' baptism, a few drawings of the actual event would have helped
Main TV Menu


.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Picasso (1960) -
Sir Kenneth Clark at the Tate Exhibition of "one of the most incomprehnsible artists-" his words. Sir Ken openly admits he is one who doesn't always understand either but he makes a good stab at enthusing us, yet though his critical erudition is to be admired, for me Picasso cannot be labelled "an entertainer," as Ken says, since "when he is being funny" I never laughed once. But Picasso's "added power by abstraction" can at least now be admired, thanks to honest Ken.
The Dream Machine (transmitted Wednesday 11th November 1964 at 9.10pm ) -
ATV documentary with some fascinating glimpses behind the scenes as producer Francis Essex attempts to assemble his variety show 'Six Wonderful Girls.' Clips are juxtaposed with a lecturer teaching his students about the new medium of television. He raises the issue of TV's need to be more self-critical and of the more obvious need to appreciate the impact the box makes on everyday life. Whilst he pontificates, Essex is trying to juggle his finances, arguing with executive Bill Ward over having to reduce his budget by a massive £1,000. The Daily Telegraph critic asks him if he's bothered about the emphemeral nature of television. Essex's reply: TV is a transient medium. "I am a person who becomes bored with long runs." There speaks the first channel hopper! We see Honor Blackman and Millicent Martin rehearsing with ATV's top scriptwriters Sid and Dick in attendance. Finally the tension of the taping! In the final analysis this is an historically important documentary, but director Denis Mitchell fails to provide any analysis of his own on the impact The Dream Machine makes. True, he allows the cameras to show us much, but since his aim is to examine the role of telly, he's no better, no worse than the medium he's seeking to criticise.
Crisis on Wheels (29th June 1966) -
directed by Kevin Brownlow. For those who have experienced the tragedy of death on the roads, this jokey analogy with war might well be anathema. There's a potted history of automobiles leading to the modern phenomenon of the car "being the object of veneration in suburban avenues on Sunday morning" before a rude awakening as the science of road accidents is analysed. But does the director see this as the crisis, or is it traffic wardens (more jibes)? But in fact it seems to be congestion that is the real enemy as the prescient fast forward to the year 2000 shows "the suburbs were overwhelmed... this jam started three weeks ago and it still hasn't moved an inch." People even take the law into their own hands to ease congestion, so the solution is simple- scrap the car!
EVR in Education (1968) -
Kenneth Kendall introduces this ATV film which showcases some of the ITV Schools programmes of the era, including Primary French (unintentionally hilarious), and Conflict (clip from Othello).

Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.
Sea War -
In association with Rank, Southern TV produced an interesting account of the Royal Navy during World War II.
Life Line - The Navy's Atlantic battle with the U-boats. Some authentic archive footage plus some interesting studio reconstruction, these scenes directed by Lawrence Huntington
The Full Man (1964) -
Tragedy.
Two clips from Macbeth with George Baker in the title role and Rosalie Crutchley as Lady M, plus a scene from Adventure Story by Terence Rattigan with George Baker as Alexander the Great and Francis Rowe as the Queen Mother. Baker then has a fascinating little discussion with presenter David Daiches about the demerits of this play. A final scene is enacted to illustrate the "inconsequential dialogue" of much modern tv drama. Obviously someone watched this and understood this sort of thing was being praised!
First In Last Out (25th June 1968)-
Documentary on training commandos, narrated by Christopher Wain
School At Sea -
50 minute Southern TV documentary narrated by Richard Davies, written and directed by Cyril Doncaster

Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Around the World (Associated-Rediffusion)
Orson Welles introduces: London- A more unlikely mismatch you're unlikely to see as Welles coaxes information from some venerable London East End ladies.
Basque- Orson warms to the region "not French or Spanish." He finds one local who compares life with that in the good old USA, then a longer deeper discussion with an author, including contrasts with US and Basque education. Perhaps it's all too tongue in cheek: "smuggling is the biggest industry in these parts."

Out of Step (Associated-Rediffusion, 1957)
Nudism- In his best suit, Daniel Farson interviews nudists in their Sunday best. Today this looks like a parody, but he is fairly deadly serious which makes it all the more entertaining, specially the two gentlemen vehemently opposed to such exhibitionism.
This Week (A-R) The company's flagship serious programme.
Accidents- 1967 investigation, on film starts with flashing scenes as an accident victim is rushed to hospital. We are shown the work of the Birmingham Accident Hospital. By following one baby's graphic tragedy, the documentary becomes intensely emotional. Too many other sad cases follow: "medical science has triumphed, but there just isn't any use in society for him." We really need something other than moving stories, the only conclusion reached is that most accidents are the result of impatience
Tempo (ABC)
A few editions have been issued on dvd.
Details and my reviews
Return to the Rhondda (TWW)
This has been issued on dvd. An optimistic and affectionate tribute introduced by Donald Houston: "the few shall not for ever sway." Also with Stanley Baker, who describes the valley as "my idea of hell." Boxer Tommy Farr tells of his career and Gwyn Thomas recounts the 1926 General Strike, puzzled indeed over his own conclusion that "the poverty was marvellous." My Welsh dad enjoyed singing along with the choirs too.
Pontcanna (TWW) - A 1965 publicity film of how TWW took over the WWN franchise having to upgrade their studios to provide this new dual service. Rather tough on the company, that they then lost their remit, this film obviously failed to win over the doubters.
Survival (Anglia) - Trailers for b/w editions, one with Rolf Harris, another with voiceover by the ubiquitous Patrick Allen
The Lonely Man (Channel TV, 1964)
- In 1960 at lonely Les Ecrehou, hides a fugitive from justice, wrongly accused of rape. Predictably amateurish production with an interesting interview, much in need of editing
News (ITN)
Review of 1955/6- one year on, ITN shows some stories covered in Sport, Home and International news.
News Headlines- A news summary from back in 1964.
Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Tempo (1961-1968)
ABC's pretentious arts programme uncomfortably filled Sunday teatime screens, or a late night Sunday spot.

'Profile' - those working in the Arts
No 1:
Harold Pinter (October 3rd 1965)
No 6: Orson Welles (November 7th 1965, 2.30pm)
'The Entertainers'
Week 1: A Guided Tour of Zero Mostel (Jan 23rd 1966)
Week 3: A Tale of Two Talents (Feb 6th 1966, 2.15pm) - Tom Jones and Lynn Seymour
Week 6: Don't Let The Wig Fool You, Mate! (Feb 27th 1966) - Danny La Rue
Week 7: Meet the Duke (Mar 6th 1966)- Duke Ellington
'Tempo International'
Tativille (May 8th 1966) - Jacques Tati
Jazz In Wonderland (May 29th 1966)- Stan Tracey

Painter at Work (Apr 8th 1962)- Graham Sutherland
The Medium-Sized Cage (March 31st 1963)- Royal College of Art students
Menuhin on Music (March 15th 1964)
Take a Simple Action and Look at It - Again (never broadcast)
Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Harold Pinter (October 3rd 1965)

A clip from The Caretaker (1960) gives us an introduction to his style of writing. "I am an old fashioned playwright," he says himself, though this might well be disputed. "Expect the unexpected" is the theme of his plays.
Then, with the almost obligatory cigarette, he reflects, "I just do it." We hear of his early life in Hackney with an unusual group of friends who talk a lot about books and ideas. His musings are accompanied by random shots of local people. Questions veer towards the more normal adolescent fights, but for Pinter they were never for him, they were "a side issue." He was a conscientious objector. He talks about his orthodox Jewish parents.
Then there is a very long clip from The Homecoming, on stage that year. Not a word is spoken in the opening minute, some point seems to be being made, but this is not followed up, making this a typical rag bag collection of Pinterisms without any cohesion.
We are told his first play was The Room in 1957. When challenged (at last) with the charge that his works are "obscure and difficult," his response is, "I try to be true to the characters and play."
Then, maybe there's time to spare, we return to The Homecoming, as though this be some sort of promo for it. We are told the scene we are about to see is about Ruth (Vivien Merchant) deciding to become a prostitute. This clip ends our torture

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Orson Welles
His life story told in half an hour through stills and, mostly, his own egocentric comments.... "humility... that's come slowly over the years."
He tells of his early acting in Ireland, bullfighting in Spain. The famous 1938 radio scare is mentioned, no more, then on to 1940 and how RKO sabotaged his film career. His failed political aspirations. Then his glorious film years, with some searching questions about relationships, finance, and why he is unable to now work in America, even though he wants to. Not sure if we don't need the other side to this story!
Welles proves to be swamped by his own ego, unable to understand his current professional isolation. By the end, the stills have been exhausted, and we are left with one long self-centred interview. Even if you're a fan, it becomes tedious, and anyway would have been just as good, or bad, on radio.
If he "sounds arrogant," at least he has some great deprecatory throwaway lines, like the final obituary-like, "I'm not interested in being remembered"

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Tativille
Narrator: Alan Dell.

After a minute of mysterious shots of a building site, stray dogs etc, we meet M Hulot himself, Jacques Tati.
He is working on only his fourth film in twenty years, Playtime. The trouble with this programme is that Tati's English isn't perfect with his French accent, and though understandable it is not so easy to follow what he is trying to convey. Whether he does say anything important, I don't know. Probably not. We follow his every move, like some devoted pet, bathing in admiration.
"He is a slow worker," we are told. He has been shooting this film for over a year, and it would be the following year before it was actually released. He is no financial guru, he is shooting on expensive 70mm film, a perfectionist.
Naturally some of his conversations with those on the set are in French, what is less clear is why a soundtrack has been added over some portions of the programme. Tati offers us his unqiue methodology. Others sing their praises of him. We watch the building of a scene with Hulot in charge of a group of tourists who are a little tipsy.
Tati adds his philosophy of being an individual in a conforming world. More ramblings end it all

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Guided Tour of Zero Mostel

A close up of a foot to begin. We can see it is Zero Mostel's as we pan up to his "morbid face."
He is unknown in Europe, but currently filming in Spain, where he is interviewed. More a joke really, plus chatting in between rehearsals, snippets of conversations mixed with his life history in the approved manner.
Some name dropping of famous artists he knows- it turns out he is an accomplished artist, this was his first career. He also talks about his night club act, "abstract," is how he describes it. Also his collision with a New York bus that nearly caused his leg to be amputated.
Rehearsals with Richard Lester directing.
His serious roles are mentioned. In Ulysses- "you can't become a rhinoceros." In Waiting for God. He reckons it's good not to understand such plays. Assuming there is anything to understand.
It is definitely hard to understand the frenetic chase rehearsal we then witness, hope the director could

To Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Painter at Work (Apr 8th 1962)

In the "spectacular" mountains in the south of France, lives Graham Sutherland, attracted to the area by the sun and the bleak landscape. He tells us about his love of the area, as he lights up a cigar.
He explains how he paints ordinary things in his garden, how he makes his first sketch and builds up his composition. This is a very intellectual assessment: "you are there to soak up what happens." His especial fascination is decaying beauty.
A new painting is born, during which time he delves deeper into his technique. You have to admire his dedication. He sounds utterly engrossed and sincere though I was left asking questions:
How does he earn his money?
Why does he paint such dreary subjects?
Does he actually believe his work is good? Does he like it?
This is the emperor's new clothes, since we get no other viewpoint on his opus. He is not the sort of artist I would care to have hanging on my living room wall. Unless you are a tortured soul, the best location might be your little room

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A Tale of Two Talents

A study of rising star Tom Jones, and a young successful ballet dancer Lynn Seymour. With some prescience, ABC selected two who lasted long and successfully in their different careers. The idea is to compare and contrast their undoubted talents, though in general the clever juxtapposition is artificial.
We hear how they both got started in the business. TJ is being driven in his car and he tells of his "entourage," his staff. He is in a sense trapped by them, unlike Lynn, though she admits she is very dependent on the talents of many others, the orchestra, and most of all her choreographer, on whom she heavily relies. She is told which parts she has to dance.
As he shaves, TJ tells us the benefits of success. Though Lynn is a success in her own field, she is not well off, the reason is that ballet is "not commercial."
Time off for TJ is very limited. Lynn also has to deal with publicity, in her case limited. TJ fusses over his photos, he admits his facial imperfection. He tells us he liked Al Jolson, but apart from Elvis, Jerry Lee Lewis is his biggest idol, he admires his "aggressiveness."
Then he is seen in a Stevenage club singing. Inevitably some time is allowed for this, as adoring fans try to mob him. He sings Skye Boat Song, or an approximation of it, surely the worst ever version, followed by I Believe. He admits to us that sometimes his voice suffers, especially if he hasn't had a good night's sleep. Lynn's life is less frenetic, we watch her in rehearsal with a partner trying out an avant garde piece. She talks about "animal magnetism," something that clearly TJ must have, her last thought being on her own love of the pop world.
Over the credits, it is back to TJ gyrating on stage

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Don't Let the Wig Fool You Mate!
The Entertainers: Danny La Rue.
"Danny has made female impersonation respectable."

12.30 at his club, he is preparing for his next show. (The narrator (Alan Dell) says 12.30am but it must be afternoon).
2.30 at the matinee at Golder's Green. Cinderella. We watch his transformation into a large woman, followed by a brief excerpt from the panto. The brief narration I found over the top.
11pm a dash to Danny's night club for more backstage scenes. Then parts of his act, much more extensive, with two songs and some banter including political satire. This is interspersed with a few reflections from Danny. Happy Feet is next, with Ronnie Corbett, followed by some jokes. Having removed his female attire, Danny ends with a final song.
This is a shallow analysis of the art, a lot of clips and close ups of making up as a female, with little attempt at exploring his motivation, or indeed the whole business of female impersonators

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Menuhin on Music
David Mahlowe reverently introduces a group of famous musicians rehearsing Mozart's Clarinet Quintet.

Yehudi Menuhin and his gang practise, and discuss the interpretation of various obscure points, like how long a particular note ought to be held.
There are also, as they play, Menuhin's own comments on this particular piece, but this is mostly obstruse and of specialist interest, dealing with technicalities beyond most of us. This must have included the producer, since the discussions become noticeably less and the musical excerpts longer, and, if you like Mozart, probably very pleasant.
Menuhin reflects on his own love of Mozart so I suppose you could say we get some insight into the composer's mind. As it went out at 11.10pm on March 15th 1964, even in ABC's own region pushed back into the slot after Lawman, it may have been designed to send late night viewers to the Land of Nod, the only snag being Menuhin wakes us up with a final comment just as I was dropping off...

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Medium Sized Cage (March 31st 1963)
A chance for media students at The Royal College of Art to present their own play, "with a very minimum of supervision," the introducer, Leonard Maguire, informs the poor viewer.

Here is a story about a student who reads Samuel Beckett, that's enough to warn you this is no joy ride. To a background of pop singing (all the gimmicks are there), he reflects on his student life in the days before students were revolting. We have his thoughts on sex, religion, and everything, this is kitchen sink, student-style.
A stain of blood on the floor momentarily changes the mood to include cartoon like pictures, but you're not interested enough in this bored student to care. And so his musings ramble on and on, and on. Not sure how he gets on to a silent cowboy movie. Then he drifts into fantasy with lots of clever visual tricks for their own sake. Not a story, a programme for the student makers alone, not aimed at any viewer, unless he be a bored student.
Mercifully it lasts not much more than a quarter of an hour, then we meet the team, who all seem dreadfully old for students, at around age 24 and 25. I wonder how they'd view their effort today?

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Meet the Duke (March 6th 1966)
Director: Helen Standage.

Last in the sub series The Entertainers.
Duke Ellington is interviewed with some reverence as he visits Britain. The start, interspersed with musical extracts, comments, history is very much in the modern approved sound bite style. Then the main interview, in close up, at times too close.
Some of the Duke's influences are discussed, his rennaisance in 1956, but the talk becomes more rambling, unless you are a real enthusiast. We meet his band individually, and after talking about their talents, the Duke goes deeper into 1966 racial prejudice and his related compositions, with one moment of self truth, "I was bitter." Then he talks about his own son before a brief reflective conclusion

Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Jazz in Wonderland

The sound of a trumpet warming up does not exactly excite with its raucous din. Here is a big band, a little big band, led by Stan Tracey, who are rehearsing before cutting an LP to be released "this week." In other words, here is a programme to plug the disc.
Alice in Jazzland is the LP. After the usual drags on fags, and snippets of incomprehnsible conversations, we are offered mutual backslapping from the participants. You really need to be a fan to be at all interested. You need to be a fan to enjoy this moody jazz they play. As it seems tuneless to me, I will desist from further comment. Indeed Stan adds his own comments over the music, which might suggest this ain't that gripping tv.
The tape is played over, "it usually sounds better than I think it is." Their second number, Teatime Gavotte is livelier, if still a cacophony.
Then we have more reflection to conclude the programme. I doubt if this 'plug' helped sell the LP, in fact it probably put potential buyers off

Tempo menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Take a Simple Action and Look at It - Again Again Again Again Again
A camera tracks actor Noel Trevarthen descending a bare stairway, across a bare floor to sit down at a table, pour a glass of water and then light a fag.
The same scene occurs again. Yes, someone has thought of a great way of making tv on the cheap!
What is reality? asks this man, identified in the credits as RD Laing. This is before the Scene is shown a third time, the main interest is in deciding whether we have different camera shots of the same actions. No, it's a new 'take' each time, how much was this actor paid?
Then Laing talks about the historical use of drugs down the ages. Followed by Scene 4, same as all the others of course, yawn. Then a long talk about unconscious realities, actually talking about LSD over Scene 5.
Scene 6 follows straight on, this time with action replays. More airtime for Laing before Scene 7 which has flash photography, and no warnings either!
More on the effects of LSD, using long words. Scene 8, same old stairs and water and fag, but plus camera effects, all very clever, accompanied by music, Indian naturally, more like a Hall of Mirrors now.
You are "out of your mind," and Laing's argument is that the sages of the past used to do this.
Scene 9 only contains part of the exciting sequence, using close ups, slomos etc, and lasts longer. Enough to send you, either to drugs or straight off to sleep- or the off switch. Cue credits.
Scene 10 however intrudes. Same as Scene 1, or is it? If you care, the total cost of making the film must have been a fiver. Laing concludes with some ramblings, but no wonder the film was never screened on tv, it's a one sided view and needed counterbalance. I would have added Scene 11 myself, in which Trevarthen tripped down the stairs and landed splat on top of Laing, for a fine slapstick finish, slapstick finish, slapstick, slap
Tempo

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Independent Television Opening Nights

London ITV (Thursday September 22nd 1955)

Scottish Television (Saturday August 31st 1957)

Anglia Television (Tuesday October 27th 1959)

Each of the original 14 ITV companies had its own opening show starting with the first station in London in 1955.
I understand that most of these opening night specials have, not surprisingly, been preserved, and that Network have been encouraged to issue them on dvd. The shows would make a fine tribute to the glorious regionalisation of these truly independent companies, and moreover, we would be treated to some rare footage of great stars from Jack Buchanan (STV) to Diana Dors (Southern), Jimmy James (TTTV) to Tommy Cooper (TWW), to name but a few.

Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Opening Night of Independent Television London Area
Thursday September 22nd 1955

This was a joint programme by Associated Rediffusion (with the Associated Broadcasting Company- later ATV- producing the Opening Night Show at 8.00-8.40pm, which had the rather unimaginative title 'Variety.')

7.15pm The guests arrive, (this preserved without the commentary). More interesting is the grandiose introduction giving glimpses of London landmarks and a potted history of the city. We are solemnly told the television act insists on a service "of high quality." It was- to start with! Then we have are all the trailers for Channel 9's programmes, serious first, of course, then popular shows, then imports, with a long clip from Dragnet.
7.30pm Sir John Barbirolli with the Halle play Elgar's Cockaigne Overture (clip).
7.45pm Speeches from London's Guildhall- the Lord Mayor of London, who argues, erroneously as it turned out, against tv bringing "a rapid decline in standards of entertainment." Charles Hill's speech is the most entertaining, as he believes "Hamlet will not interrupt his soliloquy to tell us of the favourite brand of toothpaste ordinarily used at Elsinore." And he was right when he said "competition would bring change." Kenneth Clark (then chairman of the ITA), with that dignified way of his, concludes this boring opening ceremony. The best one could say about it, is that the BBC could not have done it much better, except perhaps for the camera changes.

Gordon Butler, a tv engineer, writing in 1965, recalled how the Opening Night was nearly a calamity. "Leslie Randall came on and began talking. At least his lips moved. No sound emitted! Cyril Francis sat with perspiration running down his face. He prepared to give the order to switch to the We Apologise for the Breakdown slide. At that moment Leslie Randall stopped moving his mouth, looked a bit puzzled at the audience, pulled a tin whistle out of his pocket, played a few notes and said Good Evening Ladies and Gentlemen.
There was a short silence among the people in Master Control in Wembley. If anyone could have laid hands on Leslie Randall at that instant...."

To Opening Nights . . . Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

This is Scotland (August 31st 1957, 6.30pm)
Hosted by James Robertson Justice, who after an uncertain start infuses a pride into his homeland, as he shows during the hour long programme, the beauty of the countryside, with all its many rivers, the glories of its history and the great Scotsmen of the day, including messages of congratulation from some eminent men from across the world.
The singing of Scottish songs is in the capable hands of Kenneth McKellar, with such standards as Come Along, and Over the Sea to Skye.
On film, Alastair Sim reads the poem In the Highlands, while more light heartedly Archie McCulloch interviews Deborah Kerr who is filming in the South of France with David Niven. The latter gives the game away when he admits, what would be dear to many a Scottish heart, that "television is something for nothing." A more ambitious interview is a live link with the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh to speak to a rather off-the-cuff Moira Shearer. There's a split screen as we see James chatting happily with Moira like two old friends.
Inevitably Jimmy Logan is on hand, appearing with Stanley Baxter in excerpts from Five Past Eight, the show currently at The Theatre Royal Glasgow. They sing and act a feeble sketch as two grown-up toddlers.
Most poignant appearance is by the great showman Jack Buchanan, only two months before his death. He rambles on and, a little ignominiously, gets the hurry up call from the wings before singing with audience participation the immortal I Belong to Glasgow. He had been introduced by ITN newscaster Ludovic Kennedy, who was later to read the ITN News that night from the Scottish studios.
The Clyde Valley Stompers provide some more lively music, accompanied by "The Rock and Roll Sinners," at least that's how the opening credits describe 'em. One of the few gaffes in a generally very impressive debut for the station. There is some background noise, as scenery is shifted, perhaps unavoidable in a live performance, but this doesn't detract from the overwhelming sense of national achievement that this opening night happily conveys. Aye, it was only a pity that after this blossoming, for 10 years the company was very much in the wings of the ITV network.
In STV's 50th anniversary celebration, Jimmy Nairn, the announcer whose voice was the first heard on the 1957 programme agreed the opening night "went well." This 2007 tribute had a nice touch, in that one of the 1957 stars, Stanley Baxter, narrated the programme
However a contemporary account of the show was less than favourable. Derek Hoddinott complained about the poor quality of the filmed sequences (true), and picked on James Robertson Justice who "looked as fed up as I was," and he took exception to the host "reading poetry in the background... extremely boring and slowed down the pace to that of a tortoise." This critic got "a nasty taste in the mouth" from a rough individual who told of the bad old days, and even "welcome sight" Jack Buchanan was "unfunny." All in all he described the show as "a great disappointment. I expected something a lot better," though he does concede the camerawork was an exception, the dancing and costumes were "gay," and the singing "very good." Perhaps this Sassenach should have stayed down south?

To Opening Nights
Scottish TV page
Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


Anglia TV Opening
(October 27th 1959)

At the ungoldly hour of 4.14pm (maybe Anglia had learned from other opening night bores) a clock started ticking as a voice announced "one Minute to Zero. This is Anglia Television."
At 4.15 aerial shots of the Mendelsham transmitter were followed by flying sequences from towns and small villages around Anglia. This had been filmed by second cameraman Peter Fuller.
Then at 4.20 Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick, Chairman of the ITA, declared the station open, as the famous Anglia knight in shining armour lit up to the Anglia theme tune.
Viewers were given a brief tour of Anglia House in this opening half hour programme plus details of local and national programmes to look forward to, introduced by chief announcer Drew Russell. Some live musical numbers were also performed before a rather small looking audience. A rather odd producer, Philip Bray, introduced the talent on the forthcoming Midday Show, which included young Susan Hampshire.

To Opening Nights
Anglia TV page
Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

BBC serious programmes
Some survivors:
This is the BBC (Wednesday 29th June 1960)
On the Opening Night of the BBC Television Centre, transmitted at 7.30pm was Richard Cawston's self-portrait of the BBC. It got the thumbs up from this critic who wrote "Cawston should have subtitled it This is How a Documentary Should Be Made." It showed 24 hours in the life of the BBC, compressed into 65 minutes. Indeed it won the British Film Academy's 1959 Award for Best Specialised Film. For me what comes over is the chumminess of the chaps in charge. What the programme sadly lacks is any captioning, though I did not at all mind missing today's disease, the deadpan narrator.
Some of those in the film are: Richard Murdoch (Housewives Choice), Dimbleby's team preparing Panorama, Kenneth Horne at rehearsals, John Gregson in make-up, Roy Plomley (Desert Island Discs rehearsal), Muir and Norden preparing a Whacko script, Jennings on radio, Eamonn Andrews with a quiz (Crackerjack?), Richard Baker (6 O'Clock News), Tonight with Cliff Michelmore, and Janie Marden in a late night experimental tv show.
Face to Face
John Freeman's probing discussion with Tony Hancock
English by Television
Several series were made in the 1960s, designed to teach English to French speakers. Stories revolved around Walter (Brian McDermott) and Connie (Anne Lawson) who lived in a flat with their baby son Gordon in the town of Walchester. Cartoons with captions illustrated the grammatical and vocabulary points being made. Some instructions are in French, but mostly in English. Script Editor: Bob Stuart. Music: Edward White. Producer: Reg Hughes.
The Lost Baby (script: John Wiles, directed by John Paddy Carstairs, Twickenham Studios)- Walter is invited to a party being planned by Bill (David Brierley) and Ann (Maureen Beck). When he drives off in his Triumph Herald, he unwittingly has another passenger, Ann's baby which she has put in his car instead of hers. At home, Walter is phoned by David who warns Tom is likely to sell the local newspaper, meaning Walter could be out of a job. Then Walter phones Bill saying he is unable to come to the party, but when Bill hears the reason, he and the frantic Ann rush round to be reunited with their baby.
Compare also
On We Go (1973).
BBC News
A 1958 15 minute bulletin, read in sedate splendour by Robert Fougall at Alexandra Palace.
Main story is the Big Freeze, Michael Hancock in Manchester has a report on traffic at a standstill, scenes in Woodhead, and Brough. Then there is flooding on the River Waveney, and on the Thames. Conrad vos Bark reports on the House of Lords' Artificial Insemination debate. There's film of Eisenhower playing golf despite the US recession, and then his speech. Film of racing driver Fangio's release after kidnap, he missed the Grand Prix in which six spectators were killed. Other brief news: The Commons' Defence Debate, TUC condemntation of the Cohen Report/ Sir Winston Churchill is making good progress/ Mr Murphy in Tunisia/ President Nasser/ Floods on the Zambesi at Kariba/ The Old Bailey Brighton Conspiracy Trial/ Direct flights are to commence from London to Moscow/ Ronald Waldman is the new BBC Business Manager. What strikes the modern viewer is the heavy reliance on mute film footage, with commenary added. That, and the very serious unhurried atmosphere, responsible reporting with none of the modern jarring musical distractions that really started with ITN's News at Ten BONGS
Man Alive
television's equivalent of cine verite, this is kitchen sink cum pseudo documentary, observation rather than depth.

Love Me and Leave Me (Dec 1965) - "It's my fault," an accident. Various single women talk freely about their babies. The father of Pat's boy is alleged to be one of the Rolling Stones, you feel there is a whole programme here. Instead we switch restlessly to Caroline with two kids ("I have them all to myself") a white girl who has had relationships with black men, again you sense a programme's worth of material has been missed. Then a contrast with a Scotsman living with, but not married to a French girl, for they reject the concept of marriage. Then back to another single woman, this one a professional girl, making the point that the law is weighted towards men. Four lives superficially covered, issues raised in no depth, opportunities wasted
What is Happening? (May 1967) - "A new era... reaction," quotes from the flower people, "beautiful people... it's in the air." An all night rave in Ally Pally. Dry narration by Desmond Wilcox allows the pictures to be their own comment. "Children again," perhaps this sums it up, as various dropouts give boring utterance, full of their own importance. I was with one observer who commented, "they don't know what they're looking for," and indeed after a while this programme becomes itself "aimless," but worse, often gratuitous. As for the rave, "I think it was marvellous specially as I was on a trip." A more down to earth observer notes, "they need a blinkin' good bath"
The Ravers (June 1967) - A study of young girls following their pop idols, in particular Simon Dupree. Apparently his group is quite "restrained" in allowing fans access to them, "a great outlet for them." The pop star fields his questions rather neatly though the girls' shallowness is exposed when they are interviewed. Finally one groupie admits what was pretty obvious, "the band is here to project sex." Admits Dupree's promoter, "it's there to be exploited." His assessment is honest, though BBC reporter John Percival's questions revolve a lot round the theme of parental responsibility. "It must be normal," Dupree concludes
Leeds Piano Competition 1966
Showing the drama behind the scenes, and clips of some stunning pianists, today this would surely be done as an elimination by phone voting. What is however seriously missing, what would be an essential in a modern programme, is an insight into the judges' deliberations on why they have selected the winner who receives a measly first prize of £750.
Scene (BBC)
This long lasting schools' series tackled cutting edge issues. The one pictured here is
1.2 The Last Bus (10th October 1968)
Script: Keith Dewhurst. Director: David Yates.
Four yobs leave their coffee bar to catch the number 8A bus, last of the day, destination: Depot. They haven't enough money for their fares, so the conductor attempts to turn them off. There's a standoff and the driver brings the bus to a halt. With a defiant spit at a lady passenger, Mrs Smith, they quit. But when the conductor walks round to the driver's cab, they assault him, kicking him to the ground.
After the action, there is an interview with each of the main characters, conducted by Ronald Eyre. The cast include Robin Askwith, Jane Carr as a young lady, and Noel Dyson as Mrs Smith

Men Women and Clothes (1957) - Experimental BBC colour film
How Fashions Come and Go- No.1 in a series of 6 films made at the Museum of Costume, Eridge Castle, narrated by Doris Langley Moore
Women Alone
directed by Charles Denton. A chirpy 22 year old from Barnes, plus her 33 year old rather dowdy older friend, both single mothers. She's frank, an early example of that odd desire to bare one's feelings to the camera. Most fascinating quote: "Men have a much more interesting life than women." There's also a clip of Dusty Springfield singing, though no Swinging Sixties in sight at all here
Elgar
Ken Russell's celebrated drama documentary

The Brains Trust
with Malcolm Sargent and Yehudi Menuhin, discussion on music was always bound to predominate.
London to Brighton in four minutes.
This was a classic of speeded up filmwork, with the Brighton Belle leaving Victoria at 3pm, arriving in Brighton amazingly at 3.04pm. The fact that the filmmakers show a different train at Brighton is a slight error, but otherwise it's wonderful, with, in the other direction, nostalgic steam trains flashing past. With scary tunnels, the impressive Ouse Viaduct and a jolly soundtrack, this is tremendously enjoyable. I assume that one could rerecord it at the correct speed these days to show the whole one hour trip, though I suppose it would come out rather jerky!

The Best in Television
Awards ceremony from the Dorchester Hotel on February 14th 1969. A BBC programme showed highlights at 11.15pm that evening, the presentation to the winners, interspersed with clips from some of the winning tv programmes introduced by Michael Aspel. Unfortunately the ceremony itself was marred by the sudden illness of Kenneth Horne, the host, who sadly died later that night.
Best Actor for 1968 was Roy Dotrice for his tour de force in Brief Lives. We see an extract from this monologue which is very much of its time and crude. Best Actress was Wendy Craig, who is not present, but we see a clip from Not in Front of the Children with Ronald Hines from Nov 1968, again a swinging performance of its time. Marty Feldman won the Light Entertainment award as Marty, the bullfighter scene is shown with him as PC Ogmore. Julian Pettifer won the TV Reporting Award. It was at this point that Kenneth Horne fell ill. Jack Gold won the Specialised Producer category with an Omnibus film, we see a clip from Field of Mustard. Granada TV won the Factual producers award and there is a clip from Cities at War, the Siege of Leningrad. Thames TV shared this award for, once again, their This Week series. Dennis Main Wilson won the Light Entertainment Producer award. Drama winner was The Parachute, a BBC play, an extract is shown. Designers: awards for Roy Oxley and Tom Montcrieff. The Special Awards go to firstly News at Ten, Michael Ryan of ITN accepting the award, and then to the BBC coverage of the 1968 Olympics. The Foreign TV Service Award goes to the Czech Television station, noone available to receive it, so a prolonged round of applause. Finally the Outstanding Services Award (the Desmond Davis Award) is given to Ken Russell, an extract from Delius is shown. So as to finish on a more upbeat note, the BBC highlights end with another Marty clip, this time the Coughing Scene
Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

TV Programmes about Films
Picture Parade

a long running BBC magazine, this 1956 programme introduced by Peter Haigh who does an interview with Joan Crawford on her film The Story of Esther Costello. Heather Sears ("the most beautiful child in the whole world") also appears. (12 minutes)

Movie Memories (Anglia TV)
Roy Hudd hosted this 1980's Anglia TV series, shown in the afternoons, with clips from some old films, plus an interesting interview with a film star each week. The theme music used to start and end the programmes was called Showbiz, and was played on the wurlitzer of the New Gallery Regent Street.

Series One

Series Two

Series Three

Series Four

Series Five
To Dinosaur Films, my monthly magazine
To Documentary Programmes menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

To Documentary Programmes menu

.

.

Movie Memories Series 1
1.1 (1980)- with Jack Warner - There's a brief feature on star Jack Buchanan, with a clip from the 1937 This'll Make You Whistle, dancing I'm in a Dancing Mood with his greatest partner Elsie Randolph. Jack Warner talks about his days in the motor trade when he once was a driver for Jack Buchanan. There's a clip from his 1947 Hue and Cry and a rather subdued Warner talks us through his memories of The Captive Heart
1.2- with Charles Hawtrey
1.3- with Anne Todd - is introduced via a clip from, of course, The Seventh Veil (1945). It's The Piano Lid scene, which Roy says gave him nightmares. He also admits, in true show biz vein, he always loved her. She tells how she managed to portray a fourteen year old, even though she was married with two children! There's one nice tale of her on location in The Sound Barrier, playing a pregnant woman in a queue
1.4- with Ingrid Pitt
1.5- with Anthony Steel - A wonderful start to this programme, with Roy introducing Laurel and Hardy dancing in Way Out West. Anthony Steel, sporting a white beard and plenty of white hair, still looking distinguished, though a little stuttering at first, talks of world ranging films in which he was ever the hero, such as Where No Vultures Fly. We see him in action in the epic Storm Over the Nile (1955), the famous scene in which he receives the white feathers
1.6- with Roland Culver, who talks happily about the snags of being bald, and an embarrassing first night, and recounts in the best style a scene he had to do twenty times with Joan Fontaine, two French poodles and a recalcitrant sword
1.7- with Richard Greene
To
Movie Memories

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Movie Memories Series 2
2.1- with Diana Dors
2.2- with Anna Neagle
2.3- with Richard Todd
2.4- with Kenneth Connor
2.5- with Chesney Allen, who talks happily about his first film Okay for Sound for Gainsborough. Ches also describes the twelve films he made with Bud Flanagan, including their first Underneath the Arches, the song from which we see.Ches also tells us about one scene at a pawnbrokers in Dreaming, made on a shoestring, but finally "turned out right"
2.6- with Hazel Ascot - There is a most interesting interview with film guru Leslie Halliwell who admits, "you've got to please the majority, after midnight the minority." He also reveals what is now painfully obvious, that advertisers and the IBA don't like black and white films. However he has good news, that the new Channel Four will be recifying that. They did for a while, Leslie, thanks to you, they did, but your presence and influence have now sadly gone. A great find for the main interview is Hazel Ascot, billed as England's Answer to Shirley Temple. She is introduced via a clip from her starring role in Stepping Toes (1938). Tony, who runs the Hazel Ascot Appreciation Society, accompanies her, now a modest teacher. She tells us how she got her first film role in Talking Feet, when director John Baxter was booking her father's studio and he happened to see her dancing. She also talks wistfully about plans for her third big film, all written and cast and set to start shooting in September 1939... Sadly that was the end of her film career
2.7- with John Bentley
To
Movie Memories

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Movie Memories Series
3.1- Muriel Pavlow talks about her meeting her husband Derek Farr, initially on the set of Quiet Wedding and then in The House at Sly Corner. The first half contains some footage of child stars
3.2 Harry Fowler tells us how he was invited to talk on In Town Tonight leading to his screen test for Those Kids in Town. He's also seen with Joan Collins in a bikini in I Believe in You
3.3- Robert Beatty and his instantly recognisable voice "like honey in a hairy jar." Beatty blames his over-exposure on Dial 999 as to why "I was out of work for ten years on television." Perhaps not quite accurate. A scene from the first story of Dial 999 is shown
3.4- with Liz Fraser who is deploring of the forced "stilted" accent she was required to use in The Painted Smile. Gallantly she allows us to see a clip
3.5- Leslie Phillips after a clip from The Navy Lark, tells Roy how, despite being a Cockney kid, he learned to speak proper. "Everything came from the theatre," he explains and relates how he obtained his part in Les Girls. There's a clip from The Smallest Show on Earth, then he predicts perhaps optimistically that Carry On Nurse will be seen as a classic and has a tale from the first Carry On, Constable, a shower scene (not THE shower scene). A clip from Doctor in Love ends the programme. The first part includes Arthur Askey singing The Moth, Ziegler and Booth in Demobbed (1946), the Blackpool Tower scene in Dick Barton Strikes Back (1949), George Formby with You Can't Go Wrong in These, and Carmen Miranda.
3.6- Lionel Jeffries talks of his childhood love of making films, and has a story of his role with The Crazy Gang in Life is a Circus (plus a clip), and a nice tale of Bernard Cribbins in Two Way Stretch in Windsor High Street. He boasts that he'd also been "paid to cuddle Ava Gardner." Plus "very rare bits of film" from Xmas Greetings 1938 (including George Formby, Stanley Lupino) and the 1941 Lambeth Walk, guying Hitler. Also Stolen Jools (1931), A Friend Indeed (Deanna Durbin 1942) and Command Performance US (with Judy Garland 1943)
3.7 - Jean Kent talks of her family's showbiz origins and her work on stage with Max Miller. She talks about her part in the 1948 Good Time Girl and sings White Wings from Totti True
To
Movie Memories

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Movie Memories Series 4
4.1 with George Coulouris aged over 80, whotells us he ran away from home and started acting back in 1926. Roy comments, "you always played miserable characters." When this programme was made George was still active, his latest role being in Hart to Hart
4.2 with Dora Bryan who is seen in a clip from The Crowded Day (1954), "I played the same part in all the films," though her favourite role she says was in Old Mother Riley Meets The Vampire
4.3- with Geoffrey Keen, who relates how he got into films via Stars in Battledress. There are two clips of our guest, firstly in Passage Home, in which he plays a bosun, then a more striking role in The Angry Silence alongside Bernard Lee, "he liked a drink." Geoffrey Keen also talks about being typecast, and of when he was in Hollywood
4.4- with Sylvia Sims, who seems to get a little taken aback by one or two of Roy's jokes. She talks of how, after RADA, her career started in the theatre as an understudy. She attended a Rank screen test but was rejected. However a play on television resulted in her being offered the lead in a film with Anna Neagle, who with her husband, "looked after me like parents." The film was My Teenage Daughter (1956) and we are shown a clip from it, a confrontation between mother and daughter. Syvia also tells stories of her parts in Expresso Bongo and Conspiracy of Hearts before we conclude with a clip from Ice Cold in Alex
4.5- with Michael Craig, who reveals his boyhood film hero was John Payne. He hadn't intended however, to be in films himself, and he joined the Merchant Navy. He relates experiences of his roles in "dodgy" Italian and Yugoslav films, where being paid was sometimes problematical. He also talks of his role in a film made in Africa, working with animals, some rather dangerous, like Percy the Porcupine. The final clip is from The Angry Silence, the original story which he co-wrote. He also starred and we see his scene pleading with the angry mob
4.6- with Phyllis Calvert, who talks of her start in theatrical school. When aged 10 in 1925, she appeared alongside the great Ellen Terry at the Lyric Hammersmith. There's a clip from Let George Do It (1940). She admits she watched it recently on tv and thought it boring. She reminds us she was once known as The Million Pound Girl, because two of her films were the first to make a million. In My Own True Love, she says even the actors in it never knew how the plot was going to end, until it did. Finally a clip from the wonderful Mandy, "my favourite film I ever made"
4.7- with Victor Maddern, with his "marvellous face." His first big role when aged 22 (I think perhaps this was a slight exaggeration) in Street of Shadows, which was filmed on a shoestring. Director Lewis Gilbert of Sink The Bismark helped Victor a lot. He is also grateful to the Boulting Brothers who gave him his break in Seven Days to Noon
To
Movie Memories
Documentary Programmes Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Movie Memories Series 5
5.1- with David Tomlinson, whom you have to get used to with his white hair, I always thought of him as eternally fresh faced and youthful. He recalls his film debut in 1941 with the short Name Rank and Number. The first clip not surprisingly is from Miranda (1948) in which he carries Glynis Johns, "she weighed a ton!" Then he talks of Mary Poppins, "that was fun of course," and how he oddly landed his part. He also remembers "genius" Peter Sellers in Up The Creek and there's a clip from Further Up The Creek (1958) with Frankie Howerd. As for Carry on Admiral, it was "a b***** awful title," not the sort of language I expected from the innocent DT
5.2- with Joan Sims, who at this time (1985), Roy tells us had made over 70 films. He reminds her of her first screen role in Colonel March Investigates, and Joan tells us Boris Karloff was a very nice man. Then there was Meet Mr Lucifer, "I played a fairy," and a more serious role in The Sea Shall Not Have Them- she talks about working alongside Griffith Jones who was a terrible giggler. We have a longish clip from Please Turn Over in which Joan plays a daily with a fag constantly in the corner of her mouth. She talks of the Carry On films, "we were like a lot of kids." The programme finishes with watching a rather untypical Carry On scene, Carry On At Your Convenience, an almost romantic scene alongside Sid James
5.3- with Guy Rolfe, who appeared with everyone from Elizabeth Taylor to Sting. He mischievously enters with a false moustache. He's a good raconteur too. After 20 years out of acting, he had emerged from his retirement initially to appear on stage. The first of his clips is from Saraband for Dead Lovers. They talk about Snow White and the Three Stooges in which he played an ogre, "I don't remember that at all-" and you can't blame him for that. The last clip is from his role as captain in Girls At Sea. He brings us up to date with his film The Bride with Sting, "a wonderful story," in which he plays a count
5.4- with Eunice Gayson
5.5- with Peter Jones
5.6- with Googie Withers
5.7- with Ian Carmichael
To
Movie Memories
Documentary Programmes Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Intertel
The International Television Federation, to give it its full title, was set up in 1960, an alliance between the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Australian Broadcasting Commission, the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, the National Television and Radio Education Center in America, and Associated Rediffusion.
Aidan Crawley was in charge of A-R's operation, claiming, "Intertel may well establish itself as the most thorough and authoritative television commentary on international events in the English speaking world." The organisation did win an award in 1964 for contributing to international understanding. In Britain, despite its prestigious aura, it disappeared along with Rediffusion in 1968.

Members held annual meetings, the first in Vancouver in November 1960. Others followed in Lisbon, Georgia and Sydney. On Thursday Oct 31st 1963 the group convened in Britain, staying at Ditchley Park nr Oxford. The programme was: Nov 1st: critical reviews of past programmes by Maurice Wiggin and a US critic. An evening at Stratford to watch The Tempest, was followed on Sat 2nd Nov by meetings to thrash out problems of production, finance, and future assignments. In the evening, a pre-transmission showing of A King's Revolution, including an interview with the Shah of Iran (photo). Sunday was spent on a tour of Oxford, before the group moved to London on the 4th for a luncheon in their honour in the House of Commons. More sightseeing, then an evening hosted by Lord Hill. Events concluded on Tuesday 5th with a tour of A-R's Television House, with a final lunch there.

Some Intertel productions listed on this page: The Heartbeat of France June 14th 1961, Living with a Giant February 21st 1962, America Abroad May 30th 1962, The Unfinished Revolution September 19th 1962, Africa- The Hidden Frontiers February 19th 1964, America- On the Edge of Abundance January 27th 1965, America- The Dollar Poor February 3rd 1965, Children of the Revolution A Report on the Youth of Czechoslovakia July 21st 1965, The House on the Beach October 13th 1965, The Men in Black April 27th 1966, One in Every Hundred June 8th 1966, The Lion and The Eagle The Anglo-American Alliance from Pearl Harbour to Vietnam, December 7th 1966.
Documentary Programmes Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Religious TV

About Religion
ATV's long running Sunday night religious programme ran from 1956 to 1966 in the God Slot.
For some background on this series.
The News on Good Friday (ATV, shown Friday April 15th 1960, 6.10pm) - my review
Inquest at Golgotha (1961) - for my review
The Rise and Fall of a Hero (Mar 22nd 1964). Readings by Jane Asher, Keith Barron etc - for my review

Journey of a Lifetime (1960-2, ABC) - I have about half the films made

Life with Johnny (Tyne Tees 1969)

From Inner Space (ABC)
Part 1 April 17th 1966
This is about Dag Hammarskjöld.
It starts with a dramatic scene at a space station with a Red Alert: "identify yourselves." But though it is a false alam, it causes the the men to reflect on their reactions to what might have been a catastophic crisis.
Discussion then ranges on to war and those who try to prevent war, such as Dag Hammarskjöld. Film of a speech of his to the United Nations is superimposed with graphics of a world map.
The men talk of the past that shaped his views, and his particular inclination to isolation. His role as secretary general to the United Nations is covered, from the 1955 Atomic Peace Conference, up to the 1961 Congo crisis. After his tragic death in a plane crash, it is revealed the only book he carried was by Thomas a Kempis. The men quote extracts from Hammarskjöld's autobiography revealing his Christian views. This is followed by extracts from his 1960 UN speech when he played Beethoven's Ninth in its entirety.
Some of the men's scripted conversation is artificial when it turns to moral issues, and the opening sequence to arouse viewer interest seems misguided, but this is a curiosity, attempting to draw out the serious issues of war and peace
There were three further parts on the following Sundays. Parts 2 and 4 script Kenneth Boyd, and part 3 script Sydney Carter.

Sunday Break details
ITV Sunday Services details
To Documentary Menu

.

.

.

.

.

Life with Johnny (1969)
Cliff Richard starred in Tyne Tees Television's update of some of Jesus' parables. Sadly the Big Four wouldn't network the series, so few saw it at the time. Even more sadly, three of the six programmes have been wiped.

1 Up the Creek
An exploration of the colour problem. "I've got nothing against them," Leslie Dwyer, as the man in the pub, remarks.
Late at night, Johnny (Cliff) is short of cash and hasn't even got the bus fare home for himself and Carol (Cindy Kent). He asks the vicar, then the police (Johnny Briggs) but unlike the Good Samaritan, they cannot help. It's left to a black man, following the parable, to kindly offer the couple a lift home.
The lesson of the original parable is well illustrated.
Songs: Love is More than Words (Cliff and Cindy Kent), Help (a dance routine), Disasters in the Air, Compassion Road.

3 Johnny Come Home
Johnny informs his dad (William Hartnell) that he's leaving home for London. With £200 in his pocket, Johnny the "softie" is befriended by a "doll", Michele (Una Stubbs). "London's very expensive," he innocently comments. After a good time, like the Prodigal Son he's "skint" and decides to go home.
Whilst the main point of the parable, forgiveness, is missing, this is a tale powerfully told, illustrating the growing generation gap.
Songs: Count Us Out, Fine Words, dance with Cliff and Una Stubbs followed by That's Ma Kind of Life, I Will Arise, Celebrate.

4 Johnny Faces Facts
Not so easy to immediately see that this is an illustration of Jesus' saying about casting the log out of your own eye before the mote in your brother's.
After the opening song, Cliff sings If You're Looking for a Culprit. With his pals, he watches a television talk about the dignity of work, and are bored to tears, "I lost the will to work." They mock the posh speaker, one of the idle rich as they see it.
Janet suggests that instead of moaning, Johnny does something, like stand for parliament, or at least, "go and tell 'im."
The song Chuck a Brick is followed by a pub scene in which Janet stands Johnny up. But she does show up late, apologising because her mother has been unwell. That leads into the song Baby Don't You Blame Me.
Johnny makes up with her and they watch another epilogue. The subject is loneliness and Johnny mocks the priest. Tell him," repeats Janet, "he's too negative."
After the song Hiding behind A Cloud of Illusion, Johnny meets the priest, "you don't include yourself," he suggests, "what do you know about it?" He receives a reply that makes him think. Give up some of your time to help the lonely, instead of offering mere words. The final song is Where Is That Man?
Religious Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

JOURNEY OF A LIFETIME
I have

4 The Shores of Galilee
5 Fire from Heaven
12 Voice in the Wilderness
14 The Promised Land
15 The Road of Ruth
16 A Child is Born
17 The Innocents of Bethlehem
18 Bethesda: House of Mercy
21 David and Bathsheba
22 Jacob's Well
23 City of Jezebel
26 Baptism in the Jordan
28 Alone in the Desert
29 Water for Jerusalem
32 The Garden of Gethsemane
33 The Prison on the Hill
34 Home to Bethany
35 Abide with Us
37 The Battle of Jericho
38 Petra
39 Into All The World
Religious Menu
This was a 15 minute ABC 1961 filmed series, originally shown at 5.20pm, but later, more sensibly, used to fill up part of the 'God Slot.' It was filmed in two batches, the second shooting began in April 1961. Each programme was loosely based on the travels of John and Anne Browning played by John Bonney and Anne Lawson, who, in the storyline, meet in London and marry during his six week leave from the Middle East, where he is a water engineer and irrigation expert with the United Nations. Together they visit places associated with the bible stories, he is a sceptic, she is profundly religious. Dr Eric Fletcher MP, deputy chairman of ABC devised the series, script writers included Jean Scott Rogers, and Dr William Neil. The critics were less than impressed: "well meaning but mindless," wrote one, whilst another claimed it was "so vapid that it does endless harm to religious television as a whole."

Series details:
39 films were made, in two batches, thirteen initially, including
a pilot, Tents in the Desert, which may not have been shown. Here is a possible order of the films, with the first transmission dates on ABC Midlands/The North where known.
1 Introduction to a Journey (Jan 1st 1961) the two stars talk about their experiences. Script: Jean Scott Rogers and Stewart Farrar. Director: Lloyd Shirley
The journey began on February 12th 1961 with 2 Taxi to Nazareth. John and Anne go to the city standing on a hill, while John acts as a Good Samaritan, Anne explores by herself.
3 The Sacred Mountain - A visit to Mount Tabor where Deborah routed the armies of Sisera. Two old donkeys transport Anne and John to the top where they meet an old priest who shows them the site of the Transfiguration.
4 The Shores of Galilee
5 Fire from Heaven - John and Anne visit a collective farm on the slopes of Mount Carmel. They see a statue of Elijah and a cave named after him, where sick children are still brought to receive a blessing from a Rabbi.
6 The Witch of Endor. John and Anne try to understand why Saul's army was beaten by the Philistines. They see the site of the battle and go to nearby Bethshan where were taken the corpses of Saul and his sons.
7 Miracles at Capernaum were examined on March 12th 1961 (19th on ATV London), with a journey by boat across the Sea of Galilee to Cana. Script by Jean Scott Rogers.
8 The Faith of the Fishermen showed Anne and John crossing Lake Galilee on the ferry to Ein Gev. John, something of an unbeliever still, tries an experiment with St Peter's fish, and is startled when it succeeds. Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: John Haggarty.
9 The Mines of Solomon- with two Israeli girls, John finds Solomon's mines and finds traces of the men who worked there 3,000 years earlier.
10 The Floor of the World - With a geologist, John and Anne descend 1,300 feet below sea level to the Dead Sea. They see the sites of Sodom and Gomorrah, and a pillar of rock still called Lot's Wife.
11 Ark of the Covenant - Anne and John explore the valley where David fought Goliath. A boy shows them the cave where David hid from Saul and takes them to Bethshemesh, where the Philistines returned the Ark.
12 Voice in the Wilderness - John and Anne take a boat on the River Jordan. Anne tells him of her visit to Ein Karem, and the birthplace of John the Baptist.
Easter Sunday 1961, April 2nd, saw John and Anne travelling by train to the
13 Gates of Jerusalem and seeing David's tomb, with pilgrims carrying a canopy inside.

14 The Promised Land
Anne and John journey to Bethlehem in the first of the second batch of stories on December 17th 1961, retracing 15 The Road of Ruth.
On December 24th it was appropriate the story was
16 A Child is Born in a tour of modern Bethlehem.
17 The Innocents of Bethlehem were remembered on December 31st.
18 Bethesda: House of Mercy - January 7th 1962.
On January 14th 1962 Anne and John drive through Samaria, covering the story of Joseph's 19 Coat of Many Colours.
20 The Teacher in the Temple explored the ruins of the temple in Jerusalem.
In the Kidron valley on January 28th, the story is recalled of 21 David and Bathsheba.
On February 4th the visit was to 22 Jacob's Well, in which Anne and John visit the land of the Samaritan.
Still in Samaria, John showed Anne round the 23 City of Jezebel on February 11th.
A modern day recreation of 24 The Good Samaritan was the subject of the film on February 18th. A child knocked down on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho claims Anne and John's attention. They take her to the Police Post at the site of the Inn of the Good Samaritan, and are reminded of the famous parable.
February 25th was titled 25 Scrolls of the Dead Sea, with an interview with Yusif Saad. A discussion in the Sunday Break series followed.
26 Baptism in the Jordan was shown on March 4th, with a tour of the Monastery of St George and a tour of modern Jericho.
27 Temptation in the Wilderness
28 Alone in the Desert
29 Water for Jerusalem on March 25th 1962. A visit to Job's Well, the Pool of Siloam, and King Hezekiah's tunnel.
April 1st saw a visit to 30 Jerash including the temple of Artemis.
On April 8th Anne and John walked through the Kidron Valley, meeting Rev David Fletcher. While Anne went shopping round the streets of Jerusalem John discusses his religious doubts with David in the gardens of St George's Cathedral, in 31 Meeting in Jerusalem.
Then they retired on April 15th to 32 The Garden of Gethsemane.
33 The Prison on the Hill was the offering for Easter (April 22nd), John and Anne visiting The Kidron Valley.
34 Home to Bethany
35 Abide with Us
36 Brocade from Damascus. A tour of Syria, the story of St Paul's conversion.
Then back to Jordan to discuss Tactics in 37 The Battle of Jericho, which were examined by John on May 20th. Anne and John give a lift to a Jordan army officer who has studied historical battles.
38 Petra, this rose red city in Jordan, was toured on May 27th.
The final film on June 3rd 1962 was 39 Into All The World. At the Jerusalem gateway where Stephen was stoned to death, Anne and John reflect on Ascension and Pentecost. Then they drive towards Damascus and think about Paul's conversion, and how he carried the gospel into all the world.
Note- the earlier programmes were not networked and the dates shown here are for the ABC region.

The Religious Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Shores of Galilee
Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: John Haggarty.

This programme introduces some friction between John and a dogmatic Christian that Anne and John meet.
They are camping by Lake Galilee, John plans a day lazing around, but his dream is shattered by the arrival of "a forbidding looking character," name of Harrison, a schoolmaster who is using his holiday to follow the steps of Jesus. Though John isn't keen, they join him on a tour of the area.
They hear the parable of the sower, as Jesus sat in a boat on the lake, teaching the crowd. Fed up, John wanders off on his own. Anne is left to listen to Harrison, "he knew a lot."
John returns, and they visit a ruined synagogue. Anne sketches the ruins, Harrison points out some technical inaccuracies, which annoys John even more. Harrison recounts the parable of the talents, "I won't be preached at," John complains.
Then to the mount of the Beatitudes. On the top is a church built only in 1937 which Anne and Harrison explore. John reads out the Beatitudes and after this, he is amazingly "charming" towards Harrison. They finish their tour at the Sea of Galilee Centre

Journey of a Lifetime

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fire from Heaven
Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: John Haggarty.

John picks up a friend from a commune, Mosha, who acts as guide on a tour of Mount Carmel. As they drive there with Anne, we hear the story of Naboth's vineyard.
First stop has to be a wine cellar, "the vineyard of God." They enjoy some pleasant wine tasting.
They visit the stone altars of the god Baal, where Elijah challenged the foreign priests. Anne sketches, while John explores the excavations of the ivory house.
A huge statue of Elijah dominates the Carmelite monastery. John is slightly sceptical of the miracles attributed to Elijah and Elisha. They travel down to the River Kishon, where Elijah massacred the priests. Was this necessary, John ponders.
The cave where Elijah hid from Jezebel is now a shrine, where children come for healing. They all sit down for a thanksgiving for healing

Journey of a Lifetime

.

.

.

.

.

.

Voice in the Wilderness
Script: Jean Scott Rogers
Director: John Haggarty

John is rowing Anne on the peaceful River Jordan, the site of the baptisms by John the Baptist.
She reads the story of his birth, then goes on her motor scooter alone to Ein Karem, where John had been born.
She meets an American couple, Peter and Jenny, and together they explore the village. The visit the Church of the Nativity, and watch children at play, as Anne specualtes on John's youthful character.
Luke's story of Mary's visit to her cousin in the hill country is told and The Magnificat is read out.
Then the three of them ride to The Wilderness of St John, as she reads about his ministry from Luke's Gospel. The Americans leave her alone in the quiet of the bleak landscape.
John recounts the baptisms in the river, and briefly discusses with Anne the controversial subject of child baptism

Journey of a Lifetime

.

.

.

.

.

A Child Is Born
Script: Jean Scott Rogers
Director: Frederick Goode

John and Anne stop their Land Rover and decide to walk into Bethlehem. They recall the story of the three wise men, and John reveals he had once played Caspar in his school nativity play- only two lines, he adds wistfully.
They ask an old shepherd the way, then get more sense from a younger lad whose flute John attempts, badly, to play. As they admire the distant town, they walk through fields and recall the story of how Samuel chose young King David.
They remind themselves of the vision the shepherds had, as they walk into Bethlehem, making for the Church of the Nativity. After looking around they leave, a final telling shot of Anne alone, reading out the line from St Luke, "Mary pondered all these things in her heart"

Start of Journey of a Lifetime

.

.

.

.

.

.

Water From Jerusalem
Script: Stewart Farrar. Director: Frederic Goode.

John tells us about how King David diplomatically selected this city as his capital, not in the domain of any of the Israelite tribes. Water supplies come from outside the city wall, along a conduit.
At the Pool of Siloam, Anne tells of how Christ healed a blind man here. John is sceptical, seeing a more spiritual meaning in the story.
They splash through the tunnel from Gihon into the city and find the place where Solomon had probably been crowned king by Zadok.
"I'm tired out," sighs Anne. She has realised how much she takes for granted her supply of water back home. Finally they survey the valley across to Gethsemane

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Garden of Gethsemane
Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: Frederic Goode.

Anne and John learn that this 'garden' is really an enclosed space, and Gethsemane means where olives grew.
At the start, they are in the noisy centre of Jerusalem, and drive to the Church of All Nations. They pass into the garden where Gesus had prayed before being arrested.
In the inner garden, a monk greets them. Anne comments on the noise of traffic. They walk up the route that led to Bethany.
John asks the monk why it was that Jesus had been arrested at night, the answer being that there were less followers with Him at this time of night. But John persists, puzzled why Judas had betrayed Him with a kiss, wasn't Jesus well known to everyone?
While he discourses with the monk, Anne wanders round the garden, and quotes the long story of Jesus' time in the garden when His friends all ran away. It is not very imaginatively done, unfortunately reverence for the story has resulted in little visual appeal.
When she rejoins the others, John asks the monk about the people who arrested Jesus. Jesus forgave them all in love. The monk returns to his monastery for Vespers

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

33 The Prison on the Hill
Script: Jean Scott Rogers. Director: Frederic Goode.

John and Anne look up to the top of old Mount Zion, then walk up the steps towards it, They look at the ruins of old houses and see a church on the summit which when they reach it, is the Church of St Peter of the cock crowing.
A priestly guide, whose English is a little broken, tells them this was the site of the house of Caiaphas the High Priest. They are shown the courtyard where Peter denies his master. Then they go inside the church, where the priest outlines the layout. They descend to the dungeon, "the common prison," where Jesus was flogged. John is placed in a position for the scourging, and the priest playfully whips him lightly. Part of Psalm 88 is read.
The priest prays for Christians today who are in prison, this actually takes the form of the Lord's Prayer

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

34 Home to Bethany
Script: Stewart Farrar. Director: Frederic Goode.

Jesus must have enjoyed the walk from Bethany to Jerusalem and back, in his final days. Anne and John find Jesus becomes more real to them as they make the same journey to the village, perhaps because of the absence of shrines on the road.
At the beginning, Anne reflects on how Jesus wept over the city. As they begin the trip, Anne wonders what Jesus talked about with his disciples as they walked along, "I wish I'd been there to ask Him a few questions," muses John. You still can, Anne replies simply.
They are followed by children, in what appears to be an impromptu scene. As John is distributing sweets it's not surprising they become inundated with young friends. They have to run fast to shake them off.
They reach Bethphage, then Bethany and the Church of Lazarus. They remember the story of Mary wiping Jesus' feet, and the story of Martha complaining about having to do all the work. John recounts the "difficult" story of Lazarus being raised from the dead, "there's the tomb!" cries Anne. John cannot believe this story

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

37 The Battle of Jericho
Script: Stewart Farrar. Director: Frederic Goode.
Anne and John arrive by jeep to meet an Arab who escorts them to an army leader. The current military nature of the area is not explained, but illustrated when a convoy of lorries passes our couple, who are escorted by your friendly native.
They cross the River Jordan, and pause for John to enjoy a smoke with their companion and admire the view as they discuss the battle of Jericho. Is the biblical account "a factual report?" John believes it makes "a good story" anyway, though the Jordanian says "it rings true." Anne recalls the story of the spies meeting Rahab, and the Israelites passing through the river. God dried the river up, according to Anne's understanding.
Passing through some fertile land in the valley, they reach the modern city of Jericho, the ruins of Old Jericho, a thousand feet below sea level are pointed out by their escort, who leaves them for his home. Anne recites Joshua's commission to take God's people over the Jordan
The couple drive to the excavations of the old city and visit Elisha's spring

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

Petra
Script: Stewart Farrar. Director: Frederic Goode.

This begins with the story of the people moaning to Moses in the wilderness. Moses draws water from a rock, which Anne believes is a miracle, though John suggests Moses had found a hidden spring. Moses had "a flair for showmanship."
They ride on donkeys into Petra, John explaining how it was rediscovered by a European explorer in the nineteenth century, after being hidden for centuries. They admire the intricate entrance, then dismount and walk round the completely empty site.
They see the theatre, and Anne reads the ancient prophecies denouncing the Edomites. They climb up to The High Place to admire the far reaching view.
A Rose Red City half as old as Time

Journey of a Lifetime Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

News on Good Friday
Script: Christopher Hollis. With Richard Leech as Newscaster, Tom Singleton and Julian Grenfell as Correspondents, Ralph Truman as Caiaphas and Anthony Nicholls as Pilate. What the Good Friday news bulletin might have been, if they'd had telly in those days

Richard Leech is your typical ITN Newscaster providing an account of the Good Friday news, as if they'd had tv in those days. His first report from Jerusalem covers the trial of one Jesus.
There's a statement from Caiaphas, expressing, as must be done these days, sympathy for the dead man's relatives. I don't think that two thousand years back the high priest would have done so.
Questioned further, Caiaphas admits that Jesus had been condemned on a charge of blasphemy, yet another false Messiah, against whom the Sanhedrin felt they had to take a tough line.
His Majesty's court chamberlain (Roger Delgado) speaks on behalf of Herod, who came to regard Jesus as a "below average" messiah, for he refused to perform even one miracle.
Pilate (Anthony Nicholls) is interviewed. Feeling sorry for Jesus, he wrote Jesus' claim to be King of the Jews above the cross, partly to prove his independence, he is no puppet of the Jews.
Barabbas is less communicative, "never 'eard of 'im," he tells an interviewer. But what does it make you feel, to know another man died instead of you? "It makes you think, doesn't it?"
People from the crowd are questioned, though none seem to have much clue as to what happened. The man who had carried Jesus' cross (Oscar Quitak) explains how he got roped in, he'd been glad to help Jesus.
The reporter describes the scene at the crucifixion then three soldiers (including Tony Selby) give their impressions, one more thoughtful perhaps than the others believes he was the Son of God.
Richard Leech in the studio concludes by reminding us that it's now the sabbath, it's been "an extraordinary day"

To Religious Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

The Rise and Fall of a Hero (March 22nd 1964)
A mixture of bible readings for Easter Week, and vaguely related more contemporary poems and stories, which sit too uncomfortably together. The selections have clearly been made with some care, but I found their relevance dubious and their aptness irreverent.
The song She'll Be Coming Round the Mountain sets this tone. It is followed by poems about King Solomon, then Jane Asher recites the Palm Sunday story. Interspersed are more poems and an account of Lindberg's reception after his flight across the Atlantic in 1927. Evidently intended as a comparison with Christ riding into Jerusalem, and the parallel is noted that in 1957 when Warner Bros brought out a film about Lindberg's flight it flopped as many people had forgotten about this hero. Not sure of the parallel that is intended in this programme.
There's Nobody in the Housetops Now, a poem read by Keith Barron, is followed by Jane Asher reading short extracts from the story of Jesus' arrest, trial and death. Keith Barron reads All Men Kill the Thing They Love, and after other poems, there is a reading from the diary of Oscar Wilde, about his journey to prison. There's a parallelism of this with Christ's journey to the cross, but isn't it an offensive comparison to link Wilde with Jesus?
The song For Me is followed by Jesus being mocked and crucified. Interesting reflections by modern prisoners awaiting execution lead into the poem The Cross, and I Wonder. Actor William Marlowe reads a rather apt line, "what'd be the sense of broadcasting such distressing rubbish?"
That should be the finish, but Roy Guest gives us one more song, Tom Dooley, before Keith Barron ends with a sad poem, a half hearted challenge. Altogether, this was, apart from the fine actors, the sort of bargain basement thing that any amateur group could do

To Religious Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Inquest at Golgotha
Script: Jack Shepherd. With Patrick Magee as a Lawyer, Joss Ackland as The Coroner, Moray Watson as The Police Inspector, Edward Evans as Joseph of Arimathea, and David King as Army Captain

The case against Jesus Ben-Joseph.
A reporter attends a coroner's inquest, in the days after Jesus' death. The coroner (Joss Ackland) seeks to determine if the condemned man is dead.
The first witness is the Roman captain who had overseen the execution on Skull Hill. The prisoner had been dead at sunset, he says. The lawyer representing the Jewish Sanhedrin (Patrick Magee) queries this statement. "He was dead," the officer repeats. Jesus had also been stabbed in his side to make doubly certain.
Joseph of Arimathea (Edward Evans) is the next on the stand, he had been granted Jesus' body to place in his tomb. A boulder had sealed the entrance. Why had he given his own burial chamber for this purpose? Like Nicodemus, Joseph believed Jesus' sentence had been unjust.
A police inspector (Moray Watson) explains the tomb had been guarded to start with. However the body had somehow disappeared. A surgeon explains in general terms the probabilities, but after Jesus' terrible treatment though "survival is not impossible," he would surely have needed medical treatment to survive. Then the inspector is recalled and explains he had questioned those who might have had stolen the body, but he can find no evidence that anyone had done such a thing. He admits however "I can't prove anything."
"Were the guards drugged?" suggests the Sanhedrin lawyer. The policeman can't believe it likely that Jesus' followers could have done such an act. "Did the Sanhedrin steal the corpse?" he retorts.
Now the lawyer cross questions the army captain. He attacks the Roman for being too sympathetic towards his prisoner. Was Jesus really "unique" as He claimed? The lawyer calls it "sentimental sympathy."
The summing up as the coroner address the jury, that's us the viewers. He examines the activity of Jesus' followers after His death and alleged resurrection. Is this "fantasy," as the lawyer claims. There are two important questions for us to consider:
1 What happened to the body? and
2 Who moved the rock?
A final issue- is Jesus still dead?

The Religious Menu

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

About Religion (ATV)
This awfully dull title hid a wide ranging religious programme that began in 1956 in the God Slot at 7pm on Sundays. The programme shared the slot with ABC's Living Your Life, and this latter programme made spasmodic appearances over the years, giving the About Religion team a break. The programme ran for ten years until 1966.
The series was a mix of discussions, interviews, with occasional dramas of a religious nature:
January 8th 1956: Prebendary Douglas Owen and Rev John Groser on religious issues and daily life, including "the colour question."
January 15th 1956: Canon T Fitzgerald leads a discussion on marriage
January 29th 1956: What Has the Church to Offer? discussed by Rev Robert Duce, Minister of Petts Wood Congregational Church.
February 5th 1956: Altar in the Hearth, Rev Derrick Greeves, Minister of Methodist Church, Westminster Central Hall talks about religion in the home, with hymn singing round the piano led by Dr C Thornton Lofthouse.
April 8th 1956: The Church That Nearly Died. Revival of Christianity in Madagascar. Director: Bill Allenby.
April 29th 1956: In Praise of Mary. Father C Carr introduces a film about Mary, mother of Jesus, starring Moira Lister
May 13th 1956: Religion with Hands. The Salvation Army introduced by Rev BJ Tidball.
May 20th 1956: Confirmation. An "imaginary Catholic family" discuss the subject.
May 27th 1956: Rev BJ Tidball and young people discuss and sing everyday hymns.
June 3rd 1956: The Expansion of the Church Overseas. Preb Douglas Owen discusses with Bishop Obadiah Kariuke and Rev J Gilbert Baker.
June 17th 1956: Question Time with Canon EF Carpenter, Miss Rosamund Essex, Dr Nathaniel Micklem, and Mrs Maisie Sheed. Chairman: Preb Douglas Owen.
July 15th 1956: Water! Water! On St Swithin's Day, Rev HA Hamilton is joined by a doctor, a farmer and a water engineer to discuss the significance of water in religion.
July 29th 1956: Baptism. Rev N McCurry of High Wycombe and two parents in his parish discuss baptism with Rev Canon F Hood.
August 5th 1956: Religion on Holiday. Canon Tom Pugh, Senior Chaplain at a Holiday Camp and some colleagues discuss their work with Rev BJ Tidball.
September 9th 1956: The Parson's Job. Rev Hubert Treacher talks with Prebendary Douglas Owen.
September 23rd 1956: Monastic Life- is there a place for it in the modern world? Tom Driberg questions Father Trevor Huddleston.
October 14th 1956: Towards A Friendly World. Rev BJ Tidball talks with Rev W Gwynn-Jones, a medical student from the West Indies, a pastor from Germany, an engineer from Canada and an undergraduate from the Gold Coast.
October 21st 1956: The Church in the Community. Preb Douglas Owen discusses the church in new towns with the Bishop of Rochester.
November 18th 1956: For Whom The Bell Tolled. Leprosy, and how one missionary society is tackling the problem.
December 2nd 1956: Is It All Rock 'n' Roll? Father George Potter of Peckham talks to Teddy boys and girls.
December 9th 1956: Two Famous Journeys. Rev HA Hamilton talks of one of man's most exciting journeys, and the journey of the holy family at Christmas time.
December 23rd 1956: The Christmas Story, acted in the Church of St Peter-upon-Cornhill by their own players, arranged by the rector Prebendary Douglas Owen. Jack Hulbert introduced the performance with amateur actors: Joan Levers (Mary), Kenn Lesbirel (Joseph), and Edmund Coulter (Gabriel). These three were students at Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Others included City businessmen John Gough (The Monk Contemplation) and John Evenett (Shepherd). (Note, this programme was only shown in the London region, The Midlands had their own programme of Carols.)
December 25th 1956 (special programme at 7pm on Christmas Day): Some Thoughts on Christmas Day. Preb Douglas Owen with film showing how Christmas is celebrated round the world.
December 30th 1956: Soap Box Sunday with Cecilie Hastings, addressing a crowd and answering questions.
January 6th 1957: Talking of Nuns. With the Prioress of the Convent of St Hilda Whitby are Monica Dickens, Anthony Wedgwood Benn and John Betjeman.
January 13th 1957: The Congregation. Christian worship discussed by Rev Geoffrey Beaumont, and featuring Richard Kisch.
January 20th 1957: Towards Unity? A layman questions ministers from various churches.
January 27th 1957: Christ Behind The Iron Curtain. The church in the Communist state, Father Bernard Bassett talks to two Hungarian refugees.
February 24th 1957: People have got religion all wrong, protests Rev George MacLeod, Founder of the Iona Community.
March 3rd 1957: A Christian Cabaret, devised by Rev Robert Duce, with young people from Petts Wood
March 10th 1957: What's the Difference? 5 programmes for Lent, the series introduced by Rev Simon Phipps. 1 Clearing the Air. 4 Working It Out (March 31st) with Rev Douglas Griffiths. The final programme on April 7th 1957 was 5 The Break-Through.
April 14th 1957: Five Sorrowful Mysteries. A mime for Palm Sunday presented by The Priory Players directed by David Gill. Introduced by Very Rev Father Illtud Evans
May 12th 1957: Well, What About Religion? Rev Simon Phipps answers.
June 2nd 1957: Religion in England. Discussing a News Chronicle poll on religion were Father George P Dwyer, Rev Thomas Jarratt, Rev Austin Williams, and William Gregory. Chairman: Anthony Greenwood.
June 16th 1957: Why Be a Parson? John Gale of The Observer talks to three future clergymen.
June 30th 1957: Christianity and Warfare. Discussed by Sir Richard Acland and Hon Patrick Maitland. Chairman: Rev Noel Perry-Gore.
July 14th 1957: Religion on Holiday. Rev G Reindorp questions Billy Butlin, Col Basil Brown and Canon T Pugh about the part of religion in camp life.
July 28th 1957: What Shall I Be? Six children discuss with Rev Marcus Morris, plus Moira Shearer and Peter Twiss.
August 11th 1957: World Scout Jamboree. Chief Scout Lord Rowallan discusses religious customs of various countires with Rev Edward Patty.
September 8th 1957: Soap Box Sunday with Rev Donald Soper.
September 22nd 1957: Morals and Christianity, the difference between crime and sin discussed by Sir John Wolfenden and Ludovic Kennedy.
October 6th 1957: The World's Needs. A programme for Harvest.
October 20th 1957: Go Down Moses. Canon Joe Fison of Truro Cathedral tells the story of the Exodus.
October 27th 1957: Body and Soul. About the Christian Medical Services Overseas.
November 10th 1957: It's Right To Remember. Commentator: Stanley Meadows
November 24th 1957: Soap Box Sunday with Miss Cecily Hastings
December 22nd 1957: No Room... At Christmas. Rev BJ Tidball on care in the community.
The programme had a break at the start of 1958.
Feb 23rd 1958: The Throne of Grace. The first of a series of six programmes for Lent: What is a Christian with Rev Canon Ernest Southcott
Other themes in this mini series: Love, Peace, Patience, and March 23rd 1958: Faithfulness. With Father Hugh Bishop, and, March 30th 1958: Self Control with Rev Robert Duce
April 6th 1958: Easter Sunday, the resurrection, a talk between Father Raymond Raynes and John Betjeman.
April 20th 1958: Talking It Over with Rev Dr Leslie Weatherhead. An honest doubt about Christianity.
April 27th 1958: Soap Box Sunday with Rev Donald Soper.
May 18th 1958: Towards the Future... with Rev W Griffith Jones, Rev Howard S Stanley, Rev Kathleen Henry and a German pastor. Interviewed by Huw Thomas. The Free Church's attitude to problems affecting Christians.
May 25th 1958: Something Extra with Rev Canon Alan Richardson. A Whit Sunday special.
June 8th 1958: An Artist's Vision. George Goyder on William Blake
June 22nd 1958: The Church in a New Town. Rev E Cordingly, Rector of Stevenage
June 29th 1958: The Bishops Come to Lambeth- the Archbishop of Canterbury talks to William Clark
Aug 10th 1958: A Home in London- the work of the Methodist International House and its founder Hilda Porter
Aug 17th 1958: Divine Healing. Robert Kee discusses the healing mission of the church with Canon M Martin, Rev Dr D Spivey, Father M Hollings, Muriel Powell.
Aug 31st 1958: Talking It Over. An honest debate about Christianity with Leslie Weatherhead
Sept 21st 1958: The Bible Belongs. John Foster discusses Proof.
Sept 28th 1958: St Therese of Lisieux. Father Michael Hollings introduces a talk about the life of the saint with Leonard Cheshire and Mgr Vernon Johnson.
Oct 12th 1958: A Portrait of Christ in pictures from the National Gallery, plus the voices of Peter Barkworth, Brewster Mason, Denis McCarthy and Chairman Eyre.
Oct 19th 1958: Soapbox Sunday, with, naturally, Donald Soper. He addresses a studio "crowd."
Oct 26th 1958: Deadline, with Beckett Bould as Jim Stone, Hazel Bainbridge as his daughter, Bernard Horsfall as Vicar, and Brewster Mason as narrator. Script by Philip Turner. This play comes out of the day-to-day experiences of the ordinary parish priest. Jim Sloane is an imaginary figure, the play asks, with death our one certainty, is it possible to come to terms with our true selves, with our fellow human beings and with God?
Nov 2nd 1958: School Religion. Diana Reader-Harris, A Chenevix-Trench, Mary Green, and Malcolm K Ross with Father Trevor Huddleston.
Nov 9th 1958: Evening Prayers from St David's Home for Disabled Ex-Service Men, Ealing
Nov 23rd 1958: Between Heaven and Hell. Purgatory, with Father Michael Hollings, Brian Power and Sister St Helen
Nov 30th 1958: The Story of Job. Read by Sir Ralph Richardson, narrator: Rev George Macleod, illustrated by John Bratby
Dec 7th 1958: Preparing for Christmas. The Second Coming with Rev John Robinson.
Dec 14th 1958: I Played But You Wouldn't Dance. Songs written and played by Pere Duval.
Dec 21st 1958: Christmas Is Coming. With John Betjeman and Father Hugh Bishop.
Dec 28th 1958: Between the Acts. Rev HA Hamilton talks with Rev BJ Tidball in the interval between Christmas and New Year
Jan 4th 1959: Down to Earth. A celebration of Christmas and the New Year in words and music. With Peter Wyngarde and Jack Parnell and his Orchestra.
Jan 18th 1959: The Power of the Lord. A Tribute to Cardinal Griffin by Cardinal Gilroy of Australia, Mgr Derek Worlock, Lord Packenham and Ben Lyon.
Feb 1st 1959: Parents Talking. Rev EJ Parkinson of Limehouse Parish Church and his doctor wife discuss problems of family life.
Feb 15th 1959: The Mind's Way- mental and emotional disturbances, including a pioneer hospital run by The Society of Friends
Feb 22nd 1959: Darkness and Light. Dominican monk Rev Lawrence Bright on The Way of Light, a way out of poverty and ignorance.
March 1st 1959: Earth and Heaven. Inter-Church Aid film with commentary by RS Thomas on the Christian churches' response to hunger and poverty.
March 8th 1959: The Opening Door? Chairman Father Trevor Huddleston CR, on oppressed minorities, emphasis on the imprisoned
March 15th 1959: The Lonely Shepherd. On people living alone conquering loneliness. With Mme Jeanty Raven, Father Aidan McGrath. Chairman: Tom Driberg.
March 29th 1959: This Joyous Eastertide, introduced by Rev Erik Routley of Oxford. Easter hymns.
April 19th 1959: Soapbox Sunday with Rev Donald Soper.
May 3rd 1959: Let Us Pray. Father Trevor Huddleston talks to children about prayers.
May 10th 1959: Cross-Examination. The Ascension- Questioner: Adrian Davies. The Questioned: Rev WAL Elmslie, Rev ER Micklem, and Rev Leslie Weatherhead
May 24th 1959: A New Bishop. The new Bishop of Southwark is questioned by Anthony Greenwood, Julian Grenfell and Rev Peter Duncan.
(Note: during June and July, ABC Midlands and North did not show About Religion, instead transmitting their own religious programme The Least Read Best Selller)
June 7th 1959: Faith in Nations. What is the future of the NATO nations, spiritually and morally? Introduced by Richard Goold-Adams.
June 14th 1959: Great Christian Murals. Eric Newton talks about great paintings in Italian churches, relating them to the Gospel story.
July 5th 1959: Living Together with God. A church on a new housing estate with Rev Basil Huett, Minister of Dene Holm Methodist Church Northfleet Kent
July 26th 1959: For Ever and Ever. A dramatised imaginary conversation about the Lord's Prayer, written by Emma Smith
Aug 16th 1959: Five Times Married. A story from the Bible showing the impact of Christ, with Bishop Fulton Sheen.
Aug 23rd 1959: The Church and the Stage. Ludovic Kennedy introduces a discussion with Harry Secombe, Athene Seyler, Hugh Sinclair, Ann Parson and Dame Sybil Thorndike.
Sept 13th 1959: The One God. Christianity and Judaism explored by Sir John Wolfenden and Rev Isaac Levy.
Sept 27th 1959: Mission to Hop Pickers. Interviewer: Stanley Baron. (Rescheduled from Aug 30th 1959)
Oct 11th 1959: The Christian View. Ludovic Kennedy in the first of three conversations with the Archbishop of York. (Programme 2 was on Nov 15th 1959, the last on Dec 13th 1959)
Oct 18th 1959: Portrait of Mary. Paintings of the mother of Jesus and readings, read by Jill Balcon, Peter Barkworth, Anthony Jacobs, Denis McCarthy, Audrey Richards, David Spenser. Arranged and devised by Peter Barkworth and Maria Shirley.
Oct 25th 1959: Mary, a discussion with Rev Michael Hollings, Donald Soper, Kenneth Woollcombe. Chairman Norman Fisher.
Nov 8th 1959: A Christian Outsider. Dr John Heenan talks to Malcolm Muggeridge.
Nov 22nd 1959: Church of England- High or Low? With Rev Cuthbert Bardsley, Rev Dick Rees and Rev Kenneth Ross. Chaired by Tom Driberg.
Nov 29th 1959: Loving Thy Neighbour. With Rt Hon Earl of Woolton, questioned by Noel Perryman.
Dec 6th 1959: The First Six Months as a Bishop. The Bishop of Southwark, in a follow up to the May programme, is questioned by Anthony Greenwood and Rev Peter Duncan.
Dec 20th 1959: Christmas night. A boy and his vision of the first Christmas. With Gary Raymond, Lisa Madron, Norman Tyrrell, Frederick Peisley, Ralph Nossek, Gibb McLaughlin, Daniel Thorndike and Martin Spiers. Written by Emma Smith.
Dec 27th 1959: From Darkness to Light. Songs and music for the joyful and lonely. Witten and played by Father Aime Duval.
An Anthology of Prayer (Jan 10th 1960). Narrator: Bernard Archard, singer: Harry Barnes, harpist: Maria Korchinska, percussion player: James Blades, with the voices of Janet Joye, Peter Barkworth, Norman Tyrrell, and Judy Horn.
The Question of Unity (Jan 17th 1960). Discussion on the divisions within Christianity and hopes for reunion. With Rev K Woollcoombe, Donald Soper, Edward Taylor. Chairman: Norman Fisher.
Eye Level (Jan 31st 1960). Christian events, ideas and opinions. With Noel Perry-Gore. (Similar on Feb 28th 1960, Mar 27th 1960, and monthly, last Sunday of the month, most introduced by Antony Brown). This monthly programme continued into 1961.
Crossing the Line (Feb 7th 1960). What Price Christianity? asks Rev Simon Phipps.
Away from It All (Feb 14th 1960). A visit to a retreat in Southwell House.
The Seven Deadly Sins 1 Anger (Mar 6th 1960). Written by Elizabeth Young. Five dramatised programmes.
The Seven Deadly Sins 2 Gluttony and Sloth (Mar 13th 1960). Written by James Brabazon.
The Seven Deadly Sins 3 Lust (Mar 20th 1960). Written by Elizabeth Young.
The Seven Deadly Sins 4 Avarice and Envy (Apr 3rd 1960). Introduced by Alan Wheatley. Written by Mary Crawford.
The Seven Deadly Sins 5 Pride (Apr 10th 1960). Introduced by Alan Wheatley. Written by Mary Crawford.
Talking to The Archbishop of Canterbury (Apr 17th 1960). Filmed at Lambeth Palace, Kenneth Harris talks to Dr Geoffrey Fisher.
Why Bishops? (May 1st 1960). Norman Fisher chairs a discussion with Rev William Greer, Rev Kenneth Riches and Rev John Robinson.
The Old Believers (May 8th 1960). Christian Aid Week programme about how Russian refugees have successfully settled in South America with the aid of the World Council of Churches. Introduced by John Thompson.
Coventy Cathedral (May 15th/22nd 1960). Two programmes on the cathedral to be dedicated this month. 1- A Talk to the Architect, Basil Spence. 2- The Purpose, with members of the cathedral staff.
The Acts of the Apostles (June 5th 1960). The story of Whit Sunday with the voices of Gerald Cross, Alan Edwards, Alan Judd, Denis McCarthy, John Richmond, John Scott, Jeffrey Segal.
Minister of Grace (June 12th 1960). Dr Leslie Weatherhead looks back over the years of The City Temple London, in an interview with John Thompson.
Heaven and Hell (July 3rd, 10th and 17th 1960). with Norman Fisher. Programme 2 included Norman Fisher questioning Rev Dr Nathaniel Micklem, Archbishop Thomas Roberts and Rev Dr Ulrich Simon
Word of Judgement (Aug 7th 1960). A discussion of the reliability of the Bible, based on the film Inherit the Wind. John Thompson discusses with Stanley Kramer and Rev Maurice Wood.
The Uses of Worship (Aug 14th 1960). With Dr John Heenan who is questioned by Kenneth Harris
Soap Box Sunday (Aug 21st 1960). With Rev Noel Calvin
Eye Level (Aug 28th 1960). This month: a filmed interview with Rev Norman Motley and Othona Community Bradwell on Sea, introduced by Antony Brown
The Other Side (Sept 4th 1960). Christian and Siritualist beliefs with Rev Thomas Wemyss Reid, Rev Joseph Crehan, Rev Eric H Pyle and Rev John Pearce-Higgins. Introduced by Tom Driberg
Return to Africa (Sept 11th 1960). Trevor Huddleston discusses his new work as Bishop of Masasi with Christopher Chataway, Hannah Stanton and James Cameron
Blessed Are Those Servants (Sept 25th 1960). Anthony Greenwood interviews the Bishop of Southwark and some of those men ordained at a service shown that morning.
Who's In Town? (Oct 9th 1960). An imaginary interview with St Paul at the Areopagus TV Studios Athens with Martin Benson as St Paul, Brewster Mason, Harold Scott and John Kidd. Script: Christopher Hollis
They Refused to Escape (Nov 13th 1960) Rev Douglas Thompson and Rev Joseph Stratton, introduced by John Pearson.
Journey of Understanding (Dec 4th 1960). The Archbishop of Canterbury travels to the Holy Land. A film report narrated by Antony Brown. This programme was a joint ITN/ATV/ABC production.
Pages and People (Dec 11th 1960). The year is 100AD and St John's biography The Life of Jesus has been published. A panel of critics discuss it, and filmed interviews are given with the boy with the loaves and fishes, now a retired sailor, the woman who challenged Peter if he knew Christ, and the son of one who was raised from the dead. Script: Jack Shepherd
Bands of Love (Jan 1st 1961). Nicholas Graham talks to Anthony Greenwood. The theme is love and marriage.
Canon 1961 (Jan 8th 1961). Canon Ernest Southcott a Canadian parson working in an industrial city in the north.
Winds of Unity (Jan 22nd 1961). Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. A look through newspapers, films and contemporary magazines
Eye Level (Jan 29th 1961). First edition of 1961
Soap Box Sunday (Feb 5th 1961). With Ven Peter Booth
Dinner on Sunday (Mar 12th 1961). With Rosemary Anne Sisson. Narrator: Norman Wooland, with Rev Stephen Hopkinson, Rev Caryl Micklem, Rev John Bebb looking at the churches' attitude to Communion.
Tongues of Men or of Angels? (Mar 19th 1961). Lord David Cecil, Nigel Nicolson and Christopher Logue and chairman Norman Fisher discuss the newly published translation of the bible.
Ways and Means (Mar 26th 1961). It's Different When you're Dying, written by Rosemary Anne Sisson, presenting in dramatic form methods of entry into the Christian church. Narrator: Norman Wooland. Discussion with Rev Stephan Hopkinson, Rev Caryl Micklem and Rev John Bebb.
To Be or Not To Be? (Apr 2nd 1961). Easter Sunday edition with CS Lewis and Anthony Greenwood discussing human resurrection.
Sin and Crime (Apr 16th 1961). With Rev Dr RR Williams, Sir Cyril Black. Richard Wollheim. Chariman: Brian Connell. Law and morality discussed: should adultery be a crime? What laws should a Christian land make on suicide, mercy killing etc?
The Hungry (May 7th 1961). With Charles Weitz, Geoffrey Murray. Christian Aid Week.
The Three Archbishops (May 28th 1961, also June 4th, 11th). Three programmes 1 with Geoffrey Fisher, 2 with Michael Ramsey, 3 with Donald Coggan. Kenneth Harris talked to all three archbishops.
Music for God (July 2nd 1961). With Denis Lotis and the Barney Gilbraith Singers. Plus a discussion with Patrick Appleford and Gerald Knight.
Prisoners of Faith (July 9th 1961). Host Christopher Chataway with Christmas Humphreys, John Cordle, Mgr Derek Worlock, Francis Williams, and Peter Benenson.
Right-Wrong (July 16th 1961). Two teams of school leavers answer questions about faith and life. Questionmaster: Norman Tozer. Commenting on their answers are Stephen Hopkinson, Caryl Micklem, John Bebb.
The Church in Parliament (July 30th 1961) 1 Roman Catholics with the Marquess of Lothian, Alice Cullen, Hugh Delargy, Robert Grant-Ferris. Aug 6th: 2 Nonconformists with Norman Fisher, Lord Ogmore, George Thomas, Donald Wade. Aug 13th: 3 CofE, Norman Fisher with Lord Hawke, Eric Fletcher, Peter Kirk, Patricia McLaughlin.
Man's Idea of God (Aug 27th 1961). Tom Driberg with Antony Bridge.
Tolpuddle and After (Sept 3rd 1961). Christian Origins of Trade Unionism introduced by Anthony Greenwood, with George Woodcock, William Carron, Jim Matthews and Tom Chapman.
St Francis of Assisi (Sept 10th 1961). With Simon Phipps.
The Adman Cometh (Sept 24th 1961). With Duff Newton - an inquiry as to whether the church should use advertising agencies.
Hawksmoor of London (Oct 15th 1961). Narrated by John Betjeman, with readings read by Peter Barkworth. About Nicholas Hawksmoor, born 300 years ago, builder of many churches in London
King Herod (Oct 29th 1961), a play by Jack Shepherd. Director: Gordon Reece. Cast: Herod Antipas (Godfrey Quigley), Salome (Maria Andipa), Judge (Richard Warner), Keeper of Records (Richard Longman), Clerk of the Court (David Graham), Prosecutor (Charles Morgan), Army Sergeant (John Junkin), Nebo (Jeffrey Gardiner), Herodian Party Chairman (Norman Pitt). Synopsis: King Herod is put in a modern court to answer the charge that he "wilfully misused powers of life and death not in the interests of his people, but for his own prestige and status." Note: The actress playing Salome claimed she was a descendant of Herod!
A House Divided (Nov 5th 1961). Discussion between George Thomas MP and Dr Leslie Weatherhead about suffering and anxiety
Door to Somwhere (Nov 12th 1961). Host: Tony Sympson with Frederick Bartman as Karl Marx and William Devlin as Isaiah. Two famous men meet over dinner waiting in the halfway house between life and death. Script by Jack Shepherd.
The End of The World (Nov 26th 1961). Duff Newton introduces a discussion with Stephan Hopkinson, Caryl Micklem, John Bebb, Bernard Russell.
The World Council (Dec 3rd 1961). Third Assembly of World Council of Churches in New Delhi, a report by Kenneth Harris.
The World Council (Dec 10th 1961) as above.
Roman Catholics and Unity (Dec 17th 1961). Anthony Greenwood talks to Dr John Heenan.
Punishment (Dec 31st 1961). Sir John Wolfenden discusses the verdict of death on Adolf Eichmann and the nature of punishment in general with Victor Gollancz.
Demon Drink (Jan 14th 1962). Christian attitudes to alcohol with Duff Newton.
Soap-Box Sunday (Jan 28th 1962). Donald Soper addresses a crowd in the studio.
Thou Shalt Not (Feb 4th 1962). Which is the least observed of the Ten Commandments? With Mgr David Cashman, and Rev Theodore Smith.
The Undiscovered Country (Feb 11th 1962). Hauntings and apparitions at Borley Rectory are re-enacted. Then Very Rev WR Matthews talks about it to Stephan Hopkinson.
Slow- Men At Work (Feb 25th 1962). Dr Nathaniel Micklem and Charles Smith discuss moral issues with Christian trade unionists.
Big Business (Mar 4th 1962). George Goyder and others on the responsibilities of industry.
Hair Shirts or a Soft Option. (March 11th 1962). The relevance in 1962 of Fasting in Lent
White Man's Religion (Mar 25th 1962). Immigrants discuss whether Christianity is a European religion.
A Regiment of Women (Apr 1st 1962). Stephan Hopkinson, Caryll Micklem and John Bebb answer questions on the role of women in the church.
Christianity Limited (April 8th 1962). Father Columba Ryan discusses with FG Healy and an Anglican religious freedom, or the lack of it in some parts of the world
Eye Level (Apr 15th 1962). This series within the About Religion umbrella, returned, it had begun in 1960, and continued monthly the next being on May 20th 1962) - again hosted by Antony Brown.
Did Christ Really Rise Again? (Apr 22nd 1962). Kenneth Harris questions the Archbishop of Canterbury.
The King (Apr 29th 1962). Narration and script: Martin Bruce. Readings by Shaw Taylor. The story of the Resurrection told in Easter carols and readings from the New English Bible. Carols sung by Choir of St Marks, North Audley Street London led by Maurice Vinden
Teach Him to Live (May 6th 1962). Chairman Kenneth Harris, with Claude Leetham and Kurt Hahn.
Can You Be A Christian in .... 1 the Army? (June 3rd 1962) with Lt Gen John W Hackett, Dr George Macleod. 2 in Politics (June 10th 1962) with the Earl of Longford and Prof Hugh Trevor-Roper. 3 in The City (June 17th 1962). 4 (July 1st 1962). Chairman of all programmes was Norman Fisher.
Men and Power (July 15th 1962) introduced by Julian Grenfell. Lord Fisher of Lambeth talks to Father Michael and Sir Richard Acland about the worldly responsibilities of the church, and the spiritual problems its leaders face.
By Royal Warrant (July 8th 1962). Tom Driberg talks to Robert Stopford, Maurice Wood and Colin Stephenson about the Church of England.
The New Coventry Plays (July 22nd 1962): No 1 This is The End, with Robert Flemyng, Robin Bailey, Pauline Letts, Jane Eccles, Peter Williams, Scot Finch. Music by John Barry. Script: Ken Taylor. An outside broadcast from the porch of Coventry Cathedral, the first in a series of occasional plays
Next Door to Nobody (July 29th 1962). Geoffrey Johnson Smith discusses with Mrs Mabel Bickerstaff, Alderman Eric Mole, and Canon Ralph Stevens.
I Want To Know.... (Aug 5th 1962). Chairman: Shaw Taylor. Eric Abbott, Dean of Westminster answers viewers' questions. Future programmes included Philip Potter, of the Free Churches (Aug 19th 1962).
Persecution of Jews (Sept 2nd 1962). Anthony Greenwood discusses with William Sargent, William Simpson, and Sir Henry d'Avigdor Goldsmid.
Refugees (Sept 9th 1962), including the story of Francoise Rigby.
The Vatican Council (Sept 16th 1962). Humphrey Berkely introduces Henry St John, Bernard Leeming, Mgr Derek Warlock.
Context "a new magazine programme" replacing 'Eye Level' (Oct 7th 1962). Topics of the moment from a Christian perspective. Julian Grenfell introduced this monthly programme.
Brass Bands and Ironsides (Oct 21st 1962) with Donald Churchill as Oliver Cromwell and Joss Ackland as General Booth. With Tony Garnett. Script: Jack Shepherd.
I Want To Know.... (Oct 28th 1962). Chairman: Shaw Taylor. More viewers' questions answered, this time by Peter Booth, Archdeacon of Lewes.
Winter of the World (Nov 11th 1962). Remembrance Sunday readings by Paul Rogers, Bill Owen and Margaretta Scott. Reflecting on the Christian attitude to forgiveness is Rt Hon Richard Wood.
The Six Proud Walkers (Dec 16th 1962). An examination of the state of Christianity in the six major power blocks of the world
Dinner with the Devil (Dec 23rd 1962). A play by Christopher Hollis starring Peter Wyngarde (as The Devil), with Mark Dignam, Henry McCarthy (as Sir Basil Pumphrey) and David King. The theme is what you would give to the Devil if he came to Christmas dinner.
Almanac (Dec 30th 1962). With Stephan Hopkinson, Caryl Micklem and John Bebb.
The Law and The Prophets (Feb 17th 1963). Influence of Christian law discussed by Eric Fletcher and Sir John Wolfenden.
Why Believe? (Mar 17th 1963). Dr Lovell Cocks and Anthony Bourne-Arton.
The Watershed (Mar 24th 1963). Stephan Hopkinson, Caryll Micklem and John Bebb discuss the change in public belief in Christianity.
God Heard and Unheard (Mar 31st/ April 7th 1963). Kenneth Harris with the Archbishop of Canterbury.
Church and State (May 12th 1963). With Harold Wilson.
The Non Conformist Conscience (May 19th 1961). With George Thomas, John Huxtable.
New Coventry Plays (May 26th 1963). The Site starring Jack Gwillim and Kenneth J Warren, with Colin Campbell, Hugh Morton, and Edward Atienza. Script: Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney. The second of new Coventry Cathedral plays (the first had been performed in 1962). This story is of a young man who inherits the ruins of the old cathedral. On it an old man is building an Object, a symbolic object, but what is it? From the picture I would guess it was a giant mechanical mouse, but possibly it was only symbolic. Vic Symonds designed the creation used in this story.
Church and State (June 16th 1963). Rt Hon RA Butler talks to Kenneth Harris in a follow up programme to May 12th.
Boycott (June 30th, probably postponed to July 7th 1963). Discussion on the South African problem with Rev Joost De Blank, Anthony Greenwood, and Nelson Mustoe talking to Derek Jewell.
Christian Co-Existence (July 28th 1963). Michael Thomas introduces political cartoonist Abu Abraham who discusses the church in India where he was brought up.
Epilepsy (Aug 11th 1963). Introduced by Peter Barkworth.
Integrity (Aug 25th 1963). Dame Flora Robson in conversation with the Archdeacon of Lewes.
Wish You Were Here (Sept 8th 1963). Olive Gregg on holidays.
Context: Special Edition (Sept 22nd 1963) on The Vatican Council Second Session, introduced by Julian Grenfell.
No Man is an Island (Sept 29th 1963). Robert Kee discusses the play The Representative, on concentration camps.
The Upper Room (Oct 20th 1963). A gospel play by Alex Bradford with Alex Bradford, Princess Stewart, Ida Shepley.
The Two Faces of War (Nov 10th 1963). John Slater narrates a programme for Rememberance Sunday.
The Curate's Egg (Nov 17th 1963). The image of the church through laughter- with Leslie Phillips talking about Our Man at St Mark's. Director: Shaun O'Riordan
Religion in Education: 1963 (Nov 24th and Dec 1st 1963)- one of these programmes may have been postponed: see also Jan 12th 1964
Something's Coming, Something Good (Dec 22nd 1963). A programme for Christmas.
Religion in Schools (Jan 12th 1964). With AS Neil, Alexander Howard and John England.
A Beeching in the Belfry (Jan 19th/ 26th 1964). Leslie Paul's report on the church. No 1 What's Wrong? No 2 What's next?
Who Decides? (Feb 9th 1964). A discussion about smoking with Enoch Powell, Ronald Plumley, Wayland Young and John Morris
The Witness at your Door (Feb 16th 1964). Derek Jewell on Jehovah's Witnesses.
Calendar (Mar 15th 1964). The monthly magazine Context was now renamed. It was billed as a "programme for people who don't go to church," and was introduced by John McGregor.
The Rise and Fall of a Hero (Mar 22nd 1964). A programme for Palm Sunday. Readings by Jane Asher, Keith Barron, William Marlowe and Andrew Crawford. Songs sung by Roy Guest
Mother Theresa of Calcutta (Apr 5th 1964).
Don't Call Him Mister (Apr 12th 1964). A dramatised account of George Fox, the first Quaker. Script: Jack Shepherd. Director: David Reid. Starring George Murcell as George Fox and Cherry Morris as Margaret Fell.
The High Climbers (May 10th 1964). Ascension Day programme with Stephan Hopkinson. Tom Price, Anthony Rawlinson.
The Moving Spirit (May 17th 1964). Inspiration, a conversation between Cecil Day-Lewis, The Earl of Longford, Arnold Wesker and Cecil Woodham-Smith.
The Built In Challenge (May 31st 1964). Robert Kee on the radical forces at work in faiths today.
Have Faith Will Travel (June 7th 1964). A programme on pilgrimages with Richard Joyce, JP Delaney and Rev Eric Buchanan
Bow Bells (June 14th 1964) with Rev Joseph McCulloch. Commentator: Colin Bell.
Faces of Power (June 28th 1964) Malcolm Muggeridge talks to Rev Father Thomas Corbishley.
Can't Buy me Love (July 12th 1964). John Wren-Lewis on social workers
The Religious Press (July 26th 1964). Tom Stacey looks at religious newspapers with Hugh Kay, WE Pigott, and Rev Roger Roberts.
The High Climbers (August 9th 1964). Narrated by John Whale, written and introduced by Stephan Hopkinson. With Tom Price, warden of an Outward Bound Mountain School and Anthony Rawlinson, secretary of The Alpine Club.
Forum (Aug 23rd 1964). Christianity in the recent independent Commonwealth countries, with Brian Connell.
The Parson's Wife (Sept 6th 1964). Katherine Whitehorn looks at the role of the parson's wife today.
Quiz (Sept 20th 1964). Quizmaster Derek Jewell in a quiz about the CofE. Canterbury v York. The following Sunday, teams from the Free Churches in the North and South. Then On Oct 4th Roman Catholic Churches, teams from Westminster and Armagh.
Light Behind the Curtain (Oct 17th 1964). Kenneth Harris on churches behind the Iron Curtain.
The Gold Medallist (Oct 31st 1964). Richard Joyce on the saint in the churches today.
My Dear Wormwood... (Nov 15th 1964). On the late CS Lewis, written and compiled by Emmeline Garnett.
Great Expectation (Nov 29th 1964) An Anthology of words and music for Advent.
Man of Peace (Dec 13th 1964). Kenneth Harris talks to Dr Martin Luther King.
Never On Sunday (Jan 10th 1965) introduced by Norman Fisher. Examination of the Crathorne Committee's report recommendations into changing the laws relating to Sunday trading.
Skyscraper Parish (Jan 24th 1965) Derek Jewell examines large housing estates like Roehampton.
When the Computing Has To Stop (Feb 7th 1965) with Kenneth Harris. What distinguishes men from computers?
Good Relations (Feb 21st 1965). Viewers letters on family relationships are explored by Norman Fisher, Rev Paul Barber, Tatiana Behr, Evelyn Home, and Walter Longford.
Mainspring (Mar 7th/14th 1065) Kenneth Harris asks if we are losing our sense of values. The second programme included a discussion with Baroness Wootton of Abinger, Rev Canon Eric Saxon, and Walter James.
A Face for Judas (Apr 4th 1965). A play by Jack Shepherd. Directed by Michael Jeans. With John Carson as Tim, Hilary Dwyer as Gladys, John Abineri as Walter.
No Greater Love (Easter Sunday Apr 18th 1965) The story of a nun, Mother Maria, who perished at Ravensbruck 20 years earlier, narrated by Sergei Hackel, with Ann Castle.
John the Man (May 16th 1965) Kenneth Harris looks back with the Most Rev Igino Cardinale on the life of Pope John XXIII. Hugh Burden reads from the Pope's writings, and Norman Tozer narrated.
But One Purpose (May 29th 1965) John Snagge talks to the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbisop of York about the debate for unification of the Church of England and Methodist churches. In the second programme (July 11th 1965) John Pett explores the Methodist response.
Is Theology Really Necessary? (June 13th 1965). John Thompson discusses with Rev Canon Hugh Montefiore, Alison Wright, Keith Wedmore, and Alfred Woodcraft.
Tongues of Fire (June 27th 1965) Rev Stephan Hopkinson, Rev Kenneth Slack and Rev Michael Harper hear and discuss views expressed by Dr David de Plessis of the Pentecostal Church.
Missing Believed Killed (July 25th 1965). Margaret Hayes talks to Richard Joyce about her publicised murder by Congo rebels.
20th Century Missionaries (Aug 8th 1965). With Tom Stacey.
The Saturday People (Aug 22nd 1965) Derek Jewell on the Seventh Day Adventists.
Going with the Crowd (Sept 5th 1965). A satire on Materialism starring David Davenport. Script: Gordon Stowell. Director: Fred Wilby.
Their God and Ours (Sept 26th 1965). A meeting at St Mary-le-Bow Cheapside with representatives of various faiths, introduced by the rector Rev Joseph McCulloch. Rev Canon Richard Tydeman introduces a recording of this unique occasion.
Where are the Neighbours? (Oct 17th) Ludovic Kennedy talks to Rev John Pellow- on the new housing and its social problems.
The Great Unmentionable (Nov 29th 1965). Derek Jewell on death with Archie Markby and a professor of Clinical Cardiology.
Rev Who? (Dec 5th 1965 postponed from Oct 31st) Stephan Hopkinson discusses how clergy are elected to a parish.
900 Years (Dec 26th 1965). Westminster Abbey's 900th Anniversary, a special programme from the Jerusalem Chamber with the Dean and members of the chapter talking to John Pett.
Only six further programmes were made:
Guilty Conscience (Jan 9th 1966). Robert Kee discuss Guilt and the role of religion in mental health with Keith Wedmore and Rev Father F O'Doherty.
The Root of All Evil? (Jan 23rd 1966). Derek Jewell talks to Ronald Brech, Eugene Heimler, and Rev John Bowker.
The World We Don't Know (Feb 20th 1966). People with disabilities with Dr Winifred de Kok, Robin Fox, and Mr and Mrs Bent.
War in Peace (Mar 6th 1966). The Church Army with Derek Jewell.
Debt to Tomorrow (Mar 20th 1966) Population explosion with Ludovic Kennedy.
Rock Bottom (Apr 3rd 1966) Problems facing tramps with James Lloyd. The last programme in the series About Religion.
Programmes were initially shown from 7.00 to 7.30pm, around 1958 this was shortened to end at 7.25pm. For the final few years programmes were mostly shown at 6.35pm.
To
Religious programmes
Documentary Programmes

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Wednesday Night ITV Documentaries
Some 1959 ITV documentaries shown before a regular series began in Autumn 1959:
Insanity or Illness? (Granada)
Wed Jan 28th 1959, 8.30-9.30pm
With Robin Day, Elaine Grand and Brian Inglis.
Director: Claude Whatham.
With the co-operation National Association for Mental Health, from mental hospitals in Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cheshire, Nottinghamshire, Middlesex, Surrey and Sussex. Interviews with patients and relatives.
Tyranny The Years of Adolf Hitler (A-R)
Wed Mar 4th 1969, 8.30-9.30pm
Script: Cyril Bennett. Director: Peter Morley.
Kenneth Harris examines the man and his legacy, and asks is Hitlerism dead?
Surgeon (Granada)
Thurs Apr 23rd 1959 , 8.30-9.15pm
Directors: Peter Seabourne and Stuart Latham.
Cameras visit a big London hospital to watch a major operation on a 17 year old girl. made with help from the Royal College of Surgeons
Fear Begins at Forty (ATV)
Thurs May 21st 1959, 8.30-9.30.
Script: Julian Bond. Producer: Anthony Keary.
Subtitled The Threshold of Middle Age, this introduced a fictional character, Gerry Bernard, who has had his fortieth birthday. The programme asked if this age is the beginning of fear
Spearhead July 23rd 1959 (TWW)
The present and past of the 'spearhead' units of the British fight and Special Air Service, including film of the Royal Marine Commandos in exercise Run Aground in the west country. Two Commando VCs were joined in the studio by fourteen DSOs, fourteen Military Crosses and six Military Medals. The script and commentary were by Kem Bennett, a major in the French Resistance, the programme directed by John Wynn-Jones, a captain in No 4 Commando, and devised by TWW Station manager Peter Bartholomew, a Colonel in the Commandos who won a DSO

In Autumn 1959, the ITV network started showing documentary programmes, almost in peak viewing time. Serious programmes couldn't quite make it every Wednesday night, so cinema films and variety/sport were mingled in with the heavy stuff. The 1959/60 season is most interesting, as all weekday ITV companies each produced at least one contribution, perhaps suggesting the big companies didn't want to risk too much financially until the slot won some plaudits!

Documentary No 1
Home Front
October 14th 1959, 9.35-10.20pm (Granada TV).
In an attempt to popularise an intrinsically interesting subject, Tommy Trinder was roped in to host this portrait of Britain's wartime civilians and the work of Civil Defence.

Documentary No 2
Service Rendered
October 21st 1959, 9.35-10.05pm (Southern TV)
A programme to mark the bi-centenary of the laying of Nelson's Victory, screened on the Anniversary of Trafalgar.
It was mainly a reconstruction of life on board this ship before this battle, seen in flashback through modern day visitors.
Thus one of the visiting party Fred (Nigel Green) changes into period costume to become one of the ratings. It's not all fun, since after a drinking bout he is punished with the cat o' nine tails. Then 14 year old Jim (John Pike, ex of Ivanhoe) steps back in time to become a midshipman. Finally, using models (well this was 1959), the Battle of Trafalgar is reconstructed.

Documentary No 3
The Western. November 4th 1959, 9.35-10.20pm (ATV)
This survey took a popular look at the Western film genre. Narrated by Lindsay Anderson it included such diverse people as Henry Fonda, Bessie Love, Carl Foreman and Kingsley Amis.
It was written by Penelope Gilliatt, directed by Michael Redington, and produced by Harold Jamieson.

Documentary No 4
Engineer Extraordinary
November 18th 1959, 9.35-10.05pm (TWW)
A dramatised documentary starring Peter Wyngarde as Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Also appearing were Peter Craze as Peter, Norman Tyrrell as Father, and Angela Brooking as Mother. Script: Kem Bennett. Director: John Wynn-Jones.

Documentary No 5
The Unwanted
December 2nd 1959, 9.35-10.20pm (A-R)
Note: originally pencilled in for showing on Nov 11th.
To mark World Refugee Year, Huw Thomas reported on the plight of many in European camps as well as those displaced Chinese and Arabs.
Director Jim Pople spent five weeks from mid July that year visiting camps in Austria, Italy, Hong Kong (where he contracted pleurisy) and in Beirut.
While the issue of providing homes for some refugees was considered, co-scriptwriter and producer Caryl Doncaster reported from Jordan, "not a single refugee here, whatever their standard of living, wanted resettlement. They all wanted their lands restored."

Documentary No 6
Battle Formation
December 16th 1959, 9.35-10.05pm (Anglia TV)
The story of RAF Coltishall introduced by Hughie Green and Colin Hodgkinson, Spitfire ace.
The former pilot had a nostalgic return to his own wartime base, to relive old memories and to compare the work of the modern airfield (now defunct). The programme also included "exciting aerial sequences."

Documentary No 7
The Fifties
December 30th 1959, 9.35-10.20pm (Granada TV)
A review of the decade about to close, introduced by Ian Carmichael. It promised to be a serious retrospective, but in keeping with ITV policy, neither was it too highbrow, and there was the usual attempt to popularise the programme by using a well known 'face.'

Documentary No 8
Saturday Fever
January 13th 1960, 9.35-10.05pm (Scottish TV)
An analysis of the behaviour of football crowds, this before the years of rioting. Subtitled Football Fanaticism, the programme looked at "confessions and case histories relating to this widespread national ailment." Whether, as this was made by STV, the focus was on Scottish fans, I cannot say. The producer was John Wilson.

Documentary No 9
We Dissent
January 27th 1960, 10.20-11.50pm (ATV)
To accommodate a ninety minute programme, this documentary was moved to the end of the evening's schedules. It was a "Coast to Coast Impression of Americans in Doubt." Kenneth Tynan roamed the USA to find those questioning the affluent society, among them Mort Sahl, Dalton Trumbo, Jules Feiffer, C Wright Mills, Kenneth Galbraith and Norman Mailer. William Clark narrated the programme with comments from his studio guests. Tynan who also produced the programme wanted "to hear some Americans publicly questioning the values of their civilisation."

Documentary No 10
The Burning Question
February 10th 1960, 9.35-10.05pm (Tyne Tees TV)
Euan MacColl and Peggy Seeger added some pertinent songs to this examination of what today we call the Energy question. With a contribution from the Minister of Power Richard Wood who was then able to make the rather telling comment, "for the time being, our troubles are due to surplus rather than scarcity. I should like to reaffirm my belief that there is no ground for gloom about the future of the coal industry." Politicians never change. The producer of the programme was HK Lewenhak.
Guy Taylor made these interesting comments: "A few weeks ago, stories were flying... that local TV stations were angry because they were finding it increasingly difficult to get their shows on the network...
This programme discussed problems of the coal industry. The Minister of Power was there. So were representatives of the Coal Board, the National Union of Mineworkers and the Managing Director of Shell. Now you would think a lively discussion would have ensued: it didn't! Chairman Jack Clarke sat at an elevated desk, making him look like a High Court Judge, while the others sat at varying levels (one man was so high he looked as if he was umpiring at Wimbledon) against a black background with immediate overhead lighting. Now HK Lewenhak the producer was obviously trying to get some strong dramatic effects into the programme. But noone seems to have told him you also need some good dramatic dialogue to go with it.
On the occasions when it semeed the discussion would become lively, thanks to Will Payner, Secretary of the NUR, the chairman prevented him from speaking and substituted instead some terrifyingly bad interviews. And they were poorly photographed... By the time it ended you were left asking, What the blazes was all that about?"

Documentary No 11
Living for Kicks
March 2nd 1960, 9.35-10.20pm (A-R)
Daniel Farson was an established investigative journalist for Associated Rediffusion. This one-off study saw Farson visit centres of teenage life in London, Brighton, and gasp, Northampton. Teenagers have their say, most being against the nuclear bomb and very few supported any colour bar. After the film, the Countess of Albemarle commented on some of the questions the film raised. One wonders how probing this epilogue was.
Note: this programme achieved the best audience for a serious programme during March 1960, with 12,360,000 viewers (5.913,000 homes). In six ITV regions it was placed first in the Current Affairs category, while in the remaining three regions it came second.

Documentary No 12
The Shadow of Ignorance
March 30th 1960, 10.05-10.50pm (A-R)
Because of the subject matter, this was transmitted a little later than the normal slot. The theme was venereal disease, examined "openly and outspokenly." Specialists described the diseases, treatment clinics were shown and patients were interviewed by Jo Grimond, Elaine Grand and Brian Inglis. The programme was directed by Silvio Narizzano.

Documentary No 13
Right of Way
April 20th 1960, 9.35-10.20pm (ATV)
Subtitled The Automobile in the Modern World, Lord Boothby introduced an investigation into the problems caused by the car. Written by Eric Croston and produced by Jock Watson.

Documentary No 14
The Alcoholic
May 18th 1960, 9.35-10.20pm (ATV)
Subtitled Study of a Disease, written by Cyril Bennett and directed by Peter Morley. Nine patients spoke out about what was only then being recognised as a disease. Maybe it should be repeated today.

Documentary No 15
Candidates for Power
June 15th 1960, 9.35-10.20pm (A-R)
In Washington, Kenneth Harris reports on the autumn presidential election. He talked to Vice President Nixon and all "declared Democratic candidates." Director: Rollo Gamble

More Wednesday Documentaries. The normal length was now set at one hour.
The Editors
July 27th 1960, 9.35-10.35pm (Granada)
Director: Wilfred Fielding. Producer: Philip Mackie.
Lord Birkett discusses with the editors of national newspapers, the standards of the British press. Participants are given as editors of The Sunday Dispatch (Herbert Gunn), Daily Mail (William Hardcastle), The Guardian (Alastair Hetherington), Sunday Pictorial (Lee Howard), News of the World (Stafford Somerfield), and Daily Sketch (Colin Valdar).
Global War (August 17th 1960 9.35-10.35pm, A-R)
Written and introduced by Peter Hunt. Director: Rollo Gamble. A survey of NATO and Soviet firepower
Timothy's Second Diary (September 7th 1960, 9.35-10.35pm, Granada)
Intorduced by Richard Attenborough, interviews by Elaine Grand, introductions read by John Betjeman. A story built about a baby born during the war.
The Two Faces of Japan
November 2nd 1960 (A-R). This was repeated in the A-R region on March 24th 1961)
Introduced by Tom Harrison. Script: Cyril Bennett. Director: Peter Morley. Two major questions are posed, "are we ever going to have to fight Japan again? Will Japan ever again be an economic threat to this country?"
The Boer War
December 7th 1960, 9.35-10.35pm (Granada)
Written by Rayne Krager. Director: Claude Whatham. Producers: Elizabeth Ward and Philip Mackie.
Narrated by Sebastian Shaw, "the programme uses a novel, vivid technique to show the battles and the sieges." But also "no actors and studio sets, no reconstructions." Apparently this meant using archive film with contemporary pictures.
Wish You Were Here
December 28th 1960, 9.35-10.35pm (ATV)
An investigation into the British Tourist Industry by Brian Connell, reporter Gordon Wilkins. Producer: James Bredin.
Spare the Rod? (February 8th 1961 9.35-10.35pm, Granada)
Chairman: Dr Thomas Bloomer, with John Connell and Jo Grimond arguing the case for and against the return of the birch.
A Life of Perfection (March 22nd 1961, 10.27-10.57pm, A-R)
About nuns, filmed at the Roman Catholic Convent of the Sisters of the Assumption London, and the Anglican Community of the Sisters of the Love of God Oxford. Director: Sheila Gregg.
The Police and the Public (March 29th 1961, 9.45-10.40pm, Granada)
introduced by Henry Fairlie. Director: Mike Wooller. Producer: Jeremy Isaacs.
The New Americans
April 19th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (Granada)
Producer: James Bredin.
Ian Trethowan reported on the new president John F Kennedy and his new young administration. He also interviews the president.
The Heartbeat of France
June 14th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (A-R, Intertel production)
Written by Cyril Bennett. Director: Peter Morley.
Special theme song by Marguerite Monnot, lyrics by Marc Lanjean, and sung by Colette Renard.
Peter Finch was the narrator in this portrait of "the enduring France" including the French peasant, provincial France, the Paris of the artisan and of high fashion (including behind the scenes at Dior). Also Marseilles, aircraft and car factories, Paris jazz clubs, the shanty town for Algerian families.
The Pill
June 28th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (Granada- note: Southern refused to screen this programme)
Director: Pauline Shaw. Producer: Tim Hewat.
An inquiry into "a revolutionary method of family planning," introduced by Elaine Grand. In this programme: mothers who take the pill in Britain, the first doctor to prescribe it, and other medical experts. The church's attitude is also covered.
Mockba Moscow
July 19th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (ATV)
Producers: Bill Ward and Stephen Wade.
This programme was recorded on videotape in Moscow. Commentators Reginald Bosanquet, Shaw Taylor, Ludmilla Borozdina and Boris Belitsky toured Moscow and "talked freely with the people," a unique insight into life in a communist country. Claimed Bill Ward, "we went anywhere we liked and talked to anyone we wanted to."
Thirty Years After
July 26th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (A-R)
Script: Michael Segal. Director: Peter Robinson. Producer: Aidan Crawley.
A comparison of 1931 with today (1961), introduced by Adrienne Corri. Sybil Thorndike and Donald Pleasence discussed changes in the theatre, Fred Perry commented on sport, Sir Dermot Boyle and Sir Bernard Lovell discussed developments in air and space travel. Beverley Nichols commented on changes in social life, Colin Clark reviews the economic impact of 1931 and 1961 and Lord Boothby and Walter Hallstein explored the European question.

Head On
This was an occasional series in the Wednesday documentary slot, produced by Granada TV. Candid profiles of famous people, seen through the eyes of the people who knew them. The first programme was on Randolph Churchill (August 9th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm). Director: Norman Dunkles. Producer: Milton Schulman. With The Earl of Birkenhead, Michael Foot, Sir Fitzroy Maclean and John Spencer Churchill. Introduced by Henry Fairlie.
One later programme was on The Red Dean (March 7th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm). Director: Colin Bell. Producer: Milton Schulman. Frank opinions on Dr Hewlett Johnson, Dean of Canterbury, were given by Lord Morrison of Lambeth, The Bishop of Southwark, Dame Irene Ward, Emrys Hughes, and Col John Baker-White. Introduced and narrated by Jeremy Thorpe.

Strangers In A Strange Land
September 6th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (A-R)
Director: Rollo Gamble.
Daniel Farson in a modern boom town, Cooma in Australia. The Snowy Mountains project, the biggest civil engineering scheme in the world. Typical of Farson, he concentrates on the workers rather than the project itself. This is one of several projects which he worked on during his five months down under.

Germany, Friend or Foe?
September 20th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm (Anglia TV)
Written and directed by John Haggarty.
Joseph Haroch reported on contemporary attitudes to the Germans. Among those taking part were Alan Taylor, Will Whitehead, and General Sir Richard Gale.

The Common Market and You (October 18th 1961, 9.35-10.35pm, A-R)
with George Ffitch and Desmond Wilcox. Director: John Phillips.

Protest (November 8th 1961, 9.35-10.25pm, Granada)
Written by Norman Mackenzie. Director: Michael Scott. Producer Silvio Narizzano. Views from policemen, lawyers and protestors on how far passive resistance should be permitted. The ethics of civil disobedience are considered.

Something for Nothing
November 29th 1961, 9.40-10.35pm (ATV)
Producer: Alan Chivers.
A report by Ian Trethowan on gambling and the impact of the new Betting and Gaming Act.

Paris: A Cancer Within
December 13th 1961 9.40-10.35pm (Granada)
A World in Action special. How the Algerian war affects Paris. Reporter: James Cameron, with contributions by Edward Behr, Georges Bidault, Claude Bourdet, Claude Estier, Coup de Frejac, Alain Jacobs, and Maurice de la Rue. Narrator: Robert Holness. Director: James Hill. Producer: Tim Hewat

The Face of Beauty
December 27th 1961, 9.40-10.35pm (ATV)
Written by Tessa Diamond. Director: Jon Scoffield. Producer: Michael Redington.
Ivan Yates narrated a film on the changing concepts of beauty, asking the question What is Beautiful?

South America- An Impression
February 7th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Producer: James Bredin.
James Morris wrote and directed this tour of the Andes, Amazon, Rio, and the Argentine. He spent three months compiling his report, then producer Bredin spent a further two months filming in the continent. The programme was shown to coincide with the Duke of Edinburgh's two month visit there.

Living with a Giant
February 21st 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (A-R Production for Intertel)
Writer: Elkan Allan. Director: Rollo Gamble. Editor of Intertel Programmes: Aidan Crawley.
The commentary by Lord Boothby was about Canada, "in the Shadow of the USA." The aim was "to highlight the difference between Canada and French Canada." Filming was done in Guelph Ontario, St Hyacinthe Quebec, the border by Niagara Falls, and a township on the border, Rock Island and Derby Line.

Algeria
April 4th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Producer: Michael Redington.
Narrated by Henry Fairlie who also scripted and researched the programme. The story of the Algerian war. The producer said, "we aim to tell this story from its very beginning, and make the jungle of modern politics and war understandable to everyone." Also examined was France's relations with her colonies, and a probe into the OAS.

For Richer for Poorer (Granada)
A five part inquiry that reported on The Business of Britain 1962.
Producer: Tim Hewat.
Number 1 was titled Bingo! (April 18th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm)
Directed by Mike Wooler.
Narrator: Robert Holness. Interviewer: Alex Valentine.
Consultants: Robert Collin, Michael Shanks and George Cyriax.

The Young Offenders
May 2nd 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Script: Philip Barker and Tony Firth. Narrator: Anthony Brown. Producer: Philip Barker.
A typical young offender is followed into an Approved School and the question is asked, who is to blame?

America Abroad
May 30th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (A-R Production for Intertel)
Writer and producer: Peter Hunt. Director: Michael Ingrams.
Narrated by Michael Ingrams and Peter Dyneley.
A report on Americans working outside of their country, asking about their sphere of influence, and whether the Communist bloc countries are more successful.
Four countries are depicted: Cambodia, South Vietnam, Pakistan and Ghana.

The Trouble with Men
June 13th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (Granada)
Director: Joan Kemp-Welch. Producer: Elaine Grand.
A rather more frivolous offering, "tongue in cheek," with contributions from Fanny Craddock, Penelope Mortimer, Barbara Castle and Margaret Thatcher. In fact the whole programme was "produced, directed, designed and written by women." TV Times rather hopefully described it as "one of the most controversial ITV programmes ever screened."
A kind of 'reply' The Trouble with Women was shown on
July 18th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (Granada)
Written by Bamber Gascoigne. Director: Claude Whatham. Producer: Philip Mackie.
Chairman Brian Inglis discussed with Kingsley Amis, Nicholas Davenport, Bernard Levin, and Malcolm Muggeridge.
TV Times was plastered with complaints, all from women, on the lines of "rubbish"... "abominable facetiousness"... "ponderous patronising tone"... "sheer unadulterated drivel"... "something went sadly wrong somewhere and it wasn't the women."

Birth (July 25th 1962 9.45-10.45 (A-R)
with Daniel Farson. Director: Rollo Gamble.

Watch on the Mekong
August 8th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (Granada)
Director: Bill Morton. Writer and Producer: Peter Hunt.
Subtitled The Geography of Peace, this was a film about rival armies on either side of the Mekong River. A week was spent filming in the area, the programme being well advertised with a front page spread in the TV Times.

Challenge in the Skies
September 5th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Director: George Clark. Producer: Alan Chivers.
Ian Trethowan investigated the state of Britain's airlines and looked forward to "the age of faster than sound airliners" (they soon disappered didn't they?).

The Unfinished Revolution
September 19th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (A-R Production for Intertel)
Writer and executive producer: Michael Sklar. Producer-Director: Michael Alexander.
Narrator: Joseph Julian.
Subtitled The Emergence of Mexico, this programme dealt with the emerging Mexico and its problems inherited from its stormy past.

Oxford
October 24th 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Writer and narrator: James Morris. Producer: James Bredin.
Depicting the contrasts in the city, the spires and tyres, undergraduate life and teeming industry.

Article 237
October 31st 1962, 9.45-10.45pm (A-R)
Writers: Peter Hunt and Rollo Gamble. Director: Rollo Gamble. Producer: Peter Hunt.
The New Europe, with the views of the Foreign Ministers of Belgium and Holland, and Walter Hallstein (President of the Common Market Commission).

Dangerous Medicine
November 14th 1962, 9.50-10.20pm (Granada)
Writer: Philip Oakes. Director: Michael Scott. Producer: Jeremy Isaacs. Narrator: Bamber Gascoigne. Interviewer: Brian Trueman.
This half hour was shorter than the usual documentary at this time, so as to fit in a talk by the Duke of Edinburgh on National Productivity Year.
Probing questions about the safety of modern drugs, in the wake of thalidomide.

The length of most documentaries was now reduced to three quarters of an hour.

Target
Feb 6th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (A-R)
Written by Brian Fitzjones.
Director: Peter Robinson.
For National Productivity Year, a comparison between a worker in North Wales and one in Kentucky.

Living with the Germans
February 20th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (ATV)
Producer: James Bredin. Reporter: David Holden.
A Report on Life Among British Forces in Germany.

One Man's Hunger
March 13th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (A-R)
Written and narrated by James Cameron.
Director: Bill Morton.
Film from India, in Soharauna where a farmer struggles to support his family, "the story of One Man's Hunger is the story of them all."

How to Run a Railway
March 27th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (Granada)
Written and narrated by Ian Waller.
Director: Michael Grigsby. Producer: Jeremy Isaacs.
This was the day Dr Beeching published his infamous report. In the programme Dr Beeching and Minister of Transport Mr Marples explain all, and given the latter's participation, the stitch up.

Rebellion Ireland 1913-1923
April 24th 1963, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV- Television Reporters International)
Written and narrated by Robert Kee.
I recall this impressive documentary, a vivid account using recently unearthed film, of the bitter struggles in Ireland, and of its repercussions to Britain of its contemporary diminishing empire.

Defeat in the West How Hitler's Army Lost the War
May 29th 1963, 9.45-10.35pm (A-R)
Written and narrated by Paul Johnson.
Director: Peter Morley.
Hitler's military blunders are examined in a programme examining the reasons for his defeat. German wartime film illustrated the argument, and two German generals were interviewed, Blumentritt and Warlimont.

The Censors
June 5th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (ATV)
Written by Leslie Mallory.
Director: Bob Wylam.
Producer: Anthony Firth.
John Freeman examined the question, Why is there Censorship? Interviews with Roy Jenkins, Cecil King, Peter Brook, Joan Littlewood and Katherine Whitehorn.

Men of Our Time (Granada)
Producer: Patricia Lagone.
This was a series of four documentaries.
No 1 Ramsay MacDonald (June 12th 1963, 9.45-10.45pm), by Malcolm Muggeridge.
No 2 Mussolini (June 19th 1963, 9.40-10.25pm), by AJP Taylor.
No 3 Mahatma Gandhi (June 26th 1963, 9.50-10.35pm), by James Cameron.
No 4 Franklin D Roosevelt (July 3rd 1963, 9.45-10.30pm), by Max Beloff.

A second series of four programmes followed in 1964:
2.1 Lenin (May 13th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm), by James Cameron.
2.2 King George V (May 20th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm), by AJP Taylor.
2.3 Hitler (June 3rd 1964, 9.40-10.40pm), by Kingsley Martin. With Brian Cobby.
2.4 Stanley Baldwin (June 10th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm), by Malcolm Muggeridge.

The City
July 17th 1963, 9.45-10.35pm (ATV)
Written and narrated by Paul Ferris.
Producer: James Bredin.
Does the City of London work as well as it might? An examination of the finance and commerce of the City.

Unmarried Mothers
July 31st 1963, 9.45-10.45pm (Granada)
Written and narrated by Douglas Keay.
Director: Michael Grigsby.
Producer: Elaine Grand.
Reporter Diana Lancaster posed as a mother of a three month old son, wandering round London seeking work and lodgings.

As Eagles Fly
August 7th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (ATV)
Narrated by Shaw Taylor.
Writers: Derek Dempster and John Ashby.
Producer: Stephen Wade.
Story of the early air pioneers right up to the modern space flights.

The British at Play
August 21st 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (A-R)
Written by Ken Hoare.
Director: Bill Hitchcock.
A light hearted guide to the British on holiday.
Stephen Potter gave a guided tour to Terry-Thomas, Wendy Craig and Tony Tanner.

A Nation in Doubt
September 18th 1963, 9.45-10.45pm (ATV)
Chairman: Lord Shawcross.
Producer: Tony Firth.
A discussion on the decline and fall of Britain. The 'fall' is examined in terms of moral social and intellectual decline.

The Drug Takers
October 30th 1963, 9.45-10.30pm (ATV)
Written by John Deane Potter.
Producer: Tony Firth.
Introduced by Brian Abel-Smith. Medical experts, social workers and addicts help answer the questions:
Is drug taking on the increase? Is there a drug ring? Is this a grave national problem? "Some of the most astonishing film ever seen of drug addicts talking about themselves."

Profiles in Power - John Fitzgerald Kennedy
November 13th 1963, 9.40-10.40pm (A-R)
Director: Bill Morton.
Introduced by John Freeman with Arthur Schlesinger Jr, Professor James Macgregor Burns, Henry Reuss, and James Baldwin.
This programme was, unusually, repeated on November 19th at 10.50pm, as a preliminary to the second programme:
Profiles in Power - Nikita Kruschev
November 20th 1963, again with John Freeman.

Africa- The Hidden Frontiers (Intertel Production for A-R)
February 19th 1964, 9.40-10.40pm.
Narrator: James Cameron.
Directed by Rollo Gamble.
The Challenge of Tribalism, filmed in Kenya, examines the challenge of tribalism in a nation of over 8 million people and 40 different tribes.

Faith and the Flag (March 4th 1964, 9.40-10.40, ATV)
James Mossman surveys the pioneering missionaries into the heart of the African continent.

The Entertainers
March 25th 1964, 9.40-10.40pm (Granada)
Director: John McGrath.
Devised and produced by Dernis Mitchell, the first of two commissioned Granada documentaries.
A study of the private lives of club entertainers in the North of England. The first time a mobile videotape installed in a Travelling Eye vehicle had been used to get "a direct transcript of events as they happened." The entertainers were Johnnie Kennedy, Arlette, Bridgette, Shirley Davis, Archie Tower, and The Marvins.

... These Two Persons (ATV)
April 15th 1964, 9.48-10.33pm.
Producer: Michael Redington
A look at marriage guidance counselling, following one couple's efforts to sort out their marriage.

Black Marries White (A-R)
April 29th 1964, 9.40-10.40pm.
Director: Peter Morley
Subtitled The Last Barrier- an impression of a mixed marriage. "There is no narrator... no interviewer.. there is only the stark dialogue of human experience."
The programme came third in TAM's Top 20, with an audience of 7,606,000.

Abortion: A Question of Priorities (ATV)
June 17th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm.
Producer: Anthony Firth.
Presented by Lord Francis-Williams.

Fans, Fans, Fans! (July 15th 1964 9.40-10.25, ATV)
Alan Dell on the theme of mass adoration, particularly in the light of The Beatles. Script by Francis Wyndham. Producer: Francis Megahy
Women in Prison (August 12th 1964 9.40-10.25, Rediffusion)
Narrated by Andrew Faulds. Cameras shows the inside of a prison for women

Fans, Fans, Fans (ATV)
July 29th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm.
written by Leslie Mallory.
Producer: Francis Megahy.
Narrated by Alan Dell.
A study of fans of the past leading to the now of Beatlemania. A World in Anguish? (ATV)
July 1st 1964, 9.45-10.40pm
Producer: HK Lewenhak.
Chairman: Lord Gardiner QC, who hosts a discussion on the pressures of everyday life with a team of pyschotherapists, in London for their Sixth World Congress.

Airport (Rediffusion)
September 23rd 1964, 9.40-10.25pm
Music composed and played by Lennie Best.
Director: Charles Squires.
London Airport from dawn to dusk, fly on the wall observation, nice and cheap to make.

Goldwater, Man Out of the West (Rediffusion)
October 28th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm
Director: James Butler.
John Freeman evaluates Senator Barry Goldwater, with Dean Burch, F Clifton White, Dorothy Elston, William Buckley, and Professor James MacGregor Burns. One senses the production team thought Goldwater would win the upcoming US Presidency election.

The Grafters (Rediffusion)
November 18th 1964, 9.35-10.20pm (repeated on Rediffusion August 25th 1965)
Director: Charles Squires.
Portrait of market salesmen, street traders, but "soon they may be gone. This programme records a unique and colourful working class folklore."

The End of a Street (Granada)
December 2nd 1964, 9.40-10.25pm
Producer: Norman Swallow
Filmed in Oldham, a genuinely northern Granada documentary. The destruction of a thousand old houses to make way for modern flats, "the town's second revolution."

Sharon (Granada)
December 9th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm
Producer: Denis Mitchell
An account of the Divine Healing Campaign at the Sharon Full Gospel Church in a Manchester suburb.

Great Temples of the World (ATV)
An occasional series with Sir Kenneth Clark.
No.1 San Marco, Venice (December 16th 1964, 9.40-10.25pm). Producer: HK Lewenhak.
Further programmes were: 2 Chartes Cathedral (December 15th 1965, 9.45-10.40pm). Producer: Alastair Reid.
3 Karnak, Egypt (August 3rd 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). Producer: Jon Scoffield.

The Entertainers (Granada)
January 13th 1965, 10.25-11.25pm
Director: John McGrath. Producer: Denis Mitchell
Fly on the wall look at the backstage lives of seven little known entertainers in northern pubs and clubs. The seven were Johnnie Kennedy from Liverpool, Arlette, Bridgette, Shirley Davis, 60 year old Arthur Tower, and The Marvins.

America- On the Edge of Abundance (Rediffusion production for Intertel)
January 27th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm
Script: Jack Hargreaves. Director: Bill Morton.
Narration: James Cameron
As technology advances, America's staggering wealth is being increased. But less and less people will be needed, and without work, how will people have money to buy the machine-made goods?

America- The Dollar Poor (Rediffusion production for Intertel)
February 3rd 1965, 9.40-10.40pm
Script: Paul Johnson. Director: Randal Beattie.
Narration: James Cameron.
The darker side of the American dream, looking at the poor of the country and ways of tackling their problems.

The Fall and Rise of the House of Krupp (ATV)
February 17th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm (repeated in some regions September 1st 1965)
Written and Produced by Peter Batty.
Narrator: Bernard Archard, with Lord Shawcross, Sir Christopher Steel, Airey Neave, Goronwy Rees, Terence Prittle, Prof Francis Carsten, and Gottfried Treviranus.

Colossus at the Crossroads (ATV)
February 24th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm
Written and narrated by Lord Francis-Williams.
Producers: Francis Megahy, Stephen Wade, HK Lewenhak.
Taking part: Ray Gunther, Viscount Watkinson, Jim Conway, AJ Stephen Brown, and B Macarty.
An examination of the role of trade unions.

A Face in the Crowd (Rediffusion)
March 10th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm
Director: Bill Morton.
Five Bachelors. Gillian Reynolds interviews five men and women who are unmarried in thsi film about bachelor life.

The Tigers Are Burning (ATV)
April 7th 1965, 9.45-10.30pm.
Writer and Producer: Anthony Firth. Director: Shaun O'Riordan.
Narrator: Michael Hordern. With Norman Rodway as Hitler, Allan Cuthbertson as Guderlan.
The turning point of the second war in the summer of 1943 on the Eastern Front. The battle is shown on film, plus a reconstruction of Hitler's conferences with his generals.

A Camera in China (Rediffusion)
April 21st 1965, 9.40-10.25pm
Director: Claude Otzenberger. Producer: Jeremy Isaacs.
Introduced by Robert Kee. Three film-makers in Communist China.

A Slight White Paper on Love (Granada)
Director: David Cunliffe. Producers: Peter Eckersley, John Hamp, Leslie Woodhead, and David Plowright.
Introduced by Michael Scott, Michael Parkinson, Peter Eckersley and Denis Pitts.
Part One: Can This Be Love (May 5th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm)
Part Two: A Bed of Roses? (May 12th 1965, 9.45-10.30pm)
Part Three: Honouring the Contract (May 19th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm)

Any Old Thing (ATV)
June 2nd 1965, 9.40-10.25pm.
Writer and Producer: Leslie Mallory. Director: Derek Stewart.
Narrator: Eddy Gilmore.
The bric-a-brac world of London's markets.

Deckie Learner (Granada)
June 16th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm.
Producer: Michael Grigsby.
Eye witness account of 22 days of a trawler fisherman's journey to the Arctic Circle and back, seen through 15 year old John Bratley of Grimsby.

Harley Street (ATV)
June 23rd 1965, 9.40-10.25pm.
Writer and narrated by Paul Ferris.
Producer and Director: Colin Clark.
This programme examined the street's prestige and influence, with the residents themselves providing the evidence.

After a break of five years, some of the smaller ITV companies again started to produce the occasional Wednesday night offering.
In general documentaries were now scheduled for about three out of four Wednesdays each month.
Nye! (TWW)
July 7th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm.
Written and directed by Jack Howells.
The life of Aneurin Bevan.

Children of the Revolution (Rediffusion production for Intertel)
A Report on the Youth of Czechoslovakia.
July 21st 1965, 9.40-10.40pm
Director: Randal Beattie.
Written and narrated by Robert Kee.
Note- this was one of a series under this umbrella title.

The Great North Sea Gamble (Tyne Tees Television)
August 4th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm
Script: Frank Entwistle and Robert Tyrrell. Director: Peter Dunbar.
Narration: Antony Brown.
Cameras film the twenty companies exploring for oil in the North Sea.

World on a Knife Edge (made for ATV)
August 11th 1965, 9.40-10.35pm
Written, produced and directed by Gordon Bradley.
Narration: Robert Beatty.
Hong Kong's relationship with China.

Wyvern at War (Westward Television)
Script: Willoughby Gray.
Director and Producer: Roger Gage.
The story of the 43rd Wessex Division from their landing in Normandy in June 1944 to VE Day.
Part 1: The Sharp End (August 18th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm)
Part 2: (August 25th 1965) Children of the Revolution (Rediffusion)
An impression of the working classes.
September 8th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm
Director: Charles Squires.
Two streets named Paradise, one in London, one in Newcastle upon Tyne. A film team lived with the families to record their impressions.

LSO- The Music Men (Rediffusion)
An impression of the working classes.
September 22nd 1965, 9.45-10.45pm
Director: Peter Morley.
Film following the London Symphony Orchestra, in particular focussing on principal double bass player Stuart Knussen.

The Road to Suez (made for ATV)
September 29th 1965, 9.45-10.45pm, part 2 on October 6th, 9.40-10.40.
Written and produced by Peter Batty.
Director: George Clark.
Narration: Bernard Archard.
Reflecting on the 1956 crisis were Julian Amery, David Ben-Gurion, Sir John Glubb, Sir Harry Legge-Bourke, Selwyn Lloyd, Robert Murphy, Anthony Nutting, Shimon Peres, and Kenneth Young.

The House on the Beach (Rediffusion production for Intertel)
October 13th 1965, 9.45-10.45pm Director: Denis Mitchell.
Drug addicts at a rehabilitation centre by a Californian beach.

A Question of Loyalty (made for ATV)
originally planned for October 20th 1965, 9.40-10.34pm
rescheduled for December 8th 1965, 9.40-10.35pm.
Written and narrated by Lord Francis-Williams.
Producer: Hugh Raggett.
The story of Klaus Fuchs.
Through the story of this spy, a study of "the nature of betrayal and the conflicts of loyalty."

Crime and the Bent Society (Granada)
Billed as A World in Action Special.
Part 1: The Face of Villainy (October 27th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm). Criminals talk about themselves.
Part 2: The Big Tickle (November 3rd 1965, 9.40-10.25pm). How crime operates in britain.
Part 3: Coppers are People (November 10th1965, 9.45-10.30pm). Do the police do their job? A look at police training aimed at improving relations with the public.
Written by Douglas Keay.
Director and Producer: Alex Valentine.
Commentator: Tom St John Barry.
Among those also appearing, Alfred Hinds, Jeremy Thorpe, Supt Fabian.

Walk Down Any Street (Rediffusion)
An intimate report of an ordinary London family.
November 24th 1965, 9.40-10.40pm. Director: Charles Squires.

Peace on Earth (Granada)
A World in Action Special. (December 22nd 1965, 9.40-10.25pm).
Produced in New York by John MacDonald.
The protest movement in USA against the war. New York Reporter: Bill Biery.

This England (Granada)
Director: Michael Grigsby. Producer: Denis Mitchell. The hopes of four families emigrating to Australia.
Part 1: Take It or Leave It (December 29th 1965, 9.40-10.25pm). A follow up showed the families settling down under.
Part 2 (January 5th 1966). This follow up showed the families settling down under.
Part 3: A World Inside (January 12th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). Writer Stan Barstow goes to a mental hospital in the North of England to meet some patients and help them to write and perform a play. Director: John Gibson. Producer: Denis Mitchell.
Further documentaries under this umbrella:
Madam 6 (May 25th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm) On motorways, in particular the M6. Director: Dick Fontane. Producer: Denis Mitchell.
Living on the Edge (June 1st 1966, 9.40-10.25pm) Manchester's Moss Side. Director: Michael Beckham. Producer: Norman Swallow.
The Rugby Game (June 15th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm) Narrator: Bill Grundy. Director: Francis Megahy. Producer: Norman Swallow. What Price Peace? (Granada)
Producers: Mike Wooller and Arnold Bulka. Executive Producer: Philip Mackie.
Commentators: Bill Grundy and Michael Parkinson.
Part 1: A World in Arms (February 2nd 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). The power struggle in the world and Britain's financial and moral involvement.
Part 2: The White Man's Burden (February 9th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). British Army bases around the world. "Can we go on spending this money? Is it time we got out?"
Part 3: Arms and the Men (February 16th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). Spending on Defence.
Part 4: A World Without Arms? (February 23rd 1966, 9.40-10.25pm). Britain's nucear threat, "how dangerous is the spread of nucclear weapons? Could anything be done to stop it? Would it help if Britain disarmed?"

Member of the Family (ATV)
March 9th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm.
Narrator: Antony Brown.
Director: Tim Aspinall.
Six au pair girls describe their way of life, and their British employers give their impressions. Rather optimistically, the programe depicted "some of the human problems to be faced if Britain should become a full member of the European family of nations."

Rebellion At Easter (Rediffusion)
April 6th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm.
Written and produced by Elkan Allan.
Director: John Sheppard.
Subtitled The Songs They Sang Were of Ireland Free.
50 years on from the Easter Monday uprising in Ireland, the story is told through the songs they sang, and through contempoary film and photographs.

Wall Street - USA (ATV)
April 20th 1966, 9.40-10.40pm.
Narrators: Dick Graham and David Knight.
Producer: Jack Gould.

The Men in Black (Rediffusion for Intertel)
April 27th 1966, 9.40-10.40pm.
Producer: Richard de la Mare.
Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
An investigation into Irish Catholic priests.

When The Saints Go Marching In (ATV)
May 4th 1966, 9.25-10.30pm.
Written and produced by Anthony Firth.
Director: Shaun O' Riordan.
A survey of pressure movements for peace, starting with conscription in 1916.
With Patrick Troughton and Tim Preece, also: Edward Caddick, Richard Carpenter, Robert Raglan and David Neal.

One in Every Hundred (Rediffusion for Intertel)
June 8th 1966, 9.40-10.40pm.
Producer: Richard de la Mare.
Director: Maurice Hatton.
For Mental Health Week, a look at the problems facing the mentally handicapped and their parents in England and Canada.

The Ocean Racers (Southern TV)
August 10th 1966, 9.40-10.20pm.
Director: Terry Johnston.
Cameras join Zulu, an ocean racer with a crew of seven, on the 600 mile race The Fastnet.

Endurance (Ulster TV)
August 17th 1966, 9.40-10.25pm.
Written by Margery and James Fisher.
Executive Producer: Anthony Finigan.
With the voices of Walter How and Commdr Greenstreet.
The story of Ernest Shackleton's 1914 Polar Expedition.

The Last Invasion (Southern TV)
August 24th 1966, 9.40-10.39pm.
Script: Elwyn Jones.
Director: John Frankau. Producer: Alasdair Milne.
The story of events leading up to the Battle of Hastings 900 hundred years earlier, of the rivalry between Harold and William.
With Eric Porter, Kenneth Haigh and Douglas Wilmer. Also appearing: Geoffrey Bayldon, Caroline Mortimer, Brian Coburn, Morris Perry, Robert James, Julian Somers, Jack May, and Glenn Williams.

The State of the Nation (Granada TV)
August 31st 1966, 9.50-10.25pm.
Director: Leslie Chatfield. Producers: Mike Wooller and Arnold Bulka.
Introduced by Nicholas Harman.
The Squeeze, the biggest economic crisis since the war. Major ITV regions examined its effects.
Another programme in this occasional series was shown on October 12th 1966 (9.45-10.20pm), personnel as before except the director was Philip Casson.
Same personnel for the programme examining redeployment on November 9th 1966 (9.40-10.20pm).

Big Deal at Gothenburg (Tyne Tees Television)
September 7th 1966, 9.45-10.30pm.
Director/Producer: Robert Tyrrell.
How Sweden in 1965 became the biggest shipbuilding country in the world. The programme asked whether Britain could compete. "The leader of Britain's biggest shipbuilding union and an executive of one of the biggest British yards pledge a new approach."

The Worlds of Mr Wells (Granada TV)
September 21st 1966, 9.45-10.45pm.
Producer: Patricia Lagone.
Cast: Edward Atienza as HG Wells, David Garth as Critic.
Told in HG Wells' own words, a portrait of the novelist, on the hundredth anniversary of his birth.

Go, Go, Go, Said the Bird (Rediffusion)
October 26th 1966, 9.45-10.50pm.
Director: John Irvin. Producer: Richard de la Mare.
Commentary by Nik Cohn.
Swinging London seen through four young people.

Executive Lives Executive Wives (ATV)
November 2nd 1966, 9.40-10.35pm.
Written and produced by Douglas Keay.
Narrator: Derek Cooper.
The lives of five executives in the office and at home.

A Tale of Two Streets (ATV Pathfinder Production)
November 16th 1966, 9.40-10.40pm.
Director: Ken Ashton. Produced by Peter Batty.
Narrator: Dudley Foster.
The different worlds of Savile Row and Carnaby Street.

The Lion and The Eagle (Rediffusion Production for Intertel)
The Anglo-American Alliance from Pearl Harbour to Vietnam.
December 7th 1966, 9.40-10.40pm.
Written and narrated by Alastair Cooke.
Director Randal Beattie. Executive Producer: David Windlesham.

Documentary Programmes