LOST Dinosaur TV Programmes?
This sad page details a few programmes that at the present time seem to be entirely missing or unavailable.

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Main Dinosaur TV Menu
ABORTIVE SERIES PILOTS ABC COMEDY/VARIETY SATURDAY SERIALS ITV CHILDREN'S SERIALS BBC CHILDREN'S SERIALS BBC RARITIES
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Chess Masterpieces
Calling Scotland Yard
Afternoon Out (ITV)
Take Your Pick (A-R)
Sixpenny Corner (A-R)
Granville Melodramas (A-R)
Confidentially (A-R)
Joan and Leslie (ATV)
As Others See Us (A-R)
The 64,000 Question (ATV)
Show Talk/ Face the Mike (ATV)
Seeing Sport (ATV)
Under Fire/Youth Wants to Know (Granada)
Cool for Cats (A-R)
Gay Cavalier (A-R)
Destination Downing Street (A-R)
On Stage/Late Extra (A-R)
Highland Fling (A-R)
Life with the Lyons (A-R)
The Most Likely Girl (ATV)
Dick and the Duchess
Land of Song (TWW)
The Sunday Break(ABC)
The Verdict is Yours (Granada)
Mary Britten MD (Southern)
Educating Archie (A-R)
All Aboard (ABC)
Sunday's Child (ABC)
The Variety Show (Granada)
The Love of Mike (A-R)
Mr and Mrs (TWW)
Biggles (Granada)
Deadline Midnight (ATV)
Mess Mates (Granada)
Jango (A-R)
If The Crown Fits (ATV)
Discs A Gogo (TWW)
Top Secret (A-R)
Here and Now (A-R)
Sword in the Web (ABC)
Jezebel ex U.K. (ABC)
It's Young Again (Granada)
5 O'Clock Club (A-R)
Romper Room (Anglia)
Firecrackers (ATV)
Unwin Time (ATV)
Escape (Granada)
A Man of Our Times (Rediffusion)

Sunday Services on ITV (earlier broadcasts)
Jan 3rd 1965: Family Service from Radlett Parish Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Jan 10th 1965: from St George's Church Stockport. Commentator: Canon Wilfred Garlick. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 17th 1965: from Mount Zion Baptist Church St John's Wood Road London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Jan 24th 1965: from St Cuthbert Parish Church Billingham. Director: George Adama (Tyne Tees)
Choral Communion Jan 31st 1965: from Lancing College Chapel. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Feb 7th 1965: Parish Communion from St Luke's Church Camberwell London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 14th 1965: from Brunswick Methodist Church Macclesfield. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 21st 1965: Dialogue Mass from the Church of St Joseph Epsom. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 28th 1965: St David's Day Service from the Military Chapel Chelsea Barracks. 50th Anniversary of the Welsh Guards. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 7th 1965: Matins from St Paul's Church Herne Hill London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Mar 14th 1965: from Hereford Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 21st 1965: from St Peter's Methodist Church Canterbury. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Mar 28th 1965: Pontifical High Mass from Notre Dame de France, London. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Solemn Eucharist Apr 4th 1965: from Wakefield Cathedral. Commentator: Rev John Lyth. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Apr 11th 1965: from Clementswood Baptist Church Ilford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Easter Communion Apr 18th 1965 (10.30am-12.15pm): from Coventry Cathedral. Commentator: Rev SW Phipps. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Family Service Apr 25th 1965: from New North Road Baptist Church Huddersfield. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Holy Mass May 2nd 1965: from St Mary's Swinton. Commentator: Rev Canon W O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 9th 1965: from Wanstead Congregational Church London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist May 16th 1965: from Towcester Parish Church. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 23rd 1965: Morning Prayer from Battersea Parish Church London. Commentator: Rev Preb A Stephan Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 30th 1965: from Cosham Congregational Church. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Parish Communion June 20th 1965: from St Francis Church Leigh Park nr Havant. Director: George Egan (Southern)
June 27th 1965: Centenary of the Salvation Army from Regent Hall London. Introduced by Major Fred Brown. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Morning Prayer July 4th 1965: from St Peter's Parish Church Congleton. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
July 11th 1965: from Ruislip Methodist Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
July 18th 1965: from Oxford Place (Methodist) Chapel Leeds. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
July 25th 1965: Matins from the Queen's Chapel of the Savoy London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Parish Communion Aug 1st 1965: from Buxton Parish Church. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
Divine Service Aug 8th 1965: from the quarterdeck of HMS Tiger, in Newcastle. (Recorded July 25th). Commentary: Maxwell Deas. Director: Christopher Palmer. (Tyne Tees)
Aug 15th 1965: from Bridlington Priory. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
Aug 22nd 1965: from St John's Presbyterian Church Kensington London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
REGIONAL VARIATION: High Mass Aug 22nd 1965: from the Lady Chapel on Mount Grace Osmotherly. (Recorded Aug 15th). Introductory Commentary: Maxwell Deas. Mass described by Father Daniel Costar. Director: Christopher Palmer. (Tyne Tees- partially networked)
Aug 29th 1965: Family Communion from All Saints Parish Church Boreham Wood. Kensington London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Solemn Mass Sept 5th 1965: from The Church of Our Lady Southbourne, Bournemouth. Commentary: Father Gerard Dwyer. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Mattins Sept 12th 1965: from Holy Trinity Parish Church of Berwck-upon-Tweed. Introduction: Maxwell Deas. Director: George Adams. (Tyne Tees)
The Peaceful Sky Sept 19th 1965 (10.45am-12.50pm): 25th Annversary of the Battle of Britain from St George's Chapel RAF Biggin Hill, Westminster Abbey, and Runnymede Memorial. Commentator: Brian Connell. Reading by Paul Rogers. Directors: Stephen Wade, also Bill Allenby at Westminster (ATV)
People's Mass Sept 26th 1965: from the RC Church of St Joseph and St Francis Xavier Richmond Yorks. Commentator: Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Praise and Remembrance Oct 3rd 1965: from the Parish Church Warrington. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
Family Communion Oct 10th 1965: from Champness Hall Rochdale. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Oct 17th 1965: from the Church of St Mary East Molesey. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
REGIONAL VARIATION: Jubilee Memorial Service Oct 17th 1965: from Norwich Cathedral. On the death of Edith Cavell, extracts from her letters read by Anna Neagle. Commentary Rev AR Freeman. Director: Ron Downing. (Anglia- partially networked)
Dialogue Mass Oct 24th 1965: from RC Church of Our Lady and the Apostles Shaw Heath Stockport. Commentary: Canon O'Leary. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Oct 31st 1965: Family Communion from the Elstree Parish Church of St Nicholas. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Worship Nov 7th 1965: from Chorley Old Road Methodist Church Bolton. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Morning Prayer Nov 21st 1965: from the Parish Church of Allerton Liverpool. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Nov 28th 1965: Communion from Kensington Temple London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Holy Mass Dec 5th 1965: from RC Church of the Sacred Heart Moreton Wirral. Commentary: Very Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Dec 12th 1965: from Bromley Congregational Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
The Advent Ordination Dec 19th 1965 (10.30am-12.15pm): from Canterbury Cathedral. Commentary: Rev W Todd. Director: Berkeley Smith. (Southern)
United Free Church Christmas Service Dec 26th 1965: from Albion Congregational Church Ashton-Under-Lyne. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Sung Eucharist Jan 9th 1966: from Parish Church of St John the Evangelist Birtley. Commentator: Maxwell Deas. Director: Bernard Preston. (Tyne Tees)
Choral Cmmunion Jan 16th 1966: from Mossley Hill Parish Church Liverpool. Commentator: Canon CB Naylor. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
Jan 23rd 1966: from Cambridge Heath Salvation Army Citadel Hackney. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
A Concelebration of Mass Jan 30th 1966: from St John's Cathedral Portsmouth. Commentary: Rev Gerard Dwyer. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Feb 6th 1966: in which children play a leading part from Christ Church Gypsy Hill. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Worship Feb 13th 1966: from The Congregational Church Sutton Coldfield. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Feb 20th 1966: Solemn Eucharist from St John the Divine Kensington. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mattins Mar 6th 1966: from St John's Cathedral Portsmouth. Commentary: Rev Gerard St Paul's Church Rusthall Tunbridge Wells. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Peoples' Mass Mar 20th 1966: from RC Church of St Theresa of Lisieux, Manor Estate Sheffield. Commentator: Canon O'Leary. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Service of Consecration and Re-Hallowing Mar 27th 1966: from St Thomas Oakwood London. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Matins Apr 3rd 1966: from The Collegiate Church of St Mary Stafford. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Easter Morning Service Apr 10th 1966: from The Bloomsbury Central Baptist Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dialogue Mass Apr 17th 1966: from the Chapel of St Vincent Provincial House Mill Hill London. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Solemn Eucharist Apr 24th 1966: from The Parish Church of Our Lady St Nicholas and St James Syresham Northants. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
REGIONAL VARIATION Apr 24th 1966: The Enthronement of the new bishop in the Cathedral Church of St James Bury St Edmunds. Commentary: Canon AR Freeman. Director: Forbes Taylor (Anglia)
May 1st 1966: Blessing of the Farm and Animals from Bovinger Hall Farm Bobbingworth. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist May 8th 1966: from The Parish Church of St Wilfrid Harrogate. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
Children's Church Festival May 22nd 1966: from Sandon Road Methodist Church Harborne Birmingham. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
May 29th 1966: from Tickhill Parish Church Yorks. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
June 5th 1966: from the Pentecostal Church Bedford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Communion June 12th 1966: from St Barnabas' Parish Church Morecambe and Heysham. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
June 26th 1966: from the Parish Church of St Barnabas Temple Fortune Golders Green. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
July 3rd 1966: from The Methodist Church St Edmund's Church Street Salisbury. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Family Worship July 17th 1966: from Highfield Congregational Church Rock Ferry Birkenhead. Director: David Southwood. (ABC)
July 24th 1966: from St Andrew's Chapel, Mission to Seamen Victoria Dock Road London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Matins July 31st 1966: from Northenden Parish Church Manchester. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Aug 7th 1966: Sung Eucharist from St Cuthbert's Church Philbeach Gardens London. Commentator: Rev Preb S Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Holiday Service Aug 14th 1966: from Quay Methodist Church Bridlington. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Aug 21st 1966: Parish Communion from St Barnabas Church Little Ilford. Commentator: Rev Preb S Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Peoples' Mass Aug 28th 1966: from the Church of Our Lady of Lourdes and St Malachy Ovenden Halifax. Commentator: Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
A Children's Service Sept 4th 1966: from The Sculpture Gallery, Woburn Abbey. With the Tingha and Tucker Club. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Harvest Thanksgiving Sept 18th 1966: from Breachwood Green Baptist Church Herts. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sept 25th 1966: from The Chapel of St Joseph's (RC) College Mill Hill. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Harvest Thanksgiving Oct 2nd 1966: from Old Clee Parish Church Grimsby. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
A Service of Believers' Baptism Oct 9th 1966: from Pier Avenue Baptist Church Clacton-on-Sea. Commentary: Rev Edgar Wright. Director: John Salway. (Anglia)
Fish Harvest Festival Oct 16th 1966: from Billingsgate Parish Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Communion Oct 23rd 1966: from St James' Parish Church Hope, Salford. Director: Geoff Hall. (ABC)
Sung Eucharist Oct 30th 1966: from The Abbey Church of St Mary and St Ethelfleda Romsey. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Morning Worship Nov 6th 1966: from Heaton Moor Methodist Church Stockport. Director: Andy Gullen. (ABC)
Service of Remembrance Nov 13th 1966 (10.30-11.55am): from The Cenotaph London, and The Stone of Remembrance Edinburgh. Commentators: Shaw Taylor (London), Bill Tennent (Edinburgh). (ATV and Scottish TV)
Parish Communion Nov 27th 1966: from The Church of Christ the Carpenter, Dogsthorpe Peterborough. Commentary: Canon AR Freeman. Director: John Salway. (Anglia)
Parish Communion Dec 4th 1966: from The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin Littlehampton. Commentary: Rev Bill Todd. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Sung Mass Dec 11th 1966: from St George's RC Church Norwich. Commentary: Rev Robert Manley. Director not stated (Anglia)
Dec 18th 1966: from St Andrew's Church Rustington. Director: George Egan. (Southern)
Christmas Eucharist Dec 25th 1966 (11am-12.10pm): from Manchester Cathedral. Commentary: Ven Hetley Price. Director: David Southwood. (ABC) - (note this was actually the first ITV Sunday service since 1955 to fall on Christmas Day itself. Of course on other Christmas Days a religious service was also broadcast)

(TO BE CONTINUED)

Missing Menu

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Kick off time was about 11am, the programmes beginning in September 1957. Initially ATV's programmes had the uninspiring title Church. ABC by contrast had individual service names as titles until February 1958. Normally services were networked, but on some occasions regional companies arranged their own local outside broadcasts.
The length of the service became about an hour, then 75 minutes, though as religious programmes were outside the broadcasting hours restrictions it did not matter if they overran.
There were frequent gripes from viewers that 'their' denomination did not get enough exposure, though naturally ITV responded by saying a fair balance was preserved. What is clear from these lists, however, is that with companies not normally providing consecutive services, sometimes there would be two communions, or even two family services or baptisms in close succession.

Sept 15th 1957 (11am-12 noon): Battle of Britain Sunday from RAF Biggin Hill, commentator Wing Commander Stanford Ruck. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)

Timing now 11.15am-12noon except where indicated.
Sept 22nd 1957: from St Andrew's Presbyterian Church Frognal Hampstead. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV)
Oct 6th 1957: from Birmingham Parish Church. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV)
Oct 20th 1957: from the Parish Church of St Giles in the Fields Holborn. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 27th 1957: from Central Hall Methodist Church Westminster. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Nov 24th 1957: from St James's Church Piccadilly. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dec 1st 1957: Advent Sunday dialogue mass from RC Church of St Thomas More Eastcote. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dec 22nd 1957: from St Mary's Church Islington. Preacher: Rev David Sheppard. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Jan 5th 1958: St John's Wood Church London with Rev Noel Perry-Gore. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Matins Jan 12th 1968: Ripon Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 19th 1958: Bloomsbury Central Baptist Church London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Morning Prayer Jan 26th 1968: St Wilfrid's Parish Church Mobberley. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 2nd 1958: Candlemas from Corpus Christi Church Maiden Lane London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Communion Feb 9th 1958: Selby Abbey. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 16th 1958: Quinquagesima Sunday from Mare-street Baptist Church Hackney London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 23rd 1958: from the Parish Church Steeple Aston, Oxfordshire.Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 2nd 1958: Civic Service from the Collegiate Church of St Mary Warwick. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 9th 1958: Sung Eucharist from Tewkesbury Abbey. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 16th 1958: Missa Cantata from the RC Church of St Mary Magdalen Mortlake. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 23rd 1958: Morning Service from Bristol Road Methodist Mission Northfield Birmingham. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 30th 1958: Palm Sunday from Bristol Cathedral. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Apr 6th 1958 (10.30-11.30am): Pontifical High Mass from Westminster Cathedral. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Apr 20th 1958: Matins from Knaresborough Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
May 4th 1958 (11.15am-12.30pm): Sung Mass from St Cuthbert's Church Withington Manchester. "The action" described by Canon William O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
May 11th 1958: For the Deaf and Dumb from St Bede's Church Clapham. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)

New timing of Church 11.15am-12.15pm, except as stated.
May 18th 1958: Morning Worship from Wesley Memorial Methodist Church Oxford. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
May 25th 1958: Whit Sunday from Bromey Congregational Church. Director: Anthony Flanagan (ATV)
June 8th 1958: Sung Eucharist from Ascension Parish Church Collier Row Romford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 22nd 1958: Third Sunday After Trinity from Parish Church of St Nicholas Stevenage. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Lambeth Conference July 6th 1958 (10.30am-12noon): Corporate Communion at St Paul's Cathedral with the Archbishop of Canterbury. Commentator: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 3rd 1958: School Mass from St James' RC School Burnt Oak Middlesex. Commentator: Rev Illtud Evans. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 10th 1958 (10.30am-12.30pm): Lambeth Conference concluding service from Westminster Abbey with the Archbishop of Canterbury. Commentator: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 17th 1958: Morning Service from Methodist Church Kingsway Hall London. Conducted by Rev Donald Soper. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sept 14th 1958: Morning Service from St Michael's Chester Square London. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
Battle of Britain Commemoration Service Sept 21st 1958: from Civic Church of St Chad Shrewsbury. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Sept 28th 1958: Morning Service from Southfields Central Hall London. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
Oct 12th 1958 (10.50-12.30): Leeds Centenary Music Festival Service from Leeds Parish Church. Commentator: Bob Danvers-Walker. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Oct 19th 1958: Morning Service from the College of St Mark and St John Chelsea. Preacher: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 26th 1958: from the Ealing Divisions of the St John Ambulance. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Nov 2nd 1958: Children's Catechism and Holy Mass from RC Church of St Joseph and St Francis Xavier Richmond Yorks. Commentary by Father M Hollings. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Remembrance Sunday 1958 Nov 9th 1958 (10.45-11.20am): from the Cenotaph Whitehall.
Nov 16th 1958: Morning Service from Littleover Methodist Church Derby. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Nov 30th 1958: Morning Worship from Oxford Place Methodist Chapel Leeds. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Dec 14th 1958: from the RC Seminary of St Joseph Upholland Lancs. Commentator: Very Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Dec 21st 1958: Morning Service from Holy Trinity Church Brompton. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Morning Service Dec 28th 1958: from Avenue Congregational Church Southampton. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Jan 4th 1959: Matins from Leicester Cathedral. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Jan 11th 1959: Morning Service from Congregational Christ Church Leatherhead. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 12th 1958: Matins from Southwell Minster. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 25th 1959: Matins from Bedale Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 1st 1959: High Mass from the RC Church of Corpus Christi Portsmouth. Sermon and commentary: Rev Gerard Dwyer. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Feb 8th 1959: Morning Service from Seven Kings Baptist Church Ilford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 22nd 1959: Morning Service from Hayes Free Church Kent. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 1st 1959: Sung Eucharist from the Parish Church of All Hallows Wellingborough. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Mar 8th 1959: Dialogue Mass from St Mary's Training College Twickenham. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 15th 1959: Morning Service from the Church of Holy Trinity Bosham. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Mar 29th 1959: Sung Eucharist from the Parish Church Towcester. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Apr 19th 1959: Morning Service from Christ Church with Holy Trinity Anerley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 3rd 1959: Parish Communion from St Dunstan's Stepney. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 10th 1959: Parish Communion from Leigh Parish Church Lancs. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
May 17th 1959: Pontifical Low Mass and Confirmation from St Thomas' School Stanmore. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 24th 1959: Morning Service from Lady St Mary's Wareham. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
July 5th 1959: Morning Service from Parish Church of St Ninian Douglas Isle of Man. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
July 19th 1959: Sung Euchrist from St Asaph Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Aug 16th 1959: Holy Communion from Bridlington Priory. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Aug 23rd 1959: Sung Eucharist from St Mary's Church Ashwell. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
Aug 30th 1959: Sung Eucharist from St Mary's Parish Church Skegness. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Sept 6th 1959: Morning Service from Haven Green Baptist Church Ealing. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)

Church now broadcast 11.15am-12.30pm:
Sept 13th 1959: Holy Communion from Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC) "ITV's most ambitious church broadcast. Two ABC outside broadcast units and special equipment never used before will illuminate the vast cathedral."
Sept 20th 1959: Morning Service from St Columba's Presbyterian Church Worthing. Director: Berkeley Smith. (Southern)
Sept 27th 1959: Sung Eucharist from Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul Buckingham. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Oct 4th 1959: Morning Service from Oakwood Methodist Church Cockfosters. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
Oct 11th 1959: Family Service from St George's Congregational Church Middlesborough. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Oct 18th 1959: Harvest Festival from the Church of St Mary the Virgin Edlesborough Buckinghamshire. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 25th 1959: Dialogue Mass from Notre Dame de France, Leicester Place London. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Nov 1st 1959 (10.45am-12 noon): Mornimg Prayer from the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Norwich. Director: Stephen McCormack (Anglia)
Remembrance Sunday Nov 8th 1959 (10.45-11.20am): from the Cenotaph Whitehall, prologue spoken by Group-Capt Douglas Bader (ATV)
Nov 15th 1959: Morning Service from The Dome Mission Brighton. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Nov 22nd 1959: Holy Communion from Queen's Road Baptist Church Coventry. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Nov 29th 1959: Morning Service from the Church of St Mary Woolnoth London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dec 6th 1959: High Mass from the Church of the Holy Name Manchester. Commentator: Very Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Dec 13th 1959: Morning Service from All Souls Langham Place London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dec 20th 1959: Morning Service from Park Hill Congregational Church Nottingham. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Dec 27th 1959 (11.15am-12.15pm): Processional Carol Service from Peterborough Cathedral. Commentator: Cecil M Harrison. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Jan 3rd 1960: Parish Communion from the Church of St Gregory Bedale with Leeming Bar and Burrhill. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 10th 1960: First Sunday After Epiphany from Kensington Chapel London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Jan 17th 1960: Sung Eucharist from Southwell Minster. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 24th 1960: Sung Mass from the Roman Catholic Church of St Jospeh Newbury. Commentary: Rev Gerard Dwyer. Director: Berkeley Smith. (Southern)
Enthronement Jan 31st 1960: of the Bishop of Norwich at Norwich Cathedral. Director: Geoff Rimmer (Anglia) This was a video tape of the ceremony on January 28th
Feb 7th 1960: Fifth Sunday After Epiphany from the Chapel of Eltham College London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 14th 1960: Choral Eucharist from Bolton Parish Church. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Feb 21st 1960: Sexagesima Sunday from the Metropolitan Tabernacle London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Matins Feb 28th 1960: from the Parish Church of St Nicholas Warwick. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Sung Mass Mar 6th 1960: from Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St George Enfield. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 13th 1960: Morning Service from Hereford Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 20th 1960: Third Sunday in Lent from St John's Presbyterian Church Forest Hill London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 27th 1960: Morthering SUnday Family Communion from Great Malvern Priory. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Apr 3rd 1960: Morning Worship from Albert Hall Methodist Mission Nottingham. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Apr 10th 1960: Palm Sunday from St Stehen's Parish Church Bush Hill Park Enfield. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Apr 17th 1960: Morning Service from Wharf Road Baptist Church Grantham. (Easter) Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Apr 24th 1960: Scout Parade Service from Clapton Park Congregational Church London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 1st 1960 (11.15am-12.15pm): Solemn High Mass from the Church of St Werburgh Chester. Commentary: Very Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 8th 1960: Third Sunday After Easter from Waltham Abbey Ninth Centenary Year. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 15th 1960: Fourth Sunday After Easter from St John of Jerusalem, SOuth Hackney. A service in memory of Florence Nightingale. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 22nd 1960: Rogation Sunday from the Chapel of St Peter and St Paul, Royal Naval College Greenwich. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)

New timing 11am-12.15pm:
May 29th 1960: Morning Service from Radnor Park Congregational Church Folkestone. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
June 5th 1960: Whit Sunday from Rochester Cathedral. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 12th 1960: Trinity Sunday from Stanwell Congregational Church Middlesex. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 19th 1960: Sung Mass from the St Alban Roman Catholic Church Blackburn. Commentator: Canon O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
June 26th 1960: Second Sunday After Trinity from the Church of St John the Evangelist Redhill. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
July 3rd 1960: High Mass from the Church of St Mary the Virgin Wellingborough. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Morning Prayer July 17th 1960: from St Hilary's Parish Church Wallasey. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
July 24th 1960: High Mass from the Church of the SDacred Heart Wimbledon. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
July 31st 1960: Sung Eucharist from St Nicholas Anglican Parish Church Newport Shropshire. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)

The title 'Church' was finally dropped, the slot now called (The) Morning Service. A number of ABC broadcasts, in particular, however were listed by the type of service.
Aug 7th 1960: from Basildon Methodist Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 14th 1960: from the Parish Church of St Mary Scarborough. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Aug 21st 1960: from Kenton Methodist Church Middlesex. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sept 4th 1960: High Mass from The New Church of Christ the King Bitterne. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Sept 11th 1960: from Eltham Park Baptist Church London. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
Commemoration Service Sept 18th 1960 (10.30am-12.15pm): RAF 20th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain from Liverpool Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
An Ordination of Deacons and Priests Sept 25th 1960 (11am-12.30pm): from Southwark Cathedral. Commentator: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Nov 27th 1960: Advent Sunday from Dale Street Methodist Church Leamington Spa. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Service of Confirmation and First Communion Dec 4th 1960 (11am-12.30pm): from St Mary the Virgin Primrose Hill. Commentator: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dec 18th 1960: from the Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul Tonbridge. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Christmas Communion Dec 25th 1960: from Liverpool Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)

New timing 11am-12.05pm:
High Mass Mar 12th 1961: The RC Abbey of St Michael the Archangel Belmont Hereford. Commentator: Father Clifford Howell. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Apr 2nd 1961 (10.30am-12noon): Pontifical High Mass of Easter Day from Westminster Cathedral. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Apr 16th 1961: from Wallington Methodist Church. Commentator: Rev Cyril Thomas. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 7th 1961: Dedication from the RAF Church of St Clement Danes London. Dedication of the Royal Air Force Books of Remembrance. Commentator: Canon Fenton Morley. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 21st 1961: from Wolstanton Congregational Church, Staffs. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 28th 1961: from the Royal Albert Hall London. Commentator: Rev Cyril Thomas. The annual service of the Methodist Association of Youth Clubs. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
700th Charter Anniversary Service of the Borough of Macclesfield June 4th 1961: from the Parish Church Macclesfield. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
June 11th 1961: from St Peter-ad-Vincula, Tower of London, followed by Changing of the Guard. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 18th 1961: from the Parish Church of Birmingham. Preacher: Billy Graham. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
June 25th 1961: from Frenhead Road Methodist Church London. With the sacrament of Holy Baptism. Commentator: Rev Cyril Thomas. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
July 2nd 1961: from Church Street Methodist Church Southport. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
July 9th 1961: Pontifical High Mass from The Church of St John Fisher Rochester. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Morning Prayer July 16th 1961: from New Brighton Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
July 23rd 1961: from Punshon Memorial Methodist Church Bournemouth. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Sung Eucharist July 30th 1961: from Bangor Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Aug 6th 1961: A service of dedication and prayer for Road Safety from St James's Church Piccadilly London. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 13th 1961: from The Ebenezer Baptist Church Scarborough. Director: Geoffrey Hall (ABC)
Aug 27th 1961: from The Methodist Central Hall Queen Street Scarborough. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Solemn High Mass Sept 3rd 1961: from The Cathedral Church of St Mary Middlesborough. Commentator: Very Rev Canon Wm O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Parish Communion Sept 10th 1961: from The Parish Church of St Philip Alderley Edge Cheshire. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Sept 17 1961: from St Andrew's Presbyterian Church Eastbourne. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Sept 24th 1961: Harvest Festival from The Church of St Mary the Virgin Hambleden Bucks. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 22nd 1961 St Giles Clerkenwell (ATV)
Service of Remembrance Nov 12th 1961 (10.45-11.50): from The Centotaph Whitehall London. (ATV)
Matins Nov 19th 1961: from Cartmel Priory Grange-over-Sands. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Nov 26th 1961: Dialogue Mass from The Church of Notre Dame de France Leicester Square London. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Dec 3rd 1961: from The Parish Church of All Saints Northallerton. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Matins Dec 17th 1961: from Salisbury Cathedral. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Christmas Sunday Service Dec 24th 1961: from Heaton Moor Congregational Church Stockport. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Dec 31st 1961 (11am-12.15pm): Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols from St Mark's Parish Church Bush Hill Park Enfield. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV)
Sung Mass Jan 14th 1962: from The Church of St Mary Magdalene Wandsworth. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Church Service Jan 28th 1962: from Darlington Street Methodist Church Wolverhampton. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Feb 4th 1962: from the RAF Church of St Clement Dane. Thanksgiving service on the 21st anniversary of the Air Training Corps in the presence of the Duke of Edinburgh. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Feb 11th 1962: from Lancaster Priory. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 18th 1962 (11am-12.10pm): from St Andrew's Presvyterian Church Hampstead. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV)
Feb 25th 1962: from Main Road Baptist Church Romford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Mar 4th 1962: from Cranbrook Parish Church. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Mothering Sunday Apr 1st 1962: Family Eucharist from Malvern Priory. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Procession of Palms Apr 15th 1962: Solemn High Mass from Oscott RC College Sutton Coldfield. Commentator: Father Geoffrey Tucker. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Easter Sunday Services Apr 22nd 1962 (10.30am-12.45pm): Mattins, Procession and Solemn Eucharist from York Minster. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
May 20th 1962: Industrial Festival from Rochester Cathedral. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
The Communion May 27th 1962 (10.30am-12.05pm): from Coventry Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
June 3rd 1962: from Holly Park Methodist Church Crouch Hill. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 10th 1962: High Mass from the Convent of the Daughters of the Cross, Carshalton. Commentators: Rev John Bebb and Rev Sister Superior. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 24th 1962: from Christ Church Crouch End, part of their centenary celebration. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Mass July 8th 1962: from the RC Church of the Sacred Heart Blackpool. Commentator: Very Rev Canon O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
July 15th 1962 (11am-12.5pm "approx"): from Brownhill Road Baptist Church Catford. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)

Timing now 11am-12.15pm:
July 29th 1962: from Wesley's Chapel City Road London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 5th 1962: Parish Communion from St Mark's Church Battersea Rise London. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV)
Aug 19th 1962:from St John's Methodist Church Worcester. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Aug 26th 1962: from Holy Trinity Church Kensington London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Worship Sept 2nd 1962:from the United Congregatinal Church Dewsbury. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Sept 9th 1962: Sung Eucharist from The Parish of St Andrew Sudbury Middlesex. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV)
Sept 16th 1962: from The Baptist Tabernacle Tunbridge Wells. Director: Peter Webber (Southern)
One God Oct 7th 1962: from Hampstead Parish Church London. Second in a series of three from "the three main streams of religious thought in this country ... showing how far in our corporate worship this unity is achieved." Commentator: Rev Preb Stephen Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
One God Oct 14th 1962: from St Augustine's RC Church Hoddesdon. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 21st 1962: from the Chapel of St Peter and St Paul Royal Naval College Greenwich. Trafalgar Day annual Seafarer's Service. Commentator: Rev Preb Stephen Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Oct 28th 1962: from St Cuthbert's Presbyterian Church Hove. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Service of Remembrance Nov 11th 1962 (10.45-11.55): from The Centotaph Whitehall London. (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Nov 25th 1962: from the Parish Church Doncaster. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Sung Eucharist Dec 23rd 1962: from Ashover Parish Church Derbyshire. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Dec 30th 1962: from Stockwell Methodist Church London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 10th 1963: from St Martins-in-the- Bull Ring, Birmingham Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Feb 17th 1963: Matins from Emmanuel Church Northwood Middlesex. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
God and Man Mar 10th 1963: Man Loving God in Work and Industry. Low Mass from Saint Edmund's Church Airedale. Second in the series of Lent services introduced by Michael Thomas. Commentator: Very Rev Canon W O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
God and Man Mar 17th 1963: Man Loving God in Personal Life. Family Worship from Bridge Street Methodist Church Hereford, introduced by Michael Thomas. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
God and Man Mar 24th 1963: Man Loving God in the Family. Sung Eucharist from Manchester Cathedral, introduced by Michael Thomas. Commentator: Rev Canon SH Price. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
God and Man Apr 7th 1963 (11am-12.05pm): God Loving Man- God in Man's Suffering. Holy Communion from Parish Church of St Katherine Cree London. Sixth in the series of Lent services introduced by Michael Thomas. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Apr 21st 1963: from St Mary's Parish Church Goudhurst. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
May 5th 1963: Service of Thanksgiving for the beauty of the earth from Broomwood Methodist Church Clapham Common. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Family Service May 12th 1963: from The Mansfield Road Baptist Church Nottingham. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 19th 1963: Annual Parade Service of the North London St John Ambulance from St John's Church Palmers Green. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 26th 1963: Annual Service of the Methodist Association of Youth Clubs from The Royal Albert Hall London. Commentary: Rev Albert Cornah. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Parish Communion June 2nd 1963: from The Parish Church of Saint Lawrence Hatfield Yorkshire. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
June 9th 1963: A Civic Service of Thanksgiving for the foundation of the Queen Victoria Hospital East Grinstead from The Parish Church of St Swithun East Grinstead. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Service of Induction June 16th 1963: from Church of St Thomas Leesfield Oldham. A new incumbent is installed. Commentator: Canon SH Price. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Family Communion Service June 23rd 1963: from Church of St John the Baptist Chester. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Solemn High Mass June 30th 1963: from The Friars Aylesford Kent. Commentary: Rev Gerard Dwyer. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
July 7th 1963: from St Mary's Parish Church Goudhurst. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Family Worship July 14th 1963: from Heaton Moor Methodist Church Stockport. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Sung Eucharist July 21st 1963: from The Parish Church Towcester. Day School Festival. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
July 28th 1963: Oarsmen's Service from The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin Fen Ditton Cabridge. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Dialogue Mass Aug 4th 1963: from the RC Church of Saint Anthony Woodhouse Park Wythenshawe Manchester. Commentator: Very Rev Canon William O'Leary. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Aug 11th 1963: from Fentiman Road Methodist Church London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Aug 18th 1963: from The Parish Church of St Giles Stoney Stratford. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Aug 25th 1963: Sung Eucharist from St Alban the Martyr Holborn London. Commentator: Rev Preb A S Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Induction of a Minister Sept 15th 1963: from Bedminster Methodist Church Wolverhampton. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Harvest Thanksgiving Sept 22nd 1963: from the grounds of Raynham Hall. Director: Michael Jeans (Anglia)
Sept 29th 1963: Dialogue Mass from the Chapel of St Vincent's Orthopaedic Hospital, Pinner. Commentator: Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV)
Oct 20th 1963: from the Priory Church of St Peter Dunstable. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV)
Family Communion Oct 27th 1963: from the Parish Church Carlton-in-Lindrick Notts. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Nov 3rd 1963: Centenary Celebration Service from Bromley Baptist Church. Commentator: Leonard Fawkes. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Service of Remembrance Nov 10th 1963 (10.45-11.55): from The Cenotaph. (ATV)
Dec 1st 1963: Sung Eucharist from Christ Church Lancaster Gate London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Consecration Service Dec 15th 1963: from the Church of St Mark Chadderton Lancs. Commentator: Canon Hetley Price. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Baptism at Christmas Dec 22nd 1963: from Jubilee Methodist Church Tunstall. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Sung Eucharist Jan 12th 1964: from Liverpool Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Jan 19th 1964: Salvation Army Holiness Meeting from The Ilford Citadel. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Jan 26th 1964: Parish Communion from St Etheldreda's Church Fulham Palace Road London. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Feb 16th 1964: from Richmond Hill Congregational Church Bournemouth. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Sung Eucharist Mar 15th 1964: from Halifax Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Mar 22nd 1964: Family Communion from St Clare's Westborough Guildford. Commentator: Rev Preb Stephan Hopkinson. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Sung Eucharist Apr 5th 1964: from the Parish Church of All Saints Maidstone. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Apr 12th 1964: Dedication from the RAF Church of St Clement Danes London. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Dedication of Vol 10 of the RAF Books of Remembrance. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Opening Service of the Leeds Triennial Musical Festival Apr 19th 1964: from Leeds Parish Church. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Morning Worship Apr 26th 1964: from Egremont Presbyterian Church Wallasey. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Dialogue Mass May 10th 1964: from St Edmund's RC Church Little Hulton nr Manchester. Commentator: Very Rev Canon W O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
May 17th 1964: Pontifical High Mass from Westminster Cathedral. Commentary by Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
May 24th 1964: Matins from the Chapel of St John's Hall London College of Divinity Middx. Commentary by Rev Michael Green. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Morning Worship May 31st 1964: from the Parish Church Keighley. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Solemn Mass June 14th 1964: from the Chapel of the Franciscan RC Prep School Stony Stratford. Commentator: Very Rev Canon W O'Leary. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
June 21st 1964: Sung Mass from the RC Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Hayes Middx. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
June 28th 1964: from St Mary's Parish Church Scarborough. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
July 5th 1964: Centenary Service from Radlett Parish Church (ATV)
Morning Worship July 26th 1964: from Wesley Chapel Harrogate. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Aug 2nd 1964: Dialogue Mass from the Church of St Thomas pf Canterbury Whyteleafe Surrey. Commentator: Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 23rd 1964: from Finsbury Park Methodist Church. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Aug 30th 1964: from All Saints' Church Bradford. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Sept 6th 1964: A Scouts' Own from the Adult Leaders Training Centre Gilwell Park. Introduced by Camp Chief John Thurman. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Battle of Britain Commemoration Service Sept 13th 1964: from All Saints Parish Church Northampton. Director: Andy Gullen (ABC)
Sept 20th 1964: from the RAF Church of St Clement Danes. Thanksgiving for victory in the Battle of Britain and laying up of the Queen's Colour. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV)
Solemn High Mass Sept 27th 1964: from the Church of Our Lady of Dolours, Bognor Regis. Commentator: Rev Gerard Dwyer. Director: Berkely Smith (Southern)
Oct 4th 1964: Baptismal Service from Weymouth Baptist Church. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Sung Eucharist Oct 18th 1964: from Chchester Cathedral. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern)
Confirmation and First Communion Oct 25th 1964: from the Parish Church of St Martin of Tours Middlesborough. Commentator: Maxwell Dees. Director: Christopher Palmer (Tyne Tees)
Nov 1st 1964: from the Methodist Church Blundellsands. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Service of Remembrance Nov 8th 1964 (10.45-11.55): from The Cenotaph. (ATV)
Nov 15th 1964: from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre without Newgate London. A combined service with the City Temple. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Holy Baptism with Communion Nov 22nd 1964: from Leigh Parish Church Lancs. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Students' Service for Advent Nov 29th 1964: from Central Methodist Church Leicester. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Choral Communion Dec 6th 1964: from Brighton College Chapel. Director: George Egan (Southern)
Dec 13th 1964: from Lichfield Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)
Dec 20th 1964: Dialogue Mass from the Priory Church of Christ the King Cockfosters. For the first time, English is used in the mass. Commentator Rev John Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)
Festive Service Dec 27th 1964: from Manchester Cathedral. Director: David Southwood (ABC)

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The Granville Melodramas
The Granville Theatre at Walham Green, Fulham, a music hall until 1954, was purchased by Associated Rediffusion and converted into a small modern tv theatre at a cost of £150,000, retaining some original features like the beautifully painted wall tiles, but ripping up the entire flooring.. However, after a year's use, it closed and was put up for sale, eventually being sold in 1957 for use as a tv studio.

1 Little Gerty or the Lamplighter's Darling (Monday Sept 26th 1955) Script: George Lander adapted by Juan Cortez. Cast: John Bailey (Mr Philip Amory), Erik Chitty (Trueman Flint), Vincent Holman (Mr Graham), John Vere (Dr Jeremy), Victoria Grayson (Little Gerty), Helen Shingler (Emily Graham) and Hattie Jacques (Nan Grant). From the depths of a poverty-stricken slum, to the height of a luxury liner's deck, this pulsating melodrama traces at breakneck speed the story of the poor, abandoned waif who finds happiness and her long lost father
2 The Chain of Guilt (Oct 10th 1955)
3 The Silver King (Oct 24th 1955) Script: Henry Jones and Henry Herman adapted by Juan Cortez. Director: Cyril Butcher. Cast: Erik Chitty (Bilcher), Mark Daly (Jaikes), John Bailey (Wilfred Denver), John Arnatt (Captain Skinner), Frank Thornton (Geoffrey Ware), Helen Shingler (Nelly Denver) Neville Phillips (Henry Corkett), Hattie Jacques (Olive Skinner), Victoria Grayson (Cissy Denver), and Aubrey Danvers-Walker (Detective Baxter). Who is the mysterious Silver King? None other than Wilfred Denver, falsely accused of murder. Denver flees the country and returns a very rich man, only to find his beloved wfe and child reduced to a state of penury
4 The Hawk of the Desert or The Sheik and the Lady (Nov 7th 1955) Adapted by Juan Cortez. Director: Cyril Butcher. Cast: Frederick Jaeger (Allan Adair), John Bailey (Lt Gatson de Presalle), Helen Shingler (Nancy Adair), John Westbrook (Ahmed Ben Hassan), Victoria Grayson (Zuila), Hattie Jacques (Amara), Erik Chitty (Kahled El Serak), and Trixie Scales (Fatimah). All tremble at the name of Ahmed Ben Hassan. For he is The Hawk of the Desert. But is there no chink in the armour of his hard heart?
5 The Unwanted child or The Babe in The Wood (Wed Nov 30th 1955)
6 The Drunkard or The Fallen Saved (Dec 13th 1955)
7 Puss in Boots (Dec 20th 1955)
8 Michael Erle the Maniac Lover, or The Fair Lass of Lichfield (Dec 27th 1955)
9 East Lynne (Wed Jan 11th 1956, 9.30pm) Adapted by Juan Cortez. Director: Cyril Butcher. Cast: Dorothy Grumbar (Barbara Hare), Hattie Jacques (Miss Cornelia), Helen Shingler (Lady Isabel), John Bailey (Francis Levison), Victoria Grayson (Joyce), Beatrix Carter (Wilson), Peter Williams (Archibald Carlyle), Christopher Wearbey (Little Willie), Erik Chitty (Lord Mount Severn), and Thane Bettany (Police Officer). "Dead, dead and never called me Mother." A story of treachery, jealousy, and final retribution
10 The Poor of New York, or Wall Street Panics (Jan 25th 1956)

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Here and Now (1961-4)
A miscellany programme devised by Associated Rediffusion, interesting because some later in the series were made by Anglia and Southern Television. These regional productions are noted below.
Since many of the programmes were devised on a topical basis, TV Times often simply indicated that regular presenter Huw Thomas introduced "the fun, the excitement, the fascination of life around us." He hosted A-R's output, except where noted.

The very first programme in its regular 6.45pm 15 minute slot was on
Monday November 6th 1961. Reporter: Judith Jackson. Director: Peter Robinson. Producer: Cyril Francis.
Tues Nov 7th 1961 Reporter: Oliver Postgate. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Wed Nov 8th Reporter: Bryan Magee. Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
Thurs Nov 9th Reporter also Huw Thomas. Director: Joan Kemp-Welch.
Fri Nov 10th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Ian Fordyce.
Mon Nov 13th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Peter Robinson.
Tues Nov 14th Reporter: Bryan Magee. Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
Wed Nov 15th Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
Thurs Nov 16th Director: Joan Kemp-Welch.
Fri Nov 17th Director: Graham Watts.
Mon Feb 26th 1962 Reporter: Nan Winton. Director: Bill Hitchcock. Producer: Ray Dicks.
Tues Feb 27th Reporter: Nan Winton. Director: Mark Lawton.
Wed Feb 28th Director: Ian Fordyce.
Thur Mar 1st Director: Graham Watts.
Fri Mar 2nd Director: Bill Hitchcock.
Mon Mar 12th Director: Director: Bill Hitchcock.
Tues Mar 13th HT and Nan Winton report. Director: Don Gale
Wed Mar 14th Reporter: Michael Westmore. Director: Ian Fordyce.
Thur Mar 15th Reporter: John McCarthy. Director: John P Hamilton.
Fri Mar 16th Reporter: Douglas Robinson. Director: John P Hamilton.
Mon Mar 26th HT and Judith Jackson report. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
Tues Mar 27th Reporter: Michael Westmore. Director: Don Gale.
Wed Mar 28th Reporter: Peter Lloyd. Director: John Phillips.
Thur Mar 29th Reporter: Peter Lloyd. Director: Murray Ashford.
A Visit to Little Venice- Fri Mar 30th Reporter: Tim Brinton. Director: Michael Currer-Briggs.
Mon Apr 9th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporters: Nan Winton and NevilleBarker. Director: Mark Lawton. Producer: Michael Ingrams.
Tues Apr 10th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Steve Race. Director: John P Hamilton.
Wed Apr 11th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Thur Apr 12th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Neville Calrke. Director: Mark Lawton.
Fri Apr 13th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Jeri Matos. Director: John P Hamilton.
Mon Apr 30th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Judith Jackson. Director: Don Gale.
Tues May 1st Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Director: Peter Croft.
Wed May 2nd Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Pat Ward. Director: Don Gale.
Thurs May 3rd Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Don Gale.
Fri May 4th Introduced by Michael Ingrams. Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Don Gale.
Huw Thomas, who had been ill in hospital, now returned to the series:
Tues May 8th Reporter: John McCarthy. Director: Mark Lawton.
Wed May 9th Director: Rollo Gamble.
Thur May 10th Reporter: Judith Jackson. Director: Graham Watts.
Fri May 11th Introduced and directed by Michael Ingrams.
Wed May 16th Reporter: Nan Winton. Director: Graham Watts.
Thur May 17th Reporter: Pat Ward. Director: Don Gale.
Fri May 18th Reporter: Jeri Matos. Director: Don Gale.
(There was a break in the summer 1962)
Now shown Mondays to Thursdays.
Mon Aug 20th Director: Stephen McCormack.
Tues Aug 21st Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople.
Wed Aug 22nd Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
Thur Aug 23rd Reporter: Vivian Kemble. Director: Robert Fleming.
Mon Dec 17th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Stephen McCormack.
Tues Dec 18th From the Royal College of Art. Reporter: Nick Barker. Director: Jim Pople.
The Beeje Programme number 250 Wed Dec 19th Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Peter Croft. A demonstration of "a new dance craze"
Thur Dec 20th Director: Graham Watts.
Mon Jan 21st 1963 Reporters: Michael Nelson and Steve Race. Director: Robert Fleming. Producer: Stephen McCormack.
Tues Jan 22nd Director: Bimbi Harris.
Wed Jan 23rd Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Peter Croft.
Thur Jan 24th Reporter: Vanessa Thornton. Director: Don Gale.
Mon Feb 4th Introduced by Dick Joice. Reporter: Christopher Rainbow. Director: Anton Bowler. (Anglia)
Tues Feb 5th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Don Gale.
Wed Feb 6th Director: Graham Watts.
Thur Feb 7th Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Graham Watts.
Mon Feb 25th Introduced by Dick Joice. Director: Bob Gardam. Michael Ingrams returns as Producer. (Anglia)
Tues Feb 26th Director: Bimbi Harris.
Wed Feb 27th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Ronald Marriott.
Thur Feb 28th Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Graham Watts.
Mon Mar 4th Introduced by Dick Joice. Reporter: John McGregor. Director: Barry Barton. (Anglia)
Tues Mar 5th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Robert Fleming.
Wed Mar 6th Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Thur Mar 7th Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Robert Fleming.
Wed Apr 10th introduced by Terence Carroll. Directed by Anthony Searle. With Uffa Fox "at his home in Cowes and talking to TC in Paris". (Southern)
Mon Apr 29th Introduced by Dick Joice. Reporter: Bob Wellings. Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues Apr 30th Director: Bimbi Harris.
Wed May 1st introduced by Terence Carroll. Directed by Angus Wright (Southern)
Thur May 2nd Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Peter Croft,
Mon May 13th Introduced by Dick Joice. Reporter: Bob Wellings. Director: Bob Gardam. (Anglia)
Tues May 14th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. (no prog May 15th)
Thur May 16th Reporter: Michael Nelson.
Mon June 17th Introduced by Dick Joice. Reporter: Bob Wellings. Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues June 18th Reporter: Michael Nelson. Director: Peter Croft.
What is The Attitude of the Pupils for a Progressive C-educational School? Wed June 19th introduced by Terence Carroll. Directed Anthony Searle. With 4 prefects in the common room of Bedales School Petersfield. (Southern)
Thur June 20th Reporter: Vanessa Thornton. Director: Jim Pople.
Mon July 22nd Reporter Anthony Brown. Director: Richard Sidwell.
Tues July 23rd Reporter Michael Ingrams. Director: Bill Hitchcock.
The Old School Tie Wed July 24th Introduced by Terence Carroll. Director: Anthony Searle. From Marlborough College. (Southern)
Thur July 25th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Mon Aug 5th introduced by Bob Wellings Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues Aug 6th Director: Bimbi Harris.
Report from Cowes Wed Aug 7th Commentators: Barry Westwood and Bill Richardson. Director: Berkely Smith. Leading yachtsmen join Outside Broadcast cemeras on board Power Vessel 1. (Southern)
Thur Aug 8th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople.
Mon Aug 19th Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues Aug 20th Director: Bimbi Harris.
A Man- His Dog- and His Village Wed Aug 21st Director: Anthony Searle. A film about Fred Lexter of Abbotsbury. (Southern)
Thur Aug 22nd Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople.
Mon Aug 26th Reporter: Bob Wellings. Director: Peter Joy. (Anglia)
Tues Aug 27th Director: Bill Hitchcock.
The Gymkhana Wed Aug 28th Director: Bill Perry. John Bagguley visits New Forest Hunt Club Gymkhana at Brockenhurst. (Southern)
Thur Aug 29th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Mon Sept 9th Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues Sept 10th Director: Bimbi Harris.
The 1963 Power Boat Race from Cowes to Torquay Wed Sept 11th Director: Robert Kitts. With Peter Twiss, also aboard: reporter Jeremy James, on the 28ft cruiser named Here and Now. (Southern)
Thur Sept 12th Reporter: Vanessa Thornton. Director: Michael Ingrams.
From now on, shown Mondays to Wednesdays, same time 6.45pm.
Mon Sept 16th Introduced by Dick Joice. Director: David Kenten. (Anglia)
Tues Sept 17th Director: Bimbi Harris.
Wed Sept 18th. Reporter: Terence Carroll. Director: Robert Kitts. A film examining the change in hop picking methods. (Southern)
Mon Sept 23rd Introduced by Dick Graham. Director: Ron Downing. (Anglia)
Tues Sept 24th Director: Harry Sloan.
Wed Sept 25th. Introduced by Peter Williams. Director: David Rea. From Albemarle Youth Centre Haywards Heath. (Southern)
Shooting and Shotguns- Mon Oct 14th Introduced by Anthony Brown. Director: Harry Aldous. (Anglia)
Tues Oct 15th Director: Harry Sloan.
Portrait of the Artist- Wed Oct 16th Director: Robert Kitts. A study of Cyril Medlin, a young painter (Southern)
The New Chelsea- Mon Nov 11th with Dick Graham, directed by Harry Aldous. A visit to the new and expanding art colony in Great Bardfield Essex (Anglia)
Tues Nov 12th Reporter Michael Ingrams. Director Harry Sloan.
Say I Won't Be There- Wed Nov 13th. Terence Carroll talks to Dusty Springfield. Director Mike Mansfield (Southern)
Warm for Winter- Mon Dec 2nd Introduced by Dick Graham. Director: Harry Aldous. A visit to a sheepskin factory. (Anglia)
Tues Dec 3rd Intervewer: Michael Ingrams. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Nuclear Power- Wed Dec 4th. Reporter: Peter Williams. Director: David Rea. A visit to Dungeness Nuclear Power Station. (Southern)
Destination Europe- Mon Dec 16th Director: Harry Aldous. On board the Harwich to Hook of Holland steamer. (Anglia)
Tues Dec 17th Intervewer: Michael Ingrams. Director: Bimbi Harris.
Commuters- Wed Dec 18th. Reporter: Peter Williams. Director: Michael Connor. On board a crowded commuter train. (Southern)
Flood Warning- Mon Jan 27th 1964 Introduced by Dick Graham. Director: Harry Aldous. Visit to areas affected by the 1953 floods, to see what has been done to ensure the tragedy is not repeated. (Anglia)
Tues Jan 28th Intervewer: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople.
(no programme Jan 29th)
Instant Homes- Mon Feb 10th with Michael Robson, directed by Harry Aldous. A visit to a Norfolk factory (Anglia)
Tues Feb 11th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director Bimbi Harris.
A Dog Match Wed Feb 12th. Reporter: Steve Race. Director: Peter Frazer-Jones. Southampton dog owners challenge owners in Hammersmith. Judge: Joe Cartledge. (Southern)
Dog Patrol- Mon Mar 2nd with John McGregor, directed by Ron Downing. A visit to a police training establishment for dogs in Chelmsford.(Anglia)
Tues Mar 3rd Reporter: HT. Director Bimbi Harris.
The Sentence Begins Wed Mar 4th. Introduced by Terence Carroll. Director: Anthony Searle. Men recently released from jail. (Southern)
Roller Champions- Mon Apr 13th with Michael Robson. Directed by Ron Downing. A training session for skaters in Yarmouth. (Anglia)
Tues Apr 14th Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople.
Spring is Here! Wed Apr 15th. Director: Anthony Searle. A film fantasy about a teenage boy and girl. (Southern)
Bacon With Everything- Mon Apr 20th with Michael Robson. Directed by Harry Aldous. Visit to a bacon factory. (Anglia)
Man On a Hot Line Tues Apr 21st Reporter: Michael Ingrams. Director: Jim Pople. Michael Ingrams, Huw Thomas at Bentwaters Air Base in Suffolk.
A Day at the Seaside Wed Apr 22nd. With Peter Williams. Director: David Rea. About Britain's piers. (Southern)

The series ended in June 1964 before it could quite clock up 500 editions. (Note: Scottish Television ran their own Here and Now regional programme, which had no connection with this)

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It's Young Again (Granada)
Alan Young starred in this five part 1963 series.
As early as 1950 he had starred in his own American Alan Young Show, before finding immortality with the longrunning Mr Ed in 1961.

In each programme of It's Young Again, Alan appeared with The Avons, backed by Alyn Ainsworth and His Orchestra.
Progamme 1 (July 4th 1963) - designed by Michael Grimes. Produced by Milo Lewis. Alan is a member of the audience at a Theatre in the Round when the spotlight is trained on him and he gets embroiled with the actors, ending with a murder mystery where all the props go wrong.
2 (July 11th 1963) - designed by M Grimes. Produced by Milo Lewis. Alan is an astronaut, who has a rendezvous with an alien.
3 (July 18th 1963) - designed by M Grimes. Produced by Milo Lewis. Alan plays a cowboy whose bullets explode when a siren with skyscraper hair kisses him.
4 (July 25th 1963) - designed by M Grimes. Produced by Milo Lewis. Alan's a window cleaner at the Dorchester Hotel chatting with a Liz Taylor lookalike.
5 (August 1st 1963) - Produced by Eric Fawcett. Alan plays a customer in a cafe who orders kippers, but is only served one kipper.
Footnote: the five plots cover the five programmes, though I can only be sure that the storylines of nos 1 and 3 have been assigned to the correct dates. One of these shows survives, it is listed on the ITN Source site as Number 3, though the date given incorrectly is for the first show.

The 'Again' in the title of this series referred to the fact that British born Alan had made TV shows in Britain previously. Here are details of these earlier Granada shows:
In 1957 Alan Young starred in 13 editions of a show called Personal Appearance for Granada. In northern Britain, this was top of the television ratings. Philip Jones directed the shows which had music by Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Each week Alan had a guest in "30 minutes of gaiety, music and song." A critic described Young thus, "he has that rare gift, an aptitude for making people think he is just one of the crowd, though much simpler and more innocent... His boyish charm, his continual look of bewilderment must have had all the girls at home practically rushing to the studio to help him out of his predicaments."
On June 18th 1957 his first guest was French star Guylaine Guy. On June 25th (pictured) his guest was Marion Ryan. On July 2nd it was Elizabeth Larner. On July 9th it was Eve Boswell. On July 30th: Dorothy Squires. Aug 6th: Adele Leigh. Aug 13th: Shirley Eaton, replacing the advertised Elizabeth Larner. This is the only surviving show in this series. Aug 20th: Beatrice Arnac. Sept 3rd: Pearl Carr and Teddy Johnson. Sept 10th: this final show saw Elizabeth Larner's delayed appearance.

He also made six British shows shown fortnightly starting August 28th 1958, produced by Jack Hylton for A-R. Among those appearing regularly in the show were Eleanor Drew, Laurie Payne and Bernard Hunter with music by Billy Ternent and His Orchestra (later Steve Race), and the Barney Gilbraith Singers.

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Escape (Granada)
Six one-off stories of the Man on the Run, physical escapes, scripted by Marc Brandel.

1 Five Men for Freedom (Aug 18th 1967)
Director: Julian Amyes. Starring Calvin Lockhart, Joyce Heron, Patrick Barr and Grant Taylor. (Pictured l-r, David McKail as Jack, Peter Newton as Willy, David Cook as Ben, and Calvin Lockhart as Kingsley.) Set in Mississippi, 'there simply isn't any such thing as being protected by the law down here. Why, when those three boys were murdered here last summer, the governor of the state said it served them right'
2 Three to a Cell (Aug 25th 1967)
Director: Bob Hird. Starring Gordon Jackson, Bryan Pringle, Harry Towb and John Collin. 'They'll give us our share. One third. Why would they cross us? 'Don't you see, they had it all worked out from the start? There isn't going to be any pay-off"
3 A Bad Risk (Sept 1st 1967)
Director: Mike Apted. Starring Nicholas Pennell, with Bernard Hepton and Rudolph Walker. 'Why did I come back here? Why don't I tell them? If I tell them, I could get five years'
4 Private Enterprise (Sept 8th 1967)
Director: Ronald Wilson. Starring Martin Jarvis, Meg Wynn Owen, Amber Kammer and Malcolm Tierney. 'There's one thing the police don't know- how far we've got tonight. Wthatever the informer's told them, they don't expect us to break out tonight. And that's what we're going to do... and the informer's coming with us'
5 Nothing to Lose (Sept 15th 1967)
Director: Bob Hird. Starring Roy Marsden and Ann Lynn, with Jeremy Child and Michael Balfour. 'There must be ten million photographs of you plastered round this country- every one of those pictures has suddenly become a Wanted notice'
6 The Kindness of Strangers (Sept 22nd 1967)
Director: Mike Newell. Starring Michael Barlow, John Castle, Jonathon Elsom, Jerome Willis and Hannah Gordon.

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Unwin Time
That master inventor of Gobbledygook, Stanley Unwin made numerous tv appearances, but I think this was the only series of his very own. Professor Unwin takes an Unwinese look at hobbies and sports. It was a five minute monologue made for ATV in 1966, but only partially networked. The Producer was Donald Shingler.
Some of the lectures were:
Wrestling- Sunday April 24th 1966 10.30pm
Football- May 1st 1966
Golf- May 8th 1966
Bully Off, The Noble Art of Stick Games- May 22nd 1966
The Skill of Boatyfloating- May 29th 1966
Athletty Panters - June 12th 1966

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The Variety Show
An uninspiring title for Granada's series, replacing Chelsea at Nine, that aimed to bring variety acts "from all over the world." It shared a slot with ATV's Startime, and an Associated Rediffusion show, thus appearing once every three weeks.

1 Thursday February 18th 1960, 9.35pm. starring Rose Marie (from USA, "the original chee-chee girl"), "Britain's own" Marion Ryan (they meant Granada's Own), Los Troyadores (Latin American music), The Limbo Dancers (from the Caribbean), Henri Vadden ("from the continent"), and Alan Kemble ("thrills on wheels"). Right is a trade ad for Jack Beckitt, billed as a ventiloquist, "dummies with a difference." Music: Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Kenneth Carter. Critic 'GT' wrote this scathing review: "Carter is one of those directors who started the mobile sets idea... yet here he was producing a show which was static, dull and quite unentertaining... the only worthwhile feature was young American Tom O'Horgan (sic), who had witty material aided by some expert harp playing."
2 March 10th 1960. Starring Rose Marie, with Roger Ray (comedian), Sujata and Asoka (from Tibet, exotic dancers), Trio Siboney (from Spain, first time on UK tv), Smoothey and Layton (fast talking comedy), The Honeys (three sisters), Peter Pit (from Holland, "the baffling magician" with his Dancing Cane illusion), and Bobbie Lang (from Germany, "a breathtaking juggling act"). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Kenneth Carter.
3 March 31st 1960 starring Rose Marie with Slam Stewart, Dorothy Loudon ("scintillating cabaret star, for the first time in this country"), Fisher and Marks ("craziest of comedians"), Jeanne Darbois ("French Canadian impressionist), Bob Bain (from Britain, "humour in the modern manner"), Tung Ian (from China, high speed plate spinning), and Rudy Bolly (from France, "thrills on a slick wire"). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Kenneth Carter.
4 April 21st 1960 with Frankie Howerd, Chris Connor (from USA, modern jazz), Henri Vadden ("sensational juggler" also in #1), Bobbie Baxter ("first appearance on British tv, with a new brand of humour from New York"), Jo, Jac and Joni ("Britain's crazy pantomists"), Baby Laurence ("America's fastest tap dancer"), and The Delta Rhythm Boys. Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: David Warwick.
5 May 12th 1960 starring Diahann Carroll (from USA), Dave Barry (American humorist "return visit"- perhaps first not billed in TV Times?), The Smeed Trio (from Switzerland, yodelling with a difference), Authors and Swinson (from Canada, impressionists), Ted Lune, The Modern Jazz Dancers (from Italy), and Italo Medini (from France juggling). Tony Osborne and his Orchestra. Director: David Warwick.
6 June 2nd 1960 A compere in the form of Jackie Rae was a new feature, and there was a return visit of Dave Barry, now with his wife Ginny, with Rika Zari (from Israel, first time on UK tv), Morton Fraser's Harmonica Gang, Ray Hastings (from USA, "refreshing new comedian"), Marconick (from Holland, magician), Gordon and Bunny Jay (British comedy team), and Waltheso (from Germany, "sensational foot juggler"). Tony Osborne and his Orchestra. Director: Claude Whatham.
7 June 23rd 1960 with Jackie Rae, and Jonathan Winters (from USA, "return visit", when was the first?), The Deep River Boys, Fran Warren ("first appearance on British television), Jat Herod ("a different kind of humour"), Jon Pertwee, The De Marlos (American speciality dancers), and Noberti (from Switzerland, comedy acrobat). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Gordon Flemyng.
The show moved to Wednesdays at 8.30pm
8 July 13th 1960 compere Jimmy Young. With Jimmy Edmundson (from USA, "Professor Backwards"), Brascia and Tybee (dance team), Evalyn Tyner (pianist), Mauri Leighton, Alan Clive (impressionist), The Avons, and Tonny van Dommelen (from Holland, magician). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: David Main.
9 August 3rd 1960 compere Jon Pertwee and starring Stubby Kaye (from America), Rika Zarai ("return visit"), Leslie Uggams (from USA, singer), Rene and Lorentz (from Australia, dance team), Gary Morton (from USA, sophisticated comedian), and Le Joannys (from France, shadow act). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: David Main.
10 August 24th 1960 compere Jimmy Young. With Carol Burnett, Milt Kamen, Miriam Makeba (singer), Phil Foster ("Brooklyn's ambassador of mirth"), The Monn-keys (from Scandinavia, vocalists), Torrebruno (singing guitarist), and Gino Manelli (juggler). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Eric Fawcett.
The show continued in this slot for the 1960/1 season, I only have details of
15 December 7th 1960 compere Gary Marshal. With Jack Carter (from USA), The Barry Sisters, Hanna Ahroni (from Israel, singer), Murio and Sheila (from Paris, dance team), Roy Stuart ("a new brand of comedy"), Casey Anderson (singer), and Fred Kaps (magician). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Mark Stuart.
18 February 8th 1961 compere Billy Raymond. Emile Ford and The Checkmates, with Roger Ray ("return visit"), The De Castros (Latin American singing sisters), Alden and de John (comedy and song), Ming and Ling (Oriental hillbillies), Conrad Little Buck Buckner (tap dancer), and Cardini (master of cards, a return visit). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Mark Stuart.
20 March 22nd 1961 compere Billy Raymond. With Dennis Day (British tv debut), The Novelites ("crazy new musical act"), Ruth Olay ("return visit"), Vic Perry ("the world's cleverest pickpocket"), The Honeys, and Les Asthon (from France, acrobats). Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Mark Stuart.
23 May 24th 1961 this programme was titled The Mahalia Jackson Show in "her first appearance on British television." With Chris Barber and his Band, Leon Bibb (from America, folk singer), Julius Katchen, and Toots Thielemans (harmonica and guitar). Also Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Mark Stuart.
24 June 14th 1961 now at 8pm. Compere Peter Dulay. Starring The Peters Sisters, with Joyce and Lionel Blair ("in a sketch from their latest West End success"), Gary Morton (return visit), Vicky Autier (from France, singer), Lajos Puposy and Lili (puppetry), and The Bell-Tones. Peter Knight and His Orchestra. Director: Mark Stuart. (I think this was the final show)

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LIFE WITH THE LYONS
starring Bebe Daniel and Ben Lyon, with Barbara and Richard Lyon.
This ran for five series from 1955 until 1960. Starting and continuing on BBC radio, the first tv series was in 1955 on the BBC (pictured left), with a second beginning on May 31st 1956. For the final three series, production was in the hands of Associated Rediffusion (right picture). An early example of ITV snatching a BBC series. ITV Scripts were by Bebe Daniels, Bob Ross and Bob Block. However Ronnie Hanbury took over from Bob Ross about 4.8. The director was John Phillips except where noted.

Details of the ITV programmes:
3.1 The Green-Eyed Monster (Tues Sept 17th 1957, 8.30pm) with Molly Weir as Aggie, Frank Pettitt and guest star Jack Buchanan. Ben suspects their old friend Jack has amorous inclinations towards Bebe.
3.2 Family Secrets (Oct 1st 1957) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers.
3.3 I've Got You Covered (Oct 15th 1957)
3.4 Cool Cat on a Hot Roof (Oct 29th 1957) - with Noelle Middleton, Molly Weir, Pat Laurence, Jill Cobbold and Brian Alexis. When Richard decides that teenage girl friends are really far too juvenile for him, he falls overboard for a glamorous and sophisticated woman of the world. Note- Barbara Lyon sang for the first time on the programme, she gave us The Birds and The Bees.
3.5 Going Going Gone (Nov 12th 1957)
3.6 Where There's a Will (Nov 26th 1957, 8.30pm) - with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers as Florrie, Peter Stephens, Philip Ray and Maurice Hedley. The family are called to a solicitor's office to hear something t their advantage.
3.7 Unlucky Winner (Dec 10th 1957)
3.8 'Twas the Night Before (Dec 24th 1957, 9.45pm) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Norman Shelley, Leonard Monaghan, and Skeeter Lyon. All children between 9 and 90 believe in Santa Claus, and Bebe sets out to prove it to the family.
3.9 Danger-Woman at Work (Jan 7th 1958, 8.30pm) with Molly Weir, Carl Bernard, Ruth Gower, Douglas Bradley-Smith and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe sets off to the January sales. Ben decides to put his foot down once and for all.
3.10 Signs of the Times (Jan 21st 1958) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Hugh Morton, Richard Waring and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe decides to run the family in an entirely new way.
4.1 Who's Your Lady Friend? (Sept 19th 1958, 6.10pm) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Wilfred Brambell, Peter Hawkins and Skeeter Lyon. A case of mistaken identity results in the arrival of an unexpected and unusual female figure.
4.2 The Reluctant Genius (October 3rd 1958) with Reginald Beckwith, Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Brian Hayes and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe decides to become an artist with devastating effects on the family and the world of art.
4.3 Dangerous Curves Ahead (Oct 17th 1958) with Naomi Chance, Molly Weir, Bernard Horsfall, Guido Lorraine, Rufus Cruickshank and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe suspects Ben of mixing pleasure with business at the office.
4.4 Boxing Gloves (Oct 31st 1958) - with Harry Fowler, Molly Weir, Marian Collins, Michael Collins, Colin Douglas, Frank Pemberton and Skeeter Lyon. Ben thinks it is time Richard learned to box, and takes him along to a boxing academy. But when the big fight comes, the results are not quite what the family expected.
4.5 Family Secrets (Nov 14th 1958) - this was a repeat (see 3.2)
4.6 A Guest in the House (Nov 28th 1958)
4.7 Thirteen Shoplifting Days to Christmas (Dec 12th 1958)
4.8 The Sheriff of Fractured Wrist (Dec 26th 1958) with guest star Alfred Marks, and Molly Weir, Tony Day, Redvers Kyle, Frank Pemberton and Skeeter Lyon.
4.9 It's a Woman's World (Jan 9th 1959) with Joan Ingram, Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Rufus Cruickshank and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe decides that men have things too much their own way. So she forms a woman's party to take over the government, with surprising results.
4.10 King Richard the Last (Jan 23rd 1959)
The final series was shown weekly, and the family, as in real life, have moved from Marble Arch to Holland Park.
5.1 A Cowboy in Kensington (Friday Jan 1st 1960, 6.30pm) with David Cameron, Molly Weir, and Skeeter Lyon. The family are visited by Bebe's cowboy nephew from America. He decides to help Ben celebrate his birthday.
5.2 Home Sweet Homicide (Jan 8th 1960) with Wilfred Brambell, Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe suspects Ben of having homicidal tendencies and enlists Florrie to help her do battle with the 'monster.'
5.3 Stupid Cupid (Jan 15th 1960) with Molly Weir, Toke Townley, Lilian Grassom, Margaret Clews, Patricia WIlson, Beryl Cooke, Tessa Davies and Skeeter Lyon. Richard gets into troubles with his girl friends and accepts a little fatherly help and advice from Ben, with unexpected results.
5.4 Teddy Boys' Picnic (Fri Jan 22nd 1960) with, as teddy boys, Harry Fowler, Roy Hines and Graeme Blackwood. Also with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, and Skeeter Lyon. Barbara invites three juvenile delinquents to lunch. Director for this episode: Joan Kemp-Welch
5.5 For Love or Money (Jan 29th 1960) with Virgilio Texera, Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Ruth Gower, and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe uses a domestic agency to get a handyman, but ends in a marriage bureau.
5.6 Just What the Doctor Ordered (Feb 5th 1960) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Toke Townley, Bartlett Mullins, John Gale, Daphne Case, Mary Miller, Johnny McTurk and Skeeter Lyon. Ben is volunteered for a hospital staff concert, but the hospital mistake him for a volunteer for a new research experiment.
5.7 Top Secret (Feb 12th 1960) with Molly Weir, Richard Waring, Bruce Seton, Marianne Walla, Roy Hepworth, Geoffrey Palmer, Anthony Dawes and Skeeter Lyon. Bebe goes to the sales, getting mixed up with a gang of international spies.
5.8 Tease for Two (Feb 19th 1960) with Vera Day, Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Barry Took, Christopher Hodge and Skeeter Lyon. The family think Richard has fallen for a striptease dancer.
5.9 Your Presents Are Requested (Feb 26th 1960) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers,Toke Townley, Patricia Wilson and Skeeter Lyon. It's Bebe's birthday and she is hoping for a lovely surprise, but she doesn't get quite the one she expects.
5.10 A Chip Off the Old Blockhead (Mar 4th 1960) with Alan Gifford, Doris Rogers, Mary Miller and Skeeter Lyon. Ben's boss calls unexpectedly during his absence, and to save the situation, Richard disguises himself as his father.
5.11 The Nelson Touch (Mar 11th 1960) with Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Lilian Grassom, Patricia Wilson, Tessa Davies, Michael Logan and Skeeter Lyon. The family put on a play about the life of Nelson, with Ben as producer.
5.12 Sauce for the Goose (Mar 18th 1960) with Molly Weir, Carl Bernard, Tessa Davies and Skeeter Lyon. Ben decides, in defiance of the family, to give an open air dinner.
5.13 Be My Ghost (Mar 25th 1960) with guest star Leslie Randall, and Molly Weir, Doris Rogers, Geoffrey Palmer and Skeeter Lyon. The family go in for a spot of haunting, but things do not turn out quite as they planned.

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Under Fire (1956-1959)
"The North fires a salvo at London." Initially this was a joint venture by Granada and A-R, but once Granada had their own studio in the capital, the series became solely the property of Granada. "Aggressive and topical... no holds barred," an invited audience in the north tackles two experts 200 miles away in London.

The programme began in the Autumn 1956 schedules, the first I have noted:
Thursday October 25th 1956, 10.30-10.46pm. Directors: HK Lewenhak (Manchester) and John Rhodes (London)
Thursday December 6th 1956, 10.30-10.46pm. Chairman: Robin Day
Thursday Dec 27th 1956, 10.30-10.46pm. Chairman: Robin Day. Same directors
After a break from early in 1957, the series returned on April 6th 1957, director: Herbert Wise (Manchester).
Friday May 17th 1957, 10-10.15pm. Directors: Herbert Wise (Manchester) and John Rhodes (London)
Michael Scott became Manchester director in Autumn 1957.
Friday Dec 27th 1957, 10.30-10.46pm. Directors: Michael Scott (Manchester) and John Rhodes (London)
Monday January 10th 1958, 6-6.30pm
Friday Jan 17th 1958 at 9pm. Directors: Michael Scott (Manchester) and HK Lewenhak (London)
Success led the series to a peak time slot: starting Monday Feb 24th 1958 at 9pm. Last of series on May 5th 1958
It returned on May 26th 1958, then in the summer for a brief spell on Mondays 7-7.30pm, directors: Michael Scott and Wilfred Fielding. Photo shows Bill Grundy egging on the Manchester audience.
It was back periodically in autumn 1958 Mondays 10.15-10.45pm, directors: Claude Whatham and Wilfred Fielding, this last series finishing in Spring 1959.

Another Granada topical discussion programme was
Youth Wants To Know (1957-1959).
Young Northerners ask questions to well known personalities. "Two celebrities with opposing views face a barrage of questions from young people in Manchester."
Typical was one programme in early May 1957. The subject was Don't Put Your Daughter on the Stage. Gordon Sandison of Equity supported the motion, "new recruits into the profession should be told of all the difficulties." Opposing was actress Margaret Rawlings, "if a young woman has a great passion for the stage and if she has a genuine talent, then nothing should stop her." The audience vote at the end was For 14, Against 114. "They're all stage struck," smiled Sandison.

First programme was on Wed Feb 20th 1957: chairman Hubert Gregg. Director: HK Lewenhak. Leonard Sachs was a later chairman, on May 1st 1957. The last of this series was on Thursday June 20th 1957.
After a brief break the series returned next month on Thursdays 6.20-6.45pm. In September it moved to Thursday then Tuesdays at 6pm. Michael Scott continued as the director. Elaine Grand became the regular chairman from October 1957.
From Wed Feb 19th 1958 it was shown 6.40-7pm. Chairman Elaine Grand. Director: Michael Scott.
Some special programmes that were advertised:
Wed Mar 27th 1957 with Lady Pakenham and Barbara Kelly: on The Family v A Career.
Wed Apr 10th 1957 with Sir Richard Acland, Hugh Fraser and Prof Joseph Rotblat: on the H Bomb.
Wed Apr 17th 1957 with Angus Maude and Frank Cousins on The Future of the Middle Classes. Chairman: Hubert Gregg.
Wed May 29th 1957 with Sir Alan Herbert and Frank Sheed: on Marriage and Divorce. Director: Michael Scott.
Wed June 12th 1957 with Hector Jacks and Lord Dunsany: on Co-education. Chairman: Robert Barr. Director: Michael Scott.
Thurs Sept 13th 1957 with Lord Beveridge.
Tues Nov 26th 1957 with Sir William Williams and WJ Brown on State Support for Art?
Tues Dec 3rd 1957 with John Betjeman and Chris Brasher: Should sport be compulsory in schools?
Tues Jan 21st 1958 with Field Marshal Sir John Harding.
Tues Jan 28th 1958 with Billy Butlin.
Tues Feb 11th 1958 "This week the tables are turned, and the older generation have the chance to question for undergraduates."
Feb 26th 1958 with Peter Thorneycroft.
March 12th 1958 with Sir Ronald Howe: How to Fight Crime.
April 23rd 1958 with Sir Compton Mackenzie.
The title changed to We Want An Answer. However the emphasis was still on "young people with inquiring minds meet experts." Or, as Wiliam Blatchford wrote in 1959, "indiscriminate barracking of the sort that disgraces We Want An Answer." But there was now only one guest.
Photo shows a rehearsal in which Pat Johns stood in for the questioner.
May 14th 1958 with Rabbi Kopul Rosen.
May 21st 1958 with Sir Hugh Casson.
May 28th 1958 with Carl Foreman.
June 25th 1958 with Dame Edith Sitwell.
In the summer 1958 schedules the series moved to Fridays 7-7.30pm. Autumn 1958 saw it move to Thursdays 6.40-7pm. By October 1958 Claude Whatham replaced long serving Michael Scott as director.
Dec 4th 1958 with Peter Hall.
Dec 18th 1958 with Stephen Potter.
Director in March 1959 was Graham Evans. Claude Whatham returned in April.
Fri May 29th 1959 with Sir Ronald Gould. Director: Peter Cuff.
In the summer 1959 Malcolm Muggeridge took over the chair until the series ended that August. Director Eric Price.
Some others who appeared, dates not known: Sir Norman Birkett and Chris Brasher.
In 1960 a very similar style of programme was Who Goes Next?- "something different for those who want to know from those who know"

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Jango (1961, A-R)
A gentle half hour detective series that starred Robert Urquhart, a genial detective, and Moira Redmond as his attractive ex-wife Bee. Said Cyril Coke, producer, "why these two ever got divorced is something of a mystery. Jango is always on the point of asking her to remarry him, but somehow never gets round to it." Something no doubt due to his absent minded character. He almost bumbles by accident into crimes, but is exceptionally adept at solving them.
Crimes he solves include: a favourite aunt who has taken to shop lifting, a mysterious robbery on an underground train, the disappearance of a lorry load of cigarettes, and (ep 3) supermarket thefts in which the thieves always leave part of the cash behind!
Murder Stamp (photo) was a play in the Television Playhouse series, that introduced these characters, and it was deemed worth building this series round them. In the original play, Jango was a Professor of Criminology at Nairobi University, interested in unsolved crimes- yes, this was the original New Tricks!

0 Murder Stamp (Oct 13th 1960, 9.35-10.35) Who murdered Harry Jason? Everything points to Stanley Fletcher, but there is no real proof. After six years, it seems highly unlikely the truth will ever be discovered. With Robert Urquhart, Moira Redmond, Vincent Charles (PC Henson), Arthur White (Mr Perry), John Horsley (Det Insp Cochrane), Edward Evans (Det Sgt Oakes), Richard Mathews (Stanley Fletcher), Betty Bascomb (Mrs Fletcher), William Mervyn (Mr Whittaker), Blake Butler (Mr MacIntosh), Ray Marioni (Waiter), Julia Ratcliffe (April), Jennifer Browne (Shirley Summers), Gladys Dawson (Doris), Sheila Raynor (Mrs Jason), and Barry Wilsher (Chris Jason). Script: Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney. Director: Jonathan Alwyn.
1 A Little of What She Fancied (Jan 25th 1961, 8-8.30) A husband is suspected of killing his wife in their flat "by remote control." She was poisoned. Also with: Derek Francis (Supt Bullock), Manning Wilson (Insp Gold), Della Walker (Judy), Doris Yorke (Mrs Clamp), Beryl Roques (Waitress), Stanley van Beers (Forbes), and Barbara Ashcroft (Miss Marlin). Script: Albert Henry Webb. Director: Cyril Coke.
2 Mind the Doors, Please (Feb 1st 1961) Also with: James Cairncross (Graham), Harold Goodwin (Harris), David Graham (Conway), Gwen Nelson (Miss Blane), Richard Venron (Parkinson), Joanna Vogel (Miss Mills), and Howard Pays (Guard). Script: Peter Ling and Sheilah Ward. Director: Cyril Coke.
3 The Bumbling Burglar (Feb 8th 1961) Aso with: Peter Rosser (Police Inspector), Bernie Winters (Hymie), Roderick Cook (Thompson), Bernard Goldman (Bernie), Bee Duffell (Miss Dibbers), Arthur Brough (Taffe), Hannah Maria Miller (Hannah), Lane Meddick (Car dealer), and Richard Warner (Strada Humpernickel). Script: Mike Watts. Director: Cyril Coke.
4 The Itching Fingers of Lady Ffolkes (Feb 15th 1961)
5 Great Day for Jango (Mar 1st 1961)
6 Seven Swords of Haversham (Mar 8th 1961)
7 Treacle on Three Fingers (Mar 15th 1961) Also with Peter Sallis as Oscar Grant and Harold Goodwin as Three Fingered Jack. Rest of cast: Robert Raglan (Insp Clark), Lawrence James (Sgt Dodds), Pat-Ann Fairfoot (Receptionist), and Brian Wilde (Cemetery attendant). Script: Mike Watts. Director: Cyril Coke.
8 Champagne for Dee (Mar 22nd 1961- last story) Also with Alan Gifford as Herman. Rest of cast, many from Chez Les Dupre series: Henry de Bray (Proprietor), Peter Zander (Jean), Jean Driant (Gaston), Jacques Cey (Cashier), Andre Maranne (Anton), James Cairncross (Graham), Michael Jacques (Sergeant), Jean Serret (Superintendent), Bettine le Beau (Girl), Michael Barber (Gendarme), Elma Soiron (Madame Mary Gish), and Hugo de Vernier (George Gish). Script: Don Matthews. Director: Cyril Coke.

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Mess Mates
Series 1 began on June 28th 1960 and ran for 13 episodes. After nearly a year's break, it returned for a second series on September 12th 1961. The last story was on March 13th 1962. 40 programmes were made, though Brian Armstrong (Granada Television 2003, p169) incorrectly claimed there were 50 stories.
The regular stars were Archie Duncan as Captain Biskett and Sam Kydd as 'Croaker' Jones, married with seven kids. Also only in the first series, were regulars Dermot Kelly as Blarney Finnigan, "an old sweat," Fulton Mackay as Willie McGuinniss, "a happy Jonah," and Victor Maddern who played 'Tug' Nelson. Ronald Hines joined the second series as the new first mate 'Dapper' Drake. The other new cast members were Michael Balfour as 'Twinkle' Martin, and Frank Atkinson as 'Fry Up' Dodds (see picture).
Blisset is put in charge of the old wreck SS Guernsey, affectionately known as The Old Cow, for series 2 he was promoted to The Jersey Lily.
The blarney introducing the programme stated: "Captain Biskett, master of the battered old coaster SS Guernsey, has to watch not only his steam pressure, but his blood pressure, as he never knows what his motley crew will be up to next. Led by the mate, that arch-schemer Tug Nelson, they spend as much time trying to outwit their skipper as they do holding the ship together."

Details of many of the stories:
1 Tuesday June 28th 1960, 8pm. Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter. Biskett has to cope with the problem of the disappearing ship's bell.
2 The Stowaway (July 5th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
3 Croaker's Plague (July 12th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
4 The Head Shrinkers (July 19th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell.
5 Girl Adrift (July 26th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
6 It All Comes Out in the Wash (Aug 2nd 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
7 Blarney's Secret Past (Aug 9th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
8 Willie's Big Win (Aug 16th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
9 Croaker's Baby (Aug 23rd 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.
11 Night Train to Grimsby (Sept 6th 1960). Script: Talbot Rothwell. Director: Kenneth Carter.

Series 2:
1 The New Command (Tues Sept 12th 1961, 8.55pm): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Producer: Eric Fawcett. with Arnold Bell as Marine Superintendent, Sylvia Osborne as Lady in Rolls Royce, Anthony Smith as Henry the chauffeur, and William Sherwood as Mr Junkin. Biskett has a new command, almost a new crew, and certainly a new mate. His troubles are over, or are they?
2 A Mug's Game (Sept 19th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. With Ann Blake as Agatha Carmody, Jeffrey Lyttle as Boy, Keith Smith as Vicar, and CyrilRenison as Policeman. To cash in on the gambling craze, Dapper Drake persuades the crew that there is a big future in fruit machines. Unhappily the payoff is not exactly what they expected.
3 One Way Ticket (Sept 26th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. With Arthur Lovegrove as Charlie Burke, Martin White as Delivery man, and Michael Brennan as Police sergeant. Dapper Drake finds the tables are turned when he tries to smuggle an old pal aboard for a free trip to Ireland.
6 Ain't No Justice (Oct 17th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. With Ted Carson as First policeman, Maurice Durant as Second policeman, Frank Sieman as Henri, and Steve Merrick as Accordionist. Dapper Drake, offered the job of his dreams, finds it very difficult to keep the appointment.
8 Croaker's Last Hours (Oct 31st 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. With Vincent Harding as Doctor. Croaker has tummy ache and demands the full treatment. Captain Biskett decides to operate- with disastrous results.
9 Three Men On a Boat (Nov 7th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. With David Lawton as Sid 'Madame' Rose, and Sheila Robins as Sheila. When Twinkle tries to find himself a wife, he nearly succeeds in marrying off the whole crew. (The TV Times front cover showed a photo of the series this week.)
11 Three Men On a Boat (Nov 21st 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. (No Michael Balfour or Frank Atkinson) When Dapper Drake sights a ghost ship, Captain Biskett is keen to investigate. Croaker Jones is petrified, and this feeling is catching.
12 The More We Are Together (Nov 28th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. (No Michael Balfour or Frank Atkinson) The crew, faced with a forced indefinite leave and unable for private reasons to go home, volunteer to spend their time in an experimental isolation unit.
13 The Skipper's Mother (Dec 5th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. With Margaret Boyd as Mrs Biskett.
15 The Christmas Spirit (Dec 19th 1961): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. (No Michael Balfour or Frank Atkinson). Captain Biskett and the boys decide to take Christmas to the Croaker family, but when they arrive, laden with gifts and goodwill, everything is not plain sailing.
16 The Fur Thieves (Dec 26th 1961, 6.15pm): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. (No Michael Balfour or Frank Atkinson). The crew of the Jersey Lily finds themselves carrying a strange cargo.
17 Whose Baby Are You? (Jan 2nd 1962, 7.30pm): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. With Vivien Pickles as Woman, Stuart Saunders as Police sergeant, Clifford Earl as Man, and Jonathan Kydd as Baby's voice. An abandoned baby turns all members of the crew into soft-hearted nursemaids.
19 Blood from a Stone (Jan 16th 1962): Script: David Cumming and Derek Collyer. (No Michael Balfour or Frank Atkinson who had left the series). The boys are broke again. Biskett has money. How can the boys get it?
21 The Thing from Outa Loch Ness (Jan 30th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. The crew go on a monster hunt, and what a monstrosity it turns out to be.
22 No Future in It (Feb 6th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. Croaker, Dapper Dan and the skipper suddenly rtake a topst turvy view of the world and discover things aren't what they seem.
23 The Trouble with Women (Feb 13th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. All the nice girls lve a sailor- unless it's Croaker!
24 Bomb Happy (Feb 20th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. When the captain has a birthday, things are liable to go with a bang!
25 They Walk by Night (Feb 27th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. Does Captain Biskett walk in his sleep? Or is it two other people?
26 You're Never Alone (Mar 6th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. In an attempt to stop smoking, Croaker never gives up.
27 The Last Straw (Mar 13th 1962): Script: Talbot Rothwell and Lew Schwarz. Director: Graeme McDonald. Captain Biskett writes a letter and ends up in a sorry state.

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On Stage (A-R, 1957-8)
A late evening show, not networked.
"A weekly programme about the theatre and its personalities." TV Times never revealed any theatre workers who appeared. But the show was introduced by Robert MacDermot. First director: Peter Morley. Jonathan Alwyn also worked on the series. Producer: Norman Marshall.
The first programme on July 10th 1957 consisted of a discussion between Sir Donald Wolfit and Mrs Rose of the London CC's planning committee; Yvonne Arnaud talked about matinee audiences, Anthony Quayle on Titus, and AE Matthews also appeared. This first programme was hosted by Ludovic Kennedy. The programme on July 31st 1957 included scenes from the play Oh! Mein Papa!
Details of a few later programmes: Tuesday February 4th 1958, 11pm. It included scenes from London's Windmill Theatre, first time ever on tv. This was the 26th Anniversary of the Windmill's Non Stop Revues.
May 20th 1958 edition included Gerard Heinz.
Local repertory companies featured included those at Ipswich, Hornchurch, and Oxford.
The programme's appeal was widened in June when it was renamed Late London.
With music by the Steve Race Four. Director: Bimbi Harris.
"From the heart of London, viewers meet the people who are hitting the headlines in sport, music and the world of entertainment, together with a new slant on the happenings around town."
June 10th 1958 introduced by William Lucas.
June 24th 1958 introduced by Jacqueline Mackenzie.
On July 1st 1958 it was renamed Late Extra: "personalities who give late night London its glamour, vitality and spirit." Music by the Steve Race Four. Introduced by Jacqueline Mackenzie and Michael Westmore. Director: Bimbi Harris. Other producers of the series included Alan Morris, directors included Ian Fordyce. No presenter is often mentioned though Kenneth MacLeod and Michael Ingrams seem to have been the main interviewers.
One memorable impromptu occasion is pictured, with (left to right) Humphrey Lyttelton, Steve Race (piano), the Duke of Bedford, Peter Sellers, Norman Wisdom (clarinet), and Larry Adler.
I have a note that the guests on the August 5th 1958 edition were Edmund Purdom and Meier Tzelniker. On March 5th 1959 guest was Ronnie Carroll, Tony Estrada appeared on May 21st 1959, and Carmita on October 7th 1959. Others who definitely appeared in this series included: Jean Nepote (Interpol), Diana Dors, Eartha Kitt, Duke Ellington (his first British tv appearance), Ann Todd, Emlyn Williams, Erskine Caldwell, Schiaparelli, John Huston, Gary Marshal, Iris Ashley and Robert McDermott.
By December 1958 the Steve Race group had grown into The Steve Race Six. In mid January the Malcolm Lockyer Sextet took over. The Ronald Cass Sextet replaced them from June 11th 1959, though Steve Race also appeared with his Sextet on some programmes. From the start of 1959 the series was shown on Thursday nights at 11pm. Director: Peter Croft. Edmund Purdom became the presenter from about Feb 26th 1959. Derek Waring was the presenter starting May 1959. (Joan Phillips was the director May 21st only).
May 4th 1960 11.10pm: Fanny Craddock introduced, with music by Steve Race. Director: Tig Roe
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Show Talk (1956, ATV)
A ten minute programme shown for 17 weeks from May to September 1956 in a slot at 7.05pm on Saturdays on ATV London only.
Hosted by Clifford Davis, "TV's own columnist with his weekly report on West End entertainment." That's all that TV Times revealed, though to justify such a prime spot, there were some well known guests, unadvertised in advance, on this show, which was produced by Gil Coventry. In a trade ad at the end of the run in Sept 1956, Davis thanked his guests, which were, in alphabetical order:
Brendan Behan, Frances Bergen, George Black, Eve Boswell, Pamela Brown, Charlie Cairoli, Miss Canada, Jack Cardiff, Sir Lewis Casson, Joan Collins, Roland Culver, Diana Dors, Errol Flynn, Ben Gage, Wm Hammerstein, Roger Hancock, Radie Harris, Roberta Huby, Dennis Lotis, Rene Martz, Kenneth More, David Nixon, Val Parnell, Carol Raye, Raymond, Rossana Rory, Jacqueline Ryan, Peter Saunders, Dame Sybil Thorndike, Bruce Trent, Jack Waller, Naunton Wayne, Esther Williams, Mrs Kathleen Williams, and Norman Wisdom
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Face the Mike (1957, ATV)
Shown on Saturdays 4.15-4.45pm. Don Peters was the singer/host. Jerry Allen provided the backing music. This was an opportunity for those in show business, or singers of professional standard to perform their act for four minutes or anything up to ten minutes. Around 50 people were auditioned every fortnight in London or Birmingham by Peters and his producer Fred Wilby.
Unfortunately the acts were not announced in TV Times, so I can only give scant details from other sources of a few who appeared (do email if you can add details):
March 2nd 1957: Jack Escott
March 23rd 1957: Raimund Herincx and Jean Waugh of Twickenham
April 13th 1957: Bob Davenport and Ben Marshall (The Song Spinners)
May 4th 1957: Diana Day, Daphne Stebbing, and The Petersen Brothers
May 25th 1957: Sandra Alfred (Aldred) the first child artiste on the show, Ann Loraine
June 1st 1957: Peter Groves Trio featuring Billie Ponds and Maurice Merry
The show moved to Sundays on June 16th, this programme included Phyllis Craig
June 30th 1957: Mimi Pearse a leading lady of the Folie de Londres
July 7th 1957: Diana Dove (tv debut), and also Dorothy Wayne of The Evening Stars Marine Pavilion Folkestone, and Sylvia Norman
July 21st 1957: Barry Johns from Southampton (probable date)
July 28th 1957: Jean Scott the singing commere at the Cabaret Club London W1
Aug 18th 1957: Maurice Allen and his £1,000 glass piano
Aug 25th 1957: Lorna Dean
Sept 8th 1957: Peter Regan

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The Most Likely Girl (ATV)

A short lived vehicle, originally announced as a series of six, for Beryl Reid, who played Arethusa Wilderspin, The Girl Most Likely To Succeed in Society, To Marry a Lord etc. Also appearing: Noel Gordon as Eve Edwards, a wisecracking sophisticate who attempts to transform Arethusa into that Girl. One other regular: Barbara Couper as Madge Dresswell.
Script: Robert Bishop. Director: Cecil Petty.
Episode 1: Arethusa Arrives (Monday September 23rd 1957, 8.30pm) Also with Victim of the Week Michael Ward as Vere Farthingale.
2 Arethusa Learns to Live Graciously (Oct 7th 1957)
3 Oct 21st 1957 also with Victim of the Week: Graham Payn as Senor Don Pepe D'Ortega.
4 Nov 4th 1957 (final programme)

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Godfrey Winn in
As Others See Us (A-R)
Screened Thursdays, live from Studio 2, fortnightly, 7.30-8pm, starting on October 6th 1955. The series ran until June 1956.
Each week Godfrey chose three letters he had received relating to human problems, "and then presents these problems in dramatic form. He gives advice and suggests a solution. Many well known personalities appear in the cast."
Though these were not named in TV Times, a background feature on the series named a few of those who had acted in a story. In the very first programme were Adrianne Allen, Jimmy Hanley, and Rosamund John. Later stories included these definitely: Adrienne Corri, Hazel Court, Megs Jenkins, Emrys Jones, Avice Landone, Lana Morris, and Hugh Williams (see photo). Appearing in two stories were Mary Merrall and Jack Watling. Directors were firstly Cliff Owen, then Eric J Croall.
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Afternoon Out
Here are details of some of the weekday afternoon outside broadcasts screened on ITV.
In this era of wall-to-wall tv, it's hard to appreciate the value of these periodic afternoon shows, which were shown as a supplement to the daily schedule. Broadcasting hours were restricted by law, only religious programmes, schools broadcasts and, strangely, Welsh langauge programmes were exempt from this post war rationing: only 50 hours of ordinary programmes were permitted per week. But outside broadcasts were subject to separate government legislation- 200 hours per year were allowed, in the 1960s this was increased to 440 hours pa. Thus an average of over eight hours weekly o/bs were available, around half of which went on Saturday afternoon transmissions. This meant that many weekday afternoons offered viewers only a test card to watch, it was all very hit and miss when other outside broadcasts were scheduled, and sometimes some ITV regions offered only blank screens, while other stations were bathing in some local extravaganza.
(Not included here are the many Horse Racing outside broadcasts, the first of which was on Nov 11th 1955 from Lingfield, I've also excluded Bank Holidays, and Cricket which also featured periodically in the summer schedules.)

One early series that used OB equipment was Kingsway Corner, which picked on passers-by as they passed the A-R studios.
Apart from the opening evening's ceremony, the earliest example I have noted was

5th National Fabric Fair (Tues Oct 4th 1955, 12.10-12.30pm) with Margot Lovell at the Royal Albert Hall.
Afternoon Out (Wednesday Jan 11th 1956, 4.15-4.45pm) saw Margot Lovell touring the silver vaults under Chancery Lane. Director: Bill Perry. (A-R)
Afternoon Out (Wednesday Feb 8th 1956, 4.15-4.35pm) behind the scenes at the Victoria and Albert Museum. Director: Alan Morris.
Afternoon Out (Wednesday Feb 22nd 1956, 4-4.20pm) with Margot Lovell at the Royal Albert Hall for a household textiles exhibition. Director: Alan Morris.
Afternoon Out (Wednesday Apr 11th 1956, 4.25-4.45pm) with Elaine Grand watching a display by RAF Police Dogs. Director: Alan Morris.
After a break in the spring, perhaps it was deemed that viewers would be out of doors, the programmes returned from June to September 1956 under the umbrella Afternoon Out:
The Story of Punch and Judy (Monday June 4th 1956 3.00-4pm) - no further details Duke of Yorks' Headquarters (Mon June 4th 4-4.30)- a display by a team of army gymnasts. Director: Michael Harrison.
Design for Industry (Tues June 5th 1956, 3-4pm)- the newly opened School of Textile Design in Manchester (Granada).
Skyscraper on the South Bank (Tues June 5th 1956 4-4.30)- Sir Howard Robertson at the South Bank, where "he is plannng to alter London's skyline." Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
The Cheshire County Show (Wed June 6th 1956, 3-4.30)- Granada's Outside Broadcasts were called The Travelling Eye, this series "Views the North." The pale blue vans were used extensively in 1956 while the studios were only partially completed. The 1956 FA Cup victory parade by the Manchester City team was one of the first transmissions by this unit.
A Visit to Kew Gardens (Thurs June 7th, 3-3.45)- Guide: Elaine Grand at the Royal Botanical Gardens. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
Tea at the Embassy (Thur June 7th 1956, 3.45-4.30)- a series, this edition from the Philippine Embassy, by gracious permission of his Excellency the Ambassador of the Philippines and Madame Guerrero. Among the guests: folk singer Catalina Zandueta. Arranged by Remy Hefter and Sam Cotton. Commentary: Kenneth Macleod. Director Alan Morris.
The Travelling Eye (Fri June 8h 1956, 3-3.45)- visit to one of Britain's leading dog training centres to report on Dogs on Guard (Granada).
The Travelling Eye (Fri June 8h 1956, 4.15-5pm)- from the offices of the Manchester Guardian (Granada).
No 1 London (Mon June 18th 1956, 3-3.45)- Nick Barker and Muriel Young at the Wellington Museum on the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Way to the South (Mon June 18th 1856, 4.15-5pm)- Peter Cockburn and Arthur Adair at Waterloo railway station. Producer: Peter Lloyd (ATV).
Soccer Coaching (Tues June 19th 1956, 3-3.30 and 4.30 to 5.00)- from Lilleshall with Walter Winterbottom.
Inside out (Tues June 19th 1956 3.30-4.30)- Look at ATV's Outside Broadcast Unit, commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Stephen Wade.
Blackpool Dog Show (Wed June 20th 1956 3-4.30)- Granada's Travelling Eye at The Oval Stanley Park
Children's Hospital (Thurs June 21st 1956 3.00-3.45)- Salford Children's Infirmary.
Tea at the Embassy (Thur June 21st 1956, 3.45-4.30)- from the Finnish Embassy, by gracious permission of his Excellency the Ambassador of Finland and Madame Tuomioja. Subjects: paintings, special foods, and the Sauna. Arranged by Remy Hefter and Sam Cotton. Commentary: Kenneth Macleod. Director Alan Morris.
Handle with Care (Fri June 22nd 1956, 3-3.45 and 4.15-5pm)- on the handling of high explosives from an army battle training ground. Director: Arthur Lane.
Wimbledon 1956- the first year ITV challenged BBC coverage of the Lawn Tennis championships. Commentators included Fred Perry and Maureen Connolly.
Kent County Agricultural Show(Tuesday July 10th 1956, 4-4.30pm)- visit to Maidstone. Director: Bill Perry (A-R)
Seaside (Tuesday July 10th 1956, 4.30-5.00)- Anne Valery and Nick Barker take viewers to Clacton on Sea. Director: Michael Harrison
Kent County Agricultural Show Wednesday July 11th 1956, 3-3.45 and 4.15-5.00)- second visit with John Sharp, Stephen Black and Bill Allenby. Director: Bill Perry
Stable Companions (Thursday July 12th 1956, 3-3.45)- Bill Allenby and John Wynn Jones visit the stables of Arthur Thomas. Producer: Peter Lloyd (ATV)
The Fancy (Thursday July 12th 1956, 3.45-4.30pm)- pigeon racing with a visit to a pigeon loft in Cheshire (probably Granada production)
Industry of the Future (Monday July 16th 1956, 3-3.45, 4.15-5.00)- visit to the exhibition of the Northern Division of the Institute of Electronic Engineers in Manchester (Granada)
Dogs to the Rescue (Tuesday July 17th 1956, 3-3.45)- "remote cameras shows dogs, trained to save life, going through their paces"
Today's Children (Tuesday July 17th 1956, 4.15-5.00)- "remote cameras visit a new Secondary Modern School, the type of school thousands of children will attend for the first time next term." (no more information)
King's Cross Station (Wednesday July 18th 1956, 3-3.45)- "behind the scenes" in the engine sheds (A-R)
Baseball (Wednesday July 18th 1956, 4.15-5.00)- "for the first time," part of a league game at West Drayton between two American Service teams. Introduced by Nick Barker, commentary by Sgt Tom Craynak, director: Barry Wilson (A-R)
Liverpool Show (Thursday July 19th 1956, also for the rest of the week)- director Dave Warwick (Granada)
Royal Lancashire Show (Monday July 30th 1956, 4.15-5.00)- Sir Stanley Bell outlines the history of the show at Stanley Park. (Tuesday July 31st 1956) 3-3.45: Grand Parade. 4.15-5.00: Show Jumping (Granada)
Tea at the Embassy (Tues Aug 7th 1956, 3.45-4.30)- from the Indonesian Embassy, by gracious permission of his Excellency the Ambassador of Indonesia and Madame Supomo. Arranged by Howard S Cotton. Diplomatic liaison by Remy Hefter. Commentary: Mary Hill and Kenneth Macleod. Director Alan Morris.
Farnborough Air Show (Monday Sept 3rd 1956, 3-4.30 and Tues Sept 4th 1956 3.30-5pm)- 17th Annual Display. Commentators Colin Hodgkinson, Nick Barker, and Robert Everett. Director: Bill Perry. (A-R)
Gardening Without Tears (Wed Sept 5th 1956 3.00-3.45)- an afternoon at a market garden in Surrey with Nick Barker. Director: Graham Watts.(A-R)
Sand Yacht Racing (Thurs Sept 6th 1956 3.00-3.45)- from Fylde International Sand Yacht Club (Granada).
The Mighty Arsenal (Thurs Sept 6th 1956 4.15-5pm)- At Highbury, meet soccer personalities as Tom Whittaker, Bob Wall and Jack Crayston. Commentators: Bernard Joy and John Wynn Jones. Director: Peter Lloyd (ATV).
Chessington Zoo (Fri Sept 7th 1956, 3.00-3.45 and 4.15 to 5pm)- Producer: Anthony Flanagan.
The Keston Foreign Bird Farm (Monday September 10th 1956, 3.00-4.00) hosts J Boosey, Alec Brooksbank, and WD Cumming, commentator: Peter Lloyd. Producer: RS Compton (ATV)
The Army MT School Bordon (Monday September 10th 1956, 4-5pm) Demonstration of Hill Climbing over the Laundry Hill circuit. Commentator: Nick Barker. Director: Bill Perry. (Tuesday September 11th 1956, 3.45-5pm): Trick riding by AMTS including the Tunnel of Flame, Jumoing the Human Ramp, and Bantum the Mechanical Clown (A-R).
Waterfront (Tuesday September 11th 1956, 3.00-3.45) Travelling Eye goes to Liverpool to watch ships being unloaded (Granada)
International Sheep Dog Trials (Thursday September 13th, 3.00-4.30pm) from Castle Park Ruthin (Granada)
Hop Festival (Friday September 14th 1956, 3.00-3.45, 4.15-5pm) The story of hops with Nick Barker and Kent Walton from Beltring. Director: Alan Morris (A-R)
Town Withour Peer (Wed Sept 26th 1956, 4-5pm)- In the Travelling Eye series, a visit to Wigan (Granada).
All That Glisters... (Thurs Sept 27th 1956 4.00-5pm)- a Mayfair fashion show. Ben Lyon discusses the models with Mary Hill. Director: Alan Morris. (A-R)
Club for Boys (Wed Oct 17th 1956 4.00-5.00)- In the Travelling Eye series, a visit to a Manchester boys' club (Granada).
The Dairy Show (Wednesday October 24th 1956, 4-5pm) The second day of the 70th British Dairy Show. Director: Alan Morris (A-R)
Tea at the Embassy (Mon Nov 19th 1956, 4.00-5pm)- from the Australian Embassy. With Acting High Commissioner Sir Edwin McCarthy. Arranged by Howard S Cotton. Diplomatic liaison by Remy Hefter. Commentary: Mary Hill and Kenneth Macleod. Director Alan Morris.
Behind the Picture (Wed Nov 21st 4-5pm)- The Travelling Eye visits the Walker Art Gallery Liverpool. Director: William Gaskill (Granada).
Smithfield Show (Wed Dec 5th 1956 4-5pm)- at Earls Court. Commentators: Muriel Young, Nick Barker and Philip Buckingham. Director: Alan Morris. (A-R)
Tea at the Embassy (Mon Dec 10th 1956, 4.00-5pm)- from the Legation of the Republic of Korea. With High Excellency the Korean Minister and Mrs Louisa Pak Lee. Arranged by Howard S Cotton. Diplomatic liaison by Remy Hefter. Commentary: Mary Hill and Kenneth Macleod. Director Alan Morris.
The Moor Mystery (Wed Dec 12th 1956 4-5pm)- The Travelling Eye investigates a 53 year old double murder on the Pennine Moors. The 1903 murderer of a young man and a gamekeeper on Marsden Moor was never caught. Director: William Gaskill (Granada).
Frolics on Ice (Boxing Day 1956, 4-5pm)- Children's Christmas Party from Streatham Ice Rink. Host: Kent Walton with the British Open Professional Pair Champions 1955, also Lorna Eileen (Rock n roll on stilts), Patricia Pauley, Susan Gregory, Patricia Edwards, Susan Lee, the Skating Horse, and Andrew Fenner (Hammond Organ). Director: Bill Perry. (A-R)
The Enthronement of the Archbishop of Westminster (Monday February 11th 1957)- this marathon 2 hour 50 minute programme was directed by Bill Allenby.

Outside Broadcasts, apart from Horse Racing, and weekend broadcasts, were largely absent from the schedules until:
Wimbledon 1957 (from Mon June 24th 1957, 1.40pm, for two weeks) Commentators Fred Perry, Dennis Coombe, Emlyn Jones, Peter Lloyd, and Kent Walton. Directors: Alan Morris and Stephen Wade.
Royal Lancashire Show (Wed July 31st 1957, 4-5pm)- The Travelling Eye at the Royal Lancashire Agricultural Show at Blackpool. Director: John Nicholl. This was a return visit from 1956.
Hulton Boys' and Girls' Exhibition (Tues Aug 6th 1957)- Muriel Young and Kent Walton bring highlights of the Olympia show. Director: Alan Morris. (A-R)
World Scout Jubilee Jamboree (Tues Aug 6th 1957 3.00- 3.45)- The Wolf Cub Display. Commentators: Lord Baden-Powell and Ken Johnstone. (Wed Aug 7th 4.30-5pm)- Arrowe Park Sub-Camp to see the Cuban Contingent. Host: Ralph Reader. Junior Hosts: Neville Evans, Ian Grant and Michael Phillips. (Thur Aug 8th, 5-5.30pm)- Godollo Sub-Camp, hosts as Wednesday. (Fri Aug 9th, 4.30-5pm)- Copenhagen Sub-Camp, hosts as Wednesday. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV). A final visit was on Sat Aug 10th, 3-4.30pm, for the National Sea Scouts display, commentator: Ken Johnstone. The About Religion programme on August 11th included a discussion with the Chief Scout.
Afternoon Out: The 18th Annual Display at Farnborough (Tues Sept 3rd 1957 2.30-5pm).Commentators: Jeffrey Quill, Robert Everett and Neville Barker. Director: Bill Perry. (A-R)
Her Majesty The Queen opens the 46th Annual Conference of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (Thurs Sept 12th 1957, 11.15am- 12 noon)- From Westminster Hall. Scene described by Kenenth MacLeod. TV Presentation by Aubrey Singer and Tom Millett (by arrangement with BBC).
International Dancing Championships (Thursday Oct 31st 1957, 4-4.30pm)- from the Royal Albert Hall. Introduced by Kenneth Macleod. Commentator: Elsa Wells. Director: Bill Perry A TV Times letter claimed, "I have just been watching the afternoon session of the Dancing Champinships and I noticed during the juvenile semi-final that the iridiscent sequins on the girls' dresses showed quite distinctly in colour." (A-R).
Winter at the Wheel (Friday Nov 1st 1957, 3.30-4.30pm)- demonstration from Chelmsford on safe driving in winter. Introduced by Kent Walton. Director: Alan Morris (A-R).
University of London (Wednesday December 4th 1957, 3.15-3.45)- Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother confers an honourary degree of Doctor of Music on HRH Princess Margaret. Commentator: Neville Barker. TV Presentation by Antony Craxton (by arrangement with BBC).
Royal Windsor Horse Show (Thursday May 15th 1958, 3.11-5pm, also May 16th 2.40-3.23 and 4.15 to 5pm)- Commentator: Viscount Allenby. Director: Bill Allenby/Stephen Wade. (ATV)
Air Display (Mon May 26th 1958, 2pm)- from Rolls Royce Airfield Hucknall. Commentators: Peter Lloyd and Emlyn Jones. Director: Anthony Flanagan (ATV).
Wimbledon 1958 (from Mon June 23rd 1958, 1.45pm-5pm, then 5.30-6.45pm, for two weeks) Commentators Fred Perry, Dennis Coombe, Emlyn Jones, and Kent Walton. Directors: Alan Morris and Stephen Wade.
The Shrewsbury Musical and Floral Fete (Wednesday Aug 20th 1958, 4-5pm)- from The Quarry, with music by The Life and Welsh Guards. Commentators: Noele Gordon and Bill Allenby. Director: Kit Plant.
State Opening of Parliament (Tues Oct 28th 1958, 10.20-11.15am approx)- ITV Commentary: Robin Day (produced by BBC).
Having a Wonderful Time (Boxing Day 1958, 4.15- 5pm)- The Soho Association's annual children's party, with David Kossof, the Vipers Skiffle Group, Jackie Moran, Don Lang, Bridie Corsie, with Johnnie Haynes and Margaret Edwards. Introduced by Gordon Bradley. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
Freedom of the City of Portsmouth (Thursday May 14th 1959, 10-10.45am)- The Duke of Edinburgh receives the freedom of the city. Commentator: Neville Barker (Southern)
The Royal Agricultural Show (Wed July 8th 1959 and Thurs July 9th, 4.15- 5.05pm)- from Oxford. Commentators: Tom Glazer and David Calcutt. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
Election Results (Friday October 9th 1959). ITV's first election coverage had begun the previous evening, scheduled to end at 2.30am Friday morning. Then bright and early at 6.55am Huw Thomas had the elction results. A break from 9am but at 11am Ian Trethowan and Brian Connell gave the results, with George Ffitch, Reginald Bosanquet and John Ardagh at Party HQs. Local results were transmitted from London, director: Cyril Butcher. ITN coordinated production with directors John Rhodes and Graham Watts. The programme was due to end when the results were known.
Commonwealth Journey (Monday Dec 8th 1959, 3.30pm)- a film of the Duke of Edinburgh's tour of the Commonwealth
Note: Though there had been few weekday afternoon outside broadcasts, apart from horse racing, during 1959, the title 'Afternoon Out' had been applied to the range of Saturday afternoon events until just before Christmas, when it was altered to 'Let's Go.'
Point to Point (Wednesday April 6th 1960, 3.15pm) from Wroughton in Wiltshire. Commentators: Robin Thursfield, Noel Phillips-Browne and Peter Moor. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
Greyhound Racing (Friday April 8th 1960 3.45-4.45pm)- from Park Royal Middlesex. Commentator: Tony Cooke. Interviewer: John Rickman. Results: Peter Moor. Director: Graham Turner. (A-R)
Ponies of Britain (Wednesday April 13th 1960 3.45-4.45pm)- the Stallion Show from Royal Ascot. Commentators Mrs IM Yeomans and Noel Phillips-Browne.Director: Grahame Turner. (A-R)
Afternoon Liturgy (Good Friday April 15th 1960 3.40pm)- from Westminster Cathedral. Introduced by Rev Michael Hollings. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
The Royal Wedding (Friday May 6th 1960, 9.50am-1pm) Commentators: Brian Connell and Rev Simon Phipps (inside the abbey), Kenneth MacLeod and Bettie Spurling (outside the abbey), Michael Ingrams and Nancy Wise (outside Buckingham Palace), Peter Lloyd (at Clarence House), Huw Thomas and Neville Barker (Horse Guards Parade), Sir James Scott Douglas and Dick Norton (Whitehall).
Royal Windsor Horse Show (Thursday May 12th 1960 and Friday May 13th 1960, 3.50-4.45pm)- Commentator Bill Allenby. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV). There was a final visit on the Saturday afternoon.
Farm in the North (Wed May 18th 1960, 3.50pm)- Clifton Farm near Morpeth. Introduced by Raymond Brooks-Ward, assisted by James Lloyd. Director: Raymond Joss (Tyne Tees TV).
Greyhound Racing (Thurs July 21st 1960, 3.15-4.15pm)- from Hackney Wick Stadium. Commentator: Tony Cooke, interviews by John Rickman, results from Peter Moor. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Show Jumping (Tuesday Aug 2nd 1960, 4-5pm)- from the Northampton Show at Abington Park. Commentator: Viscount Allenby. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV)- a second visit, previously in 1959.
The Billingshurst Horse Show (Wed Aug 24th 1960, 3.45-4.45pm)- from The Manor House. Commentators: Muriel Young and John Cotterill. Director: Tig Roe (A-R).
Polo (Thur Aug 25th 1960, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Ham Polo Club. Commentators: Robin Addie and Emlyn Jones. Director: Grahame Turner (A-R).
Farnborough Air Display (Tues Sept 6th 1960, 2.30-4.45pm)- Commentators: Jeffrey Quill and Colin Hodgkinson. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Show Jumping (Wed Sept 7th 1960, 4.00-4.45pm)- from the Romsey Show in Broadlands Park. Commentator: Noel Phillips-Browne. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Junior Lawn Tennis Championships (Thurs Sept 8th 1960, 2.00-4.45pm and Fri Sept 9th 2.00-4.15pm)- from Wimbledon. Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Director: Grahame Turner (8th)/ Graham Watts (9th) (A-R).
Greyhound Racing (Thurs Oct 13th 1960, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Hackney Stadium. Commentator: Tony Cooke. Interviewer: Peter Lloyd. Betting and Results: Peter Moor. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Five-A-Side Football (Fri Nov 11th 1960, 3.45-4.45pm)- The national contest organised by The People. Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Director: Grahame Turner (A-R)
Marionette Rehearsal (Mon Dec 12th 1960, 4.15-4.45pm)- from Little Angel Theatre Islington where John Wright's Marionettes are rehearsing for their Christmas tour. Introduced by Nancy Wise. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Schoolboy Boxing (Tues Dec 13th 1960, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Albany School Enfield. Commentator: Fred Verlander. Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
Christmas Rush (Fri Dec 16th 1960, 4.20-4.45pm)- Peter Lloyd visits the South Eastern Parcel Office London Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
Forgeries And Deceptive Copies (Mon Jan 30th 1961, 4.15-4.45pm)- OB cameras at the British Museum in the Department of Prints and Drawings. Introduced by Celia Irving. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Greyhound Racing (Mon Feb 6th 1961, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Park Royal. Commentator: Tony Cooke. Interviewer: Peter Lloyd. Betting and Results: Peter Moor. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
The Design Centre (Tues Feb 7th 1961, 3.45-4.15pm)- in Haymarket. With Dick Norton. Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
Basketball (Wed Feb 8th 1961, 4.00-4.45pm)- from Third USAF Ruislip. London Rockets v Greenham Common Pirates. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
Canal Crusing (Tues Mar 21st 1961, 4.15-4.45pm)- from Little Venice Paddington to see the British Waterways Exhibition. Commentators: Kent Walton and Maureen Davies. Director: David Gardner (A-R).
Crookham One-Day Event (Wed Mar 22nd 1961, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Twesledown Racecourse in Hampshire to watch the show jumping. Commentator: Viscount Allenby. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Greyhound Racing (Thurs Mar 23rd 1961, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Stamford Bridge. Commentator: Tony Cooke. Interviewer: Peter Lloyd. Results: Peter Moor. Director: David Gardner (A-R).
Croome Hunt Point-to-Point (Tuesday Apr 4th 1961, 2.45-4.30pm)- at Ryalls Court Upton-on-Severn. Commentators: Raymond Brooks-Ward and Peter Lloyd. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV).
The Queen in the North (Wednesday May 24th 1961, 11.50am-12.40pm)- The Travelling Eye watches the Queen opening Manchester's new courts. Commentator: Bill Grundy. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
The Royal Wedding (Thursday June 8th 1961, 1.10-3.40pm)- from York Minster, the marriage of the Duke of Kent to Katharine Worsley. Commentators were the cream that ITV could produce: Ian Trethowan, Brian Connell, Bill Grundy, Tom Coye, Reginald Bosanquet, Keith Fordyce, Jenny Nasmyth, Peter Lloyd, and Gerry Loftus. Drectors: Andy Gullen, Raymond Joss, Anthony Flanagan, David Warwick, Graham Watts, and Max Morgan-Witts. From which it can be deduced that the ITV companies cooperated on this.
Wimbledon 1961 (two weeks from Monday June 26th 1961)- the usual ITV coverage, Granada showed very little. Commentators; Fred Perry, Emlyn Jones, Kent Walton and Jaroslav Drobny. Directors: Graham Watts, Grahame Turner, and J Murray Ashford.
The Enthronement (Tuesday June 27th 1961, 1.45-3.45pm)- of the new Archbishop of Canterbury. Commentator: Brian Connell. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern TV).
Oh! Oh! (Tues Oct 17th 1961, 4.15-4.45pm)- OB cameras visit the OO model railway layout "at a famous London store.". Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Pembroke Dutson (ATV).
Toys in the Design Centre (Wed Oct 18th 1961, 4.15-4.45pm)- from the Design Centre. With John West and Carola Mason. Director: John P Hamilton (A-R).
Tenpin Bowling (Thur Oct 19th 1961, 4.10-4.45pm)- from Leytonstone Bowl. South Ruislip (USA Ladies) v Dagenham (GB Ladies). Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Director: John P Hamilton (A-R)
A Fibre in Fashion (Fri Oct 20th 1961, 4.00-4.45pm)- A fashion show from Celanese House. Commentator: Mary Hill. Director: Bill Allenby (ATV).
National Five-A-Side Football (Tues Oct 31st 1961, 4.10-4.45pm)- from Municpal Baths Epsom. District semi finals and finals, organised by The People. Commentator: Kent Walton. Director: Grahame Turner (A-R).
Rugby Football (Wed Nov 1st 1961, 3.45-4.15pm)- from Royal Artilllery Barracks Woolwich. Second half of Royal Artillery v Royal Army Service Corps. Commentator: Gerwyn Williams. Director: Grahame Turner (A-R).
Royal Horse Guards (Thur Nov 2nd 1961, 3.45-4.20pm)- from Knightsbridge Barrakcs. Commentator: Lt-Col JA Cooke. Director: John P Hamilton (A-R).
Schoolboys Boxing (Fri Nov 3rd 1961, 4.10-4. 45pm)- from Barnfield Secondary Modern School, Burnt Oak. Commentator: Fred Verlander. Director: John P Hamilton (A-R).
Rugby (Wed Nov 8th 1961, 3.45-4.15pm)- from Old Deer Park Richmond. Second half of Surrey v Eastern Counties. Commentator: Gerwyn Williams. Director: Anthony Flanagan (ATV).
Royal Journey (Thur Nov 9th 1961, 4.10-4.45pm)- Outside broadcast from the Museum of British Transport in Clapham. Guide: John Scholes, with Celia Irving. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
Jewellery (Fri Nov 10th 1961, 4.00-4.45pm)- a visit to Goldsmiths' Hall. Commentator: Keith Fordyce. Director: Pembroke Duttson (ATV).
Association Football (Wed Apr 11th 1962, 3-4.45pm)- from Aldershot. Army Cup Final. Commentators: Peter Lloyd and Joe Jagger. Director: John P Hamilton (A-R).
Greyhound Racing (Thur Apr 12th 1962, 3.45-4.45pm)- from Stamford Bridge. Commentator: Tony Cooke. Interviewer: John Rickman. Results: Peter Moor. Director: Graham Watts (A-R).
London Schools Amateur Boxing Association (Fri Apr 13th 1962, 3.45-4.45pm)- from St Peters Primary School Woolwich. London trials for the London v Dublin tournament. Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
Wimbledon 1962 (June 1962) - the usual coverage
Tennis (Wednesday July 25th 1962, 3.15-4.45pm, and Thurs 26th, and Fri 27th July)- Inter County Week from Devonshire Park Eastbourne. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Mary Halford. Directors: J Murray Ashford and Grahame Turner (A-R by arrangement with Southern).
The Building Centre (Fri Aug 3rd 1962, 3.45-4.45pm)- John West shows round "one of Britain's best known young-marrieds." Director: Robert Fleming (A-R).
Bowls (Monday Aug 20th 1962, 3.45-4.45)- at Watney's Bowling Green Mortlake, for the Amateur National Championships. Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Director: J Murray Ashford. (A-R)
Trades Union Congress (Monday Sept 3rd 1962, 10.55am-12.30pm, and 2.15-5pm. Also Tuesday to Thursday that week commencing 9.25am)- from Winter Gardens Blackpool. The first ever broadcast of this congress. Commentators: Bill Grundy and Harold Perkin. Director: Mike Wooller (Granada).
Liberal Party Assembly (Wed Sept 19th 2-5pm, with interruptions for Schools broadcast)- from Pier Pavilion Llandudno. Travelling Eye at the party conferences for the first time. Commentators: Bill Grundy and Ian Trethowan. Director: Mike Wooller (Granada). (Note: the precise coverage was announced only the day previously. It continued until the closing speech on Saturday Sept 22nd, 10.20am. There was similar coverage of the Labour and Conservative Conferences, the latter also having to compete with Racing from York. Similar schedules also in 1963 of the party conferences.)
Institute of Directors (Wed Oct 31st 1962 10am-1pm, with interruption for Schools)- annual conference from Royal Albert Hall. Introduced by Brian Connell. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
The Royal Smithfield Show (Tues Dec 4th 1962 4.00-4.45pm)- from Earl's Court. Commentators: Peter Lloyd and Raymong Brooks-Ward. Director: Grahame Turner. (A-R)
A New Look at Old Ships (Wednesday Feb 27th 1963, 3.45-4.20pm)- from the Science Museum to see the new Sailing Ship Gallery with John McCarthy. Director: J Murray Ashford (A-R).
International Football (Wednesday May 8th 1963, 3.45-4.45pm)- England v Brazil from Wembley. FA Centenary match, second half coverage. Commentator: Gerry Loftus. Director: Graham Turner.
Wimbledon 1963 (fortnight commencing Monday June 24th 1963, 1.40-5pm) the usual coverage, commentators: Fred Perry, Emlyn Jones, Dennis Coombe and Mary Halford. Directors; Stephen Wade, Bill Allenby and Raymond Joss.
Show Jumping (Thursday July 11th 1963, 3.00-4.45pm, and Fri July 12th, 1.50-2.50 and Sat July 13th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Tennis (Monday July 22nd 1963, 2.45-4.45pm, and Tues 23rd, and Fri 26th July)- Inter County Week from Eastbourne. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Mary Halford. Director: Berkeley Smith (Southern TV).
Gardening Made Easy (Wed Aug 7th 1963, 4-4.45pm)- another visit to Arkley Manor near Barnet with WE Shewell-Cooper. Reporter: Celia Irving. Director: Graham Watts (A-R)
Shopping in Britain (Thur Aug 8th 1963) from the Design Centre Haymarket. Goods to appeal to the overseas visitor, introduced by Dick Norton. Director: Graham Watts.
The Stratford-upon-Avon By Election (Friday Aug 16th, 10.45-11.45am)- declaration of the result and background, caused by the resignation of John Profumo. Intorduced by Brian Connell, with David Butler. Interviewer: Reg Harcourt. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV).
Baseball (Monday Aug 19th 1963, 3.45-4.45pm)- London Rockets versus Greenham Common from US Air Force Base West Ruislip. Commentators: George Beech and Emlyn Jones. Director: Jim Pople. (A-R)
Bowls (Fri Aug 23rd 3.45-4.45)- Finals of the amateur national singles championships from Watney's Bowling Green Mortlake. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Edward Sussam. Director: J Murray Ashford. (A-R) A letter to TV Times (no.410) gave thanks for the coverage but did note the end of the finals was not transmitted.
Softball (Mon Aug 26th 1963, 3.45-4.45)- from US Air Force Base West Ruislip. Commentators: George Beech and Emlyn Jones. Director: J Murray Ashford. (A-R)
Polo (Tues Aug 27th 1963, 3.45-4.45)- Ham versus Silver Leys from Ham Polo Club. Commentators: Robin Addie and Emlyn Jones. Director: Grahame Turner. (A-R)
Hockey (Mon Sept 9th 1963, 3.45-4.45pm)- Unicorns v SD Dickens XI. Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Director: Grahame Turner (A-R).
Liberal Party Assembly (Wed Sept 11th 1963, from 9.15am, with breaks, daily to Sept 14th)- from The Dome Brighton. Commentators: Alastair Burnet and George Ffitch. Director: Berekley Smith (Southern- only partially networked).
The Solemn Enthronement of John Heenan (Tuesday September 24th 1963, 10.55-11.30am)- from Westminster Cathedral. Commentator: Rev Bebb. Director: Bill Allenby (ITN).
International Soccer (Wednesday October 23rd 1963, 4.05pm-4.30)- England v Rest of World from Wembley Stadium- part of the second half. Commentator: Gerry Loftus. Director: Grahame Turner. (Longer highlights were shown at 9.55pm)
The Royal Smithfield Show (Monday Dec 2nd 1963, 4-4.45pm)- from Earls Court. Commentators: Rodney Crouch and Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Graham Watts. (A-R)
Tournament Golf (Wed Mar 25th 1964/ Thurs Mar 26th 1964, 3.15-4.45pm)- from Sunningdale. Commentators; Peter Lloyd and Bill Cox. Director: John P Hamilton. (A-R)
Afternoon Sport (Tues Apr 7th 1964, 3-4pm)- Snooker Challenge Match Lancashire v Yorkshire, John Spencer from Radcliffe plays Denis Robertson from Middlesborough. Commentators: Ted Lowe and Harold Phillips. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
Afternoon Sport (Wed Apr 8th 1964, 3-4pm)- Ice Skating from Altrincham. Commentator: Gerry Loftus. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
Afternoon Sport (Thur Apr 9th 1964, 3-4.15pm)- Hockey from Sale. South African Tourists versus Brooklands Select XI. Commentator: Gerry Loftus. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
Afternoon Sport (Fri Apr 10th 1964, 3-4pm)- Badminton from Manchester. Lancashire versus Cheshire- Ken Derrick plays Tony Jordan. Introduced by Gerry Loftus. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
At the Zoo (Mon Apr 13th 1964, 3-4pm)- Dr Desmond Morris looks at The Sea Lions at Feeding Time. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
At the Zoo (Fri Apr 17th 1964, 3-4pm)- Dr Desmond Morris looks at The Chimps' Tea Party. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
At the Zoo (Mon Apr 20th 1964, 3-4pm)- Dr Desmond Morris looks at The Penguins at Feeding Time. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
The Celebrations of the Fourth Centenary of Shakespeare's Birthday (Thursday April 23rd 1964, 10.15am-12noon)- Commentators: Shaw Taylor, David Rees, with Levi Fox. Interviewer: Judith Jackson. Producer: Raymond Joss (ATV).
Show Jumping (Thurs 30th Apr, 1-1.50pm, 2.10-2.35 and 4.20-4.45, Fri May 1st, 1.30-2.35 and 3.40-4.45)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Wimbledon 1964 (fortnight commencing Monday June 22nd 1964, 1.40-5pm) the usual coverage, commentators: Fred Perry, Emlyn Jones, Dennis Coombe and Kent Walton. Directors: Grahame Turner, John P Hamilton and Jim Pople.
The Royal Show (Tues July 7th 1964, 2.40-4.45pm, Wed July 8th, 2.05-4.45pm, Thursday July 9th 2.20-3.15 and Fri July 10th 2.30-2.45pm)- from Stoneleigh Abbey. Commentators: Viscount Allenby, Lionel Hamden and Raymond Brooks-Ward. Interviewer: David Lloyd. Director: Raymond Joss (ATV).
Show Jumping (Thursday July 9th 1964, 3.15-4.45pm, and Fri July 10th, 2.45-4.45 and Sat July 11th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Amateur Golf (Fri July 31st 1964, 2.15-4.45)- Britain versus Rest of Europe from Muirfield. Commentators: Arthur Montford and Alex Allan. Director: Jack Sampson (Scottish TV).
Cowes Week (Sat Aug 1st 1964, Bank Holiday Mon Aug 3rd, Tues Aug 4th 1.35-2.10pm)- Commentators: Barry Westwood and Bill Richardson. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
The Ascot Jumping Show (Wed Aug 12th, Thurs Aug 13th, Fri Aug 14th 1964, 3-4.45pm, also Sat Aug 15th)- from the lawns of the Royal Ascot Racecourse. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Anthony Flanagan (ATV).
An Exhibition of Hittite Art (Fri Aug 14th 1964, 2.15-3pm)- from the Diploma Gallery of the Royal Academy with John Mills. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion)
Gardening Made Easy (Wed Aug 36th 1964, 3.45-4.45pm)- wirh Dr WE Shewell-Cooper Director of the International Horticultural Bureau, and Celia Irving. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion)
Science '64 (Thursday August 27th 1964 10am-12.30pm)- the British Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting at Nuffield Theatre Southampton. Opening by Lord Brain. Talks by HG Conway and Professor BR Williams. Commentator: Barry Westwood. Directors: John Braybon and Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Science '64 (Friday August 28th 1964 10am-12.30pm)- Talks by Prof CGC Chesters and Prof HJ Eysenck. Commentator: Barry Westwood. Directors: John Braybon and Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Science '64 (Monday August 31st 1964 10am-12.30pm)- Talks by GS Robinson, Prof WT Williams, Dr DMA Mercer and AR Manser. Commentator: Barry Westwood. Directors: John Braybon and Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Science '64 (Tuesday September 1st 1964 10am-12.30pm)- GJ Thomson on Hovercraft and A Silverleaf on Hydrofoils. Commentator: Barry Westwood. Directors: John Braybon and Peter Frazer-Jones (Southern TV).
Science '64 (Wednesday September 2nd 1964 10am-12.30pm)- Irradiation of Foodstuffs by Prof FG Young, and Accelerated Freeze Drying of Food by Prof KA Munday. Commentator: Barry Westwood. Directors: John Braybon and Bill Perry (Southern TV).
Show Jumping (Fri Sept 11th, 12.45-2.15, and 3.40-4.45)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern TV).
National Exhibition of Children's Art (Thurs Sept 17th 1964 3.45-4.45)- from Royal Institute Galleries Piccadilly, With John Mills. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
The XVII Olympiad (from Mon 19th Oct 1964, 12noon-2.28pm) London Producer: Grahame Turner. Tokyo Producer: Bill Ward.
The State Opening of Parliament (Tues Nov 3rd 1964, 11am)- ITV Commentary: Alastair Burnet (produced by BBC).
After a break, apart from Horse Racing, OB cameras returned for
Spring Out (Monday April 12th 1965, 2.50-4.20pm)- Desmond Carrington introduced these programmes. The first was
Hockey from St Albans Hockey Club. England Schoolmasters versus England Schoolboys. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Spring Out (Wednesday April 14th 1965, 2.35-4.20pm)- Desmond Carrington from Rosslyn Park Club for a rugby match. Commentators: Gerwyn Williams and Ian Todd. Director: Grahame Turner (Rediffusion).
Show Jumping (Thursday April 15th 2.00-4.20, and Good Friday 1965 1-2.45, 3.30-4.20pm, also April 17th and 19th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
Spring Out (Monday April 26th 1965, 3.20-4.20pm)- Toga and Teens, Desmond Carrington at Piccadilly Hotel for a teenage fashion fair, with Caroline Charles, and two teenagers: Jenny Hanley and Jennifer McAlister. Director: John P Hamilton (Rediffusion).
Spring Out (Tuesday April 27th 1965, 3.20-4.20pm)- What's Yours? With Desmond Carrington at the Royal College of Arts for an exhibition of Public House Design. With Joh McCarthy. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Spring Out (Wednesday April 28th 1965, 2.55-4.45pm)- Association Football. Desmond Carrington at the National Recreation Centre Crystal Palace. The final of the Rediffusion Cup. Commentator: Peter Lloyd. Director: John P Hamilton (Rediffusion).
International Football (Wednesday May 5th 1965, 2.55-4.45pm)- from Wembley. England v Hungary. Commentators: Gerry Loftus and Johnny Haynes. Director: Grahame Turner (Rediffusion for Eurovision).
Royal Windsor Horse Show (Thursday May 13th 1965, 2.59pm- 4.45, also shared with Horse Racing on Friday May 14th)- Commenator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV).
The Royal Tour of Germany (Friday May 21st 4.05-4.45pm)- commentator in London: Peter Snow, in Germany: Bill Grundy and Barry Westwood. Producer in London: Stephen Wright, in Germany: Barrie Heads. Another programme on Thursday May 27th 3.00-4.20pm, same personnel except the London commentator was Andrew Gardner.
Wimbledon 1965 (fortnight from Mon June 21st 1965, 1.45pm) (ITN)
Polo (Monday July 5th 1965, 3.20pm)- from Ham Polo Club. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: John P Hamilton (Rediffusion).
The Royal Show (Tuesday July 6th 1965 2.00-4.45pm, Wed July 7th 2pm, and Thurs July 8th 2.05pm)- from Stoneleigh Abbey. Commentators: Viscount Allenby and Lionel Hampden. Interviewer: Leslie Thomas. Director: Tony Palmer (ATV).
Show Jumping (Fri July 9th 1965, 2pm, also Sat 10th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
Bowling (Tues July 13th 1965, 3.15-4.50pm)- from Belle Vue. Director: David Warwick (Granada).
Show Jumping (Fri Aug 20th 1965, 2.30pm)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
With No Intent... (Thurs Aug 26th 1965, 1.30-4.20) from the Police Driving School Chelmsford. "120 people who are alive and well today will be dead in 96 hours time." On the bank holiday road accidents, the programme drew attention to the causes of accidents. With Lord Lindgren, and George Eyles. Commentators: Peter Lloyd and Celia Irving. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Show Jumping (Thursday September 9th 2.00, and Friday Sept 10th 1965 both days shared with Horse Racing from Doncaster, also Sat Sept 11th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
Liberal Party Assembly (from Wed Sept 22nd 1965, varied coverage as in previous years)- Granada's Travelling Eye from Scarborough. Commentators: Bill Grundy and George Reid. There was similar coverage of the Labour Conference from Sept 27th 1965 commentators: Bill Grundy and Michael Scott, and Conservative Conference.
A Children's Festival of Carols and lessons (Christmas Eve 1965, 3.40-4.20pm)- children from Berwick, Carlisle and Brampton (TTT)
Westminster Abbey 1065-1965 (Tuesday December 28th 1965, 10.30am-12.10pm)- commentator: Brian Connell. Director: Graham Watts (Rediffusion).
The 250th Anniversary of Westminster Hospital (Friday January 14th 1966, 11.15am-12.15pm)- commentator: Barry Westwood. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Election '66 (Friday April 1st 1966, 9am onwards). After the late night broadcast that was scheduled to end at approx 3.30am, and the ITN Breakfats News, this mammoth production with Studio Link by Alastair Burnet with George Ffitch and Robert Kee. Director John Phillips.
Going-Going-Gone! (Tuesday April 5th 1966, 4pm)- at Christie's for an important sale of Renaissance paintings with John Mills. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion). Maybe this was the grandfather of all our modern day auction programmes?
Tennis (Thur April 7th 1966, 12.55pm also Good Friday and April 9th) from the Cumberland Lawn Tennis Club. Commentators: Dennis Coombe and Bill Threlfall. Directors: Jim Pople and Steve Minchin (Rediffusion). Airtime was shared with
Show Jumping (Thur April 7th 1966, from 2.30pm also Good Friday and Easter Monday)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
Table Tennis (Mon April 25th 1966, 3.45-4.45pm) from the Crystal Palace. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Peter Lowen. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
Salad Ways (Tues April 26th 1966, 3.45-4.45pm) from Westminster Domestic Science College. Final pre-exam tests. Commentators: Celia Irving and Janne Blair-Stewart. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Here Comes Summer (Fri April 29th 1966, 3.45pm) A visit to the Design for Leisure Exhibition at the Design Centre Haymarket.Commentators: Margo Mayne and Tony Doonan. Director: John P Hamilton (Rediffusion).
Royal Windsor Horse Show (Friday May 27th 1966, also Sat 28th)-shared with Cricket and Horse Racing. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (ATV).
Wimbledon 1966 (fortnight from June 20th 1966) Commentators: Fred Perry, Dennis Coombes, Emlyn Jones and Bill Threlfall. Directors: Jim Pople, Steve Minchin and John Phillips. Presentaton by Grahame Turner.
The Royal Show (Tues July 5th 1966 2pm and Wed July 6th, Thurs July 7th)- from Stoneigh Abbey. Commentators: Raymond Brooks-Ward and Lionel Hampden. Interviewer: Leslie Thomas. Director: Tony Parker (ATV).
International Water Ski-ing (Monday July 11th 1966, 3-4pm, and Thursday July 14th, 3.45-4.45pm) from Princes Water Ski Club London Airport - commentator: Richard Davies. Director: Graham Watts. Producer: Grahame Turner (Rediffusion).
Dance, Little Ladies (Tuesday July 12th 1966, 3.45-4.45pm) from Holland Park. Lester Clark watches rehearsals of Coppelia and talks to students and teachers of the Royal Ballet School. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Overseas News Special (Tuesday July 26th 1966, 9.30-9.40am, repeated at noon)- part of the World Cup coverage. Granada provided local reports.
Show Jumping (Wed Aug 17th 1966, from 1.45pm, Thur Aug 18th from 1pm, both shared with Horse Racing from York, and Fri Aug 19th 1pm)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Bill Perry (Southern).
TUC Congress (Wed Sept 7th 1966, 9.30am-12.30pm and 2.00-3.10pm)- from Blackpool. Reporters: Bill Grundy and Michael Scott. Director: Leslie Chatfield. Producer: Michael Murphy (Granada).
Show Jumping (Thur Sept 8th 1966, 1pm- 3.10, and Fri Sept 9th 1.00-2.45, 4.00-4.45)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (Southern).
Liberal Party Assembly (Wed Sept 21st 1966, from 9.15am with breaks for Schools broadcasts and daily)- from The Dome Brighton. Commentators: Alastair Burnet and George Ffitch. Directors: Peter Tiffin and Stephen Wade (Southern). Similar coverage of the other party conferences, Labour and Conservative (Granada).
Table Tennis (Monday Dec 5th 1966, 3.20-4.20pm)- England v Rumania, recording of Saturday's match at Edmonton Town Hall. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach. Director: Anthony Flanagan (ATV). Note- this was also advertised for Wed Dec 7th at 3.20pm.
Here Comes Christmas! (Thurs Dec 8th 1966, 3.20-4.20) Keith Fordyce at the Camden Arts Centre in Hampstead with Celia Irving for an exhibiton of old toys. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Here Comes Christmas! (Fri Dec 9th 1966, 3.20-4.20) Keith Fordyce at the Ealing School of Hotel Keeping and Catering with Ann Aldred and Clement Freud, who are Talking Turkey. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
Tenpin Bowling (Mon Dec 12th 1966, 3.20-4.20)- from Edgware. Commentator: Bill Campbell. Director: Victor Rudolf (ATV).
European Professional Ballroom Dancing Championships (Tues Dec 13th 1966, 3.00-4.10pm)- recorded at The Hague. Commentator: Keith Fordyce.
Tenpin Bowling (Wed Dec 14th 1966, 3.20-4.20)- a special event, Ladies Doubles Tournament from Edgware. Commentator: Bill Campbell. Director: Victor Rudolf (ATV)
Here Comes Christmas! (Thurs Dec 15th 1966, 3.20-4.20) Keith Fordyce at the Commonwealth Institute Theatre Kensington with Cy Grant at a dress rehearsal for Bethlehem Blues. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Bomberg and Kemeny (Mon Mar 20th 1967, 3.20-4.23pm)- A new exhibition at the Tate Gallery, with commentators John Mills and Sheldon Williams. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
International Schoolboys' Rugby (Wed Mar 22nd 1967, 2.55-4.23pm)- England v Wales from Twickenham. Commentators: Gerwyn Williams and Ian Todd. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
The Royal Maundy (Thur Mar 23rd 1967, 11.25am-12.30pm)- at Durham Cathedral. The first occasion this event was fully televised. Commentator: Maxwell Dees. Director: Christopher Palmer (Tyne Tees).
Association Football (Thurs Apr 6th 1967, 2.05-4pm)- from Crystal Palace. National Association of Youth Clubs' Cup Final: Lancashire v Oxfordshire. Commentators: Hugh Johns and Barry Davies. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
Tennis (Wed May 31st 1967, 3-4.20pm, Thurs June 1st, 2.30-4.20pm and Fri June 2nd 2.30-4.20pm)- from Surbiton Lawn Tennis Club. Surrey Grass Court Championships. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Bill Threlfall. Directors: May 31: Jim Pople, June 1: Steve Minchin, June 2: Jim Pople and George Sawford (Rediffusion)
Full Circle (Fri June 2nd 1967, 9.50-10.50am and 12.30-2.30pm)- Return of Sir Francis Chichester. Commentator: Brian Connell. Directors: Jim Pople (in Greenwich), Steve Minchin (in The Mansion House). Producer: Grahame Turner. (Rediffusion). NB as Chichester's return was delayed, the programme was retitled Home from the Sea and rescheduled for Tuesday June 13th 1967, 10am-10.50 and 12.15-1.20pm) Commentator: Brian Connell. Directors: Stephen Wade (in Greenwich), Steve Minchin (in The Mansion House), George Sawford (at Tower Pier). Producer: Graham Watts. (Rediffusion). Another delay meant that Home from the Sea was rescheduled for Friday July 7th 1967 10am-1.15pm. All the same personnel.
Royal Richmond Horse Show (Thurs June 15th 1967, 2.45-4.23pm, and Fri June 16th 1.15-2.15pm, also Sat June 17th)- Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
Expo 67 (Wed June 21st 1967, Thurs June 22nd 3.20-4.23pm and Fri June 23rd 1.15-2.15pm)- from Montreal with Barry Westwood. Director: Jim Pople. Producer: Grahame Turner (Rediffusion)
Wimbledon 1967 (fortnight from June 26th 1966) Commentators: Lew Hoad, Fred Perry, Dennis Coombes, Emlyn Jones, Peter Wilson, Peter Lorenzo and Richard Davies. Directors: Anthony Flanagan, Anton Bowler and Raymond Joss.
Show Jumping (Thur July 13th 1967, 2pm- 4.45, and Fri July 14th- shared with Horse Racing, also Sat 15th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (Southern).
Table Tennis (Fri July 28th 1967, 3.00-4.45pm)- from Crystal Palace. Commentators: Emlyn Jones and Keith Fordyce. Director: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion).
National Bowls Championships (Mon Aug 14th 1967, 3.15-4.45pm)- from Watney's Mortlake. Commentators: Bill Threlfall and Ted Sussum. Director: George Sawford (Rediffusion).
European Water Ski-ing Chapionships (Tues Aug 15th 1967)- Commentators: Shaw Taylor and David Spyer. Programme Co-ordinator: Steve Minchin (Rediffusion by arrangement with Dutch TV).
Show Jumping (Wed Aug 16th 1967, Thur Aug 17th 3pm- 4.45, and Fri July 14th 2.30-4.45pm, also Sat 19th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (Southern).
Trades Union Congress The 99th Conference, from The Dome Brighton (Mon Sept 4th 1967, 10.55am-12.30pm, 2.10-4.45pm also Tues Sept 5th also mornings of Wed Sept 6th, Thurs 7th and Fri 8th) with George Ffitch and ALastair Burnet. Directors: Steve Minchin and John Phillips. Producer: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
Show Jumping (Thurs Sept 7th 1967 from 2.40pm shared with Racing from York, and Fri Sept 8th 2.30-4.45pm, also Sat 9th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Anthony Howard (Southern).
National Exhbition of Children's Art (Mon Sept 11th 1967 4.00-4.45pm)- with John Fitzmaurice Mills. Director: George Sawford (Rediffusion).
A Service of Memorial and Burial (Tues Nov 7th 1967 12.01pm-1.05)- Clement Atlee, from Westminster Abbey. Commentator: Brian Connell. Director: Jim Pople (Rediffusion).
RAC Rally 1967 (Wed Nov 22nd 1967, 10.35am-11.05am)- "the fullest coverage ever of a motoring event in this country." ntroduced by Richard Davies, Commentators: Stuart Turner, Barrie Gill, John Sprinzel,James Tilling and Tony Bastable. Production Team: David Rees, Raymond Joss, Robert Reed, John Sichel, John Cotter, Ann Greenwood and Sid Kilby. Executive Producer: Bill Ward. Despite the extravagant claim above, I can't find any other programmes on this rally!
Afternoon Extra! (Mon Dec 11th 1967 3.35-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Fashion Forum- at London's Playboy Club, commere Sarah Ward. Director: Steve Minchin. (Followed by Design for Living- with Trewin Copplestone) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Tues Dec 12th 1967 3.30-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with The Face of Man- with John Fitzmaurice Mills at the Whitechapel Gallery. Director: Jim Pople. (Also after this was Parents welcome?- on the Plowden Report) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Wed Dec 13th 1967 3.35-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Christmas Choice- at Heal's, with Sarah Ward and Keith Fordyce. Director: George Sawford. (Also after this was an episode of Run, Buddy Run) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Thurs Dec 14th 1967 3.30-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Recent British Painting - with John Fitzmaurice Mills and Sheldon Williams at the Tate Gallery. Director: Jim Pople. (Also after this was an episode of The Beverly Hilbillies) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Mon Dec 18th 1967 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with The Marsh King's Daughter - from the Little Angel Theatre Islington. John Wright shows children 'behind the scenes.' Director: Steve Minchin. (Followed by Design for Living) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Tues Dec 19th 1967 3.35-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Carrier Cooks Christmas- with Rbert Carrier. Compere: Michael Wale. Director: George Sawford. (Also after this was Parents welcome?- on the Plowden Report) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Wed Dec 20th 1967 3.20-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with The Golden Robe of Merlin - from Streatham Ice Rink with Carol Ann Warner (Princess Honeydew), Harold Williams, Raymond Wilson, Linda Bernard and Elaine Long. Director: Jim Pople. (Also after this was No Time for Sergeants) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Thurs Dec 21st 1967 3.35-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Mince Pies and Matron - at Evelina Children's Hospital Southwark, with Freddie Earlle. Director: Steve Minchin. (Also after this was an episode of The Beverly Hilbillies) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Fri Dec 22nd 1967 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Super Santa! from the Beauchamp Lodge Settlement House Paddington. An improvised play. Director: George Sawford. (Also after this was More Best Sellers) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Mon Jan 8th 1968 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Pre-Ski!- from Crystal Palace Recreation Centre, with Robin Brock-Hollinshead and Celia Irving. Director: George Sawford. (Followed by Design for Living) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Tues Jan 9th 1968 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Table Tennis- from Crystal Palace Recreation Centre. Commentator: Johnny Leach. Director: Grahame Turner (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Wed Jan 10th 1968 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with International Cover Girl '68 - recording of the UK finals from the Top Rank Ballroom Croydon. Commentator: Keith Fordyce. Director: Steve Minchin. (After this was an episode of Run Buddy Run) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Thurs Jan 11th 1968 3.45-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Top Cooks! - from Olympia. Compere: Michael Wale. Director: George Sawford. (After this was an episode of No Time for Sergeants) (Rediffusion).
Afternoon Extra! (Fri Jan 12th 1968 3.15-4.45pm)- Hosted by Jon Kelley, with Ski-ing - Grindlewald. Commentator: Emlyn Jones. Programme Coordinator: Jim Pople. (Swiss TV Programme). (After this was More Best Sellers). This was the last of the series Afternoon Extra!
Relics of War (Mon April 8th 1968 3.15-4.15pm)- from the Imperial War Museum. Dr Noble Frankland shows Barry Westwood the new air exhibition. Director: Steve Minchin. (Rediffusion).
Hepworth at the Tate (Tues April 9th 1968 4pm)- John Fitzmaurice Mills talks to Dame Barbara Hepworth Director: Jim Pople. (Rediffusion).
Pets in Store (Wed April 10th 1968 3.45-4.30pm)- With Grahame Dangerfield. Director: George Sawford. (Rediffusion).
Show Jumping (Thurs April 11th 1968 2.00-4.30pm, and Fri April 12th 2-4pm, also Sat Apr 13 and Mon Apr 15th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade. (Southern).
Wimbledon 1968 (fortnight from June 24th 1968) Commentators: Fred Perry, Emlyn Jones, Dennis Coombes, Peter Wilson, Peter Lorenzo and Richard Davies. Directors: Vic Rudolf, David Foster, Raymond Joss (ITV Presentation).
The Royal Show (Tues July 2nd, Wed July 3rd and Thurs July 4th 1968, 1pm-1.45)- from Stoneleigh Abbey. Commentators: Raymond Brooks-Ward and Lionel Hampden. Interviewer: Leslie Thomas. Director: Tony Parker (ATV).
Show Jumping (Thur July 11th 1968 2pm, and Fri July 12th shared with Racing from York, also Sat 13th and Sun 14th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (Southern).
European Athletics (Tues July 23rd 1968, 3.45pm) from Brescia Italy. Commentator: Barry Davies. Programme Coordinator: George Sawford (Rediffusion, by arrangement with the Italian Television Service).
Bowls (Friday July 26th 1968) 3.45-4.28pm) from Westminster Bank Sports Club Norbury. English Bowlng Association versus City of London Institute Bowls Association. Commentator: Neil Durden-Smith, with help from Ted Sussum. Director: George Sawford (Rediffusion- possibly their final outside broadcast).

My site ends with the change in ITV franchises, but it's interesting to record that the same old names and even programmes were back in action for the new Thames Television:
Navigator Extraordinary Captain James Cook RN (Tues Aug 6th 1968, 3.20-4.20pm) from the National Maritime Museum Greenwich with Barry Westwood and Alan Villiers. Director: George Sawford (Thames).
The Dublin Horse Show (Thurs Aug 8th 1968, 2.40-4.20pm) with Raymond Brooks-Ward. Co-ordinator: Jim Pople (Thames by arrangement with Telefis Eireann).
National Bowls Championships (Mon Aug 12th 1968, 2.45-4.10pm) from Watneys Sports Ground Mortlake. Commentators: Neil Durden-Smith and Ted Sussum. Director: George Sawford (Thames).
London Salon of Photography (Tues Aug 13th 1968, 3.20-4.20pm) from the Royal Water Society's Galleries with Barry Westwood. Director: Steve Minchin (Thames).
Show Jumping (Wed Aug 14th 1968 and Thurs 15th 2.40-4.10pm, and Fri 16th .30-4.10pm, also Sat 17th)- from Hickstead. Commentator: Raymond Brooks-Ward. Director: Stephen Wade (Southern).
British Association for the Advancement of Science (Thur Aug 22nd 1968 11.30am-12.30pm, and Fri Aug 23rd 10am-12,30pm, and at 2.30pm, Mon Aug 26th 11.30am-12.30pm)- annual meeting in Dundee. Commentator: Ron Thompson. Director: George Thomson (Grampian).
The usual TUC Congress coverage (100th congress) began on Sept 2nd 1968, but further outside broadcast information is beyond the scope of this site.
I cannot cover every region, so I would be most grateful to hear of additional weekday ITV outside broadcasts, and I would acknowledge your contribution..

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Confidentially (A-R, 1955-6)
This comedy/variety series starring Reg Dixon began on September 23rd 1955. One regular was Lucia Guillon as 'The Wife,' Dorothy Blythe and Austin Melford were also in the early shows. Others appearing during the run included Carl Bernard as various characters, Victor Platt as Henry, Dorothy Gordon as Sally, Dorinda Stevens, Edgar Driver, and Frederick Piper. The story on Nov 23rd 1955 included Reg, Lucia Guillon, Norah Gordon as Aunty, Dorothy Gordon, Scott Harrold, Dorinda Stevens, Carl Bernard, Austin Melford, Fred Willis, Redmond Bailey, Anita Sharp-Bolster, Keith Smith, Dorothy Blythe and Robert Gregory. Musical interludes from The Visionaires, The Visionettes and the Metrognomes. Director: Milo Lewis. The programme was shown irregularly, the last edition seems to have been on January 9th 1956, with Reg, Lucia Guillon, Keith Smith as Tom, Victor Platt as Sam, Tony Sympson as Shady Character, and Austin Melford as Policeman.

A novel feature from programme 3 was the inclusion of "Miss Anonymous," an idea of Reg's, to include an unknown "to whom stardom beckons." Each week a new singer, so as all the shows are lost, who knows who these ladies were? The girl pictured left was in programme 3 on October 7th 1955. Anyone know her, or any of the other anonymous Miss Anonymouses who appeared? The only definite one I have traced is Rosemary Squires who was Miss Anonymous in the final programme.
Frank Lockyer, Husband and Manager, kindly confirmed to me that Rosemary sang After You've Gone, "taking the role of an enraged wife whose husband had walked out on her during which she picked up kitchen implements and threw them all over the place.... when Reg Dixon saw the clip he said 'That's the lady I want to play the part of my scatty wife in my next series Let's Stay Home.' So she played his scatty wife throughout the series during which she also did a number of singing appearances as herself." He added, "when she did the rehearsal as the 'scatty wife' as a starlet - even the orchestra members stood up and applauded." (Rosemary had earlier had success on Ralph Reader's Chance of a Lifetime, along with Ronnie Carroll and Dave King)
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Sixpenny Corner

The very first ITV soap opera began on Friday September 23rd 1955 at 10.45am and ran for 15 minutes each weekday, made live at the Viking Studios in Kensington. While it was screened in this improbable daytime slot, rehearsals were held each afternoon for the next day's transmission. In early 1956 it moved to an evening slot.
This was the tale of young newlyweds Bill and Sally Norton who run Sixpenny Corner, a dilapidated garage in the rural town of Springwood. They live in a bungalow nearby, but also in a flat above the garage.
Script by Jonquil Antony and Hazel Adair. Producer: John Lemont.

General Cast List for programmes 1 to 6 (Sept 23rd, Sept 26-30): Patricia Dainton as Sally Norton and Howard Pays as Bill Norton (pictured). Robert Webber played Mr Norton Bill's father, Betty Bowden was Mrs Doris Sharpe Sally's mother. Stuart Saunders was Uncle Fred, and Olive Milbourne Aunt Mabel. Shirley Mitchell played Yvonne Sally's sister and Robert Desmond was Stan Bill's Brother. Bernard Fox was Tom Bill's youngest brother and Walter Horsbrugh Mr Sharpe Sally's father. Edward Judd was Denis Boyes and Elizabeth Gott was Mrs Boyes.
Cast lists for programmes 7 to 11 (Oct 3-7) was as before but excluded Olive Milbourne and Walter Horsbrugh, but included Christine Pollon as Grete Edler, O'Donovan Shiell as Dr Kevin O'Shea, James Lomas as PC Doakes and David Anthony as A Policeman. Storyline: Tom and Grete his sweetheart have come to Bill's flat having quarrelled with Grete's father.
Cast lists for programmes 22 to 26 (Oct 24-28, now at 11am) were as for the opening, only excluding Bernard Fox; also with O'Donovan Shiell, Margaret Boyd as Nanny, Bert Allison as Milkman, and Stella Wilkinson as Customer. Storyline: Bill and Sally are anxious about a possible meeting between Tom. who is due back from Germany, and Grete, who is ill in hospital. Sally, on the eve of her birthday, contracts a severe cold and is kept in bed with a temperature. But plans for a party go on, and her birthday cake is delivered.
Cast lists for programmes 32 to 36 (Nov 7-11) were as for the opening, only excluding Bernard Fox and Edward Judd; also with Christine Pollon. Storyline: Episode 31 had seen Bill and Sally pondering their difficult financial situation, following poor business results, largely due to Bill's inexperience. Uncle Fred received an unwelcome visitor when his wife Mabel announcer her intention of staying a few days longer in London.
Cast lists for programmes 42 to 46 (Nov 21-25) were as for the opening, only excluding Edward Judd and Walter Horsbrugh; also with Christine Pollon.
Storyline: In ep 41 Bill had been hoping for better times at the garage, and Sally fewer housekeeping worries.
The programme continued over the Christmas holiday period, with Christmas Day 1955 falling on a Sunday, this helped!
Cast lists for programmes 77-81 (Jan 9-13 1956, starting from this week, the series was moved from daytime and screened each weekday 7.06 to 7.20pm). Cast were the same twelve as on the opening week, also with Christine Pollon, Seymour Green, Gladys Spencer as Mrs Vince, Vi Stevens as Rosie Chubb, Michael Collins as Dr Tim O'Shea, John Charlesworth as Eddy Perkins, and Elizabeth Fraser as Julie Perkins. Director: Ronald Marriott (husband of Hazel Adair) In the previous programmes, Sally went alone to her old firm's Twelfth Night party and missed the last train. She was driven back by Philip Collier, who faked a breakdown. But Sally saw through this..
Cast lists for programmes 82-86 (Jan 16-20 1956) as opening week except for Elizabeth Gott. Also with Christine Pollon, Margaret Boyd, Seymour Green, Gladys Spencer, Vi Stevens, Jan Miller as Moira O'Shea, Michael Collins, Anne Warren as Joanie Chubb (Rosie's daughter), Elizabeth Fraser, Patrick Boxill as Mr Boyes, and Bill Shine as JL Smithers. Director: Peter Maxwell. On Friday 13th, Bill had returned home with bad news.
Cast lists for programmes 92-96 (Jan 30- Feb 3 1956) were as for the opening, only excluding Elizabeth Gott and Edward Judd; also with Christine Pollon, Seymour Green as M Louis Delorme, Gladys Spencer, Vi Stevens, Charles Ross as Phillip Collier, Michael Collins, Anne Warren, Joan Ingram as Aunt Stella (Sally's aunt), and Bill Shine. Storyline: In the previous Friday's story, Bill received a telegram from Mr Bostwick saying he had a firm offer for the garage and would sell if he didn't hear from Bill before six o'clock. On Monday Sally and Yvonne are worried about Mrs Sharpe. On Tuesday Bill accused Sally of deceiving him, and they had another quarrel, though it's quickly patched up. On Thursday Tom says he is leaving Springwood. On Friday, Yvonne and Sally persuade Mr Sharpe to go with them to 'Madame Dorice,' where he was just in time to stop Mrs Sharpe from signing her new shop away.
Cast lists for programmes 97-101 (Feb 6-10 1956) were as for the opening, only excluding Bernard Fox, Walter Horsbrugh, Edward Judd and Elizabeth Gott. Also with O'Donovan Shiell, Christine Pollon, Mysie Monte as Mrs La Trobe, Margaret Boyd, Seymour Green, Vi Stevens, Jan Miller, Michael Collins, Anne Warren, Bill Shine, Rona Laurie as Mrs Asher, Rosemary Stevens as Charmaine, and Dorinda Stevens as Miss Golightly. Director: Ronald Marriott. Storyline: On Monday Dr Kevin O'Shea told his brother Tim that he had guessed his secret. Tuesday: the truth about Monsiuer Louis was discovered. Wednesday, he broke down, and Mrs Sharpe had pity on him. Thursday: Dr Tim confesses to Grete.
Cast lists for programmes 107-111 (Feb 20-24 1956) were as for the opening, only excluding Bernard Fox, Elizabeth Gott and Edward Judd; also with Christine Pollon, Margaret Boyd, Seymour Green, Vi Stevens, Jan Miller, Michael Collins, Anne Warren, John Charlesworth, Elizabeth Fraser, Anthony Lang as Mike Perkins, Bill Shine, Dorinda Stevens, and Robert Raglan as Inspector Brown. Director: Ronald Marriott. Synopsis: In the last episode, Mr Smithers angered Sally, who slapped his face, but was sorry afterwards on account of the partnership. Then Bill makes a startling discovery and decides on drastic action. In Wednesday's story he receives a visit from the police. On Thursday, it's Moira's turn to learn something disturbing.
137-141 (Apr 2-6 1956). Synopsis: On Wed 4th Owen Meredith (played by Arthur Lawrence) found himself in a very embarrassing situation. Thursday's episode saw a "pleasant reconciliation." Friday: Grete accepted Dr Tim's proposal and agreed to marry him soon.
Cast lists for programmes 142-146 (Apr 9-13 1956) were as for the opening, excluding Bernard Fox, Elizabeth Gott and Edward Judd. Also with Christine Pollon, Mysie Monte, Vi Stevens, Jan Miller, Ronald Cardew (Brigadier La Trobe), John Charlesworth, Elizabeth Fraser, Rosemary Stevens, Arthur Lawrence, Yah Ming as Lan Wang, Peter Duguid as Monty Rixby, Olive Kirby as Secretary, John Barrard as Syd, Donald Cashfield as Charlie, Frances Cohen as Celeste, Margaret Flint as Mrs Walker and Cyril Renison as AA Inspector. Director: Peter Maxwell. Synopsis: Monday- Stan and Julie have a crushing experience. Tuesday- Yvonne tells Sally of her expectations. Wednesday- Eddie Perkins' behaviour worries Bill. Thursday- Yvonne is hysterical.
Cast lists for programmes 157-161 (Apr 30- May 4 1956) were as for the opening, excluding Bernard Fox, Shirley Mitchell, Elizabeth Gott and Edward Judd. Also with Gwynne Whitby as Aunt Laura, Christine Pollon, Sylvia Bidmead as Beverley Patterson, Vi Stevens, Charles Ross, Michael Collins, Julia Byfield as Mrs Cobbett, Jan Miller, John Charlesworth, Elizabeth Fraser, Arthur Lowe as Mr Boswick, Susan Richards as Mrs Wilmot, Frederick Schiller as Herr Edler, Howard Lang as Mr Perkins, Eira Griffiths as Miss Lucas, Pamela Binns as Miss Stevenson, Colin Douglas as Dr Williams and Bette Vivian as Mrs Wright. Director: Ronald Marriott. Synopsis: In last Friday's story, Eddie had had a very painful experience. Monday- Rosie Chubb was upset by a quarrel. Tuesday- a disturbance at Dr Tim's. Wednesday- an unexpected caller at the bungalow was not very welcome. Thursday- Stan has an experience which makes him very miserable.
Cast lists for programmes 177-181 (May 28- June 1 1956) were as for the opening, excluding Bernard Fox, Elizabeth Gott and Edward Judd. Also with Christine Pollon, Sylvia Bidmead, Vi Stevens, Jan Miller, Michael Collins, Anne Warren, John Charlesworth, Elizabeth Fraser, Arthur Lowe, Howard Williams as Jeremy Carr, Marian Lehmann as Margaret Muller, John Crocker as Photographer, Ronald Marriott, Peter Maxwell and Hazel Adair as Three Strangers. Plus Susie the Dog. Director: Ronald Marriott. Synopsis: The previous Friday Beverley had given Stan an ultimatum. Monday: Grete makes an exciting discovery. Tuesday: Bill and Sally find Mr Boswick a great trial. Wednesday: Eddie learns a lesson he won't easily forget. Thursday: Stan is overjoyed.
In the summer schedules of 1956, the series ended after about 200 episodes.
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Cool for Cats (A-R 1956-1961)
First screened December 1956. Mondays 7.16-7.30pm, Later it was shown twice a week. Then expanded to half an hour's length. Host: Kent Walton. Ker Robertson was on the turntable.
A simple format, playing new records, but a hit show, partly thanks to first director Joan Kemp-Welch who "employs all the ingenious tricks of scenery, lighting, camerwork and sheer stagecraft, which she's contrived herself, or inspired and wheedled out of her excellent team."
Here's an account by Wilfred Altman of one September 1957 show: "Record Number 1 is Fire Down Below, by Shirley Bassey. Kent Walton, a young Canadian actor with a natural modesty and warmth, gives viewers the bare details. The record is played and the screen reveals a background of blazing flames with a superimposed shape of a heart and the outline of a girl singing and dancing.... Another record, Teenage Angel, provoked the idea of having a girl on the screen with a pair of wings, dancing in the clouds... there is a number by Tommy Steele put over with superb effect by the mere focusing of the camera on a fish tank. The tank is magnified, or the divers in it are reduced in size, but on the screen, they float down until they reach the seabed." Joan said her most unusual trick effect in the series was a matchstick sized man standing on a glass of champagne and sitting on the edge of it. Choreography was by Douglas Squires (more of his memories are on line on the CoolforCats webpage), and design by Michael Weld. Dancers included Tony Bateman, Roy Allen, Angela van Breda, Pauline Innes and Mavis Traill.
After a break in March 1957, the series returned twice weekly, now networked, on Wednesday July 12th 1957, 6.30-6.45pm, with the same team. Also on each Friday at the same time. Some sources suggest this was a repeat, but in fact this was a completely new show. In September that year, transmissions moved to most Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6.45-7pm. Brian Taylor took over direction of a few shows towards the end of 1957. At the start of 1958 the two directors were sharing the load, most Mondays and Wednesdays at the same time. A bigger change came in February 1957, when two half hour editions were made, one Wednesdays at 6.10pm, the second at 11pm on Fridays. With such a workload, other directors were brought in including Bimbi Harris. Early Summer 1957 saw the show on Thursdays 7-7.30pm, Brian Taylor now in charge, but soon back to its late night Friday slot. Guest artists occasionally mixed in with the records, on June 27th 1957 Audrey Jeans and Eddie Silver, July 17th Jimmy Jackson, November 21st 1957 The Mudlarks. Dance directors now were Malcolm Goddard, or Jack Carter. Director: Brian Taylor, though other occasional directors included Peter Croft and Daphne Shadwell. The programme took a short break in May, after celebrating 100 shows. It was being networked from July, with choreography by Peter Darrell or by Lennie Mayne. Directors included John P Hamilton or Peter Croft. November: John P Hamilton directed, choreography by Malcolm Goddard, Ray Landor. A number of shows were made on location, including from an Army camp at Kingston-on-Thames, and an RAF base at Odiham (Aug 7th 1958).
After a break over Christmas 1959, the programme returned, no longer fully networked, with a new feature, Cool Cartoons by Neville Wortman. Director normally John P Hamilton, though Peter Moffatt took over for the month of August and J Murray Ashford also directed a programme. The 200th edition was on Friday May 6th 1960, 7pm with guest singers Mike Preston and Joy, and Dave Adams. Dance direction by Peter Darrell, Ivor Megiddo, or Malcolm Clare. The Freemen were in the June 10th show. Freddie Earlle was in two shows during July/Aug 1960. In the autumn 1960 schedules, it was back in a late evening slot, Tuesdays at 11.7pm, with the byline "the She-Cats and He-Cats get together." On the Dec 20th programme, directed by Don Gale, the dancers are listed: Una Stubbs, Fiona Jackson, Veronica Bravo, Rex Rainer, Joan Palethorpe, Bernard Eastow, Alex Morrow, and Victor Duret. On both January 31st and February 7th 1961, directed by John P Hamilton, there were these dancers: Fiona Jackson, Veronica Bravo, Rex Rainer, Joan Palethorpe, Alex Morrow, Shirley Sunners, Ronnie Curran and Colin Stowe. The series ended in February 1961, as Kent and Ker went to TWW to front their
Discs-A-Gogo
Note: Robin Hunter was also a dancer on the programme during 1958.
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Take Your Pick (A-R)
With Michael Miles. On the gong: Alec Dane. Announcer: Bob Danvers-Walker. Organist: Harold Smart.
Director: Audrey Starrett (left of first photo). Intially produced by Arlington Television and Radio Ltd for A-R, the company had first used the format on Radio Luxembourg.
The Yes No Interlude got the show off to a lively start. Contestants, in the first shows selected from the London studio audience, then chose a key to one of ten boxes. Michael would bribe them to take some cash instead of opening the box, which could contain a booby prize (in 3 random boxes). Or possibly something nice, or even the special prize in Box 13.

Series 1 (September 1955- May 1956), Fridays 8.00- 8.30pm, later it began at 7.30pm. An early photo (not seen here) in TV Times is captioned "Mrs Miles" wielding the gong.
Series 2 (September 1956- June 1957) Fridays 7.30-8pm.
A special event, Michael Miles announced a Diamond Rush, for viewers to find where £1,000 worth of diamonds had been hidden just under the earth on Saturday December 8th 1956. Cheltenham was the venue. 250,000 applications were received. The next Friday's programme on December 14th included an interview with the lucky winner. March 8th 1957 saw the launch of "the biggest prize ever offered on British tv," The House Competition. The value of this new property was £5,000. Entry was restricted to married couples with two children, in regional heats. Round two, for Yorkshire viewers was on April 12th. On Good Friday April 19th competitiors were from the Manchester area. Then the four best entries appeared on the final programme on May 3rd 1957, with viewers voting for the winning couple. The panel of judges in the studio consisted of Lady Georgina Coleridge, Bebe Daniels and Ben Lyon. The last programme in series 2 was on June 14th 1957, with a vintage Rolls Royce as the star prize! Other notable prizes in this era included: Collecting a Rolling Pin, the good news was that it was on the roof of the Empire State Building, a trip to Rome to get a photo of Gina Lollobrigida, and, er, a tractor.

Series 3 (September 1957- June 1958) Fridays 8-8.30pm.
A new gimmick included (on October 18th and 25th 1957) The Spinning Topper. The viewer whose poem identified best the celebrity, was invited to take part in the quiz- from their own home. The clue on Oct 25th was 'Nine for thirty seven was pretty hot, but the following innings he took the lot,' - answer was Jim Laker of course. For Christmas, the December 27th edition had an audience and competitors entirely made up of farmers (why?). On January 17th 1958 viewers saw filmed shots of two prize winners, round the world air travellers Mr John Milner in Beirut, and Mr Henry Case in San Francisco. Next week Cass was seen in Honolulu and Milner in Singapore. The two strangers then met on Sydney Harbour Bridge before cashing a cheque in their joint names for, wow, £100. In March 1958 the show came from the Ideal Hotel Exhibition, on March 7th a dining room suite was star prize.
Programme 100 was shown on March 14th 1958, the second from the Ideal Home, the top prize was a mere Rock Garden. March 21st offered a bedroom suite.

Series 4 (September 1958- June 1959) Fridays 8-8.30pm.
Among the 'stunt' prizes, was living as Robinson Crusoe on Tobago (film on Oct 17th 1958 edition of winner Geoffrey Vokes). He was awarded the trip as a forfeit for answering incorrectly. Oct 24th 1958 had an estate car as the top prize. In December 1958, Mrs Grace Sweetlove opened Box 13, and found she had won a greyhound. The dog's name? Take Your Pick, of course! Among shows away from the London Studios was that on May 15th 1959 which was telerecorded at the Theatre Royal Glasgow.

Series 5 began on September 18th 1959 and ran until June 10th 1960. Fridays 8-8.25pm. Hostess: Elizabeth Kingdon (pictured), who though not credited in TV Times, had been with the show since 1957. There was a special on Christmas Day 1959, 8.45-9.15pm in front of old age pensioners, plus veteran stars Shaun Glenville and Billy Danvers.

Series 6 began on September 16th 1960 and ran until 23rd June 1961. Fridays 8.30-8.55pm. Elizabeth Kingdon again hostess. December 23rd's edition was a Christmas special with all competitors and audience from the London markets of Covent Garden, Smithfield, Billingsgate and Leadenhall. One prizewinner was a Mr Robert Churchyard, who won a huge fridge and a year's supply of groceries. The stunts of previous years were more sedate now, with the show consistently in the Top Ten, it had no need to pull too many punches.

Series 7 commenced on 15th September 1961, once again on Fridays 8.30-8.55pm. The first show contained an audience of London street traders. Lila Joseph opened Box 13 winning "a bowler." Not much to that, with six more added, only she had to sell them in Times Square New York! Another exotic prize in November was a humble threepenny piece. It was an ingredient in a Christmas pudding, for which the other ingredients had to be gathered from around Australia: the lucky winner was named Ernest Irving. Another winner was Mr Eric Morgan who won a 17 day tour of Russia. At the start of 1962, the quiz was moved to Thursdays, 8-8.30pm, the first time it had not been a regular feature of Friday night viewing. However this didn't last long, at the start of February it had slotted back to Fridays, 7pm. A special show on March 9th came from Cardiff. The final show of the series was on June 8th 1962.

The first show in Series 8 was on 14th September 1962, same time Fridays at 7pm and with "the usual team." The first of the series was the 275th programme. There was the usual Christmas special on December 28th 1962, with all the audience old age pensioners. On January 11th 1963, the show came for the first time from Manchester, from ABC's Didsbury studios. On February 22nd 1963, the show was on the road again, with an edition from Bristol. The 300th Take Your Pick went out on March 8th 1963 with a special edition from HMS Collingwood, audience and all competitors from the Royal Navy. (This programme was an outside broadcast "in cooperation with Southern Television.) The final quiz of series 8 was on June 7th 1963.

Series 9 began in September 1963 same time same place. TAM placed Take Your Pick in the National Top Ten for 38 out of the 39 shows in this series. Among special programmes were one from Luton on 25th October 1963, while on 20th December that year the audience were all publicans and barmaids, allegedly. Another outside broadcast was on March 20th 1964, from Lewisham Town Hall, other programmes away from Wembley Studios included one from Mile End Road London, another from Hornsey, as well as others from home counties locations. Though the studio was home for the April 24th 1964 quiz, the audience were all from the Maidstone and Chatham area of Kent. Top prize on offer on March 6th 1964 was a loose fitting Persian lamb spring coat with a fur collar. The usual summer break began in June 1964.

TV Times celebrated the commencement of the Series 10 with a front cover montage, that was shared, of course, with Double Your Money. The first show, with the same old team, on Sept 18th 1964, was in front of an audience of dustmen (why?). Michael Miles explained the format was as before, with a few small changes. He reflected on the less popular ideas, like The Joker. But this series did see the return of viewer competitions, the first was a mystery phrase, a clue to one word of which was given each week. Winners' names were put into a hat, and a contestant drew out one lucky name, an Air Partner who then won exactly whatever the studio contestant won. A special edition of the show towards the end of 1964 offered viewers the chance to win one of two Ford Corsairs. Other Special Audiences in this series included Aylesbury, High Wycombe and district (Oct 30th 1964), then further afield to the Tyne Tees area and Newcastle (Nov 20th 1964). As Christmas Day 1964 fell on a Friday, there was a special edition that week, before an audience of old age pensioners. Mrs Edith Graves won £50 in the Treasure Chest. Jan 8th 1965 was in front of the folk of Stevenage and Hemel Hempstead. Jan 29th 1965 was a special edition from the Guildhall in Southampton. Back up north on Feb 26th 1965, with a quiz from Victoria Hall Halifax, then to the Aldershot and Guildford area on March 26th. That was the last of the advertised specials, with the series concluding on June 11th 1965.
In a TV Times article, Michael Miles mentioned some memorable winners. Most recently Herbert Marsden who had accepted the £30 offered for his key and given away the cash to Dr Barnardos.

Series 11 began on Friday September 24th 1965, usual time. However the one change was new hostess Jane Murray. As always, the first quiz was a special, devoted to "the British housewife." A special on October 15th had an audience who were members of the RAF. Then on October 29th the quiz came from Belfast. November 26th included taxi drivers, while on December 17th it was the turn of farm workers. A special of sorts on Feb 4th 1966 had all the audience and contestants from as far away as Fulham, Hammersmith and Shepherds Bush! But the first major change for years occurred in March 1966, as the series finished its season earlier than usual!

Series 12 started on September 30th 1966, same Friday slot, same team as the last series, "it's the same format as before." The edition on October 28th celebrated National Youth Week with members of youth clubs from all over Britain. The November 11th edition was a special for Armistice Day, audience members of the British Legion. Feb 3rd 1967 saw the audience entirely made up of newspaper workers. The show was out on the road again on March 17th 1967, and out a long way, since it came from Sydney Australia! All the audience were ex-pats. Bob Danvers-Walker accompanied Michael Miles, but there was a guest organist, Milton Saunders. This series ended in May 1967.

Series 13, the last and the longest, opened on Friday September 29th 1967, now 7.30pm-8pm.In fact a few of the later shows in the last series had been screened at different times. No hostess was mentioned. The series opener was from RMS Queen Mary. A new gimmick began on October 27th with Viewers' Box 13, Michael Miles phoned the lucky person at home, "make sure that you are watching." And the prize to the lucky viewer was.... £5. But the winner also had the opportunity to be a contestant in the following week's show. This seemed to end after about a month, and the missing Alec Dane returned with his Gong. A Christmas special on Dec 22nd 1967 consisted of blind people. Viewers Box 13 was revived starting on Jan 12th 1968, you had to send in a postcard with your name on if you wanted to be included in the draw to select the person phoned, "make sure that you are watching." The winner appeared on the Jan 19th programme, to gamble on winning a Penny Whistle, or The trip of a Lifetime. The Gong seems to have gone again, and the regions showed the quiz in different Friday slots. After a month Alec Dane had returned, alternating fortnightly with Viewers Box 13. On Mar 22nd 1968 a "Gran Tourismo" car was on offer. May 3rd had a cruise round the Med on offer, or a rubber duck! June 7th had an audience in the catering trade, had the series continued, no doubt an audience of sewer workers or members of the House of Lords, or even both together, would have happened! Announcer Bob Danvers-Walker had one week off on June 28th, replaced by John Braban. But Bob was back the next week on July 5th 1968 for a special from Aberavon Lido. This was long serving director Audrey Starrett's last programme. New producer was John P Hamilton. These last four shows were on the road: July 12th was from the Winter Gardens Blackpool. July 19th came less glamorously from the Civic Hall Solihull. The final ever show, which is still in existence, was on July 26th 1968 from the Tyne Tees Studios in Newcastle. "Don't miss this final show."

The show, in a very similar guise, was revived next year by Southern Television, until Michael's early death in 1971. Thames revived it with Des O'Connor in the 1990s, but all this is outside the scope of this site.

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A Man of Our Times (1968, Rediffusion)
Max Osborne, manager at a High Wycombe furniture factory, is facing redundancy, but is offered a job in Australia. He takes 13 episodes to decide whether to go down under. Starring as Max was the great George Cole, with Jennifer Wilson as his lover Muriel (only in eps 1-4 and 12).
Series created by Julian Bond. Producer: Richard Bates. Executive Producer: Stella Richman.

Here are Rediffusion's own Synopses:

1. The Name of the Man (Thurs Jan 4th 1968, 9pm- other areas showed the series in another slot, Tuesdays at 10.30pm). Among the rest of the cast: Charles Tingwell, Clive Morton, Douglas Livingstone and Zuleika Robson.
In her flat, schoolteacher Muriel is serving breakfast for her schoolgirl daughter Lucy, and for Max who lives here as part of the family. She mentions their holiday plans, but Max insists his financial position will not allow it, even though he's entitled to promotion at the factory where he works, as the firm is being taken over. On his way to work, he calls to see his bank manager, Roberts, who listens to his promotion story, but warns not to count on anything and meanwhile practise some economies.
At the factory, foreman and local shop secretary Ron Banks demands some guarantees from Max that the forthcoming takeover will not mean redundancies and Max promises to take this up with Henry Somes.
Somes is discussing the takeover with his son David, an army friend of Max's who had arranged Max's job here. Garlands, the takeover firm, are actually demanding Max should go, but David defends Max, adding that it was Max himself who had introduced Garlands to them. Somes promises to do his best, but a takeover that benefits everybody cannot be jeopardised for one man's sake.
Over a pub lunch Max tries unsuccessfully to pump David over his future, but back in his office Max telephones Muriel to say that there's a meeting at 5.30 after which she can expect good news. Muriel has to phone back with the bad news that Lucy has had an accident in the school gym, can he come home at once? Afraid to miss Somes, Max puts Muriel off, and her icy response confirms his fear that he has made the wrong decision.
David has been trying without much success, to land a job for Max among his friends. At the 5.30 meeting, Max explains Ron's fears regarding the future under the new dispensation and receives guarded assurances from Somes. As to Max's own future, there's only prevarication and David is forced to admit Garlands want him out. Max is shocked and outraged, the more so when he is offered a job as manager of a subsidiary firm in Perth Australia. There's no common ground, and Max ends up reproaching David for not warning him in advance. Consider the Perth job seriously, is David's recommendation.
Max meets Ron in the pub and is surprised by the universally enthusiastic reaction to the Perth offer.
When he gets home, Muriel is incensed by his lack of concern for Lucy, had she been his child... He offers to accompany her to hospital to see Lucy. But when she is told of the Perth job, she rebuffs him at once. If he won't travel thirty miles on her behalf, she will certainly won't go half way round the world for him.

2. The Two-Legged Chameleon (Jan 11th 1968) also with Diana Beevers as Gwen, Norman Rossington, Douglas Livingstone, Richard Leech, Michael Graham-Cox, Timothy Carlton, Anne de Vigier, Zuleika Robson, Frank Dracott, Maurice Quick and Alan Casley. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Michael Lindsay-Hogg.
Following her accident, Lucy has been a hospital outpatient. Max and Muriel meet her when she is discharged, and Max promises to celebrate by taking them both to Chessington Zoo at half term. After Lucy has caught her bus, Max and Muriel revert to their customary strained relationship. She's not prepared to let him forget his faux pas and accuses him of trying to con Lucy.
At the factory, Max notices two of the men from Garlands snooping around. He and his secretary Gwen settle down to an unaccustomed sandwich lunch in their office. He tries to explain the complexities of his long standing affair with Muriel and the fact that he is still married to Sally. He feels he could not possibly go to Australia to take up his new job without Muriel or Lucy. But the enterprising Gwen has been checking up on other possible vacancies for her boss, one for a personnel officer.
At home that evening, there's a letter waiting for Max from Sally, the constant barrier between Max and Muriel. Max admits he'll be unable to take them to Chessington tomorrow, that brings on a fresh complaint from Muriel that she and Lucy are always last on his list of priorities. When she tells Lucy, she's disconcerted by her daughter's disenchanted assessment of them.
Max can't go as he's got an interview with a Mayfair management consultant. Interviewers Bellamy, Feathers and Hoare expose Max's weaknesses thus confirming him in his pessimism.
Muriel has phoned the office and discovered Max hadn't come clean over cancelling the Chessington trip. She goes there alone with Lucy. Max goes to join them there, surprised he has been shortlisted for the post. He tells all and Muriel apologises for her earlier suspicions. After an enjoyable time, the day ends happily. Back home, Muriel shows Max the birthday present for Sally that he invariably would otherwise forget.
Next day Max gets behind and is going to be late for his next interview. Gwen offers to drive him, making it clear she'd be prepared to come with him to Australia if he fails to land this job. Max meets his prospective employer Dick Bush on the roof of his building. This man is ruthless and direct, deliberately provoking Max, but the job is Max's. When Gwen is informed, she is dismayed, having lost the chance to go down under, and feeling a fool for betraying her emotions. Max feels embarrassed and clumsy over the incident.
Later he tells Muriel he has accepted Bush's offer of a job at a lower figure than his current income and with limited prospects, for her sake. Muriel insists he turns the offer down. She also tells him he ought to have squashed Gwen's hopes, of being incapable of seeing one relationship through, of playing one against the other. Lucy breaks into their row, making an intense appeal on her own behalf. It ends with Muriel agreeing to go to Australia, but on her terms. He must divorce Sally and put an end to his blurred relationships with "suffering secretaries." It's an ultimatum. He reflects on whatever happened to love

3. Sally Go Round the Moon (Jan 18th 1968) also with Jean Harvey, Norman Eshley, Margaret Boyd, Lucy Appleby, Christopher Witty, Michael Hall. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Alan Clarke.
Max buys a birthday present for Sally hoping that will persuade her to give him a divorce. Muriel is certain it'll fail. A young man named Simon Houlder prevents Max from going in to Sally's house. The impasse is only broken when Sally drives up, accompanied by her ex-nursemaid Edie.
When she takes Max inside, he finds his gift compares very poorly with her other presents. One is from admirer Simon, she admits she enjoys his attentions. Already aware of his unpropitious start, Max invites himself to dinner, hoping for a chance to prove his case. Also present will be his children, Clare who is met at the station, she has a special affection for her father, as exclusive of that between son Michael and his mother.
Vainly Max tries to re-establish himself as head of the family over lunch. He is also unsuccessful in getting on more friendly terms with Michael, and, an afternoon out rejected, Max takes an afternoon nap. As he searches Sally's room, he is shocked to find evidence of her relationship with an Oliver Anson. When he returns downstairs, he finds Sally flirting with Simon. Max is put in his place, she says she has every right to do what she likes in her own home. That's just what ruined the marriage in the first place, retorts Max.
Ejected, Max lands in the local churchyard and reviews what has happened. He has achieved nothing of what he had intended. He decides to pocket his pride and go back to Sally's. She does accept his apology, but also rejects his invitation to dinner. But she changes her mind when she finds that Oliver has let her down.
The meal begins well since the head waiter recognises Max. Sally meets Max half way and they dance, enjoying an unfamiliar intimacy. The ice is really broken when they see the comic side of their situation. So when he sees Sally home, Max claims he has missed his last train home, and is invited to stay, sleeping in Michael's bed. He decides not to phone Muriel. But he does see Sally in her room, to discuss the divorce. The entire Australia question depends on her. Softened, she believes Max is inviting her to accompany him down under. Max hasn't the heart to disillusion her, and takes the line of least resistance. They make love.
In the morning, he returns to Muriel, with his courage screwed up to explain his absence. But he is astonished to discover Muriel has cleared her things out and gone. There's a note, but guessing its contents, Max doesn't bother to read it

4 Got Yourself Sorted Out At All? (Jan 25th 1968) also with Jean Harvey, Charles Tingwell, Clive Morton, Maxine Audley, Maurice Hedley, Nora Swinburne, Diana Beevers, Gabrielle Blunt, Penny Darrell, Athene Fielding, and Richard Cornish. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Alan Clarke.
Somes resents what he sees as Max's equivocal attitude to the Australia offer and he suspects him of disloyalty. But David defends him, disapproving of his father's scheming to make use of Max if he should take the job.
Sally's parents, Mr and Mrs Prentice urge Sally to have nothing more to do with Max, alarmed when they hear about Max's offer to take her down under.
In the pub, Max describes to Shirley his difficulties in persuading his family to agree to go to Australia. David joins them and apologises again for what has happened with Max's current job. Max fills David in on his current personal problems, Muriel's ultimatum and disappearance, and Sally misunderstanding, thinking he wants her to accompany him.
In the office, Gwen holds Sally off, as per her boss' orders, and locates Muriel. Against her friend Miss Cardew's advice, Muriel meets Max in a teashop. Make your mind up about Sally and the job, then she'll consider coming back to him. But is Max finding he quite likes the unaccustomed freedom?
Max is offered a job by a Mrs Alcon, which he turns down, but as she is in the same furniture business, she asks him for a quotation for some furniture. Another job is mooted to him, but why this sudden interest in him? Gwen suggests it's down to David, the least he can do in the circumstances.
Somes wants to know Max's decision. But he won't be rushed into accepting the Australia job as Somes wants. But then taken off guard, when Sally phones, he accepts a dinner date with her. He castigates Gwen for not protecting him from her, and that upsets Gwen. Mrs Alcon accepts Max's quote, and Max apologises to Gwen and she joins David and him in the pub for a celebratory drink. But David makes it clear he's not behind these job offers.
The meeting with Sally also includes her parents, there for moral support. The whole thing is a disaster, the Prentices united in their mutual detestation of Max. Max retorts by claiming they had tried to buy him for Sally when she was "on the shelf." It turns out Prentice is behind those offers, bent on trying to keep Sally in England. Max comes clean and tells them that he never wanted her to go to Australia, all he wants is divorce. He is disconcerted to see Sally is relieved rather than shocked, she'd never really wanted to go to Australia at all. But she refuses point blank to consider divorce, she cannot face a public humiliation on top of her private grief. Since there is no point arguing further, Max leaves empty handed

5 It All Looks Different Through a Custard Cream (Feb 1st 1968) also with Wilfred Pickles, Michael Turner, Daphne Slater, David Bird, Diana Beevers, Michael Lees, Christopher Witty, Brian Anderson and Ronald Falk. Script: Douglas Livingstone. Director: Alastair Reid.
Bill Harlow is an important customer whom Max entertains in the pub. He's also Australian, and urges Max to join him for a weekend's drinking. But Max can't as he has to attend his father's retirement party in Dorset. He is Sam Osborne, a widower, who retired four weeks ago, and is resentful that his employers the Wessex Cider Company have held the party over to coincide with the retirement of Richard Parker, his brother in law and managing director. Max's sister Anthea, a widow, keeps house for Sam, and the pair have settled into a joyless routine.
On the way down Max meets Ted Harvey, the firm's sales manager, who's making for the same party. The two conceal their mutual dislike, but Max is shocked to learn that Ted is staying at Sam's, since he happens to be friendly with Anthea. When they get there, Sam cuts through Anthea's plans and assures Ted that he'd be more comfortable in a local hotel. Anthea is hardly pleased and she urges Max to take their father with him to Australia: she's been looking after him for the past eighteen years, now it's his turn.
At the party at the Wessex Company, Parker is discussing the firm's future with his successor Minton. Anthea has to apologise for Max's disruptive appearance and Sam is getting steadily drunker. Thus when Parker announces Sam is to make a speech, there's only an incoherent mumbling and he leaves. Max follows him to Sam's old office. Sam says he'd always hated this job, the Parkers had forced him into it when they'd found their daughter was expecting Anthea. Though astonished at first, he gladly accepts Max's offer to go with him to Australia.
Max meets his son Michael at a restaurant. He wants to go to university at Cambridge and has no desire to join them.
Anthea and Ted attempt to revive their former intimacy, but just as he is persuading her to come to his hotel, Max interrupts. When Ted leaves, Anthea refuses to fall in with the trip to Australia. She doesn't want to be housekeeper again. She meets Ted at the hotel, but soon realises he's more concerned with safeguarding his own position with his employers than with her. Anthea tries him out over whether she ought to go down under, and when he is enthusiastic, her fears are confirmed. So she tells Sam and Max she will go with them

6 Uncle Richard Knows Better Than You (Feb 8th 1968) also with Wilfred Pickles, Michael Turner, Daphne Slater, David Bird, Diana Beevers, Lucy Appleby, Roger Brierley, Malcolm Douglas and George Betton. Script: Douglas Livingstone. Director: Alastair Reid.
Sam and Anthea see Max off at the station. He feels rushed by Sam's single-minded enthusiasm for the whole venture, and nagged by Anthea's exuberance. Sam has already arranged for house agent Harman to sell his house, even though Anthea is more cautious, urging to wait until plans have been finalised.
Back at work, Max is upset that the firm have refused to pay for his family's fares to Australia, and anticipating this, Gwen has some information on assisted passages. Anyway, Sam offers to help with the money.
Clare is Max's daughter. She attends a convent school. She's keen to go with them until she hears Sam and Anthea will be looking after her. After all, she hasn't seen them for eight years. So Max sets up a meeting in a London fish restaurant. Sam forces the pace with some jokes, and when Anthea and Clare discover a mutual interest in tennis, it seems the ice is breaking. However Sam is getting drunk and Clare becomes embarrassed, especially when Max tries to establish a close relationship with her. It's an unsatisfactory time and as Max and Anthea bid farewell to Sam at Waterloo station, they try to lift the gloom. For Clare has already left them, saying she has a headache. Sam has insisted Anthea stay in town to check their plans at Australia House. When the train has departed, she demands Max give a definite decision about Australia. On the train, Sam gets drunk and steps out of the train thinking it has stopped at a station. He suffers a heart attack and ends up in a coma.
When Max gets down to Sam in Dorset, his uncle Richard Parker and Ted are already there. They visit him in hospital, he's not likely to recover. Ted takes his chance and urges Anthea to stay in England, that annoys Max who tells Ted to leave Anthea alone. Max is furious everyone is assuming the worst for Sam. He berates Parker for forcing his father into a job he did not like. Parker points out the Sam is no better than a drunkard, no use at his job and should have been sacked years ago. Max storms out.
Sam does die. Anthea thinks it was suicide, blaming Max on his unthinking optimism and his assumption they'd all love Australia. That meeting with Clare, Sam knew had been doomed to failure. Anthea says she hates Max, all his life he's always taken, and given nothing in return but disappointment. She's going back to Ted.
Max phones Clare but can't bring himself to tell her of Sam's death

7 The Dream Time (Feb 15th 1968) also with Thorley Waters, Maurice Hedley, Terence Brady, June Jago, Noel Hood, Carmen Munro, Harry Hutchinson, Tom Criddle, Gabrielle Drake, David Dandas and Frederick Shrecker. Script: Arden Winch. Director: Alastair Reid.
In an Oxford hotel bar, Prentice slangs Max over his treatment of Sally. Max tries to explain he only wants a divorce from Sally. Prentice leaves, leaving Max to foot the bill. Max then meets Dr Maynard, known as Wilfred, a regular figure around the city, who is as lonely as Max. They agree their time in university was a "dream time." The two embark on a sightseeing tour, finishing at his old college St Edmund Hall. Max explains how he sacrificed his Oxford career for a girl, life was never the same again. Max had met Lydia, who lived over a tobacconist's, where the attractive young Rose notoriously seduced many an undergraduate. Wilfred sympathises, he's living on a legacy that lasts as long as he remains a bachelor. The pair visit the shop, Max horrified to find Rose is still there, a middleaged slattern. Disconcerted by the grotesque anti-climax, he determines to find Lydia again.
Over tea, Max relates how he had been forced into marrying Sally, somehow he'd never got round to marrying Lydia. Prompted by Wilfred, Max goes to the office where Lydia used to work, but a Miss Waller is uncooperative, even claiming noone by the name of Lydia had ever worked here. So he leaves frustrated, and encounters Anna, an African student, whose idealistic hopes contrast sharply with his own sense of failure. She is proud of the fact that she's the first woman from her country to study in England. She plans to start a hospital for women in her country and Max wishes her luck. It recalls his own time at university when he'd been "free." That was more important than the actual degree he took, he reflects. Now money is all important, but then it had mattered very little. Wilfred holds a party for his Oxford cronies, who all seem to be middle aged and seedy. One is called Robin, who has a young man Roy in tow and when he talks to him, Max is shocked to find Roy brackets him with Wilfred's generation and age group. Roy is in fact the son of his former friend Garland. It's also clear Max is quite out of fashion with pop music these days. Roy's girl friend Penny has found out that Lydia is now living in London.
The party over, Max is despondent over the fact that he is middle aged and hasn't achieved anything. The dream time in Oxford had been his only happy time, but now he wonders whether even this was an illusion, the entire experience remembered as a fantasy, no relation to the truth

8 Which Side Are You On? (Feb 22nd 1968) also with Charles Tingwell, Clive Morton, Frederick Jaeger, Douglas Livingstone, Aubrey Richards, Denise Buckley, Mary Hignett, Gabrielle Blunt, Godfrey James, Henry Stamper and Shivendra Sinha. Script: Roy Russell. Director: Gareth Davies.
Somes and David fear a Go Slow at the factory could ruin the firm, but Ron Banks the shop steward is convinced all will be well when the rich company Garlands take them over. Ron proposes leaving negotiations in Max's hands, but by now Somes is doubting Max's reliability.
Max is now back at back after Sam's funeral. He has a temporary secretary in Sandie Turner, who is most efficient. He blames the dispute on Somes who has arbitrarily moved six men without any consultation, as four are Pakistanis there's some suggestion of colour prejudice. Max meets with Ron Banks and they do agree on the principle of joint consultation. But Max strenuously denies Ron's insinuation that because Max is leaving he is only interested in himself. He's always kept his word in the past, Max claims.
In the pub, David lets Max understand that if the dispute could be resolved quickly, it would be noticed by Garlands, to mutual benefit, but resenting what sounds like a bribe, Max insists he always does the best he can anyway.
When Max probes the causes of the dispute with Ron Banks further, he discovers that the fear of victimisation is the root. When Garlands take over, the men will not have Max there to protect them. The representative of Garlands, Noel Smedley, aged 48, is of the view that Max can have no love for Garlands and David too believes Max is taking the men's side. Max however claims his past negotiation successes have always depended on his being utterly impartial.
Smedley affirms to Somes and David that Garlands will not countenance taking over an unprofitable firm, and that the transfer of all six men must stand. Max puts the men's side, that they fear Garlands might tear down the factory and erect a new office block. The men down tools. Max proposes that the local union officer Wilkinson be brought in, but the men refuse. Alongside the sympathetic Sandie, Max watches Smedley and Somes failing to attract the attention of the strikers, and he tells Sandie to put Wilkinson in the picture.
Max is asked to quieten the noisy rabble, and does so. Smedley interprets this as a sign of Max's one sided sympathies, but takes his chance and continues addressing the men, only to be met by more resentment and heckling. Wilkinson sends Gregson, not a conciliator at all and Somes blames Max for introducing him into the dispute. But the men go back to work, Gregson however demanding that the six men be reinstated within fifteen minutes or there will be a walk out. He sees the issue as a test case against the big business interests for which Garlands stands. Poor Max can see that his old friendly methods of negotiating no longer apply. When he relays Gregson's ultimatum, Max finds himself blamed for bringing Gregson in. Inefficient and disployal Max is. Outside the factory Max meets one of the six, Askew, who feels guilty about it all. Max admits the affair is out of his hands and drowns his sorrows in the pub with Sandie

9 You Know Who Your Friends Are (Feb 29th 1968). Cast as well as George Cole were Charles Tingwell, Clive Morton, Frederick Jaeger, Douglas Livingstone, Aubrey Richards, Denise Buckley, Mary Hignett, Gabrielle Blunt, Godfrey James, Henry Stamper and Shivendra Sinha. Script: Roy Russell. Director: Gareth Davies.
Deadlock at the factory after a week of dispute. Banks and Gregson blames Max, believing him to be concerned only with his own future. Somes and David have agreed to call on Smedley at Garlands' luxurious city offices, blaming them for the firm's verge of collapse. Smedley offers a way out, that the takeover should be accepted at a lower price. This Somes and David flatly reject.
At the local working men's club Gregson warns the men they could be in for a hard time. One, Ken Bartlett, believes Max ought to have been given a better chance to act.
Banks fails to persuade David to reinstate Max, thinking he is not really interested in solving the dispute. David is evidently attracted to Sandie and arranges a weekend in Brighton with her.
Max holds a clandestine meeting in the pub with Jim Askew, one of the six sacked workers. Max bravely asks Jim to risk abuse from his fellow workers and reapply for his job. Next morning Jim runs the gauntlet of the picket line, and is met at the gates by Max. To everyone Max announces he will sign Jim on when the strike is over. Gregson and Banks question Jim closely over his change of heart.
Somes and David blame Garlands for sacking the men in Max's absence. With Smedley, they consider ways out of the impasse. It is agreed to give Max a free hand for twenty four hours, and Smedley gracefully agrees to keep out of his way.
The status quo is restored. At a meeting scheduled for 4pm, Gregson warns Banks not to let his distrust of Max jeopardise negotiations. The meeting takes place in Somes' office. Max tells everyone that the key figure in the dispute Jim Askew, is on a week's leave, and that another man is willing to take on the job he had refused to do. Both sides accept this, and to joint consultation in the future. Further the factory will remain a factory.
Sandie congratulates Max on success, in turn he thanks her for her encouragement. She doesn't tell him about David and he is bewildered by her lack of warmth.
Smedley thanks Max, coolly, for his efforts. Max finds that by settling the strike he has ruined himself. Had it continued the take over would have failed and he would still be in a job.
Max meets with Gregson who is bleakly contemptuous of his shattered illusions. Neither side is grateful to Max, who now learns that the men are even blaming him for their wages lost during the strike

10 Someone I Knew (Mar 7th 1968) also with Isabel Dean, Hugh Cross, John Hallam, Margot Boyd, Rosemary Rogers, Ernest Hare and Michael Sheard. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Bill Bain.
"Max drives to Southend in a hired car and joins a funeral party in the local cemetery. Among the mourners are Lydia Laing, 40, and Frank Meredith, 45. Although utterly unprepared for Max's visit, Lydia turns to him instinctively afterwards, allowing him to drive her away from her well intentioned friends and relations. Sitting in the car near the beach, she tells Max how she has spent the past eighteen years looking after her mother, until her death, so fulfilling a promise to her father on his deathbed. Lydia had always disliked her mother for the way she had subtly punished her father for being a failure during his lifetime, and afterwards had hypocritically pretended he had been perfect. Lydia is astonished at the ease with which she is confiding in Max, and in a pub he admits his journey here had been prompted by reading about her mother's death. He now gives her a partial picture of his own life, his marriage and family and his limited success as a personnel officer.
Lydia has forgotten her friends, who may be anxious on her behalf. It is twenty years since she and Max last met and she eagerly accepts his invitation to lunch. Max, pleasantly excited, wonders how long it will be before this relationship goes sour too.
In the restaurant they nostalgically recall the intimacies, delights and disasters, of their youth shared at Oxford twenty years ago. A picnic expedition to the Perch Inn which had begun romantically but ended in Max's falling in the water, a symbol of his later life. An occasion when Lydia had felt at one with Max, but he had failed to respond to her mood. Max's short lived venture into business on his own when he had invested and lost his little capital. They agree that reality had tarnished the brilliance of many of their contemporaries, that they are failures themselves.
Breaking the mood, they make an absurd show of enjoying themselves by going to the pier amusement arcade, trying all its attractions and ending in hysterical laughter. They speculate on their possible fate had they got married, as Max had wanted. Lydia consoles herself with the idea that she has been engaged for five years to Frank, but it is not a passionate relationship. Lydia invites him home to tea.
At Lydia's Victorian home they share tea and toast like students and re-enact their first meeting. Lydia is suddenly distressed by regret for the past, but refuses to let Max comfort her. She insists they are too late and too old and she does not want a further meeting. He now tells her the truth about himself: that he and Sally are separated and only married because she refuses a divorce. Max insists that he and Lydia were genuinely in love once before and they have a chance now to put the mistakes of the past right. Insisting he needs her, Max enlarges on his own troubles with Sally, Muriel and his job. He is unprepared for Lydia's outraged response. She points out she would have welcomed him at any other time but now, when he is merely looking for a support. She believes he sees her as his last resort and accuses him of tricking her with his nostalgic talk about the past. Now, as she is asking Max to go, Frank calls. He greets Max warmly and thanks him for taking care of Lydia at a critical moment. After Max has left, she dismisses him to Frank as 'someone she knew,' but Frank guesses there had been a special relationship.
Accepting the end of another dream, Max sets off home in the hired car."

11 Never Mind How We Got Here- Where Are We? (Mar 14th 1968) also with Jean Harvey, Peter Barkworth, Basil Henson, Shelagh Fraser, Christopher Witty, Lucy Appleby, Bruce Robinson, Reg Peters and Ralph Ball. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Alan Clarke.
"When Max goes to his bank to cash a cheque, he is asked to see the manager Mr Roberts, who is anxious to know what economies Max is preparing to make. Max tells him about the Australia offer and immediately Roberts becomes more affable and promises considerable financial help if Max takes the job. Max thanks him, explains that if he can get a divorce from his wife, he will certainly take the job, and promises to look in the following day and discuss details.
Max meets Sally in Cambridge, where she has gone with Michael, who is having interviews for a place at the university. Max is horrified when he discovers that Oliver Manson, whom he knows to be a close friend of Sally's is staying at the same hotel. That evening Sally comes to Max's room with a bottle of champagne and tells him she is prepared to give him a divorce. Max is furious that she has got himself and Manson under the same roof to discuss the matter and refuses to agree to a divorce.
Over breakfast the following morning, Max and Sally continue to row and she finally storms out of the dining room closely followed by Manson. A moment later, Michael comes in and Max tells him that he is not prepared to divorce Sally and let another man look after his children. Michael seems unperturbed and announces at the end of the meal that he passed his interview.
Max returns to the bank and tells Roberts that he is unlikely to go to Australia after all. Roberts' attitude changes abruptly and he warns Max that he will have to straighten his affairs quickly. Max goes to see Clare, and tells her that he has decided to go to Australia without her. She is surprised as mother had written to her saying that she had finished with Oliver Manson. Max is equally surprised to hear this, and wonders what the devil Sally is playing at.
Max goes to Manson's house and receives a chilly reception. Finally Manson admits that he had just been away on holiday with Sally and at the end of it she told him that she did not want after all to marry him. Max goes to Sally's house and tells her that he knows that she is finished with Manson and so why does she want a divorce? Sally explains that she feels that at last she has grown up and can stand on her own two feet. She has not given Max a divorce before, in case she needed him back. Now she feels that she can live happily alone. Max agrees that they should do the decent thing. He agrees to the divorce and they part for ever."

12 If Only Wishing Could End As Loving (Mar 21st 1968) also with Norman Rossington, Garfield Morgan, Andree Evans, Ann Rye, George Tovey, Jean Driant, Gilles Milinaire, Colin Maitland, Robert Sessions, Harry Tierney, David Billa, Maria Gray, Billy McComb, Gilles Dattas, Sylvie Dattas, Jacques Cey, Michael Faure and Ann Heffernan. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Michael Lindsay-Hogg.
"In the street, Max is intercepted by Bush, who would like to employ him. Bush admits he had underrated Max before, but that he had been impressed by his handling of the Garland crisis. Now he would like an early response to his offer, but Max insists he must first resolve his personal domestic problems.
He calls for Muriel at Dawson's flat, but hears she has gone to attend Lucy's school play. After hearing that Sally has offered Max a divorce at last, and admitting their mutual dislike, Dawson urges Max to make a special gesture now towards Muriel at this critical time.
Muriel has arrived at Victoria to board The Golden Arrow and is joined by Max at the last minute. He refuses to be drawn, claiming that the surprise expedition is purely for pleasure, and Muriel is satisfied. She is further pleased by their hotel at the Pas de Calais, but outside the cold wind disperses some of their romantic feelings. That evening, as they are coming down for dinner, Muriel is dismayed to meet a fellow teacher, Heather, who is staying at the same hotel with her friend Ian. There is no room for dissembling. Both couples are engaged in illicit affairs. Recognising the risk to their vulnerable new relationships, Max rushes Muriel out to a restaurant, rather than make up a foursome suggested by Ian.
The restaurant proves disappointing and Max is disgusted with the food, wine and service, and further irritated by a boisterous wedding party. Muriel agrees that the meeting with Heather has ruined the occasion for them. Max erupts at the waiter, refusing to tip him, and then marches over to the wedding party who are amusing themselves at his expense. He relents at the last moment, seeing the pathetic young bride, and leaves abruptly. He and Muriel go to an amusement arcade, but fail to lift the feeling of gloom. Forced into a corner, Max explains his motive in coming here, that Sally is offering a divorce. He had taken Dawson's advice that he should make a big splash, and he has spent the whole evening trying to establish the right moment to ask Muriel to marry him. Muriel is touched by his confession, and a new tender mood is generated.
Going on to a nightclub, they are put out by the arrival of Ian and Heather, but now Muriel feels herself secure enough to cope with them. All four agree that the dinners served at both hotel and restaurant had been bad. Heather, clearly anxious and inexperienced, begs Muriel not to desert her. Ian, self appointed 'life and soul of the party,' embarks on a series of dirty stories. Both Ian and Max are agreed on an evening of hard drinking. Muriel persuades Max to act as the cabaret conjuror's stooge, but afterwards, with his suit ruined, he recalls bitterly how Sally too used to enjoy making him appear a buffoon.
Later at the club, Max and Ian are getting on well together, reminiscing and establishing mutual acquaintances, and ignoring the women. In a drunken schoolboy mood, they decide to help the cabaret stripper take her clothes off. They are forced to beat a retreat from the restive French audience, leaving the embarrassed Muriel and Heather to pay the bill.
Having got back to the hotel, Max passes out, leaving Muriel hurt and angry. He wakes in the morning, at a disadvantage, to find Muriel dressed and packing. Defending his last night's conduct, he points out that he was coerced into stooging for the conjuror, but Muriel suggests it was really the shock of having his marriage proposal accepted that had made him get drunk. Muriel insists that they both face the truth: that the only thing they have in common is sexual attraction, and their affair only continued because Sally had happened to find it out. Max, realising how he has cheated everybody, ascribes his character defect to his public school upbringing. Piying him, and seeing him as a baby, Muriel knows their marriage would certainly fail. Miserable and desperate they return to London on The Golden Arrow and part on the platform making a clean break."

13 Long Time Since You've Got My Breakfast (Mar 28th 1968) also with Isabel Dean, Clive Morton, Charles Tingwell, Peter Jeffrey, Douglas Livingstone, Diana Beavers, Mary Hignett and Gabrielle Blunt. Script: Julian Bond. Director: Bill Bain.
"Gwen is in Max's office typing a farewell note for him, when Mrs Carr appears, to see if he is in yet, and has made up his mind about Australia. Gwen says she has no idea.
David Somes and his father are preparing for the first meeting of the new board of HS Soames Limited, and also wondering whether Max has made up his mind.
Max is at home getting ready to go to work for the last time, when Lydia arrives with a small parting present. For a moment it looks as though she may have come to say that she has changed her mind, but finally she goes. We see Lydia and Frank, and she tells him that she feels there is no point continuing their relationship.
The meeting has come to an end, except that David suggests that the company should make some gesture to Max. He is severely reprimanded by his father and the new chairman, Rushton.
Max arrives at his office and finds Gwen's note. He goes upstairs to see Mrs Carr and she promises to let him see Somes as soon as he is free. Rushton leaves, and David tells his father that he intends giving Max a farewell gift. He goes down to Max's office and they go to the pub together for a drink. David tells Max that he thinks Max should go to Australia and get away from all the dreary people that they both know. Max agrees that it is the only thing to do. David goes back and tells his father that he has organised a party for Max at 5.30pm and intends giving him a cheque for £1,000. Somes is shamed into agreeing to contribute half the amount.
That evening Max listens while Somes delivers a speech of sickening platitudes. Max is horrified at Somes' bland hypocrisy, and still more horrified at the bland way it is received by Mrs Carr, Gwen, David and Banks. He accepts David's cheque and then tells them all what he really thinks of them, and storms out.
The following morning, with a heavy hangover, Max answers the doorbell and discovers Lydia there again. She makes breakfast and he tells her what he is going to do. She tells him that she has left Frank and is also free to start again, and this is what they decide to do."

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The Love of Mike (from April 20th 1960, A-R)
A series of 26 comedy programmes made on Ampex, the first from A-R after the end of their partnership with Jack Hylton.
Michael Medwin starred as dance band trumpeter Mike Lane, who is always in a jam with debts and dames. Carmel McSharry as the char, and Brian Wilde as Bob, who shares his flat co-starred, though Wilde was replaced by Bernard Fox as Malcolm on and from the June 8th episode. The other co-star was George Roderick as George, a henpecked neighbour, who helps out just to get away from his wife.
Director: firstly Bill Hitchcock, then Ronald Marriott (from June 8th), then Cyril Butcher (from July 4th), also Bill Turner. Theme music written by Tommy Watt.
Contemporary criticism of the first show: "Disappointing... riddled with comedy cliches and corny situations. Medwin strained too much... the laughter wore off more than halfway through to a tiny trickle... while all the supporting characters were good, the bit players were appallingly bad."
But by the July 4th 1960 story, critic John Price was able to admit, "a fine comedy team has been moulded by the director, Cyril Butcher." The story was about George buying a greengrocer's shop next door to a new supermarket. Mike's fast talking gives George the chance to sell the shop for twice the price paid, but he refuses to sell, believing he's landed a gold mine. Instead he buys another shop opposite the supermarket.
Another story showed Mike stumbling on a judge's badge for a Miss World contest, and using it to his advantage. Another had him playing in a band at the Cannes Film Festival, but as he can't get a flight ticket, he poses as the pilot. Being a thoroughly moral series, Medwin explained, "he never gets anywhere. All his little tricks blow up in his face."

A follow up series began on May 15th 1961:
Three Live Wires
which again starred Michael Medwin, Bernard Fox and George Roderick. They were joined by Deryck Guyler as The Manager, and Derek Benfield as Higgenbottom, who was given joint starring status from story 3. Scripts: James Kelly and Peter Miller. Director: Christopher Hodson. except for: Don Gale (June 19th, Aug 7th). John P Hamilton (June 26th, July 17th, Sept 4th, 18th, 25th) Episodes included: 1 French Cleaner (May 15th 1961)
2 Stranger Than Fiction (May 22nd 1961) with Bernard Hunter, Patricia Haines, Vanda Godsell and guest star Sydney Tafler.
3 The Play Off (May 29th 1961) with Bill Shine, Ronnie Stevens, Constance Wake and David Morrell.
4 Room Up Above(June 5th 1961) with Barry Macgregor, Audrey Noble, Kathleen Boutall, Tony Sympson, Grace Dolan and guest stars Peter Vaughan and Moira Redmond.
5 The Recall (June 12th 1961) with Ivor Salter, Harry Littlewood, David Blake Kelly, Alister Smart, Noel Coleman and John Bosch.
6 The Critic (June 19th 1961) with Charles Morgan and guest Peter Vaughan.
7 The Suit (June 26th 1961) with Ronnie Corbett, Peter Stockbridge, Fred Abbott, Charles Stanley, plus The Dudley Moore Trio. Guest star Kieron Moore (no Deryck Guyler).
8 Falling Star (July 3rd 1961) with Lionel Murton, Ronnie Stevens, Harry Littlewood, Joe Ritchie and guest star Dickie Henderson.
9 The Ring (July 10th 1961) with Harold Berens, Arthur Lowe and Valerie Brooks. Also with Audrey Noble, Geoffrey Denton, Agatha Carroll, Jacqueline Maude, Chris Carlsen and Gay Holden (no Deryck Guyler).
10 Winner Take All (July 17th 1961) with Anthony Sager and Leslie Handford.
11 Who Was That Lady? (July 24th 1961) with Betty Huntley-Wright, Valerie Brooks, also John Dearth and Raymond Hodge.
12 The Suggestion Box (July 31st 1961) with Timothy Bateson as Mr Bligh, Steven Scott as Mr Swan and Jessie Robins as Mrs Berry.
13 Pay or Return (August 7th 1961) with guest stars Naomi Chance as Bubbles and Freddie Mills as O'Brien. Also with Vic Wise as Cookie and Ross Hutchinson as Doctor.
14 The Salesman (August 14th 1961) with Alexander Dore, Peter Welch, also Laurel Solash and Beryl Andrews.
15 The Matchmaker (August 21st 1961)
16 Reflections (August 28th 1961) with Peter Byrne, Charles Julian, also Noel Coleman and Paul Williamson.
17 The Cash Box (September 4th 1961) with Virginia Vernon and also Hugh Evans.
18 The Tea Break (September 11th 1961) with John Scott, also Timothy Bateson, Denis DeMarney and Peter Lawrence.
19 The Disappearance (September 18th 1961) with Duncan Lewis, also Malcolm Webster and Jennifer Browne (no Deryck Guyler). This script only by Gerald Kelsey and Dick Sharples.
20 The Rise (September 25th 1961) with John Scott.
In all there were 26 stories, the last being
26 The Holiday (November 6th 1961) with Ronnie Corbett, Joan Ingram, Renee Harrison and Patricia Haines..

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Highland Fling (Associated Rediffusion)

Described as a musical comedy in six episodes, this started on the August Bank Holiday 1957. The star was Richard Hearne, who had originally scripted it in 1939 as a musical at the Gaiety Theatre, but the war aborted the project. Now with Richard Waring, Hearne had adapted it for tv. Henry Kendall produced the show, which was directed by John Phillips. The original music was by Joyce Cochrane. Programmes were made at Studio One Wembley before an audience. The stories also starred James Hayter (except the first story) and Charles Heslop, with Nicolette Roeg, Jean Bayliss, David Williams, and Charles Lamb.
1 No Sale (Monday August 5th 1957 at 9.30pm). Billy McQuirtle and his pals of the old estate agency of Nutty, Dime and Wormy are selling a Scottish castle, but they appear to be doing their best to prevent anyone from buying it. But then Billy's best friend falls in love with a millionaire client's beautiful daughter.
2 Desirable Residence (August 12th 1957). Millionaire Augustus Trim (James Hayter) won't be put off buying the castle.
3 Vacant Possession (August 19th 1957). Augustus Trim has invited the entire office to stay with him at the castle for the weekend.
4 (August 26th 1957).
5 Castle Plot (September 2nd 1957). Also with Rufus Cruikshank. Now that Trim is happily installed in the castle, there seems nothing that Billy and his pals can do. However, when they meet Red Wully, a six foot four red-bearded gent, Billy gets the idea of entering Trim against him in the Highland Games.
6 Going Concern (September 9th 1957). It's Billy's last attempt to put Augustus Trim off. He haunts the castle in ghostly garb. Whether his plan will succeed, depends on Trim's reaction to nocturnal disturbances.
The picture shows Richard Hearne in a publicity photo for A-R, taken from the top of their Kingsway building

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SUNDAY'S CHILD
This ABC series started on 14th June 1959, with child star Mandy Miller, aged almost 15, starring as Mandy Proctor. Daphne Anderson co-starred as her scatty mother Evelyn Proctor. Peter Lambda devised the series and wrote all 13 stories. Geoffrey Nethercott was the director, and the producer was Philip Dale.

Here is a contemporary account of this first story: Mandy plays the daughter of a widow who tries to get money out of her bank manager to take a trip to New York to sell some inventions that her husband left after he died. When he refuses, Mandy decides to take out a loan, which is secured by her forthcoming appearance on a tv quiz. Commented Derek Hoddinott, "I like the way the bank employees voted to support Mandy and Mandy herself was so delightful, so talented, and the direction so clever, that I rate this the best of the new series on TV." The others in this cast were Fred Kitchen, Brian Wilde, Billy Milton, Eric Hillyard, Robert Young, Frances Leak, James Bret, Maidie Andrews, Graeme Campbell, Sheila Gill, Launce Maraschal, John Grant, Kenneth Collins, Andrew Irvine, Frank Littlewood, and Susan Tress.

Here are details of a few of the other stories:
4 The Fourth Freedom (July 5th 1959) with Hana Pravda as Anna Kovacs, Stratford Johns as Police Sgt, Anthony Jennett as Policeman, Humphrey Morton as Clerk, James Raglan as Cdr Frederick Scott, Edward Evans as Glyn Morgan, Vincent Holman as Sir Wilfred Arden, Scott Harrold as Liberal MP and Ann Tirard as Wardress. An illegal visitor from another country arouses the crusader in Evelyn. Anna must be allowed to stay! It is Mandy who brings about the 'summit talks.'
7 Care and Protection (July 26th 1959) with Joan Hathorne as Moira Arlington-Smith, Margo Andrew as Angela, Geoffrey Adams as Clerk of the Court, Colin Fry as Solicitor, and Aubrey Danvers-Walker and Charles Weston as JPs, with Little Jumbo. It seems Mandy's new friend will turn out to be just another juvenile delinquent. Mandy has an idea, and it is another youngster who supplies the answer
10 What Makes the Wheels Go Round (August 16th 1959), with Hana Pravda as Anna, Tom Macaulay as Sir Robert Freeman, Barbara Everest as Miss Lawson, and David Graham as Denis Quendon. Mandy finds herself up against a formidable opponent who has discovered a protege of her late father, who has discovered a revolutionary chemical process.
11 The Star (August 23rd 1959), with Patrick Holt as Rod Silvano, and Hana Pravda, who plays a falling star threatening to upset Mandy's little world.
12 The Emperor's Tailors (Aug 30th 1959), with Howard Payne as Harry Briggs, Sidney Vivian as Biff, William Lyon Brown as Jasper Poole, Marion Wilson as Mrs Poole, and Ewan Roberts as Alastair McKay. Mandy finds it difficult to understand how someone can become a genius through no fault of his own.
13 Sunday Closing (Sept 6th 1959- final story), with Hana Pravda as Anna, Barbara Everest as Miss Lawson, Cyril Shaps as Mr Pettigrew, Billy Milton as Magistrate, John Stuart as MP, Vincent Holman as Sir Wilfred Arden, William Lyon Brown as Jasper Poole, Marion Wilson as Mrs Poole, Margo Andrew as Angela, Stewart Guidotti as Johnny and Fred Kitchen as Bank Manager. An informer tries to spoil Mandy's birthday party, but many of her old friends come to the rescue of Miss Lawson and she is able to extend her premises.
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The Verdict is Yours (Granada)
"The cases ... have no scripts... nobody in the studio knows what's coming next." However the programmes were of course rehearsed, allegedly only the story outline was revealed to the participating actors, so these rehearsals must have been fascinating. Philip Purser describes one such in the book Granada Television (2003) p125. Apparently the one playing the guilty party knew their identity, but no one else, certainly not the jury. A naturally suspicious viewer wrote in TV Times (No 144), "I fail to see how it can be unscripted," to which the reply was given, "those taking part are briefed on the character in which they appear. They are told how old they are, where they live, their family background etc. Witnesses are told whether they appear for the defence or the prosecution and what they are supposed to have seen. They then go into the witness box and answer questions impromptu. There is no rehearsal."
Director Herbert Wise stated, "the original intention was that each case should last two days, but in the end everyone agreed it would be better to add an extra day." He added, "to help speed up the action, a commentator is being used to summarise the evidence, and we will switch to him whenever a new witness is being sworn in. He is the only person in the programme who has no counterpart in a real court."
One member of the jury, which was taken from members of the public as in real life, explained, "the jury took notes of all the salient points and discussed them very earnestly and soberly." She refers to this case of Arthur Martin, a "far from sympathetic character, truculent and surly," but, claimed the juror, "our verdict was unanimous and based solely on facts."
One of the longest serving of the 'barristers', Simon Kester, was in all series, but unfortunately casts were not published (except for repeat broadcasts) and without the actual programmes, which were taped but mostly wiped, we will never know the casts.

First series (1958) - Three "unscripted" half hour programmes comprised one trial.
Unfortunately TV Times didn't even provide details of the storyline for this first series! David Ensor was the judge throughout the series, a real life solicitor whose task was to clarify any confusing issues and sum up in two minutes, though "sometimes the director stretches a point... and gives me an extra 40 seconds! In those two minutes I have to give a summing up that a real judge would take two hours over."
One story in July 1958 was congratulated on for its authenticity by the secretary for the National Institute for the Deaf- when the problem of a deaf witness with a hearing aid was accurately depicted.
Another viewer complained, erroneously, that the jury seemed to have changed the next night in the Case of the Poisoned Pen Letters. The women on this jury were alleged to have been really horrified when they were given copies of "genuine, gruesome, poison pen stuff." Barristers tried to prove the girl's handwriting seen on an estate agent's catalogue was the same hand as the writing in the letters. The woman on trial for this crime was Elizabeth Redding, played by Shirley Lawrence. She was found not guilty.
Another case from this first series starred actress Barbara Burke, playing Lucy Mitchell, accused of electrocuting her mother in a bath.
In another, Eira Heath played Maria Hernandez accused of murdering her lover's wife with weedkiller. She too was acquitted.
One case starred Kevin Stoney as ex-army officer Roy Cromwell, accused of murdering a wartime pal by backing a car into him in a hotel car park.
Derren Nesbitt was in one of the first series, and his performance so impressed Irving Allen of Warwick Films that he was offered a part in the film In the Nick.
And William Lucas played Arthur Martin, accused of blowing up machinery at a factory where he had once worked.
In Regina v Farrell (date 1958), script: by Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney, director: James Ormerod, Martin Benson played the prosecuting counsel, and John Chandos defence counsel. Others appearing included Basil Dignam as Major Farrell, Helena Hughes as the major's niece who is a nun, and Monica Grey as a family doctor.
From various sources, I can confirm these definitely also appeared in this series: Tony Church, Clifford Earl, Andrew Faulds (also in On Trial), Keith Faulkner, Gretchen Franklin (as a "murderess"), John Harvey, Michael Hawkins, Geoffrey Hibbert, Thora Hird (series 3), Edward Jewesbury, Judy Kenny, Lloyd Lamble, George Mikell, Norman Mitchell, Edna Morris (series 3), Russell Napier, Rachel Roberts (most likely series 1 or 2), Thelma Ruby, Ivor Salter, Sally Ann Shaw (series 1 or 2), Peggy Thorpe-Bates, Thorley Walters (series 3), Colin Welland (as an accused man, series 3), Neil Wilson and John Witty.

Details of some of the cases:

Series 1: Regina v Cromwell part, in Granada archive with date of May 28th 1958, which must be incorrect.

The first case was on
Tuesday July 1st 1958 10.15-10.45pm Wednesday July 9th 1958 10.15-10.45pm and Thursday July 10th 1958 10.15-10.45pm.
Case devised by Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney Designed by Paul Bernard Directed by Herbert Wise.
A case of blackmail

Tuesday July 8th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Wednesday July 9th 1958 10.15-10.45pm and Thursday July 10th 1958 10.15-10.45pm.
Case devised by Peter Wildeblood Designed by Paul Bernard Directed by David Main

Tuesday August 5th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Wednesday August 6th 1958 10.15-10.45pm and Thursday August 7th 1958 10.15-10.45pm.
Case devised by Fenton Bresler Designed by Paul Bernard Directed by Max Morgan Witts

Tuesday August 12th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Wednesday August 13th 1958 10.15-10.45pm and Thursday August 14th 1958 10.15-10.45pm.
Case devised by Fenton Bresler Designed by Paul Bernard Directed by Herbert Wise

Tuesday August 19th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Wednesday August 20th 1958 10.15-10.45pm and Thursday August 21st 1958 10.15-10.45pm.
Case devised by Fenton Bresler Designed by Paul Bernard Directed by Max Morgan-Witts

Tuesday September 2nd 1958, Wednesday September 3rd 1958, and Thursday September 4th 1958
Case devised by Henry Kershaw Directed by James Ormerod

Tuesday September 9th 1958, Wednesday September 10th 1958, and Thursday September 11th 1958
Regina v Cordoza (complete three episodes, in Granada archive)

Wednesday September 17th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Thursday September 18th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11.00-11.30pm
Henderson v Ford
Case devised by Philip Grenville Main Directed by Claude Whatham (part in Granada archive)

Wednesday September 24th 1958 10.15-10.45pm Thursday September 25th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11.00-11.30pm
Case devised by LF Lampitt Directed by James Ormerod

Wednesday October 1st 1958 10.15-10.45pm Thursday October 2nd 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11.15-11.45pm
Case devised by LF Lampitt Directed by James Ormerod

Thursday October 16th 10.15-11.15pm (this was an hour long trial)
Case devised by LF Lampitt

Wednesday October 22nd 1958 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday October 23rd 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.28pm
Case devised by John Hopkins Directed by Herbert Wise

Wednesday October 29th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday October 30th 1958 11-11.28
Case devised by Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney. Directed by Michael Scott

Wednesday November 5th 1958 11-11.28pm, Thursday November 6th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.28pm
Case devised by LF Lampitt Directed by James Ormerod

Wednesday November 12th 1958 11-11.30pm, Thursday November 13th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.30pm
Directed by Claude Whatham

Wednesday November 19th 1958 11-11.28pm, Thursday November 20th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.30pm
The Case of The Disfigured Actress
Case devised by John Hopkins Directed by James Ormerod (part in Granada archive)

Wednesday November 26th 1958 10.15-10,45pm, Thursday November 27th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.30pm
Case devised by LF Lampitt Directed by Michael Scott
Cast includes Jack May as Defence Counsel. Also Benice Swanson as one of the witnesses, Renee Patch

Wednesday December 3rd 1958 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday December 4th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.30pm
Case devised by Harry Kershaw Directed by Michael Scott

Wednesday December 17th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday December 18th 1958 10.15-10.45pm, and 11-11.30pm
Case devised by Peter Fison Directed by Warren Jenkins
Causing grievous bodily harm is the new assize court trial charge. A young Jamaican bus driver is alleged to have attacked a civil servant. In the lower courts the accused denied the allegation and reserved his defence

Note- The series In Court Today was a variation on the courtroom theme, shown in the summer of 1959, each unscripted programme 30 minutes long, the setting a Magistrates Court. Directors included James Ormerod and Graham Evans. The producer was Harry Elton. Programmes were telerecorded, for instance the case screened on Wed 6th May was actually made on Fri 1st May. Some excitement occurred off camera, since as soon as the recording was over, a detective pounced on one of the audience and arrested him!
The group of actors and actresses in the series were taken to a court in Manchester, and another in Stockport to study proceedings. No lines were written for them in the series, no notes, allegedly, about the way to act, no guidance as to how to react under cross examination. The only script consisted of the charge sheet, written in the formal language of the court.
Clerk of the Court in each story was played by John Horsley, as seen in this photo. If you know any others who appeared, I'd be pleased to hear from you.
The series was panned by critics. Equity wasn't happy either, since the role of chairman of the bench was taken by real-life magistrate Alderman J Cleary of Liverpool.
The first programme was on April 29th 1959. The series ended at the end of June 1959.

The second series of The Verdict is Yours, with probably eleven programmes, opened at the start of July 1959. Each case was now reduced to two half hour programmes, not shown in all ITV regions. Southern TV did not screen it, oddly because lawyer Fenton Bresler, one of their presenters did devise some of the cases for this programme. Simon Kester and Martin Benson again regularly appeared as lawyers.

2.2 The Case of the Farmer's Bull
Wednesday July 8th 1959, 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday July 9th 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Designed by George Haslam. Director: Mike Wooller.
Cast includes David Ensor as Judge, Jack May as Counsel for Defence, Martin Benson as Counsel for Prosecution.
A long standing feud between neighbouring farmers flares into violence over the right of way across a field, and farmer John Cullen is charged with shooting his neighbour's prize bull

2.4 The Case of the Fake Painting
Wednesday July 22nd 1959, 10.15-10.45pm, Thursday July 23rd 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Case devised by Peter Wildeblood. Designed by George Haslam. Director: Graham Evans.
Cast includes David Ensor as Judge, Jack May as Counsel for Defence, Martin Benson as Counsel for Prosecution.
An Amercian declares that two pictures have been switched and brings an action for fraud

2.8 The Case of the Missing Golf Funds
Wednesday August 19th 1959, 10.15-10.45pm,
Thursday August 20th 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Designed by George Haslam. Director: Mike Woolgar.
Cast includes David Ensor as Judge, John van Eyssen as Counsel for Defence, William Fox as Counsel for Prosecution.
Henry Wentworth, mild elderly secretary of the Seacombe Golf Club, is unable to challenge the accusation of the newly elected captain that £100 has disappeared from the club safe. He finds himself charged with stealing it.

2.9 The Case of the Broken Engagement
Wednesday August 26th 1959, 10.15-10.45pm,
Thursday August 27th 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Case devised by John Whitney and Geoffrey Bellman
Designed by George Haslam. Director: Wilfred Fielding.
Cast includes David Ensor, Simon Kester and William Squire.
Prudence Eland, daughter of a rich industrialist and a member of the Mayfair bright set, makes a satisfactory match with the 8th Marquis of Salchester. While on holiday on the Italian Riviera, she meets Italian prince Georgio Vittoria d'Umberti, and is frequently seen in his company by a notorious gossip columnist who makes the most of it in the English papers. Lord Salchester breaks off the engagement, and Prudence Eland's father insists that she sue him for breach of promise.

2.10 The Case of the Bathing Accident
Wednesday September 2nd 1959, 10.20-10.50pm,
Thursday September 3rd 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Case devised by HV Kershaw
Director: Wilfred Fielding.
Cast includes David Ensor, Simon Kester and John Chandos.
A 17 year old girl (played by Barbara Brown) alleges that while swimming in Austria on a holiday arranged by her school, she got into difficulties owing to lack of proper supervision and sustained injuries during an attempted rescue. Her father sues the Principal of her school.

2.11 The Case of the Murdered Pawnbroker (last of series)
Wednesday September 9th 1959, 10.25-10.55pm,
Thursday September 10th 1959, 10.15-10.48pm,
Case devised by Fenton Bresler
Director: Mike Wooller.
Cast: David Ensor as Judge, William Squire as Counsel for Defence, William Fox as Counsel for Prosecution, with David Lodge and Ronald Hines.
John Gordon, a 22 year old lorry driver, is accused of the murder of an 85 year old pawnbroker, Joseph Booth. The prosecution alleges that Gordon stabbed Mr Booth with a knife while attempting to steal 140 gold sovereigns. Gordon denies the charge.

This seems to be a repeat: The Case of the Offensive General
Friday February 12th 1960, 11.07pm-12 midnight (Granada region only)
Case devised by Peter Wildeblood
Director: Michael Scott.
Cast: David Ensor as Judge, Martin Benson as Counsel for Plaintiff, William Fox as Counsel for Defendant, Ralph Michael as Lord Charlcote, Georgina Cookson as Dr Christine Helder.
An offensive military campaign of the last war is fought again during a slander action at Birkenhead Assizes.

On Trial, a series of recreations of real life trials followed in the summer of 1960.

After a long break The Verdict is Yours was revived: Third series 1962/3
75 or 85 minute stories shown at peak viewing time. Set in Birkenhead Assizes, producer Peter Wildeblood said it was "a rewarding programme to produce, as well as a fascinating one," for "it teaches us the art of cross examination."

3.1 Regina v Harding
Monday August 27th 1962, 9.15-10.40pm
Case devised by James Parish. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Michael Scott. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
Typist Christine Milton drowns during a midnight bathe on a lonely beach. Police charge bank manager David Harding with procuring her death. Mr Justic Ensor tries the case.

3.2 Regina v Talbot
Monday September 3rd 1962, 9.15-10.40pm
Case devised by Cyril Abraham.
Director: Eric Price. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
The bosun of a British merchant ship comes up for trial before Mr Justice Ensor on a charge of murdering a person unknown. He is accused of fighting with a stowaway at night and throwing him overboard, but members of the crew on watch give differing accounts of what they saw.

3.3 Braithwaite v Merton
Monday September 10th 1962, 9.15-10.40pm
Case devised by Cedric Wallis. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Michael Scott. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
Victor Braithwaite, a former county cricketer, accuses Donald Merton, a master at his son's college, of enticing away his wife.

3.4 Regina v Zyrawska
Monday September 17th 1962, 9.15-10.30pm
Case devised by Hugh Forbes. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Eric Price. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
For years Jack and Susie Morris have been powerless to prevent the growing domination of Katya Zyrawska, their Polish paying guest, over their teenage daughter Paula. But when Paula gets into trouble with the French police, they continue their fight in court.

3.7 Bardolino v Duxford
Monday October 8th 1962, 9.15pm
Case devised by Michael Gilbert. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Howard Baker. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
Lucia Bardolino, an Italian au pair living in the home of a Cheshire MP, sues the police for damages to her reputation as a result of being cautioned under the Street Offences Act. Verdict: the jury found for the plaintiff .

3.8 Regina v Derbyshire
Monday October 15th 1962, 9.15pm
Case devised by Cyril Abraham. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Eric Price. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
Prosecuting counsel played by Martin Benson.
For three months Robert Derbyshire's attractive Brazilian wife (played by Leda Casares) has been pestered by indecent telephone calls. When he traps a suspect in a nearby callbox there is a fight, which results in a charge of grievous bodily harm.
Leda told me in 2013, "I do remember that Alfred Burke played my husband, a terrific guy, and that Martin Benson played the prosecution counsel. Yes there was a great element of improvisation, which at that time was hard for me as I was conscious about my accent. In any case I had so little to say that it didn't matter. What I remember was that I had a fabulous make-up artist, and that a suit was chosen for me and a velvet hat. At the end of the shoot I was given the hat as a souvenir. And, miracle I still have it." You can see it in this publicity photo of her taken for this programme. Thank you, Leda Casares

3.9 Regina v Browning
Monday October 22nd 1962, 9.15pm
Case devised by Fenton Bresler. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Eric Price. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
The police ambush three burglars who escape. Thomas Browning, seen running away in a nearby street, is arrested and identified, but claims he is being victimised.

3.10 Laughton v Ware
Monday October 29th 1962, 9.15pm
Case devised by Cedric Wallis. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Claude Whatham. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
Naval rating Charlie Barnes returns from sea, calls off his wedding, and pawns the ring. As a result he finds himself charged at the Birkenhead Assizes with receiving stolen property.

The series was now shortened to one hour, with a return for the jury's verdict after a brief break for the News Headlines.

3.12 Regina v Bellingham
Friday November 16th 1962, 10.15-11.10pm, verdict after News Headlines
Case devised by Vivienne Mason (pseudonymn for Vivienne Ensor, wife of David Ensor). Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Richard Everitt. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
A young labourer is accused of arson after a hayrick blaze at a village harvest festival.

3.14 Laughton v Ware
Friday November 30th 1962, 10.15-11.15pm, Verdict after News Headlines
Case devised by Maurice Wiltshire. Editor: Guy Morgan.
Director: Max Morgan-Witts. Producer: Peter Wildeblood.
An unsuccessful by-election candidate sues an undergraduate of the local university for a rag week libel.

3.17 Regina v Cullen
December 21st 1962
Case devised by Hugh Forbes. Director: Max Morgan-Witts.
Harry Cullen is accused of 'wounding with intent' as the result of a grudge fight with a fellow member of an amateur boxing club

3.18 Henley v Laurence
Friday December 28th 1962, 10.15pm
Case devised by Nicholas Palmer. Editor: Hugh Leonard.
Director: Christopher McMaster. Producer: Claud Whatham.
The Laurences, in danger of losing their foster son Alan, decide on a showdown with the Thompsons, the boy's parents. As a result, Harry Laurence faces a murder charge.

3.19 Purley v Devlin
January 4th 1963
Case devised by Hugh Leonard. Director: Peter Plummer.

3.20 Regina v Maldon
January 11th 1963
Case devised by Jack Rosenthal. Editor: Hugh Leonard. Director: Christopher McMaster.
Cast includes Jack May.
Graham Maldon hounds a successful decorator for payment of large sums of money. He claims he is collecting a gambling debt. The prosecution calls it blackmail

3.24 Regina v Middleton
Friday February 8th 1963, 10.15pm
Case devised by Jack Rosenthal. Editor: Hugh Leonard.
Director: Peter Plummer. Producer: Claude Whatham.
Can a wife steal from her husband? The Law says yes- in certain circumstances, and Helen Middleton is arrested on a charge of larceny following a quarrel with her husband.

3.25 Regina v Leek
Friday February 15th 1963, 10.15pm
Case devised by John Finch. Editor: Hugh Leonard.
Director: Peter Plummer. Producer: Claude Whatham.
May Featherstone leaves her husband and later marries again. She is subsequently put on trial for bigamy. But who is the real bigamist- May or her first husband, Jack Featherstone?

3.26 Henley v Bone
Friday February 22nd 1963, 10.15pm
Case devised by Peter Lamda. Editor: Hugh Leonard.
Director: Christopher McMaster. Producer: Claud Whatham.
William Bone, a chemist, prosecutes Don Henley, an efficiency expert, for fraud. The case is dismissed for lack of evidence. Now it is Henley's turn to sue Bone- for malicious prosection.
Cast includes David Ensor, Jack May (a frequent actor in the series as a barrister), Mark Eden.
Note- this exists in the Granada archive

3.29 Regina v Curry
Friday March 15th 1963, 10.15pm (final programme)
Case devised and edited by Hugh Leonard.
Director: Peter Plummer. Producer: Claud Whatham.
Hezekiah Curry stands accused of blowing up the hothouse of his neighbour and arch-enemy Peter Boyle. Was this an accident or sabotage?

To Granada's series of real life trials, On Trial
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On Trial (Granada, 1960)
was a series of ten dramas depicting real-life trials.
Andrew Faulds was the Narrator in all of the trials, Peter Wildeblood producing the entire series.

1 Sir Roger Casement Friday July 8th 1960 9.35pm, repeated: Friday June 30th 1961 11.2pm (Granada region only)
Starring Peter Wyngarde in the title role, Abraham Soafaer as Lord Chief Justice, John Robinson as Serjeant Sullivan KC, John Westbrook as Sir FE Smith KC, Henry Oscar as Sir George Cave. Commentary by Brian Inglis. Cast also included: Neil Wilson, Brian Phelan, James McLoughlin, Liam Gaffney, Joan O'Hara, Jack Cunningham, Michael Robbins, Colin Blakely, John Barron, Ballard Berkeley, J Leslie Frith, John Maitland.
Documented by Cedric Watts. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Cliff Owen.
On Good Friday 1916, Sir Roger Casement was arrested after landing from a German U-boat on the Irish coast. His trial for treason, overshadowed by the existence of his notorious private diaries, was one of the most sensational in history.
Critic 'JP' commented that "the use of a narrator and a commentator (Brian Inglis) to describe events during the trial and to explain the background... was excellent... Peter Wyngarde did not have very much to say. How could he, when Casement refused to be called as a witness in his own defence? Abraham Sofaer appeared as a very upstanding and correct Lord Chief Justice, John Robinson played Defence Counsel, and John Westbrook was Prosecuting Counsel. Even Henry Oscar had only a relatively small part as the solictor general... a difficult experiment but a production well done."
2 The Baccarat Scandal July 15th 1960, Friday July 14th 1961 11.2pm rpt (Granada region)
Starring John Justin as Sir William Gordon-Cumming, Alan Webb as Sir Edward Clarke QC, Michael Shepley Sir Charles Russell QC, Georgina Cookson as Mrs Arthur Wilson. Commentary by James Laver. Cast also included: Barry Lowe, Graham Crowden, Derek Smith, Hugh Cross, Kevin Brennan, Redmond Phillips, Malcolm Watson, Gilbert Spurge.
Documented by William Slater. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Henry Kaplan.
Sir William Gordon-Cumming is accused of cheating at cards during a society house party at which the Prince of Wales is a guest. In spite of every effort to suppress the scandal, it breaks out and Sir William is forced to bring an action for slander. Critic 'GT' liked the programme, writing, "direction of Henry Kaplan was, as usual, beautifully controlled and timed to heighten and lessen tension by a single shot of a glance, a smile, a look of worry."
3 Admiral Byng (July 22nd 1960) with Donald Wolfit in the title role. With William Mervyn as President of the Court, John Horsley Vice-Admiral Temple West, Jack May as Lord Robert Bertie, Noel Trevarthen as Capt Hervey. Narrator: Andrew Faulds, commentary by Commander Kemp RN.
Also in the cast: Richard Wordsworth as Charles Fearne, Peter Bathurst as Robert Boyd, Charles Heslop as General Lord Blakeney, Nicholas Selby as George Lawrence, John Miller as Rear-Admiral Holder, Richard Butler as Capt Simcoe, and Michael Lees as Capt Moore.
Britain is at war with France, Austria and Russia. The all important island of Minorca has fallen to the enemy, and the public demands a scapegoat. On December 28th 1756, Admiral Byng, Commander-in-chief in the Mediterranean is put on trial accused of cowardice. The critic ('RW') who reviewed this programme was most unimpressed: ""I don't think the excess of dialogue was the fault of ... the scriptwriter as the narrator was careful to point out that the play was 'in the actual words used.' Whatever it was that kept this documented play so static and so flat it certainly added nothing to the authenticity of the trial. Donald Wolfit as the unhappy and misjudged admiral... managed a look of dismay as he heard the adverse verdict, that became the only believable thing in the whole production. The whole subject with its exaggerated attires, its background of death before dishonour, lent itself to Ham. Everyone took advantage of it."
Director: James Ormerod.
4 Spencer Cowper Friday July 29th 1960 9.35pm, Friday July 28th 1961 11.2pm rpt (Granada region)
Starring Laurence Payne in the title role. Also starring: George Howe (Baron Hatsell), Richard Warner (Mr Jones) and Llewelyn Rees (Sir Hans Sloane). Cast also included: Viola Keats, George Skillan, Hamlyn Benson, Derek Tansley, Frank Crawshaw, Felicity Young, John Woodnutt, Paul Sherwood, Rory McDermot, William Young, Bartlett Mullins, Roger Boston, David Jarrett, Maureen Gavin, John Ronane, John Tucker.
Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Michael Scott.
The body of an 18 year old Quaker girl is found floating in a village stream. Spencer Cowper, a rising young barrister, is charged with her murder. On July 16th 1699 at Hertford Assizes, he conducts his own defence.
5 Oscar Wilde August 5th 1960, Friday July 7th 1961 11.2pm rpt (Granada region)
Starring Michael MacLiammoir in the title role, Andre Morrell as Sir Edward Clarke, Martin Benson as Edward Carson, Harold Scott as Mr Justice Charles. Commentary by JB Priestley. Cast also included: Lewis Wilson, Deering Wells, Alan Browning, Derek Sydney, Brian Alexis, Clive Colin-Bowler, Michael Caridia, Beresford Williams, Tudor Evans, Michael Bangerter.
Documented by Peter Lambda. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Silvio Narizzano.
Victorian England idolises Oscar Wilde, but when his private life is exposed in the courts, it seems that even his fame as an author cannot survive the scandal.
Two trials were shown, in a flashback the case brought for libel by Wilde against the Marquess of Queensberry.The main trial is of Wilde in the dock at the Old Bailey. Critic 'GT' confessed he was "completely disappointed," in the director, "Narizzano's worst production to date. It lacked depth, excitement. Camera work was dull, cutting was slow." Surprising too, was some bad acting, "only Andre Morrell came off well." especially disliked was "the dreadfully bad casting" of Oscar Wilde: "I have great admiration for this actor.. but MacLiammoir had the wrong looks, the wrong build and lacked the extra-delicate sensitivity of Wilde... he hammed it up." Then "the usually reliable Martin Benson... was not the fiery cunning lawyer. He only looked like one." This programme, 'GT' described as "a complete failure"
6 The Dilke Case Aug 12th 1960
with Leo Genn as Sir Charles Dilke, Allan Cuthbertson as Henry Matthews QC, Laidman Browne as Walter Phillimore QC, Rachel Roberts as Mrs Rogerson, Joanna Dunham as Virginia Crawford. Commentary by Roy Jenkins MP. Others in the cast were Basil Dignam, Jack Gwillim, HM Beaufoy Milton, Ronald Adam, Ralph Truman, Donald Pickering, John Dawson, Walter Horsbrugh, Ian White.
Documented by William Slater. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Cliff Owen.
In 1886 Sir Charles Dilke Liberal MP for Chelsea is a respected figure. The Prime Minister, Mr Gladstone, looks on him as his political heir. Then suddenly Dilke is named as co-respondent in a sensational divorce suit brought by a Scottish MP against his pretty young wife Virginia Crawford.
7 The Tichborne Case Aug 19th 1960, Aug 18th 1961 11.2pm rpt (Granada only)
starring John Slater as The Claimant, with Oliver Johnston as Sir William Bovill, Nicholas Meredith as Sir John Coleridge, William mervyn as Sgt Ballantine, Lloyd Lamble as Hardinge Giffard, John Bailey as Henry Hawkins, Joyce Howard as Catherine Radcliffe, Edward Underdown as Lord Bellew. Also appearing: John Harrison, John Salew, John Wentworth, Bryan Coleman, Ian Ainsley, Malcolm Watson and Donald Bisset.
Documented by Peter Lambda. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Claude Whatham.
Roger Tichborne, heir to a baronetcy and a fortune, sets off on a voyage round the world to forget an unhappy love affair with his cousin Kate. The ship on which he sails is reported sunk with no survivors. Eighteen years later a butcher from Wagga Wagga Australia, comes to London claiming that he is the long-lost heir. In 1871 begins one of the longest and strangest cases in legal history.
8 WT Stead Aug 26th 1960, Aug 4th 1961 11.2pm rpt (Granada region)
with William Franklyn as Stead, costarring Douglas Wilmer (Sir Richard Webster QC), James Raglan (Charles Russell QC), Brian Oulton (Mr Justice Lopes), Annabel Maule (Rebecca Jarrett), Avis Bunnage (Mrs Armstrong), Milo O'Shea (Charles Armstrong). Others in the cast were Abb Martin, Julia Nelson, Frank Pemberton, Howard Taylor, Daphne Foreman, Peter Burton, Bruno Barnabe, Robert Sansom, William Wymar, Owen Berry as Archbishop of Canterbury and Keith Ashley as Bramwell Booth.
Documented by Vincent Brome. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Michael Scott.
In a series of articles exposing the corruption that lies beneath the puritanical surface of Victorian London, newspaper editor WT Stead describes how he bought a 13 year old girl from her parents for £5. The scandal has an extraordinary sequel when Stead is put on trial at the Old Bailey accused of abducting the girl.
9 The Trial of Governor Wall September 2nd 1960, September 1st 1961 rpt 11.2pm (Granada)
starring Roger Livesey as Governor Wall, Ewen Solon as Sir Edward Law, Anthony Sharp as Spencer Percival with Ballard Berkeley as Mr Knowlys, Geoffrey Toone as Thomas Poplett, Lally Bowers as Mrs Harriet Lacy, Glyn Owen as Evan Lewis. Others appearing were Eric Woodburn, Ronald Ibbs, Robert Cartland, Joss Ackland, Peter Madden, Edward Rees, Edwin Brown, David Dodimead, Henry Rayner, Raymond Mason.
Documented by Fenton Bresler. Designed by Darrell Lass. Director: Mario Prizek.
For twenty years Joseph Wall, ex-Governor of a British penal colony, has eluded justice. Now in 1802, he is brought to trial at the Old Bailey, charged with the murder of Serjeant Armstong, who died after a brutal flogging ordered by this governor.
10 Horatio Bottomley September 9th 1960 starring Harold Goldblatt in the title role. With Raymond Huntley, Geoffrey Chater, Edwin Richfield, Hugh Moxey, Peter Williams, John Longden. Director: Herbert Wise. The 1922 trial of the MP on 23 counts of larceny.
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Note: A 1965 BBC series JURY ROOM also dramatised a few of these celebrated cases

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CHESS MASTERPIECES
I've found it difficult to track down details of this series. Can anyone kindly add to the information below? Or reveal where the series can now be found?
About 33 films made in the 1950s by Horace Shepherd, these ten minute illustrative chess games were screened on BBC in the children's series Focus during 1959 and 1960, then bought up by ATV.
The Immortal Game - London 1851 at the first International Tournament in London, the most brilliant game in the annals of chess
The Wayward Queen - she pays the supreme penalty for her greedy wanderings
The Last Word
A Blind Alley - a 1932 game, a sacrifice of rooks and queen
The King on the Run - a match between a professional and an amateur
The Sleepless Knights- Near the start, black receives an unpleasant surprise and the two white knights lead the black king to his doom in spectacular manner
A Lost Opportunity- the loser has a chance to turn the tables, but misses it, so his game drifts into the shallows where he is swiftly checkmated (played 1887)
The Prodigy- A remarkable game played simultaneously with several opponents by a boy of eight, later to gain worldwide repute
Full Circle- A 1947 game in which the white queen makes a remarkable circular tour. Half way through she checks, then moves through a complete circle to call mate on the square from which her attack began
The Ambitious Pawn- A humble pawn, for once becoming ambitious, calls checkmate
The Smother Mate- Daring attack and defence with a surprise finish
Caught in the Web - Played in Chicago in 1904, prophetic of the gangster era. After a little finesse in the way of leadership, the two gang leaders are both liquidated. Then the lower ranks start some cunning business
The Terrible Turk- I remember this one when watching the repeats. An entertaining chess 'machine' that was a swindle
A Battle of Wits- played in Moscow in 1914 part of a simultaneous exhibition by the great Capablanca
The Greedy Bishop
Many A Slip
The Smoke Screen
A Bolt from the Blue- the shortest game ever played between two masters in a tournament in Paris in 1924
The Last Victory - played by Napoleon in exile in 1821
Means to an End- played in 1941 between an amateur and professional. Both sides attack with the same pieces, but the pupil receives a sharp lesson
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If the Crown Fits (ATV)
Scenes of Royal Life in Grabnia, a backwater of a monarchy, starring Robert Morley as King Rupert with Tracy Reed as Princess Amelia, beatnik heir to the throne. Also with Erik Chitty as Stevens, and Peter Bull as Major Domos. Director: Alan Tarrant. First mooted in summer 1960 with a title of King, Queen and Knave, it was planned in autumn 1960 for Jean Seberg to be Morley's co-star. However delays meant this plan was never to be realised. Eventually six stories were shown in the following spring:
1: Public Relations (Saturday April 29th 1961)
2: Kythos (May 6th 1961)
3: Gambling (May 13th 1961) - also included in this cast: Doris Hare as Mother, and card players Henry McGee. and Ivor Dean
4: Peppercorn Rent (May 20th 1961)
5: The Ballet (May 27th 1961) with Gladys Cooper as Madam Olga and Peter Gilmore as Pavlov
6: Royal Divorce (June 3rd 1961) with Miles Malleson as Prime Minister, Lisa Daniely as Simone and Charles Lloyd Pack as Chancellor. Ivor Dean was now Minister of Labour.
There was a week's "riotous filming" in Spain The plan had been to make an ITC film series, if these taped stories had been a success. Evidently they weren't.
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Deadline Midnight (ATV)
39 stories of The Globe newspaper (a clone of The Daily Mirror according to contemporary accounts), shown during 1960 and 1961.
Adviser: Arthur Christiansen. Producer: Hugh Rennie.
Main cast: Peter Vaughan as news editor Joe Dunn, Brian Badcoe as Robby Robinson, another news editor, and Alexander Archdale as Holland, the editor of The Globe.
The Chief Reporter played by Bruce Beeby was Matt Stewart, critic Guy Taylor wrote, "I particularly liked Bruce Beeby... he had quiet authority and respect." The other reporters included Jeremy Young as Neville Crane, James Culliford as Tom Douglas, and Mary Law as Peggy Simpson. Armine Sandford played Jane Smith, secretary to the news editor.
Series two saw Peter Vaughan replaced by Glyn Houston as Mike Grieves.

Some story details
1.1 (Monday June 13th 1960, 9.35pm-10.30). Apparently the story was not that advertised in TV Times but the story of "a farmer whose land is to be taken away from him for a reservoir. He shoots the local bigwig, one of the instigators of the scheme."
1.2 (Monday June 20th 1960- no ML)- script: Bill Haughton. Also in this cast: Toke Townley as Leonard Topey, Fred Ferris as Topey's agent, Pauline Winter as Betty Topey, Felicity Young as Julie Topey, Fred Johnson as Mr Topey, and Amy Dalby as Mrs Topey.
1.3 (Monday June 27th 1960, 9.35pm-10.30- not PV, JY) Script- LF Lampitt. Also starring Keith Pyott as Mr Dodswell. With Margaret Rubel as Mrs Dodswell, Hana Pravda as Anna, Basil Moss as John Mundy (also in 1.4), John Wentworth as Sir WIlliam Roe, Philip Ray as Price, and Michael Logan as General.
1.4 (July 4th 1960- no JC) Script: Bill Craig and John Law. Also starring Cyril Luckham as Mr Barnaby, and James Sharkey as Mr Dickson. With William Sherwood as Prosecuting Counsel, Noel Hood as Mrs Marlowe, Hamlyn Benson as David Mackie, Katy Wilde as Jennifer Marlowe, Tracey Lloyd as Margaret Barnaby, Norman Bowler as Andy Milne, Hilda Fenemore as Mrs Breen, Denis Holmes as Mr Barnes, and Basil Moss. Daily Globe reporters establish the innocence of a tv celebrity accused of assaulting a young girl.
1.5 (July 11th 1960, no PV, AA, BBe)- Script: Geoffrey Bellman and John Whitney. Director: Phil Brown. Starring Brian Badcoe, with Armine Sandford. Also starring Nyree Dawn Porter as Julie Sykes and Meredith Edwards as Partidge, with Janet Joye as Miss Sykes, Gladys Tudor as Nancy Amoore, Tristram Jellinek as Rush-Thompson, Roderick Cook as Cockrel, Vivian Pickles as Jocelyn, Michael Caine as Ted Drake, Claire Gordon as Vera, Sydney Arnold as Bennett, Kenenth Gowan as Len, Charles Rea Anthony Bates David Ludman and Shirley Butler as Reporters, and Patrick Godfrey as Photographer.
1.6 (July 18th 1960- no BBa). Script: LF Lampitt. Director: Geoffrey Nethercott. Also starring Esmond Knight as Edward Lee, Valerie White as Mrs Tate, and Brian McDermott as Richard Lee. With Sylvia Davies as Maureen Tate, Frederick Peisley as Mr Winkworth-Brown, Basil Moss as John Mundy, Kevin Stoney as Colin Tate, Jean Harvey as Editor's secretary, Owen Berry as John Tanner (also in 1.9).
1.7 (July 25th 1960- no PV, AA, BBe)
Script: Gerald Kelsey and Dick Sharples. Starring Patrick Magee as Hughes, and George Woodbridge as Hudson. With Meadows White as Cresswell, Laurence Herder as Gino Borelli, John Steed as Carlo, Bernard Brown as John Stafford, Malcolm Webster as Mark Williams, Edward Palmer as Simmons, Patrick Connor, John Flint and Jack Smethurst as Miners. Crane investigates friction at a Cornish mine between Italian workers and the local miners.
1.8 (August 1st 1960- no PV, JY, ML, AS) Script: Michael Ashe. Director: Phil Brown. Also starring John Gabriel as Leonard Fordias, Clive Morton as Sir Joynson Field. With Anne Blake as Sister Plunket, Tony Quinn as Dr McLinnie, Mary Kenton as Mrs Simpson, Rachel Herbert as Nurse Craig, Patrick Maynard as Martin Jones, Jean Harvey as Editor's secretary, and Marjorie Forsyth as Mrs Maroon.
1.9 (August 8th 1960- not BBa, BBe, JC) Script: Geoffrey Bellman & John Whitney. Director: Geoffrey Nethercott.
In this cast also: Barbara Lott as Mrs Fisher, Olaf Pooley as Lucas, Elizabeth Ashley as Miss X, Edward Evans as Preston, Michael Ritterman as Montez, Ivor Salter as coffee stall owner Len, Vi Stevens as Mrs Clegg, Bartlett Mullins as Arthur, Joe Gibbons as Taxi driver, Stratford Johns as Dalkin, Owen Berry as Mr Tanner, Jacqueline Lacey as Woman, and Kenneth Cowan as Globe photographer Len.
1.10 (August 15th 1960)
1.11 (August 22nd 1960)
1.12 (August 29th 1960)
1.13 September 5th 1960 Script: Bill Craig. Director: Geoffrey Nethercott.
Starring PV, AA plus BBa, BBee, JC, JY, and also Armine Sandford. Also starring Stuart Saunders (Marsh) and Robert Cartland (Insp Byrne), with Basil Moss (John Mundy), Mary Law (Peggy Simpson), Fred Kitchen (Worth), Gerald Lawson (Trmap), Edward Kelsey (Simmons), June Ellis (Mrs Marsh), Michael Lewis (Tony Marsh), Kenenth Nash (Johnny Duggan), Rory McDermott (Duggan), David Morrell (Desk Sergeant), and Lewis Wilson (Reporter).

The second series was shown fortnightly on Saturdays 10-11pm.
Series two also starred Glyn Houston as news editor Mike Grieves (replacing Peter Vaughan). James Culliford also left the series. Rex Firkin was the new producer.
2.1 Refugee (March 11th 1961)
2.2 Murder Story (March 25th 1961) Script: Louis Marks. Director: James Ferman.
Starring GH, BBee with AS. Guest star Richard Pearson (Det Supt John Berry), with Vincent Ball (Keith Durrant), Pat Gilbert (Jill Collins), Peter Fraser (Dick Seton), Patrick Connor (Ben Dagworth), Desmond Llewelyn (Police Sgt), Manning Wilson (Det Supt Stanley Warnick), June Ellis (Phyllis Berry), Judy Child (Mrs Cross), and Hayden Ward (Police constable)
2.3 Manhunt (April 8th 1961- no BBe)
Script: Allan Prior. Director: Phil Brown.
With Vincent Ball as Keith Durrant (also in 2.9, 11), Anna Turner as Mrs Standen, Christine Pollen as Fiona Fitzgerald, Jacqueline Forster as Lorrie Baynes, Hilda Barry as Miss Godbert, Sarah Miles as Vi Vernon, David Ludman as Simms, Tony Sympson as Gibson, Leon Peers as Ronald Standen, John Evitts as Len Baynes, Harry Walker as Colls, and Frank Pettitt as Inspector.
2.4 The Billy Brewster Story (April 22nd 1961- no AA, BBa, ML)
Script: Bill Craig.
Also starring Harry Locke as Freddy Price, Mary MacKenzie Laura Page, Larry Martyn as Billy Brewster.
With Robin Richmond as Organist, Pat Gilbert as Jill Collins (also in 2.9), John Miller as Mackie, Frederick Peisley as Pringle, Roy Hepworth as Musical director, Renny Lister as Jean Lewis, and Rex Graham as Peter Forbes.
2.5 It's a Free Country (May 6th 1961)
2.6 The Humble Win (May 20th 1961)
2.7 Bid for Glory (June 3rd 1961- not BBa, BBe)
Script: Louis Marks. Director: Wilfrid Eades.
Also starring Olaf Pooley as Mark Byron, and with Lloyd Lamble as Harold Brereton.
With Harold Littlewood as Policeman, Peter Fraser as Dick Seton (also in 2.8, 10), Andreas Malandrinos as Tony Condrini, Barrington Hunt as Doctor, Rita Webb as Mrs Condrini, Frances White as Anna Condrini, Gillian Maude as Mrs Brereton, Gillian Raine as Editor's secretary, John Baker as Mr Forsyth, Robert Lankesheer as Mr Kingly, Gordon Harris as Mr Buchanan, Frank Pendlebury as Charlie, and Vincent Charles as Porter.
2.8 The Slow Night (June 17th 1961- no GH, AA, JY, ML, AS)
Script: Ken Taylor. Director: Christopher Morahan.
Also starring Peter Fraser as Dick Seton with Terence Knapp as Paddy Joseph.
Also in this cast- Max Faulkner as Wheeler, John Colin as Todd, Will Leighton as Reeves, Hamlyn Benson as Macdonald, Coral Atkins as Pat Joseph, Benedicts Leigh as Susan, Michael Browning as Policeman, and Roger Kemp as Police Wireless Operative.
2.9 Doggo (July 1st 1961, now at 8.50pm - no BBa, AA, BBe, ML)
Script: Allan Prior and Louis Marks. Director: James Ferman.
With Vincent Ball as Keith Durrant and Pat Gilbert as Jill Collins. The rest of the cast were: Anna Cropper as Beth Gibson, Howard Goorney as Tim Gibson, Christopher Burgess as Charlie Hammond, Reg Manikin as Tipster, Jean Alexander as Mrs Gibson, William Kendall as Major Thomas, David Lander as George the barman, Jack Cunningham as Nelson, June Lewis as Fran, Phyllis Montefiore as Sylvia Barratt, Peter Collingwood as Barney Tutley, and Alan Browning as Niccolini.
2.10 One Man Went to Fly (July 15th 1961- no BBe)
Script: Hazel Adair. Director: Wilfrid Eades.
With Peter Fraser, Peter Froggatt as Peter Rundle, Anthony Harrison as Jim Coates, Tenniel Evans as Eddie Yates, Frank Pendlebury as Photographer, Hannah Watt as Rhoda Martin, Richard Burrell as Rev Vernon, Margaret Anderson as Mrs Vernon, Dorothea Phillips as Mrs Gibson, Meadows White as Mr Riley, Sheila Manahan as Mrs Browning, Robin Ford as Porter, David Conville as Manley, Peter Elliott as Diplomatic Correspondent, Timothy West and James Beck as Ambulance men, Kenneth Thornett and Geoffrey Lea as Policemen, Pamela Greer as Receptionist, Langley Howard as Mr Gibson, Richard Scott as First man, Alan Stuart as Copy-taker.
2.11 Letter from a Lady (July 29th 1961 -not AA, BBe)
Script: Hazel Adair. Director: John Knight.
Also starring Vincent Ball. With Ballard Berkeley as Managing Editor, Nora Nicholson as Amy Prentice, Mary Merrall as Mrs Frant, and Margery Withers as Matron.
Others in this cast: Sheila Brennan as Bridie, Dixon Adams as John Forbes, Jane Jordan Rogers as Yvonne, Clifford Cox as Mr Begg, Roger Avon as Landlord, Robert Hunter as Fred, Bill Cartwright as Inspector, and Rifat Shenel as Proprietor.
2.12 Pen of Venom (August 12th 1961- no AA, BBa, BBe)
Script LF Lampitt. Director: Wilfrid Eades.
Also starring Frank Pettingell as Frank Pearson, Ernest Milton as Rector, and Arthur Brough as Billy Bloor. With Bill Maxan as PC Morton, Leslie Heritage as Harry, Ruth Haden as Mrs Pratt, Margot Macalaster as Mrs Torby-West, Rachel Thomas as Blodwyn Griffiths, Edmond Bennett as Higgins, Dorothy Darke as Miss Winterton, Robert Sansom as Coroner, Nora Gordon as Mrs Edwards, Anna Burden as Mrs Benton, Hilda Terriss as Farmer's Wife, and Henry Rayner as George.
Crane has the task of finding the writer of mischief-making letters that bring tragedy to the village of Hendersham.
2.13 One Way Ticket (August 26th 1961)

Series 3 was really a continuation of the second series, only the stories were now screened weekly, and shown on Saturdays from 10 until 11pm. Ballard Berkeley who had appeared in series two was a regular character at the start of this new series, playing the managing editor. Vincent Ball ditto, playing reporter Keith Durrant.
3.1 The Unforgiven (September 9th 1961 - not AA, JY, ML)
Script: Bill Craig. Director: Quentin Lawrence.
Also starring Wensley Pithey as Frederick Hall, Carl Bernard as Sir James Symington, Christopher Rhodes as Dr Hoesler. Others in this story were John Ringham as Bert, Clare Owen as Receptionist, Marianne Deeming as Anna Hall, and Fred Kitchen as Walker.
Synopsis: A car breakdown on the way to London Airport causes Matt Stewart to miss the main story of a baby born on a flight from Germany. But his brief interview with the doctor who delivered the child has surprising results when the Halls see Matt's report in The Globe next day and recognise who the doctor really is.
3.2 Take Over (September 16th 1961 - not AA, BBa, BrBe, JY, VB, ML)
Script: Leon Griffiths.
Also starring: Olaf Pooley as Mark Byron (previously in 2.7), John Barrie as McLaren, John Arnatt as Pearce, and Barbara Clegg as Stella McLaren. With Norman Pitt as Ingrams, Maurice Hedley as Sir John, Ian Shand as Kenton, Nita Moyce as Miss Chrystall, Peter Hunt as Copytaster, Pat Gilbert as Jill Collins (previously in 2,4,9. She is also in 3.4, 12, 13), Edwin Apps as Reporter, Geoffrey Denton as Colonel Preistley, Colin Rix as Colson, Dennis Cleary as Chief sub, and Bruce Heighley as Copy boy.
Mark Byron of The Daily Globe arrives to see John McLaren, only to find that he has been found dead with an empty bottle beside him. McLaren had asked Byron to come and see him because he had a new ending for a story Byron was writing about him.
3.3 An Eye for Detail (September 23rd 1961 - no AA, BBa, BrBe, VB)
Script: Allan Prior. Director: John Nelson Burton.
Also starring Patricia Marmont as Penelope Harper, Harry H Corbett as Harry Briggs, and Frederick Jaeger as Martin Maxwell. With Wendy Hutchinson as Margaret Coffey, Jeanne Watts as Debbie Briggs, Jane Merrow as Dilys Jones, Andre Bolton as Henri Paul, Louisa Vaughn as Secretary, and Ken Parry as Mr Proudfoot. Also with Peter Fraser (from series 2. He is also in 3.4, 12).
Monsieur Paul, a famous dress designer, bitterly claims that Penelope Horner, the Daily Globe's fashion editor, is responsible for a leak in the secrets of his fashion salon. Penelope and the Globe staff set out to clear her name.
3.4 Man in a Frame (September 30th 1961- no BaBe, AA, BBa, BrBe, ML, JY)
Script: Robert Holmes. Director: Geoffrey Nethercott.
Also starring Peter Fraser, and with Pat Gilbert. Other stars: Derek Francis as Maurice Dobling, and Warren Mitchell as Andre Gudenian. With Neil Hallett as Len Bryan, Anthony Harrison as Tim Beasley, Pamela Lane as Jean Bryan, Caroline Denzil as Sylvia Potter, Patricia Denys as Doris Stanley, Charles Morgan as Det-Insp Foy, Alec Ross as Sgt Rawlings, Roy Roberts as PC Mason, Henry McGee as George Mallandine, Denis Cowles as Green, Christopher Hodge as Janitor, Margaret Stallard as Nurse, Roger Avon as Granville.
Len Bryan, financial editor of The Daily Globe, has stumbled on a story which will expose financier Andre Gudenian as a swindler. But Gudenian knows that if he can delay publication of the story for 24 hours, he will be safe- and he lays a trap for Bryan.
3.5 Exclusively Yours (October 7th 1961)
3.6 The Tenpenny Scandal (October 14th 1961) starring Glyn Houston and Olaf Pooley
Script: Raymond Bowers. Director: Phil Brown. other regulars were JY and AS, with Jennifer Hillary (Girl), Roderick Lovell (Tenningham), Charles Lloyd Pack (Housham), Derek Newark (Mechanic), David Lawton (Hollis), James Urquhart (First passenger), John Marquand (Second passenger), Philip Anthony (Collector), Alastair Hunter (Supervisor), John Harvey (Farrar), Terence Soall (Attendant), Philip Garston Jones (Plump MP), Carmen Silvera (Woman passenger), John Rongham (Bert Trout), and Patrick Boxill (Joe Dorset).
Two Members of Parliament, Tenningham and Hosham, are rivals for a big new job in the public transport services. Mark Byron founds out how they travel to Westminster, and hoping to catch them emerging from the Underground together, sends a photographer to the station. But the picture he gets is very different from the one Mark is expecting
3.7 Before the Cock Crows (October 21st 1961)
Script: Bill Craig. Director: John Knight. With GH, BBa, BBe, also JY, AS, plus Meredith Edwards (Mr Vernon), Kenneth Cope (Joey Lippert) and Edward Evans (Lippert). Also appearing: Madeline Newbury (Judy Stewart), John Maxim (Man), Robin Wentworth (Dinely), John Matthews (Barman) and George Betton (Drunk).
3.8 The Golden Handshake (October 28th 1961)
3.9 Why George Brown Hanged (November 4th 1961 - not AA, BaBe, BBa, VB, ML)
Script: David Osborn. Director: Anthony Keary.
With: Bernard Archard as Eddie Bernstein, David Hemmings as Alan Scott, Norman Allen as Harry Wilson, John Barrett as Policeman, David Ryder as Archie, Carmel McSharry as Sylvia, Dudy Nimmo as Mary Brown, Freda Bamford as Mrs Brown, John Boxer as Mr Brown, Leslie French as Vicar, Stuart Saunders as Uncle Bill, Constance Lorne as Mrs Timpkins, John Waite as Mr Langham, Katherine Parr as Mrs Langham, Patricia Clapton as Caroline Hollick, Alexis Kanner as Arthur Watts, Marie Makino as Elderly Lady, and Daffyd Havard, Alethea Carlton, Tony Leah as Objectors.
George Brown, aged 23, has been accused, convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of an elderly nightwatchman. On the eve of the execution, Alan Scott, a sensitive young reporter, is sent to cover the story. He becomes more and more convinced of George Brown's innocence
3.10 The Girl from Harrow (November 11th 1961)
Script: Hazel Adair. Director: Royston Morley. Starring GH, BBee, BBer, BBa, VB, also AS, Jy. Plus: Patrick Newell (Bertie Miller), Lyn Ashley (Faye Downes), David Graham (Mansell), Dixon Adams (John Forbes), Peter Bennett (Joey Wright), Joan Pert (Rosa), Allan McClelland (Mr Downes), Denis Holmes (Martindale), Raymond Brody (Logan), Doug Sheldon (Onions), Margery Mason (Mrs Downes), Laurel Mather (Hospital Sister), Elizabeth Saunders (Nurse), Walter Horsbrugh (Harry), Martin Wyldeck (Police Inspector), Peter Wyatt (Detective), Liza Page (Leila), Joan Holley (Suzanne) and Rhona Leigh (Babs). The Daily Globe send their man to a seaside town when the local reporter suggests that a big-time gang are making a bid to take the place over
3.11 Striptease (November 18th 1961)
3.12 The Inheritance (November 25th 1961 -not AA, BaBe, BBe, JY, ML, VB)
Script: Ken Taylor. Director: John Knight.
Also starring Pat Gilbert, and with Peter Fraser.
Other stars: Patricia Burke as Connie Starr, and John Welsh as Bill Mostyn. With: William Gaunt as Tony Mostyn, Grace Arnold as Meg Mostyn, Tony Quinn as Parkin, Richard Rudd as Walters, Anthony Sharp as Gamble, David Bloomfield as Fields, and Tom Gill as Norman Paul.
A man called Kelvin has left £20,000 to his son Nicholas Smallwood. The Daily Globe sets out to trace the heir, and finds he is an adopted son of the headmaster of a small prep school in Yorkshire. The reactions of the family are not as simple as they expect.
3.13 Libel Story (December 2nd 1961 - not BaBe, BBa, ML)
Also with Pat Gilbert.
Other stars: Pamela Brown as Sarah Dryden, Edgar Wreford as Milton Laud, with Richard Longman as Dryden, John Barron as Globe's Counsel, and Nicholas Selby as Laud's Counsel. Also appearing: John Dawson as Stannard, Elsie Wagstaff as Emmeline Chandler, Graham Leaman as Judge, Shirley Butler as Jessica Andrews, and Brian Hewlett-Jones as Court Usher.
Neville Crane finds himself at a revivalist meeting conducted by evangelist Milton Laud, who is launching a Save Mankind mission in London. Crane suspects there is a dubious financial background to Laud's campaign, and writes an exposé which the editor, after taking legal advice, decides to print. But Laud sues the paper for libel.
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The 64,000 Question

The phrase passed into the language, in this hugely popular quiz that ATV made with host Jerry Desmonde, who had also in 1956 hosted Hit the Limit. Colin Clews was the director, John Irwin the producer. The first half hour show at 7.45pm on May 19th 1956 offered a prize, not quite the same as its American counterpart, of 64,000 sixpences (over one and a half thousand pounds). This was doubled in the autumn, and if you accepted the Val Parnell bonus you could receive £3,520 in Defence Bonds. Robin Bailey took over the quizmaster's role for later shows which gradually lost their viewer appeal, the series ending on January 11th 1958. An offshoot, The 64,000 Challenge, hosted by Robin Bailey, for the twelve winners of the original show "who stayed the course," started in June 1957, temporarily replacing the original show. It ran for 13 programmes. The champions competed with new challengers in an attempt to win the 64,000. However a plan to match British winners against their American counterparts does not seem to have materialised.

A novel feature at the start of The 64,000 Question was the celebrated ex Det Supt Robert Fabian who was named "Custodian of the Questions," to ensure noone cheated! The first contestant to nearly reach the 64,000 was a schoolmaster named Vernon Goslin, but he failed on the last question on Troilus and Cressida. and on August 11th 1956, a similar fate awaited Ashley Stacey on The Bible. The first winner to answer all seven parts of the 64,000 sixpences question was 65 year old Albert Norman, a retired diamond cutter who answered questions on roses. Said producer John Irwin, "I was a bit wary of his self confidence," he even said he would name one of his future roses after members f the production team. The first winner of the 64,000 shillings was 73 year old Jane Brown from Wolverhampton, who on October 13th 1956 answered correctly all her questions on Charles Dickens. She used the winnings for an eye operation. In 1957 another to win the £3,520 was Lady Cynthia Asquith, answering questions on Jane Austen. Other full prizewinners included 17 year old Tony Moore a dental student on the 31st programme on Dec 15th 1956. His subject was British birds. James Preston a theology student who was the first person to have two chances at the top question won on Dec 29th 1956. Jerry Desmonde had been ill for the previous programme, so Tony Mariott took over a short notice. Val Parnell felt that it was only fair to give James another chance the following week.

The first hostesses were Sally Pearce, Ann Gage and Eve Vitt. The first minor change to the original programme came in the autumn of 1956 when the series moved on September 15th to 8pm, still on Saturday nights. In December 1956 it moved still later to an 8.30pm start. A bigger alteration to proceedings came in January 1957 when Fabian was replaced by an ex policeman, but not so celebrated, Fred Narborough. In March 1957 it was back to an 8pm start. SallyPearce was replaced by June Sylvaine during that spring, and by June 1957 Robert Fabian was back in post, accompanied by his three escorts. However the programme took a break after 57 shows to make way for The 64,000 Challenge, which began on June 15th 1957 at 8.30pm, hosted by Robin Bailey. It was again directed by Colin Clews. John Irwin explained, "the public are now convinced of the straightness of the questions," so no custodian, but there were three new escorts, Ann Mayhew, Stafford Hutchison and Gaden Collins. The programme went out live from "one of ATV's London Theatres." It ran until September 7th 1957. Winner of the final was Dr Alfred Norris of Hull who won £1,600 on Bible questions defeating Ashley Stacey who had the consolation of taking away £160.

The following Saturday at 8pm saw the return of The 64,000 Question, now with Robin Bailey as questionmaster, and old escorts Ann Cripps and Eve Vitt plus Ann Mayhew from the 'Challenge' series. Eve was replaced by Gwynneth Tighe near the end of the year for the last few shows. ABC stopped screening the series at the start of 1958, and this heralded the end of the road, viewing figures had been dropping off anyway. There had been approximately 74 programmes, plus the 13 Challenge quizzes.

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Educating Archie
Hoping to repeat the huge success of his long running radio show, Peter Brough starred with his Archie Andrews in this 1958 Associated Rediffusion series that ran to 13 stories. "It is of paramount importance, "Brough stated," that his appearance must satisfy the millions who had built up a picture of the little fellow in their minds." As a second series of 13 stories was made in 1959, maybe this aim was achieved.
Others in the cast: Irene Handl as Archie's housekeeper (though she does not appear in 2.3 to 2.5, or 2.7 on),
Dick Emery as a jack-of-all-trades, and
Freddie Sales as the non-paying lodger also appeared in the stories up to #2.8.
Scripts: Marty Feldman and Ronald Chesney. Ronnie Wolf replaced Chesney for the second series.
Director: Christopher Hodson (all stories to #2.8).
The series was made on film, two weeks being allowed to make each story. It could survive somewhere! A contemporary reviewer was however unimpressed: "when one manages to see through the appalling telerecordings... one finds them midlly amusing. What I do think is so successful is the way Archie himself is presented, making him seem like a real person just as we had imagined in the radio shows. Where the show falls down, however, is that Archie himself is so unattractive.... Irene Handl, an asset to any show, Freddie Sales and Dick Emery work very hard to make the programme come off but it fails, unless it is meant for younger viewers."

Details of a few of this first series:
1.1 (Friday September 26th 1958, 6.10pm)
Brough, Archie and company take a trip to Paris, and try to corner the market in the world of fashion.
1.3 (October 24th 1958)
When Brough and Archie discover that there is money to be made out of modern painting, everyone wants to get into the picture.
1.4 (November 7th 1958) This script by Barry Pevan and Marty Feldman.
In an effort to help Brough, Archie discovers that easy money is the hardest kind to make.
1.5 (November 21st 1958)
Freddie takes up wrestling, and, with Archie's help, he makes 'rings' round his opponent.
1.9 (January 16th 1959)
(Script: Marty Feldman and Barry Pevan.)

Details of all the second series:
2.1 The Man Who Couldn't Grow Up (September 18th 1959, 6.30-7pm)
There is a mix-up over Freddie's birth certificate. With Archie's help, he starts a second childhood and becomes a mixed-up kid.
2.2 The Prune Mutiny (September 25th 1959)
Archie and Freddie learn a few new wrinkles from a case of prunes.
2.3 The Day The Bongolis Left (October 2nd 1959)
To Brough and Archie, living on a tropical island sounds like heaven. When they get there, it looks as if heaven is nearer than they think.
2.4 The Man Who Lost his Pants at Monte Carlo (October 9th 1959)
Some people lose their shirts when they gamble, but Archie and Freddie go too far.
2.5 The King and Archie (October 16th 1959)
When Brough's home becomes the royal house of Rabelaisia, he goes all out to reap a king sized profit.
2.6 (October 23rd 1959)
When Archie finds out that Freddie is a 'national art treasure,' he realises the value of friends.
2.7 Don't Put Your Nephew on the Stage (October 30th 1959)
When Archie turns Freddie into a star, he finds that fame and fortune do not necessarily go hand in hand.
2.8 The Case of the Missing Aunt (November 6th 1959)
Brough and Co try emigrating to Sydney under false pretences, but find it hard to pull the wool over the eyes of the Australians.
2.9 The Day We Fooled the Fuhrer (November 20th 1959). This story directed by Pat Baker. With Dick Emery, Ray Barrett, Sheena Marshe and Peter Swanwick.
During the war, Archie Brough and Dick go to entertain the troops and find themselves at war with England.
2.10 Brough and the Bald-Headed Bandit (November 27th 1959). Directed by Bill Turner. With Dick Emery, Ray Barrett and Peter Swanwick.
Archie and Co go to the Wild West to try to sell hair restorer to cowboys, but find it difficult to cover the wide open spaces.
2.11 The Man with the Golden Feet (December 4th 1959) Directed by Bill Turner. With Dick Emery, Ray Barrett and Max Bacon.
Archie tries to get Ray into TV, but only succeeds in getting his foot in.
2.12 (December 11th 1959) Directed by Bill Turner. Guest star Dora Bryan, with Dick Emery, Ray Barrett, Guy Middleton, Roy Jefferies and Harold Taylor.
Archie runs away to start a literary circle, but when Brough interferes, he gets the book thrown at him.
2.13 (December 18th 1959) Directed by Bill Turner. With Dick Emery, Ray Barrett, Claude Jones and Vi Stevens.
Archie wants to become a doctor but when he tries to get through the exams, the patients stand more chance of 'passing out' than he does.
An extra show, not fully networked was shown on Christmas Day 1959, 5.30pm-6pm.
Archie's Christmas Party, directed by Bill Turner, with sketch written by Ronald Chesney. In this programme Archie invited viewers to a Yuletide frolic with some friends, including Ronald Chesney, Ossie Noble and Harold Taylor.

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In March 1958, the 'break' in Sunday broadcasting when ITV shut down at 6.15pm was finally closed when ABC began
The Sunday Break.

The first programmes were broadcast from 6.15pm to 7pm, at which latter time the already established programme Living Your Life commenced. Initially, the series was screened three out of four Sundays, with TWW's
Land of Song making a monthly appearance in this slot.
The Sunday Break was billed as 'A Sunday Club for Teenagers,' opening its doors for the first time on March 16th 1958. Social worker and ABC Religious Adviser Penry Jones who helped devise the series stated it was "about life and its meaning," and contained dancing, singing with Bible readings and discussion. A story writing competition based on Biblical themes was held, eligible entrants had to be between 16 and 21. Producer Ben Churchill explained that most of the show was, at first, spontaneous though "the script will be written to fit the personalities of the young people." The first scripts were by Vivian Milroy. "We decided on a club atmosphere right from the start." It was soon evident that teenagers liked it, one enthusiastically writing to TV Times, "I was beginning to tire of those smug half-hours, with clerics discussing problems without a note of urgency... this programme could well provide a shot in the arm for the revival of Christianity." Well maybe it didn't achieve quite that, but it possibly did contribute to a much needed partial modernising in the church and the flourishing of a new breed of churches.
The club gradually attracted top stars, from the religious celebrities like Rev David Sheppard and Rev Donald Soper, to rock stars like Marty Wilde and jazz legends like Nat Gonella. One critic described the unholy mix thus, "I get the impression that the various clergy.. get more and more embarrassed each week while so-called serious discussion verges on agony column topics instead of reaching down into more profound subjects." Thus Guy Taylor (Television Today, Dec 10th 1959), though he was no teenager, but his conclusion is interesting, "is it worthwhile discussing whether debs work or not and whether the press give accurate reporting of their parties? I would venture to suggest the original idea of The Sunday Break is beginning to fade from view and seems to be emerging into something quite different."
Maybe this is why the physical club was closed in June 1960, and the programme took to the road. Now Guy Taylor gave a mixed reception to the changed format. He liked the teenagers' visits to report on the work of local churches, and he thought Janice Willett directed the programme "very well." However he found Hazel Adair's script "a little laboured at times," Reginald Barrett-Ayres musical lectures were "completely out of place," and nul points for The Sunday Break Songsters, and for the jiving competition "against a background of what appears to be galloping fungus."
The following summer a regular feature was the showing of clips from recent films, often followed by a discussion.
From late 1962 the programme saw no more pop singers and jazz players and adopted a far more sombre note. The programme took a break at the end of March 1964 before returning that summer. Then in October that year, the programme shared a slot with About Religion from 6.35 to 7.05pm. Sunday Break limped on, with occasional programmes, until September 1965.

Picture: Barry Westwood, one of the longest running presenters, who hosted The Sunday Break for about two and a half years starting in Autumn 1961.

Two pilots were made before the series began on
Sunday March 16th 1958 with Janette Scott.
Sunday March 23rd 1958 with Rev George F MacLeod and Victor Soverall.
Sunday March 30th 1958 with Canon Bryan Green and Steve Race.
Sunday April 20th 1958 with Rev David Sheppard.
Sunday May 11th 1958 with Rev Marcus Morris, plus Sheila Buxton, Alex Welsh Band.
Sunday May 18th 1958 with Rev Marcus Morris and Sheila Buxton, Alex Welsh Band.
Sunday May 25th 1958 with Margaret Jones, Steve Race, Lucille Mapp, Alex Welsh Band.
Sunday June 8th 1958 with CA Joyce, Victor Soverall and Alex Welsh's Band
Note- June saw the closing date for the painting competition, open to anyone aged between 16 and 21. There were five choices of Biblical subject: The Creation, Portrait of Amos, The Crucifixion, Cleansing of the Temple, Paul in Shipwreck.
Sunday July 6th 1958 with Rev Geoffrey Shaw, plus Rosemary Squires, Reginald Barrett-Ayres, Alex Welsh Band.
August 3rd 1958 with Canon Ernest Southcott, Victor Soverall and the Alex Welsh Band.
August 10th 1958 with Rev Max Magee, Roy Guest and the Alex Welsh Band.
August 17th 1958 with Father Peter Blake, Cy Grant, Dill Jones, Alex Welsh Band.
September 14th 1958 with Rev Len Barnett, Jim Dale, John Disley, Alex Welsh Band.
September 28th 1958 with Rev Walter Fyfe, Barbara Lyon, Dill Jones Trio, and Dickie Hawdon.
October 12th 1958 with Canon Bryan Green, Earl of Harewood, Gerald Lascelles, Jon Vickers, Johnny Dankworth, George Chisholm, and Dill Jones Trio.
October 26th 1958 with Rev Geoffrey Shaw, Chas McDevitt, Shirley Douglas, Mick Mulligan, Dill Jones Trio
November 9th 1958 with Rev Simon Phipps and Dill Jones Trio.
November 23rd 1958 with Rev Bill Wright, Jeremy Lubbock, Mervyn Levy and Dill Jones Trio with Dave Shepherd.
November 30th 1958 with Rev Tom Colvin, Victor Soverall, Mervyn Levy and Dill Jones Trio with Johnny Dankworth.
December 21st 1958 with the Lord Bishop of Birmingham , Mervyn Levy, Johnny Duncan, Vic Ash, Johnny Scott and Dill Jones Trio.
December 28th 1958 with Canon Edward Patey, Kenny Baker, Chas McDevitt, Shirley Douglas, and the Dill Jones Trio.
January 4th 1959 with CA Joyce, Victor Soverall and Dill Jones Trio.
January 18th 1959 with Professor CD Coulson, Cy Grant, William Reid (Sadler's Wells Opera) and Dill Jones Trio.
February 1st 1959 with Rev Donald Soper, William Reid of Sadler's Wells and the Dill Jones Trio. Also with Humphrey Lyttelton and Yolanda.
February 22nd 1959 with Rev David Sheppard and Dill Jones Trio. Sheppard explained that "it might be a good idea to put the argument side away for a bit and to say what it means to get to grips with Christian teaching." This programme therefore, was the first of three which did that. His aim was to show that "confirmation is the time when somebody, having thought out his place, takes his stand in the Church as a follower of Christ."
March 1st 1959 with Rev David Sheppard, Sam Wanamaker, Mervyn Levy, TS Lowrie, and Dill Jones Trio.
March 15th 1959 with Rev James Currie, Chas McDevitt, Shirley Douglas and Dill Jones Trio.
March 29th 1959 with Rt Rev Dr Dwyer Bishop of Leeds, Mervyn Levy, Victor Soverell, and Dill Jones Trio. Director: Janice Willett.
April 19th 1959 with Rev Walter Fyffe and Richard Williams. The club's music by Bob Cort and Dill Jones Trio. Director: Ben Churchill.
May 10th 1959 with Rev Bill Wright, Jeremy Lubbock and Dill Jones Trio.
May 17th 1959 with Rev George D Wilkie, Gary Mills, Rev Geoffrey Beaumont.
May 24th 1959 with Rev Charles Davey, Valerie Masters with the Ray Ellington Quartet. Anthony Finigan was now producing the programmes.
June 7th 1959 with Rev Tom Colvin, Ruby Murray, Bernard Braden, Bernie Burgess, Dill Jones Trio.
June 14th 1959 with Canon ED Patey, Steve Benbow and The Hedley Ward Trio.
July 5th 1959 with Rev Charles Davey. Music by Ray Ellington Quartet
July 26th 1959 with Rev Simon Phipps and Acker Bilk 's Paramount Jazz Band
August 16th 1959 with Father Donald Proudman and the Alex Welsh Six. Producer now of the programmes was now Janice Willett.
August 30th 1959 with Father Hugh Bishop, Edric Connor and the Vic Ash Quintet.
September 6th 1959 with Rev Geoffrey Shaw, Elaine Burton MP, the Chief Constable of Manchester.
September 13th 1959 with Rev Uist Macdonald, and the Vic Ash Quintet. Producer for this programme was Eddie Kebbell.
September 27th 1959 with Rev Maurice Wood, Millicent Martin, Alex Welsh and His Band. Producer: Janice Willett.
October 4th 1959 with Malcolm Moore, Eddie Hickey and the Norman Percival Group. Producer from now on was Eddie Kebbell. Julie Stevens was now a regular at the club, though never credited as such in TV Times.
October 11th 1959 with Rev Austen Williams, John Betjeman, Endre Muller, and The Jazz Maker.
October 25th 1959 with Father John Fitzsimmons, Tom O'Brien, Chris Langford and the Norman Percival Group.
November 1st 1959 with Rev Bill Wright, Keith Waterhouse, The Jean-Ettes and Ted Heath.
November 8th 1959 with Rev John Gardiner, Jim Dale and Mick Mulligan and His Band.
November 22nd 1959 with Philip Race, Colin McInnes and guest Marty Wilde and the Wildcats. Music: Red Price Group.
November 29th 1959 with Rev Charles Smith, The Singing Hills and the John Barry Seven.
December 6th 1959 with Rev James Currie, Lorie Mann and the Dix Disley String Quintet. Lorie mimed two songs, according to the producer it was because she was unwell.
December 20th 1959 with Canon ED Patey, John Betjeman, Allan Bruce, George Mitchell Singers, Norman Percival Group.
December 27th 1959 with Bishop Leslie Newbiggin, Jack Escott, Norman Percival Group.
January 3rd 1960 with Rev Walter Fancutt, Yvonne French, Mr Aker Bilk and his Paramount Jazz Band.
January 17th 1960 with Rev Kenneth Slack, Kenny Baker, the Roy Marsh Quintet.
January 24th 1960 with Rev David Sheppard, Wally Whyton, Johnny Wiltshire. Directed by Janice Willett.
January 31st 1960 with Rev Alan Booth, Woolf Phillips and His Quintet. Programmes now directed by Anthony Finigan.
February 14th 1960 with Father Clifford Howell, Craig Douglas, Nat Gonella and His Georgians.
February 21st 1960 with Rev Donald Tytler, Anstice Gibbs, and Humphrey Lyttelton and His Band.
February 28th 1960 with Rev James Maitland, Bob Cort, Diz Disley String Quintet.
March 13th 1960 with Dr William Neil, Ken Collyer's Jazzmen.
March 20th 1960 with Rev Len Tyler, Alec Dixon, Terry Lightfoot's Band.
March 27th 1960 with Rev Donald Carpenter, Modern Jazz Committee.
April 10th 1960 with Rev Huw Pearce-Jones.
April 17th 1960 with Dr William Neil, George Mitchell Singers, Norman Percival and His Group.
April 24th 1960 with Rev EF Easson, Humphrey Lyttelton and His Band.
May 8th 1960 with Rev Cuthbert Bardsley, The Alan Ganley Quintet.
May 15th 1960 with Rev Bill Wright, Bob Cort, Alex Welsh and His Band.
May 22nd 1960 with Prof John Bachmann, The Diz Disley Quintet, The Bell-Tones.
June 5th 1960 with Father AE Basil, Robin Garton and his Band.
June 12th 1960 with Rev Donald Carpenter, Mervyn Levy, Nat Gonella and His Georgians. Note: Twelve electricians came out on strike at ABC's Alpha Studios in Birmingham, causing the programme to be televised from the carpenters' shop, the only location where the house lighting was suitable for tv caneras. "Viewers saw discussion groups sitting on work benches among saws and drills. Noise of traffic could be heard in the background. By using the carpenters' shop noone had to do an electrician's duties and the only prop used was a bowl of imitation fruit."
June 19th 1960 with Canon Bryan Green, Steve Benbow Folk Four, George Chisholm and the Jazzers. The studio club closed after this programme.
July 3rd 1960 introduced by James Roose Evans, with Reginald Barrett-Ayres, Sunday Break Songsters. Now directed by Janice Willett again. Script by Hazel Adair. "A new and stimulating edition," including film of two girls in a Manchester convent. In the studio they question Rev Mother Superior and Sister Michael.
July 10th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres and The Sunday Break Songsters. A boy and girl living at The Mayflower Centre talk to Rev David Sheppard
July 17th 1960 introduced by James Roose Evans, with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres, Sunday Break Songsters. Film of Rev James Currie of Glasgow.
July 31st 1960 introduced by James Roose Evans, with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres, Sunday Break Songsters. Two teenagers investigate Cotswold Approved School in Wiltshire, then talk to the headmaster CA Joyce.
August 7th 1960 introduced by James Roose Evans, with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres, Sunday Break Songsters. Two teenage boys attend the Stafford Cripps Memorial Conference.
August 14th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres and The Sunday Break Songsters. A film report by two teenagers, a Muslim and an agnostic, on the youth camps run by the Iona Community. In the studio they talk with Rev John Jardine and Peggy Bee
August 28th 1960 introduced by James Roose Evans, with Ronnie Hilton, Reginald Barrett-Ayres and The Sunday Break Songsters. A filmed report by Robert Weller of the Royal Sailor's Rest Devonport. In the studio to face questions: Lt Cmdr FN Savage RN, and Harry Greenwood. Script: Hazel Adair
September 4th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton etc. Film report from Tower Hill, followed by a discussion between the two young people who have visited here with Dr Donald Soper
September 11th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton etc. Film report of two young people at Scargill a Christian holiday centre. In the studio they talk with assistant warden Rev RMW Marsh
September 25th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton etc. Film report of a Catholic Youth Centre in Blackburn, and local factories. Two young people question Mary Goggins and Owen Jordan of the Youth Christian Workers' Group
October 9th 1960 with Ronnie Hilton and including the semi-finals of the Jive Competition. Also topical events for young people. Film Report: The Gorbals
December 4th 1960 introduced by Neville Barker with Lorie Mann, Dick Williams' Band. Students from London University explore the conflict between Roman Catholic studies and religion. Very Rev Mgr GA Tomlinson answers their questions.
December 18th 1960 introduced by Neville Barker with Mark Wynter, Dick Williams' Band. Two teenagers visit an Oxford Street store where the Rev Michael Harper works as a chaplain.
Christmas Day 1960: this edition was screened from 12.15pm until 1pm. A filmed report revisited personalities seen in programme, they describe how they spend the festive season: Rev David Sheppard, CA Joyce, Rev and Mrs James Currie and Rev John Jardine. Elizabeth Laurie sang carols with The Sunday Break Songsters accompanied by the Dick Williams Band. Plus a cartoon featuring the vibraphone as part of Dick Williams' guide to the orchestra series.
January 22nd 1961 introduced by Neville Barker with guests Johnny Dankworth and Susan Grey, also The Dick Williams Band. On film, Oxford and Cambridge undergraduates get a foretaste of London's East End with Rev Maurice Wood, Vicar of St Mary's Islington (is that 'East End'?)
January 29th 1961 with Cleo Laine and Johnny Dannkworth. Film report by two teenagers on A Day in the Life of a Bishop (Mervyn Stockwood), film directed by Jeremy Summers. Plus The Dick Williams Band and a cartoon featuring the drums
March 12th 1961 introduced by Neville Barker with Cy Grant. Young people of Oxford give their attitude to the Bible and Rev H Sims discusses the new version of the Bible.
March 19th 1961 with guest Sacha Distel, and Raymond le Senechal Quartet. A film report from Yardley, Birmingham, about Canon Charles Crowson's Do It Yourself parish. Followed by a discussion with Roy Nelson of Harlow and Tom Ferguson of East Lothian
April 16th 1961 introduced by Neville Barker. With the results of the Religious Art Competition. Filmed report on a day in the life of Rev Duncan Forester and three theology students at New College Edinburgh.
May 7th 1961 introduced by Neville Barker. With Alex Welsh and His Band. Filmed report by Jeremy Summers on the YMCA Woolwich. Also John West talks about the SS Canberra. Programmes now directed by Marjory Baker.
May 21st 1961 with Neville Barker, Kenny Ball and His Jazzmen, Carole Simpson.
June 4th 1961 with Neville Barker, Dick Charlesworth and His City Gents, Jackie Lynn. Film of Luton Industrial College and Mission with Rev William Gowland.
June 11th 1961 with Neville Barker, Clyde Valley Stompers. Film of Methodist Association of Youth Clubs annual rally. Andrew Duncan talks to members.
June 18th 1961 with Tony Iveson, Terry Lightfoot New Orleans Jazzmen, Valerie Mountain. Excerpt from The Hoodlum Priest and a discussion with Don Murray who plays the priest Father Charles Clark.
July 2nd 1961 with Neville Barker, Will Todd and His Trio, and the Bell-Tones. Filmed report on Father Frayne Liverpool Port Chaplains.
July 9th 1961 with Neville Barker, Red Price Combo, The Allisons.
July 16th 1961 with Neville Barker, Dick Charlesworth and His City Gents, Jackie Lynn. Excerpts from Between Two Worlds, about Northern Rhodesia. Rev Philip Potter talks about the church's role in the rising nations. Neville Barker visted a Smethwick Youth Club which had a colour bar, and this provoked strong viewer reaction.
July 30th 1961 with Neville Barker, John Barry Seven, and Danny Williams. Extracts from the film Leaves of the Tree, about the translation of the Bible into an Eritrean language. Three young Welsh church members talk about their recent visit to Berlin.
August 6th 1961 with Neville Barker, Mick Mulligan's Band. George Melly. Rev Alan Keighley talks to young people about fatal accidents and Rev E Chad Varah discusses Christ's Second Coming after extracts from Whistle Down the Wind have been screened. Original producer Ben Churchill was the programme's director for the August programmes.
August 13th 1961 with Neville Barker, Monty Sunshine's Band, The Davidson Brothers. Filmed report on missionaries in East Africa with a discussion by Ven DIC Waldron and Dr Jean Waldron.
August 27th 1961 with Neville Barker, Acker Bilk's Paramount Jazz Band, Jim Dale. Excerpt from Hand in Hand, followed by a discussion on marriage between two people of different religions led by Rev JC Fenton and AI Polack. Plus a discussion on astrology with Rev Kenneth Ross and Peter Clark.
September 3rd 1961 with Neville Barker, Johnny Dankworth, Nick Villard. Squadron leader Brian Mercer discusses aerobatics at the Farnborough Air Show, and a filmed report from Nechells Secondary School Birmingham, on The 11 Plus and After. Marjory Baker had now returned to produce the series again.
September 10th 1961 with Neville Barker, Bruce Turner and His Jump Band, Ronnie Hall. Film report on the Abbeyfield Society.
September 24th 1961 with Neville Barker, Wilf Todd and His Trio, Van Doren. Bishop Ambrose Reeves discusses the colour bar.
October 29th 1961 with Barry Westwood, Ken Colyer's Jazzmen, and Gay Pursue. Film report on the work of Group Captain Cheshire VC, who afterwards in the studio answers questions from young people.
November 5th 1961 Operation Leadership- film report on the Church of Scotland's youth camp at Glenmore Lodge. With Dick Charlesworth and His City Gents, also Jackie Lynn
November 19th 1961 with Barry Westwood, Mike Cotton and His Six. Who Wants to Read Books, a filmed report by Jeremy Summers, discussed afterwards by Rev Timothy Beaumont.
November 19th 1961 with Barry Westwood, Terry Lightfoot, Clinton Ford. Film report on Toc H, plus Rabbi Rosen discussing Jews and Christians- how do they get on?
December 3rd 1961 with Barry Westwood, New Orleans Knights, Paul Raven. Rev John Mortimer's ballet school in Surrey. The Christian attitude towards the homeless is investigated by Rev John Nicholls.
To accommodate the series Journey of a Lifetime, the programme was now shortened to thirty minutes from 6.30pm to 7pm.
December 17th 1961. Man in Time a modern nativity play performed by St James Youth Club Lockleaze Bristol.
December 24th 1961 with Barry Westwood, Melbourne New Orleans Jazz Band. No Room at the Inn- with Donald Soper and Norman Pannell. Dilys Powell talks on religious films.
December 31st 1961 with Barry Westwood, Chris Barber, Ottilie Patterson. Religion Under the Big Top- from Billy Smart's Circus. Rev WD Omand explains the role of clergy among circus folk.
January 14th 1962 with Barry Westwood, Second City Jazzmen. Rev Tom Colvin disuccses with young people the problems of being a Christian in a Communist country.
January 28th 1962 with Barry Westwood, Mike Cotton Jazzmen. The Law is discussed by Dr William Neil with young people. Inspector Leonard Hampton discusses the relationship between teenagers and the police.
February 11th 1962 with Barry Westwood. From Wingfield Music Club London, a remarkable story of courage in the face of handicap, filmed by Jeremy Summers. This is then discussed by Rev Scott Hutchison. Thank you to Janet Cattier who appeared in this film and described it for this site: "I was filmed with my violin getting on a bus at the top of Queen's Road in Hoe Street, Walthamstow, going to the club. This club was held on Monday evenings in Hale End Road School for sick and physically disabled children. On arriving at the school the film crew were waiting. In the school hall, the orchestra starts up and my 'Carnival March' is played. Then my 'Seagulls' Flight', with Georgina Kent (who had one arm) playing cello, and me accompanying her on piano, was filmed. Then I was filmed getting a hot dog from the film crew's food kiosk."
February 18th 1962 with Barry Westwood, The Galliards. Dilys Powell, Alan Dent and Rev John Wedmore discuss whether or not films like King of Kings do good or harm. There is also a filmed report of the Student Christian movement among overseas students in London.
February 25th 1962 with Barry Westwood, Valerie Mountain. Yusef Saad discusses Do the Dead Sea Scrolls challenge the New Testament? (This follows on from the Journey of the Lifetime film on the Dead Sea Scrolls.) Dr William Neil then discussed how such discoveries affect our understanding of the Bible.
March 11th 1962 Should the Churches Advertise? - Mervyn Francis and Father Nigel Larn, with Malcolm Mitchell Trio
March 25th 1962 with Barry Westwood, Dr William Neil, songs by Carole Simpson, accompanied by Colin James. Did Christ Really Heal The Sick?
April 8th 1962 Can People Be Raised from the Dead? - Dr William Neil discusses with Heather Bloom and Gordon Watts, the story of the Raising of Lazarus. Plus: Is Pop Music Trash?- Larry Adler who thinks most of it is, discusses with a group of young people
April 15th 1962. Barry Westwood introduces an edited version of A Man Dies. The passion story performed by St James Presbyterian Church Lockleaze Bristol, told through jive and rock music. Rock Harkness played Jesus. The original production had been screened in 1961. This programme is extant in the ABC archive.
April 22nd 1962 with Barry Westwood. A film titled The Boys, about some boys at Canterbury Cathedral.
May 6th 1962 with Barry Westwood. Jazz On Sundays with Chris Barber's Jazzband with Ottilie Patterson
May 20th 1962 Barry Westwood narrates Cross Over Coventry. A film about the staff of the cathedral.
June 3rd 1962. Barry Westwood discusses the Journey of a Lifetime series which ends today, with its creator Dr Eric Fletcher. Music: Peter Shade Trio. Pamela Lonsdale now directed the series.
The programme now resumed its 45 minute slot starting at 6.15pm.
June 10th 1962 with Barry Westwood. Songs: Steve Arlen, accompanied by The Expresso Five. Also in the programme: Prison- A Place of Punishment or Reform?
June 17th 1962 with Barry Westwood. Life Upon the Wicked Stage! With Rev John Hester, David Rudkin, songs by Carole Simpson and Colin James
July 8th 1962 with Barry Westwood. Music by Ronnie Ross Quartet. Honour Thy Father and Mother: Canton Fenton Morley discusses the fifth commandment with some young people.
July 15th 1962 with Barry Westwood. Songs: Alan Klein. Theme- Violence.
July 29th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Songs: Colin James. Reporter: Desmond Wilcox. Sunday Break's "first outside broadcast" from Leicester and the third British Conference of Christian Youth.
August 5th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. With Steve Race and his Trio. Reporter: Gordon Watts. Theme- Christians in Conflict- more from the British Conference of Youth.
August 26th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. With songs by Carole Simpson accompanied by the Brian Dee Trio. Theme- Flying Doctor Service for Africa- some young volunteers from the Midlands who are travelling to Gasau in Northern Nigeria.
September 2nd 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. With music by the Tubby Hayes Quintet. Theme- The Doubters.
September 9th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. With music by Joe Brown and The Bruvvers. Theme- No Jobs for The Boys, problems of unemployed school leavers, one interviewed was a 16 year old school leaver from Liverpool Tony Hughes, who recalled Joan Bakewell's (uncredited in TV Times) part in the programme. The host was Rev Bill Wright, and the producer for this programme only was Michael Mills.
October 7th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. With Alan Klein. Theme- Borstal Boys. Producer again Pamela Lonsdale.
October 21st 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Songs- Maureen Stobie. Theme- Never on Sundays, Sundays laws.
October 28th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Songs- Jill and Terry. Theme- Best Seller, the Bible.
November 18th/ November 25th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Love Sex and Marriage. The second programme included a clip from the film A Kind of Loving. Originally planned in three parts this mini series was extended to four "because of the enormous response from viewers." Claimed TV Times, "a real social service," with 90% of viewers praising these programmes
December 23rd 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Loneliness. Interviews with Rev Chad Varah and Miss Heather Jenner.
December 30th 1962 introduced by Barry Westwood. Behind the Idols. The idols of the pop world with Mike Sarne.
February 10th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- No Time for Politics. Young people discuss whether the church should have anything to do with politics.
February 17th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- No Time for Politics. This second programme featured Anthony Greenwood, Peter Kirk, and Walter James. This programme only directed by Laurence Bourne.
March 10th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Your Lucky Stars. Young people talk to a professional astrologer.
March 17th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Booze. Young people argue for and against total abstinence.
March 24th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Fleet Street.
March 24th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Lolly, Christian attitude to money. Also- Boxing, should it be banned?
April 21st 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Superstitions.
May 5th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Go, Go, Go!, about new music in church.
May 12th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Help! Three stories for Christian Aid Week. Plus- Jobs, the Youth Employment Service.
May 19th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Exams.
June 2nd/9th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Africans on Africa (2 programmes).
June 16th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- We Teach Them All Wrong? Director: Laurence Bourne.
June 30th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Poor Dad! Responsibilities of fathers. From now on, the director of the series was Geoff Ramsey.
July 7th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Sin! Four young people discuss their views. Also- Young Film Makers. A discussion of one of the winning films at the National Film Theatre competition.
July 14th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood with Rev Simon Phipps joining three young people visiting Coventry Cathedral.
July 28th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Poor Dad! With Roy Shaw (possibly same as June 30th?)
August 4th 1963 Holiday Edition with Gordon Watts.
August 11th 1963 introduced by Gordon Watts. Theme- What About the Workers? The Young Christian Workers movement.
September 8th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Peace Factory. A new type of factory opening next week in Glasgow.
September 22nd 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Teenagers Talking, the subjects include Buddhism and religious painting.
September 29th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- The Old Folk.
October 20th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Speak Up! Young people talk about Beatniks, and a new monastic order of the young.
October 27th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Is There Life After Death?
November 3rd 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- War Glorious War. Do books and films glamorise war?
November 17th/ 24th 1963, December 1st/8th 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- All About Marriage. A series starting where the 1962 series Love Sex and Marriage left off.
December 22nd 1963 introduced by Barry Westwood. The Christmas Season.
January 12th 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- The Rat Race.
January 19th 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- How I Learned to Stop Worrying And Love the Bomb. Young people discuss the topic in the light of Stanley Kubrick's new film, and a recent Report from the British Council of Churches.
January 26th 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- The Nurses. Director: Mike Vardy. This programme is extant in the ABC archive.
February 9th 1964 Suffer Little Children!- an investigation into modern Sunday Schools
February 16th 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- A Man's Life, from an Army base in Surrey. Director: Ben Churchill.
March 15th 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Theme- Calypso in a Cold Climate. How West Indian immigrants fit into the British scene. Director: Ted Childs.
March 22nd 1964 introduced by Barry Westwood. Hallelujah, a programme of American gospel singing by the cast of Black nativity. Commentary by David Mahlowe. Director: Ben Churchill.
After a break at the end of this month, the programme returned in the summer schedules, but now 30 minutes long, from 6.15-6.45pm.
July 12th 1964 Some Holiday!: interviews with those on a World Council of Churches camp
July 26th 1964 Theme: Start in Life, a visit to a school in Yorkshire. The production team now Richard Lindley, Gordon Watts, and Ted Childs.
August 2nd 1964 Theme: Some Holiday, young people at a work camp organised by the World Council of Churches.
August 9th 1964 In for Life : a young Church of England Benedictine monk talks about his vocation
August 23rd 1964 Theme: Freedom, an improvised drama by teenagers on holiday at Scargill House in the Yorkshire Dales. Directed by Ted Childs.
August 30th 1964 Theme: What is This Thing Called Love? With Frances Wigram, Maurice Geller and Una Walsh. Directed by Ted Childs.
September 6th 1964 Theme: A Question of Suitability, colour bar in employment. Directed by Ben Churchill.
September 20th 1964 Theme: Time on Our Hands. From the Midlands Arts Centre for Young People, exploring leisure time. Directed by Geoff Ramsey.
September 27th 1964 Theme: Out of the Frying Pan, young people alone in the city. Directed by Ted Childs.
The programme now filled a half hour slot from 6.35pm, which was filled by other religious programmes in other weeks.
October 24th 1964: On the Spot. Donald KcKay at Manchester College of Science and Technology answers students' questions. All the remaining programmes were directed by Ted Childs.
November 8th 1964: a filmed report from Dresden on the work of Aktion Suhneszeichen, an international movement for reconciliation.
December 20th 1964 A Man in Time, including excerpts from A Man Dies, staged earlier this year by St James Parish Youth Club Bristol.
January 3rd 1965 Is the church merely a private religious club?
January 31st 1965 The Rising Storm. A North London school facing possible closure.
February 14th 1965 White on Black Equals Grey. The British Council of Churches' report on The Future of South Africa.
March 21st 1965 Selling People Is Wrong. The story of the campaign to abolish slavery.
March 27th 1965 Sideways Christian Soldiers. Should Christians speak out on topical issues, and should they speak with a united voice?
April 11th 1965 Doing a Skipper. People sleeping rough in London, this programme dealt with the work of the Simon Community Trust.
April 25th 1965 Confrontation. Donald Soper and David Tribe, President of the National Secular Society. (see also Sept 12th 65)
May 9th 1965 One Hundred Years At War. The Salvation Army story.
May 23rd 1965 Youth on Trial. Mods, Rockers and Pop fans stand in the dock to face charges brought against them.
June 6th 1965 Perrin: Pretre Ouvrier. The story of Father Perrin a priest who found the workers of France but lost his church.
June 20th 1965 Rt Hon Michael Stewart answers questions from theology students from Edinburgh, Glasgow, and London.
The programme was now being shown erratically, the next being
August 1st 1965 How to be A Failure, an examination of the examination system.
August 15th 1965 The Restless Ones, the film that is to launch Billy Graham's Greater London Crusade in 1966. Critic George Target questions Bill Brown.
August 29th 1965 And the Walls Came Tumbling Down. The crumbling church.
September 12th 1965 Confrontation. Lord Soper and FH Amphlett Micklewright. This was the last Sunday Break programme I have been able to trace.
If you can add details of any of the other programmes shown, or appeared in the programme at all, I would love to hear from you

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Five O'Clock Club and other Rediffusion TV attempts to rival BBC's Blue Peter
. . . . . . . Associated Rediffusion made several attempts to produce a good children's magazine.
The first embryonic attempt in 1955 was perhaps Blue Cross Society Club with Stuart Gelder, which was essentially for pet lovers. Another specialist interest was catered for in Space Club which ran for much of 1956.
During 1957 children's ITV programmes were linked by Jimmy Hanley under the umbrella title Jolly Good Time, and this eventually became the title of a mix of miscellaneous snippets, such as Mr Happy (the controller of birthdays) and various little playlets, such as The Adventures of Twizzle. By the end of this year Jolly Good Time was confined to Tuesdays at 5pm, while on Fridays at the same time was a similar programme Let's Get Together. Jon Pertwee was one of several to host this show. Charlie Drake and various partners had a spot as Mick and Montmorency. Steve Race was the regular presenter during 1958 though in spring 1959 the show ended.
In April 1958, Nevil Whiting who had been hosting Jolly Good Time, was the host of Lucky Dip on Tuesdays at 5pm, which included Make Em Laugh, a six minute comedy spot, and Look Here, a feature on different hobbies. In the summer, the programme was subtitled The Junior Newspaper, introduced by Ted Kavanagh, though Nevil Whiting returned as the host during the autumn. Early 'correspondents' included Peter Waterman, while Bert Weedon joined in the autumn as Music correspondent, along with Fanny and Johnny Craddock, with the Happy Cooking Page. Muriel Young near the end of the year joined as a Special Correspondent. By 1961 she was the Fashions and Careers expert. After nearly two years, Nevil Whiting left the series in March 1960, replaced by Howard Williams. TV Times first mentioned in May 1961 that there were "interruptions by Ollie Beak," an irritating puppet who subsequently became immensely popular with children. (Ollie and the dog Fred Barker had previously been introduced in A-R's Small Time.) The last edition of Lucky Dip was on Tuesday September 5th 1961, for from the following week it was replaced by
Tuesday Rendezvous. "Friends old and new" was the byline, and indeed the resident hosts were the familiar Howard Williams, Muriel Young and Bert Weedon. Lo and behold guest experts were Fanny and Johnnie Craddock, and art guru John Mills was another guest expert on the first show on September 12th 1961. Grahame Dangerfield, animal expert, was also an early visitor to Tuesday Rendezvous, he had been a late recruit to Lucky Dip. Ollie Beak was in charge of The Visitors Book presumably to attempt to keep him out of mischief. And Ollie's pal, Fred Barker, received regular mention in TV Times from June 1962. One new feature was the Rendezvous Pony Club, introduced by Carole Baker. A popular early innovation throughout the series was Star Record Guest, though sadly the artist was never named in TV Times. The major difference in this new programme was that it filled the children's hour slot from 5.00 to 5.55pm.
Howard Williams soon left the programme leaving Muriel and Bert in charge. However he returned to the fold in May 1962 (possibly he was an Equity member and thus involved with the protracted dispute between that organisation and ITV). Weedon left at the end of that month, though he did return in October 1962. Christmas Day 1962 falling on a Tuesday, resulted in a special Christmas Rendezvous, a fantasy with the usual members of the team, who also included John Mills, Graham Dangerfield and Bob Wallis and His Storyville Jazzmen, who provided a history of jazz during the run of the series. The biggest change came on June 7th 1963 when the programme was reduced to a length of 25 minutes. It's not clear how all the regular features managed to get squeezed in. However Bert Weedon disappeared during the summer, as in the previous year. The very last programme was on September 24th 1963, but Muriel Young and Howard Williams returned the following week with
Five O'Clock Club which proved to be A-R's most successful children's magazine, though it ended up as little more than a pop show. It ran continuously until 1965, then with a further run into 1966. It started on October 1st 1963, now in a regular slot on Fridays as well as Tuesdays, recalling the Jolly Good Time scheduling back in 1957. Ollie Beak and Fred Barker were also recalled and the byline of the show sounded suspiciously like that of Tuesday Rendezvous, "old friends- now new members of a Television Club." There was Graham Dangerfield on Pets, while on Fridays dear old Jimmy Hanley had a Do it Yourself spot. But at least now guests were publicised in advance, everyone from the big names, to pop hopefuls who didn't quite make it to the top! Among new novelties was Daisy a clowning cow (played by Jimmy and June Kidd). Roger Webb and His Trio provided some of the music.
These were some of the advertised guests:
Oct 1st 1963: Harry Secombe. The Innocents. Oct 4th: Rosemary Squires. Craig Douglas.
Oct 11th '63: "a large part of the programme was built round two puppets taking bets with the host and hostesses," complained an irate viewer
Oct 15th 1963: The Eagles. Oct 18th: Sir Compton Mackenzie, Bert Weedon.
Oct 22nd 1963: Hughie Green. Karl Denver Trio and Mark Wynter. Oct 25th: The Caravelles and Billy Fury.
Oct 29th 1963: Billie Davis. Adam Faith and the Roulettes. Nov 1st: Moura Lympany. The Swinging Blue Jeans. Teddy Green.
Nov 5th 1963: Freddie and the Dreamers. Joe Brown. Nov 8th: Lt-Gen Sir Brian Horrocks. Dev Douglas. The Viscounts.
Nov 12th 1963: Larry Adler. The Tornados. George Bean. Nov 15th: Sir James Gunn. Russ Conway. Mike Sheridan and the Nightriders.
Dec 3rd 1963: The Vernons Girls. The Marksmen. Dec 6th: Bernard Tussaud. Dave Clark Five.
Christmas Eve 1963: David Kossoff. The Classmates. Muriel Smith. Dec 27th: Laurie Jay Combo. Rosemary Lane.
Jan 14th 1964: Joe Brown. Adrienne Poster. Jan 17th: Bert Weedon. Danny Williams. Alan Drew.
Jan 21st 1964: Susan Maughan, The Contrasts. Jan 24th: Teddy Johnson and Pearl Carr, The Bachelors, Angela Mortimer.
Jan 28th 1964: Marty Wilde. The Aces. Jan 31st: Mike Hurst. Bill Clifton.
Feb 11th 1964: Houston Wells, and The Sundowners. Feb14th: Vince Eager, Mike Preston.
Feb 18th 1964: Chris Sandford. Cloda Rogers. Feb 21st: Dev Douglas. The Cameos.
Mar 3rd 1964: guest singers Adam Faith and The Roulettes, also Marilyn Powell. Mar 6th: The Square Pegs and Karl Denver Trio.
Mar 17th 1964: Ezz Reco and the Launchers with Boysie Grant. The Joy Strings. Mar 20th: Gene Vincent. The Federals.
Mar 24th 1964: The Swinging Blue Jeans. Chad Stuart and Jeremy Clyde. No edition on Mar 27th (Good Friday).
Jay Denyer now replaced Howard Williams and Jimmy Hanley now became one of the regular resident club members. Graham Dangerfield left.
Apr 7th 1964: The Monarchs. Isla Cameron. Rick Jones. Freddie and the Dreamers. Apr 10th: The Hustlers. Maureen Scott. Spider Austin. John Mills.
No edition on Apr 14th 1964 (Budget Day). Apr 17th: Cilla Black. The Cumberland Three. Silvano's Sophisticated Chimps.
Apr 21st 1964: Millie. Malcolm Price Trio. Sid Plummer. Apr 24th: Steve Benbow. Bernard Hughes. The Footprints.
Apr 28th 1964: The Applejacks. Govinda. Gil Dova. May 1st: The Bedlams. Rod and Carolyn. Tom, Dick and Harry.
Louie Ramsay now joined the residents.
May 12th 1964: Glenda Collins. Tony Sheveton and the Shevells. Sheriff Danny Arnold with Pete Stanley and Wizz Jones. May 15th: The Chimes. Morgan-James Duo.
May 19th 1964: Brian Poole and the Tremeloes. Also with Jeremy Taylor, Michael Martell, Andrew and Paul Tracey. May 22nd: Manfred Mann. Kay Garner.
May 26th 1964: Lulu and the Luvers with Steve Perry, The Islanders, Christine Quaite, Sonny Farrar. May 29th: Tony Sheridan, plus The Hi-Fi's. Jan and Kelly.
June 2nd 1964: The Countrymen, with Andee Silver, Miar Davies, The Vendettas, Vercoe. June 5th: Peter and Gordon. Susan Maughan. The Druids.
Jimmy Hanley now left the series.
June 16th 1964: Mark Wynter, Chris Barber and Ottilie Patterson with Pierre and Company. June 19th: Ricky Livid and the Tone Deafs, with Shirley Collins, The Honeycombs.
June 23rd 1964: The Cockneys, Bettina and Bryce, Bryan Davies. June 26th: Adam Faith and the Roulettes, The Other Two.
June 30th 1964: The Band of Angels. Bernard Hughes. The Orchids. July 3rd: PJ Proby. The Jynx. The Healey Sisters.
July 7th 1964: Mike Sheridan and the Nightriders. Chris Rayburn. July 10th: Long John Baldry. Jean Redpath.
July 14th 1964 and July 17th: no guests advertised in TV Times
July 28th 1964: Billy J Kramer. Mickey Finn and the Blue Men. Joey. July 31st: The Merseybeats. The Langleys. Adamo.
Aug 4th 1964: The Jynx. Adamo. Anna-Lou and Maria. Aug 7th: Gus Backus. Sandie Shaw. The Settlers.
Aug 11th 1964: The Shevelles, Mike Redway and The Dougie Squires Three. Aug 14th: Patsy Ann Noble, The Blue Aces, The Woodpeckers.
Aug 18th 1964: Marianne Faithfull, The Overlanders, Doctor Crock and His Crackpots. Aug 21st: The Migil 5, Jackie Martin, Roslynn.
Aug 25th 1964: Nola York. The Juniors. The Road Stars. Aug 28th: Helen Shapiro. Chad Stewart and Jeremy Clyde. The Showtimers.
Sept 1st 1964: Kay Garnier. Larry Parker. Herman's Hermits. Sept 4th: Lesley Gore. Robin Hall and Jimmie MacGregor. The Voomins.
Sept 8th 1964: The Messengers. Billie Davis. Roy Bradley and his Music Breakers. Sept 11th: Barry Kent. Julie Grant. Brian Poole and the Tremeloes.
Sept 15th 1964: Lulu. The Carefrees. Sept 18th (Muriel Young temporarily not here): The Mudlarks. Christine Quaite. The Naturals.
Sept 22nd 1964: Chris Barber and Ottilie Patterson. Carol Deane. Sept 25th: The Rustiks. Ria Bartok. The Clearways.
Sept 29th 1964: The Ladybirds. The Jones Boys. Kopy Kat. John Halford. Oct 2nd (Muriel Young returns): Tammy St John. Morgan-James Duo. The Band of Angels.
Oct 6th 1964: Pierre and Company. Lady Lee. The Zombies. Oct 9th: Barry St John. Pip and Roy. The Nutrons.
Oct 20th 1964: The Supremes. Bern Elliott and the Klan. Bernard Hughes. Oct 23rd: Dionne Warwick. The Laurie Jay Combo. Don, David and Dean.
Oct 27th 1964: Marty Wilde. Swinging Blue Jeans. Sid Plummer. Oct 30th: Peter and Gordon. Stevie Lewis. Vince Philpott and The Drags.
Nov 3rd 1964: Manfred Mann. Patsy Ann Noble. John Morris. Nov 6th: Marianne Faithfull. Bobby Shafto. Shelley.
Nov 10th 1964: Dana Valery. Malcolm Mitchell. The Clarions. Nov 13th: The Searchers. Andee Silver. The Spinners.
Nov 17th 1964: Heinz. The Hi-fi's. Peppi with the Rustlers. Nov 20th: The Caravelles. The Overlanders. The U.K.'s.
Nov 24th 1964: Larry Parker. Ian Douglas. The Yardbirds. Nov 27th: Eden Kane. The Trendsetters. Beverley Jones.
Dec 1st 1964: Stubby Kaye. The Honeycombs. Lorne Lesley. Dec 4th: The Applejacks. Julie Rogers. Clinton Ford.
Dec 8th 1964: The Contrasts. The Three Bells. The Austins. Dec 11th: Lulu. The Nashville Teens. The Countrymen.
Dec 15th 1964: Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. David Berglass. Baby Dolls. Dec 18th: The Barron Knights. Valerie Masters. Ron Moody.
Dec 22nd 1964: Susan Maghan. Des and Dave. Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames. Dec 25th (a special Christmas edition from Trafalgar Square): The Hollies. Millie. Brian Poole and the Tremeloes. The Joy Strings. Christine Ching.
A new year, and the programme was renamed in 1965 in honour of the two puppets Ollie and Fred's Five O'Clock Club. Muriel Young was now the sole compere. Daisy the cow continued to appear, but Roger Webb was replaced by new resident musicians. In January it was The Kingfishers.
Star guest to start the year was Stubby Kaye. He was the star guest in each edition for two months.
Jan 5th 1965: With The Singing Blue Jeans. Samantha Jones. The King Brothers. Jan 8th: With Dave Clark Five. Sandie Shaw. The Keyes.
Jan 12th 1965: With The Naturals. Larry Parker. Gitte. Jan 15th: Cilla Black. Johnny Thunder. JL Watson and the Hummelfluges.
Jan 19th 1965: With Gerry and the Pacemakers. Del Shannon. Sheila and Jenny. Jan 22nd: With Tommy Quickly and the Remo Four. Chris Barber and his Band. Elkie Brooks.
Resident musicians now The Mike Negal Trio.
Feb 9th 1965: Mike Sheridan and the Nightriders. The Three Quarters. Patrick Kerr. Feb 12th: Ginger Johnson and his African Drummers. Mark Wynter. Margo and the Marvettes.
Feb 16th 1965: Tommy Bruce. Shirley and Johnny. Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tick. Feb 19th: Manfred Mann. Marilyn Powell. Ivy League.
Star Guest now Tommy Quickly for each show, replacing Stubby Kaye.
From March 4th 1965, the Friday edition switched to Thursdays.
Mar 9th 1965: Marianne Faithfull. Gilbert and Partner. The Messengers. Mar 11th: Tom Jones. Heinz and the Wild Boys. Adrienne Poster.
Mar 16th 1965: Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames. One Two and Three Group. Twinkle. Mar 18th: Gerry and the Pacemakers. T.Bone-Walker. Nana Mouskouri.
Mar 23rd 1965: (from Battersea Play Park): Johnny Kidd and The Pirates. Stubby Kaye. Mar 25th: (again from Battersea Play Park): Stubby Kaye the only special guest.
Mar 30th 1965: The Nashville Teens. Carol Deene. Apr 2nd: The Four Pennies. Helen Shapiro. Beryl and Bobo.
(No programme on Apr 6th 1965 due to Budget).
A new star guest on all shows from now on was Jon Pertwee, replacing Tommy Quickly. And there were also new resident musicians- The Michael Hill Group. Apr 8th: Freddie and the Dreamers. The Shevells. Jacqueline Moore.
Apr 13th 1965: The Applejacks. The Countrymen. Rosemary Squires. Apr 15th: Susan Maughan. Tony Knight's Chess Men. Bobby Shafto.
Apr 20th 1965: The Overlanders. Donovan. Louie Ramsay (a former host). Apr 22nd: The Walker Brothers. Lesley Duncan. The Ian Campbell Folk Group.
Apr 27th 1965: Lulu and the Luvvers. Adam, Mike and Tim. Pinky. Apr 29th: The Searchers, The Ladybirds. Brian Gregory.
New star guest on all shows, replacing Jon Pertwee, from now on was Craig Douglas.
May 11th 1965: Manfred Mann. Beau Brummel. David and Marianne Dalmour. May 13th: Dave Clark Five. Tony Blackburn. The Chantells.
May 18th 1965: Cilla Black. Toni Ross. Heinz and the Wild Boys. May 20th: Janie Marden. The Woodpeckers. Kenny Miller.
May 25th 1965 Susan Maughan was the compere, replacing Muriel Young: Richard Anthony. The Three Bells. The Shangaans. May 20th: Susan Maughan again compere: Connie Francis. New Faces. The Quiet 5.
The last programme was on June 3rd 1965. Muriel Young did return the following week with old pal Stubby Kaye to host Stubby's Silver Star Show. The Mike Hill Group also continued to appear, to provide some continuity. This show ended on Sept 2nd 1965, to be replaced by another spin-off
Five O'Clock Funfair.
Ollie and Fred returned, now not quite top of the bill, but Daisy the cow had gone. New host was Marjorie Sigley. The schedule continued as before, ie Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5 to 5.25pm. Guests were:
Sept 7th and 9th 1965: The Alexis Korner Group.
Sept 14th: The Hollies. Sept 16th: Les Flambeaux.
From now on The Alexis Korner Group became the resident regulars.
Sept 21st: The Lancastrians.
Sept 28th: The Harbour Lites. Sept 30th: The Silkie. Alan David.
Oct 12th 1965: Julie Grant. The Symbols. Oct 14th: The New Lost City Ramblers.
Oct 19th: The Animals. Oct 21st: Ronald Gamack.
Oct 26th: Swinging Blue Jeans. Ronald Gamack. Millie. Oct 28th: The Animals. Kim Martyn.
Nov 2nd 1965: Paul and Barry Ryan. Hedgehoppers Anonymous. Nov 4th: Julie Grant. The Moody Blues.
Nov 11th: Tsai Chin.
Nov 23rd: The Bow Bells. Nov 25th: The Foremost. Sue and Sonny.
Nov 30th: The Casuals. The Karlins. The Army Catering Corps. Dec 2nd 1965: The Searchers. Stanley Unwin.
This was the last Funfair, for returning now was the ever popular
Five O'Clock Club. "New style" it was called, and there was a new face in Wally Whyton, though familar in one sense, for he was Ollie Beak's voice. Tommy Quickly was also a regular and of course Muriel Young. Also back were inevitably, Ollie and Fred. The Alexis Korner Group (later: Sextet) were also regulars, thus giving some sort of link with the previous series. One other 'innovation' is that the series returned to its old Tuesday and Friday slots. Guests were:
Dec 7th 1965: Jonathan King. Chris Andrews. Danny Tigleau (Hawaiian fire dancer). Spencer Davis Group. Dec 10th: John Summers. Valerie Mitchell. The Kinks. The Transatlantics. Janet Templar and Victor the Clown.
Dec 14th: The Bo-Street Runners. The Settlers. Ray Martine. Gina Carroll. Dec 17th: Gerry and the Pacemakers. The Caesars. Vol Mckenna. Big Pete Duker.
Dec 21st: Lonnie Donegan. Vince Hill. Herbie's People. Norma Leon. Gary and Jan. Dec 24th: Johnny Tillotson. The Ivy League. Lita Roza. Mike Redway. Herman's Hermits.
Dec 28th: Justin Hayward. The Varations. The Zombies. Joy Marshall. Dec 31st: The Dalys. The Small Faces. The Honeycombs. Kenny Lynch. The Hollies.
Guest compere now Gerry Marsden (replacing Tommy Quickly).
Jan 11th 1966: Patty La Belle and the Belles. Joni Adams. David Essex. Pinkerton's (Assort.) Colours. Adamo. Jan 14th: Josh Hanna. David and Jonathan. Elaine Delmar. Chris Farlowe. Julie Rogers.
Jan 18th: Robb Storme. The Truth. The Exciters. The Mindbenders. Lulu. Jan 21st: Jimmy Cliff. The Nashville Teens. Dodie West. Morgan-James Duo.
Jan 25th: Paul and Barry Ryan. The Pretty Things. Doug Sheldon. John Summers. Jan 28th: The Nigel Brooks Singers. Cliff Bennett. Neil London. The original Drifters.
Feb 1st 1966: David Ballantyne. Peter Thompson. The Merseybeats. Ernestine Anderson. Feb 4th: The Pacemakers also appear with Gerry Marsden. Billie David and Keith Powell. The St Joseph's College Band from Beaulah Hill. Ken MacKintosh. Star Guest: Matt Monro.
Feb 8th: Roslynne. Gary Benson. The Silkie. Danny Williams. Feb 11th: Chad and Jeremy. Billy J Kramer. Mark Murphy.
Feb 15th: The Four Pennies. Brendan Phillips. Janie Marden. Roger Webb. Charlie and Inez Foxx. Feb 18th: Tommy St John. Lorne Lesley. The Migil 5.
Feb 22nd: The Hollies. Glenda Collins. Justin and Karlsson. Feb 25th: The King Brothers. The Twins. Adam Faith.
Mar 15th: Freddie and the Dreamers. Al Saxon. Patsy Ann Noble. Mar 18th: The Spencer Davis Group. The Settlers.
Mar 29th: Dave, Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick, Tich. Kiki Dee. Billy Joe Toyal. Apr 1st 1966: The Peter B's. Victor Manz. And presenting Rory and Crispian St Peters.
Apr 12th: Janie Jones. The Alan Price Set. Apr 15th: Roy Orbison. Martha and the Vandellas.
New guest compere, replacing Gerry Marsden: Joe Brown.
Una Stubbs temporarily replaces Muriel Young.
Apr 19th: Lewis Rich. Apr 22nd: Wayne Fontana. Fram and Alen.
Muriel Young returns.
New guest compere: Bill Boyle. Alexis Korner now has only a Quartet.
June 7th 1966: Mark Wynter. The Newby. Miki Dallon. June 10th: The Jeeps. Dev Douglas.
June 21st: Freddie and the Dreamers. Kim Cordell. June 24th: Susan Maughan. The Hollies.
June 28th: Michael Cox. Neil Christiansen. The Koobas. July 1st: David and Jonathan. Also first round of IQ game, London v Home Counties.
Alexis Korner Quartet now replaced by The Mike Hill Group (who had been regulars on the series during part of the previous year).
July 5th: The Ivy League. Joy Marshall. Englebert Humperdink. July 8th: The Fortunes. Also second round of IQ game, Norwich v Cambridge.
July 19th: Madeline Bell. Alan Price. Joe Brown. July 22nd: Dusty Springfield. Peter and Gordon. IQ game- Birmingham v Manchester.
July 26th: The Creation. Dave Berry. July 29th: Billy Fury. IQ game- Glasgow v Edinburgh.
Aug 2nd 1966 : Jonathan King. Lee Drummond. Aug 5th: Manfred Mann. Lesley Dawson. IQ game- Bristol v Exeter.
Aug 9th: The Ivy League. Danny Street. Brendan Phillips. Aug 12th: The Troggs. IQ game- Liverpool v Newcastle.
Aug 16th: Washington DC's. Chris Andrews. Aug 19th: Wayne Fontana. Jackie Trent. The Sounds of Time. IQ game- round eight.
Aug 23rd: The King Brothers. David Essex. Aug 26th: Vince Hill. Greg Hunter. IQ game- Quarter Final: London v Cambridge.
Joe Brown now returns briefly as the guest compere.
Aug 30th: Sandie Shaw. The Mindbenders. Ray Martine. Sept 2nd: The Hollies. Laura Lee. IQ game- Quarter Final: Llandudno v Manchester.
Guest compere now Mitch Murray.
Sept 6th 1966: Hayes and Wadey. Cliff Bennett. Jackie Trent. Michael Skinner. Sept 9th: The Rohtchilds. Kenny Damon. IQ game- Quarter Final: Edinburgh v Bristol.
Guest compere now sees the return of Gerry Marsden.
Sept 20th: Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames. IQ game- Semi Final
Sept 23rd 1966: Susan Maughan. The Troggs. IQ game- The Final. This was the last meeting ever of The Five O'Clock Club. The vital question is, whatever happened to Ollie Beak and Fred Barker?
The following year Rediffusion started
Come Here Often.

I am most grateful to Mick Robertson for his memories of working on this programme, made by Rediffusion in 1967/8.
"Come Here Often was a children’s magazine show. I was a researcher on it – one of my first jobs. Liz Cowley was the Producer, Lewis Rudd Exec Prod. Liz came fresh from A Whole Scene Going at the BBC, a very Sixties youth culture show. She brought some of that fresh and modern approach to children’s programming with Come Here Often.
The series was live and came from the same basement studio as Ready Steady Go. The Presenters were Sarah Ward and Cliff Morgan. Sarah was cutting edge, Cliff wasn’t, but he was already a legend because of his wonderful rugby career.
I can’t remember much of the content of the shows although I was helping make them. Cliff demanded directors show big close-ups of kids, "let’s see their big smiling gobs," Sarah flirted, very professionally. I know we featured bands The Who, The Herd, The Kinks etc. We also had a music talent strand featuring kids for which I was responsible. It was great though I say it myself! A sixteen year old boy called Seymour won it. The finals were judged by Spike Milligan and Alan Price amongst others. At least one of the finalists was a band that went on to be famous. That strand was the start of presenting for me, first giving the results, then introducing the strand. Eventually I replaced the legend that was Cliff Morgan, and then Associated Rediffusion lost its licence. Come Here Often ended. And because I was identified with it I wasn’t invited to present its successor ‘Magpie’ for about 2 years.
Come Here Often was a truly Sixties pioneering buccaneering show which in spite of its short life was a significant influence on future children’s television, not least on its Thames TV successor Magpie. Of the 80 episodes made, all I have are a few photos and a script. A live show leaves no tapes and all the inserts were shot on 16mm film."
Magpie began in August 1968, and Mick was one of its hosts from 1972 to 1980.

Come Here Often began in the summer of 1967, Fridays, 5.25-5.55pm. "Talking-swinging-arguing-making type programme- indoors, outdoors and everywhere." Another byline was "pop stars and poets, pastry cooks and politicians, everybody and everything gets stirred in and stirred up." Here's a third, "bring the whole world bouncing to your doorstep. From animals to astronauts, films to football." The first director was Vic Hughes, while these later shared the job, John Phillips, Diana Potter, and Prudence Martin. Though it was not fully networked at first, it was from September 1967, when it became a twice weekly magazine (Tuesdays and Fridays). But it returned to a weekly slot at the start of 1968, Tuesdays at 5.25pm. Cliff Morgan left the series in April 1968. TV Times announced that the "80th and last programme" was on July 23rd 1968.
Mick Robertson was advertised as co-host for the last few shows. We must be grateful to him for his memories, as TV Times was rarely able to announce any special guests on the show. However it can be stated that Spike Milligan was advertised to appear on January 9th and 16th 1968. The 'Special edition' mentioned by Mick Robertson was on April 9th 1968, the final of the write-your-own song competition. As well as Alan Price, George Martin was another of the judges. The series went out with a bang in July 1968, with three weeks showing film of Sarah Ward at RAF Singapore, in a Hercules turboprop from RAF Lyneham via a base they had in the Maldives."After the Royal Navy- the Royal Air Force!"- so presumably there'd been an earlier mini series on the navy.
To give a flavour of the content, one show in August 1967 showed Sarah Ward doing a parachute jump, "absolutely hair raising," she described it, "but we'd spent a small fortune getting two camera crews there to do the filming, so I had to go through with it." Another drama in November 1967 was when she and Cliff Morgan had to capsize their yacht in the Thames to show how a rescue operates. A less scary moment included a visit to Cadbury Somerset, in search of the Round Table

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Destination- Downing Street (1957, A-R)
Six spy thrillers in four parts each, preceded by one single introductory story. Originally planned in 13 parts, it proved so popular with viewers that three additional four part stories were added to the run. Critics however were less enthusiastic, one describing the stories as "unreal and hysterical."
All the stories were written by St John Curzon of TV Scripts Ltd (21 Hertford Street London W1). He joked, it was "my first, and possibly last." That seems to have been the case.
The live programmes were performed at Wembley Park Studios, with a maximum of six main sets per episode, plus a few filmed linked sequences. The author claimed "the Alster sequences in Hamburg to be quite effective."
Each episode starred John Stone as Mike Ashton on the trail of the enemy, known as ARKAB. On his team were Sylva Langova as Sylva, Graham Crowden as Colin, Donald Morley as Jacques Delauny, and also with Diana Lambert as Phoebe (who was in stories 1 to 13 only).
Destination- Downing Street was replaced by Murder Bag which did so well, which was perhaps the reason why this popular serial was not revived.

Details of the stories:
1 Prologue (Monday March 25th 1957, 8pm)

2 The Machiavelli Touch: Part 1 (April 1st 1957) - this group of stories directed by Robert Tronson.
3 The Machiavelli Touch: Part 2 (April 8th 1957)
4 The Machiavelli Touch: Part 3 (April 15th 1957) - with David Garth as Dufresne. With the death of Glass, all chance of tracing the Pterodactyl has gone. The safe has been rifled, clearly the work of The Machiavelli Touch, but Machiavelli has vanished.
5 The Machiavelli Touch: Part 4 (April 22nd 1957)

6 The Green Patch: Part 1 (April 29th 1957)- this group of stories directed by Ronald Marriott. Mike Anson and his team investigate a helicopter crash in Tanganyika- someone talks too loudly in a bar in Dar-Es-Salaam, and The Green Patch assumes an international importance.
7 The Green Patch: Part 2 (May 6th 1957)
8 The Green Patch: Part 3 (May 13th 1957)
9 The Green Patch: Part 4 (May 20th 1957)

10 Mr Crazy: Part 1 (May 27th 1957) - this group of stories directed by Robert Tronson. Also in this episode: Nancy Graham as Mary Jane, John McLaren as Arkwright, and Arthur Gross as Mertens. The ruthless espionage organisation known as Arkab have already involved Mike and his team in two dangerous adventures. Now they strike again, this time in an unexpected quarter, at the eccentric American millionaire that the press have nicknamed Mr Crazy.
11 Mr. Crazy: Part 2 (June 3rd 1957). Also in this story: Nancy Graham, John McLaren, Arthur Gross, John Sharplin as Charlesworth, Lawrence James as Joe, Lian-Shin Yeng as Ying, and Stratford Johns as Eisenstein. There is only one clue as to the identity of the attackers of Mr Crazy, and Mike gives Sylva the job of following it. She succeeds in getting a lead, but is herself trapped.
12 Mr. Crazy: Part 3 (June 10th 1957). Also in this story: Nancy Graham, John McLaren, John Sharplin, Lawrence James, Lian-Shin Yeng, Stratford Johns, and Frank Shelley as Bazzini. All roads seem to be leading to Rome. As J Harold Arkwright aka Mr Crazy sets out by plane for Italy, he is followed by his would-be assassin Joe Murray, and Mike Anson and his colleagues. Also on the plane is the sinister Gustaf Eisenstein. Is he one of Arkab's agents?
13 Mr. Crazy: Part 4 (June 17th 1957, now at 10pm) Also in this story: Nancy Graham, John McLaren, John Sharplin, Lian-Shin Yeng, Stratford Johns, and Frank Shelley. The ring about Arkab seems to be tightening. With Mr Crazy as bait, the trap is set, and Mike Anson and his team are waiting for 'Cato,' Arkab's agent, to fall into it. But something goes wrong and Phoebe is in great danger.

14 Two Faces East: Part 1 (June 24th 1957) - this group of stories directed by Jonathan Alwyn. With Andre van Gyseghem as Breitmann, and Leonard Trolley as Marsham. Mike Anson finds that faces and even fingerprints are no use against a new ruthless enemy.
15 Two Faces East: Part 2 (July 1st 1957). With Andre van Gyseghem, Helen Misener as Frau Hoffbauer, Wanda Ronda as Frau Kohne, Michael Blythe as Hintzel, and Edward Burnham as Clubfoot. A foreign scientist has the same fingerprints as a dead man. Is Arkab using plastic surgery in its work of sabotage? Jacques, planted in the next cell to the suspected man, and about to be deported, has received a message from Dr Chlmann to deliver to 'Melchior' in Hamburg.
16 Two Faces East: Part 3 (July 8th 1957) With Andre van Gyseghem, Wanda Ronda, Michael Blythe,Edward Burnham, Joss Ackland as Immelmann, Dermot Palmer as Zeke, and Ellen Blueth as Girl Clerk. Jacques is safely in touch with Melchior and Mike is installed at the Winter Palace Hotel. The widow of a famous plastic surgeon has confirmed Mike's suspicion that Arkab are operating a nefariopus Face Factory.
17 Two Faces East: Part 4 (July 15th 1957) With Andre van Gyseghem, Wanda Ronda, Michael Blythe, Edward Burnham, Joss Ackland, Dermot Palmer as Zeke. Mistrusting the handsome Baron, Mike refuses a bridge invitation from Frau Kohne, whom he suspects to be the plastic surgeon they are looking for. Jacques, a virtual prisoner in the underground clinic, has met Zeke, an American Army deserter, whose face has been changed for an Arkab mission to the US.

18 The Empty Man: Part 1 (July 22nd 1957)- this group of stories directed by Jonathan Alwyn.
19 The Empty Man: Part 2 (July 29th 1957) With Frank Olegario as Yakeez, Raymond Adamson as Greg, Petra Davies as Eldor, Barry Shawzin as Yilman, John Rumney as Rankov, Michael Ritterman as Prof Kjoumerian, Fenella Fielding as Djemila, and Victor Baring as Nicolaides. Mike is in Beirut investigating the attempt to sabotage Britain's newest airliner. Sylva and Jacques have been established as listening posts in the underworld. With Inspector Yakeez, Mike hopes for the recovery of Hasheem, who is believed to have planted a time bomb.
20 The Empty Man: Part 3 (August 5th 1957). With Frank Olegario, Raymond Adamson, Petra Davies, Barry Shawzin, John Rumney, Fenella Fielding, and Andreas Antoniou as barman. Hasheem, the 'empty man,' is still well beyond interrogation, though Mike has made contact with his sweetheart Eldor, the Professor's daughter, who believes Hasheem to be dead.
21 The Empty Man: Part 4 (August 12th 1957). With Frank Olegario, Raymond Adamson, Petra Davies, John Rumney, Andreas Antoniou, Anthony Jacobs as Ornescu, Michael Argy as Milo, and Julian Sherrier as Hasheem. The poisoning of hotel porter Yilman robs Mike and his friends of another clue. Hasheem is still unable to speak, only a shock can bring his brain to life. Then appears the suavely sinister figure of Milo who haunts Hasheem's sweetheart Eldor, and drives Rankov in panic from Beirut.

22 Danger's End (final group of stories): Part 1 (August 19th 1957) - the first three of these stories stories directed by William Freshman. With Anthony Jacobs as Ornescu (from last story). Mike and his friends have been on the trail of Arkab, but now the situation is reversed.
23 Danger's End: Part 2 (August 26th 1957)
24 Danger's End: Part 3 (September 2nd 1957). With George Pastell as The Chief, also Andre Charisee as Inspector Baruch, and Bernard Archard as Meissner. In Brussels, Mike and his friends have intercepted a letter instructing Maria Voelcker to report to Innsbruck. After disposing of the interfering Mr Behreins they think themselves in the clear, but neither they, not the unfortunate Maria, realise that in this instance Arkab is calling the tune.
25 Danger's End: Part 4 (September 9th 1957). This final episode directed by Eric Croall. With George Pastell, also Bernard Archard, and Jan Conrad as Lehmke. In Innsbruck Mike has learned for the first time that Arkab is waiting for him to walk into a trap. With Colin, he trails Sylva and Mesissner to the house beyond the Swiss border, the secret headquarters, for which Jacques has the phone number.

Other actors who appeared in an unknown episode of the series were Philip Ashley, Peter Bathurst, Basil Beale, AJ Brown, Nicholas Bruce, Oliver Burt, Victor Charrington. Margaret Clifford, Barry Cookson, Michael Corcoran, Basil Coulolias, Valerie Craig, George Crowther, Guy Deghy, Hugo de Vernier, Otto Diamant, Conway Dixon, Antony Doonan, Colin Douglas, Michael Ely, Hugh Evans, Edward Forsyth, David Franks, Louise Gainsborough, Mary Gillingham, Martin Gordon, Arthur Goullet, David Graham, Joyce Gregg, Susan Hampshire, Dennis Handby, Richard Harris, Michael Harrison, John Harvey, Brenda Haydn, Michael Hitchman, Thelma Holt, Michael Jacques, Barry Keegan, Eric Lander, Howard Lang, Yvonne le Dain, Margaret Leigh, Duncan Lewis, James Lloyd, Raymond Lloyd, Arthur Lowe, Adina Mandlova, Kirsten Milne, Norman Mitchell, Richard Molinas, Edwin Morton, John Nicholson, Ralph Nossek, Kendrick Owen, Delia Paton, George Pravda, Elizabeth Rees-Williams, Susan Richards, George Roderick, Graham Rowe, Anthony Sagar, John Salew, Jeffrey Segal, Anthony Sheppard, William Sherwood, Tom Simmons, Benn Simons, Gloria Simpson, Norris Stayton, Sheila Steafel, Kathleen Stuart, Derek Sydney, Colin Tapley, Norman Taylor, Ernst Ulman, John Unicomb, David Waller, Peter Welch, Frank Williams, Leonard Williams, Jerome Willis, Pauline Winter, Yvette Wyatt, Yah Ming. (Source for this list- TV Scripts Ltd)

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SATURDAY SERIALS
were a high spot of the night's viewing in the 1950's on ITV. I would suggest that many owed their origins to the success of Francis Durbridge on 'the other side.'

Pictured: reahearsing the Javanese palace dance which was featured in episode fve of McCreary Moves In (1957).
Far right is Mrs Soerapti Moderows, wife of the cultural attache at the Indonesian Embassy. She is demonstrating one of the hand movements to dancer Lisa Peake.
In the background is the famous dancer Ram Gopal.

Details of these serials, click where highlighted:
My Sister and I (ABC 1956)
The Man Who Was Two (ABC 1957)
Joyous Errand (BBC 1957)
Electrode 93 (ABC 1957)
Motive for Murder (ATV 1957)
The Schirmer Inheritance (ABC 1957)
Five Names for Johnny (ATV 1957)
McCreary Moves In (ABC 1957)
Web (ATV 1957/8)
The Man Who Sold Death (ABC 1958)
The Man Who Finally Died (ATV 1959)
Epilogue to Capricorn (ATV 1959)
The Voodoo Factor (ATV 1959/60)

Brief details of five other ITV Saturday serials.
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Death to The First Lady
A serial shown on ITV in 5 parts, written by Peter Key. The first episode, The Red White and Blue, was shown on Saturday August 18th 1956, 9-9.30pm. John Knight was the Producer, and music was composed by Tommy Reilly.
John Loder starred as Tom Abel, President of the Pacific Federation. He is visiting Britain, accompanied by his daughter Kim (Maureen Connell) to sign an agreement covering the sale of a strategic possession. Kim is kidnapped.
Also starring was Dermot Walsh as Bill Anderson, others appearing including Graham Stuart as Prime Minister Robert Sturgess, John Ruddock as Foreign Secretary John Bridger, and James Raglan as Colonel Jason of Internal Security. The final episode Danse Macabre was screened on September 8th 1956.
The Strange World of Planet X
Made into a feature film, this tv serial starred Helen Cherry as Fenella Laird, William Lucas as David Graham, and David Garth as Gavin Laird. The script was by Rene Ray. Director: Quentin Lawrence, Producer: Arthur Lane.
The stories were: 1 The Formula (September 15th 1956), 2 The Terrible Cabinet (September 22nd 1956), 3 The Unholy Threshold (September 29th 1956) - "was it just a dream? Or have you been to the strange world of Planet X?"
4 The Dimension Discovered (October 6th 1956), Episode 5 (October 13th 1956), Episode 6 (October 20th 1956)- with Paul Hardtmouth as Prof Kollheim, Episode 7 (October 27th 1956). Note- though originally advertised as in "six episodes," this seventh episode is billed as such in TV Times.
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde
shown in 6 parts from November to December 1956 on Saturdays at 8.30-9pm.
Adapted for tv by James Parish. Directed by Philip Saville.
The title role was played by Dennis Price, with Ian Fleming as Dr Lanyon and Philip Ray as Utterson.
The Trollenburg Terror
Perhaps the best remembered of ATV's serials, being turned into a feature film. This 6 part serial starred Sarah Lawson as Sarah Pilgrim and Laurence Payne as Philip Truscott. The script was by Peter Key, and it was directed by Quentin Lawrence.
Episode 1, The Mind of Ann Pilgrim, was shown on December 15th 1956 from 8-8.30pm, the following episodes followed: 2 First Blood, 3 The Giggle of Madness, 4 The Power of the Ixodes, 5 The Trap, and 6 Final Episode.
As this serial is better documented than most, I am not giving fuller info here.
The Gentle Killers (1957)
stars: Dermot Walsh as Paul Donaldson, Hazel Court as Stella Manning, and Sydney Tafler as Dr Julian Goldsworthy. Others in the cast included Brian Oulton as Prof Millington Arkwright, Tony Church as Insp Fellowes, and Frank Hawkins as Sgt Maybrick.
Script by Lewis Greifer and Leigh Vance. Director: Quentin Lawrence.
General synopsis: Forty people have disappeared, and now oil engineer Paul Donaldson thinks he is witness to the kidnapping of a peer. It leads him to a world ranging plan by The Gentle Killers to carry out simultaneous assassinnations in numerous countries.

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My Sister and I (ABC)
was screened on Saturdays 9-9.30pm during May and June 1956. Although billed as a serial, this was as much a comedy.
Alick Hayes wrote the scripts and produced the series. Art director: Bertram Tyrer. Director: James George.
The stars were Dinah Lee as Sally, and Jane Taylor as Jo, two "endearing" sisters. Co stars were Jack Howarth as the pigeon fancier Grandpa, and Ethel Manners as Mrs Balshaw.
Episode 1 Starting Work (May 19th 1956) also featured Fred Fairclough, Fred Ferris, June Kearsley, and Fred Godfrey.
Episode 2 The Widowhood Method (May 26th 1956) also had in the cast Alison Bayley, Ray(mond) Cooney, Grenville Eves, Fred Godfrey, Penelope Davis, Rosina Enright, Juliet Cooke, Christine Gotts, Patricia Ware, Jean Wraith, Joan Mercer, and Doreen Eagle.
Episode 3 (June 2nd 1956)
Episode 4 (June 9th 1956) with same cast.
Episode 6 (June 23rd 1956) with Alison Bayley, Raymond Cooney, Fred Godfrey, and Fred Fairclough.

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The Voodoo Factor (ATV 1959/60)
Written by Lewis Greifer
Music: Johnny Dankworth
Sets designed by Tom Lingwood
Producer: Quentin Lawrence.
Shown on Saturdays 8.25pm-8.55pm. The stars in each of the six episodes were:
Maxine Audley as Marion Whittaker and
Maurice Kaufmann as Dr David Whittaker.
Other co-stars who appeared in all stories except the first:
Tony Church as Prof Axhem, and Charles Carson as Captain Ross.
The story was set in the Timor Islands in the Indian Ocean. Two doctors, Whittaker and Cave, had been carrying out a programme for the Malaria Research Council. A sociologist called Axhem had claimed the islanders were suffering from Spider Fever. However another explanation is that an anti-malaria serum administered by Dr Cave had been contaminated. When Cave is drowned the case is closed. The story begins two years later, when a man appears in London with similar symptoms.

1 The Malayan
December 12th 1959
Synopsis: The bell rings, and Dr Whittaker is called to see a patient with the symptoms of a disease which does not, dare not, exist. A legendary goddess reaches across two millennia to make her power felt in the London suburbs.
Rest of cast:
Eric Young... The Malayan
Reginald Marsh... Insp Wilkins
Trevor Reid... Dr Sam Newman
Peter Baldwin... Dr Phil Evans
Frank Pettitt... Jim, a oliceman
Eric Flynn... Tom lab assistant
Brian Hawksley... Joe lab assistant

2 The Professor
December 19th 1959
Synopsis: Dr Whittaker's adversary is the legendary Polynesian goddess who died 2000 years before. The stakes are his life and the life of his wife Marion.
Others in cast:
Philip Bond... Dr Tony Wilson
Anna May Wong... Malayan girl
Jill Hyem... Alice Simms
Eric Young... The Malayan
Richard Bennett... Robin Horsman
Jill Ireland... Renee
Jennfier Hales... Sue
John Dearth... Bob Busby

3 The Spiders
December 26th 1959
Synopsis: Can a friend who died two years before come to life again? Could a legendary goddess exercise her power across 2000 years of time? To Dr Whittaker the answer is self-evident. Only one thing proves him wrong- the facts.
Others in cast:
Philip Bond... Dr Tony Wilson
Anna May Wong... Malayan girl
Jill Hyem... Alice Simms
Eric Young... The Malayan
Richard Bennett... Robin Horsman
John Dearth... Bob Busby
Dallas Cavell... Riordan
David Brierley... Smith
Richard Burrell... Jim Herring

4 The Elixir
January 2nd 1960
Synopsis: Who is this girl? Is she the innocent victim of fear and primitive superstition, or the source of all evil? The girl's smile is an enigma. Unless Dr Whittaker and his wife can solve it, they must die within hours.
Others in cast:
Philip Bond... Dr Tony Wilson
Anna May Wong... Malayan girl
Jill Hyem... Alice Simms
Richard Bennett... Robin Horsman
Dallas Cavell... Riordan
David Brierley... Smith

5 The Missing Factor
January 9th 1960
Synopsis: In Timor, nearly two years previously, nearly 200 men, women and children died. What killed them? Voodoo? The curse of the goddess they had offended? Or was it a 20th century curse, more ruthless, deadly and undiscriminating? The lives of several hundred people hang on the answer.
Others in cast:
Philip Bond... Dr Tony Wilson
Frank Hawkins... Albert Williams
Anna May Wong... Malayan girl
Jill Hyem... Alice Simms

6 Operation Lifeboat
January 16th 1960
Synopsis: A still silent ship. The radio calls but who is there to answer? What has happened there? Is this the way the world will end, with a whimper of horror and a plea for forgiveness? It is the last round between the adversaries who cannot understand each other, a dying scientist and a dead goddess.
Others in cast:
Philip Bond... Dr Tony Wilson
Frank Hawkins... Albert Williams
Anna May Wong... Malayan girl
Jill Hyem... Alice Simms
Richard Burrell... Jim Herring
Dorothy Smith... Nurse
Deborah Springer... Nurse

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The Man Who Sold Death (1958)
Script: Ingram D'Abbes
Designed by Elisabeth Dorrity
Director: Andrew Osborn (ABC)
Shown on Saturdays 7pm-7.30pm.
Star: Edward Chapman as outwardly respectable solicitor Adam Krane

1 Rules of the Game
February 8th 1958
with Cyril Shaps as Grubbe, and David Davies as Chief Insp Marshall.
Also in this cast:
Malcolm Watson... Harman
John Crocker... Police sergeant
John Quarmby... Police constable
Anita Sharp Bolster... Mrs Lindsay-Ross
Melissa Stribling... Lady Cynthia Varney
John Miller... Coroner
Robert Young... Solicitor
Ballard Berkeley... Insp Gray
John Longden... Sir Frank Egerton
Carl Duering... Weigall
Alan Robinson... Perry
Synopsis: Murder without motive is not the easiest thing to get a line on, and Scotland Yard, with a numbe rof these unsolved cases on their hands, are finding the problem a tough one. The crimes follow no fixed pattern, but they all have certain things in common- there are no clues, and there seems to be no motive. The police are called to yet another crime, and viewers start to follow the activities of The Man Who Sold Death.

2 Pawn for Pawn
February 15th 1958
with Cyril Shaps as Grubbe,
Margaret Anderson as Diana Birch
Peter Bryant as Jimmy O'Bryan
Guest star: Percy Marmont as Sir John Birch
Others in cast:
Arnold Ridley... Mr Penpley
Paddy Turner... Mary the maid
Andre Charisse... Croupier
Melissa Stribling... Lady Cynthia Varney
Moris Farhi... Barman
John Cross... Leapman
Synopsis: Having carried out another successful operation, the man who devotes his skill to the lucrative profession of murder on a 'percentage for profit' basis meets a new client. After much planning, he calmly and coldly carries out his part of the contract. But for the first time in his career, something unexpected happens.

3 Queen off the Board
February 22nd 1958
with Cyril Shaps, Margaret Anderson and Peter Bryant
and with
Melissa Stribling... Lady Cynthia Varney
Christopher Hood... Newsboy
Anna Barry... Miss Flynn
Paddy Turner... Mary the maid
Dorothy Darke... Lady Cynthia's maid
Carl Duering... Weigall
Synopsis: Determined as the Man is to collect his dues for his latest professional service, his immediate problem lies in a threat from his one emotional weakness- a glamorous woman. As an experiences chess player he knows that it sometimes pays to sacrifice an important piece which may be used to advantage by his opponents. And, alas, there is only one way in which this situation can be dealt with. He regrets the necessity but his own safety demands a blank space on his side of the board.

5 Black King in Check
March 8th 1958
with Cyril Shaps, Margaret Anderson, Peter Bryant David Davies and John Longden. Also:
Jack Stewart... Det Sgt Phillips
Christopher Hood... Newsboy
Synopsis: In spite of Krane's ability to plan the move ahead, he cannot foresee the hand that chance will play. The law operates in a patient and formidable manner and is often set in motion by the smallest of details. It is in this way that the police are first brought into contact with Krane- with violent consequences.

6 Checkmate!
March 15th 1958, 7.15pm
with Cyril Shaps, Margaret Anderson, Peter Bryant David Davies and John Longden. Also:
Ballard Berkeley... Insp Gray
Jack Stewart... Det Sgt Phillips
George Hagan... Scott
Carl Duering... Weigall
Final synopsis: Once again by a quick move in play, Krane thinks he is out of check, but chance is the better player. The police are in command of the game and for once Krane is not able to be one move ahead of the other side

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McCreary Moves In (ABC)
A seven part serial shown November 2nd to December 14th 1957
on Saturday evenings 9.30-10pm
starring Alan White as Mike McCreary
also starring George Pastell as Captain Raka and
Andre Van Gyseghem as Van Gelder.
All three stars can be seen in this photo
Script: Michael East. Director: John Knight
Producer: Guy Verney.
ABC Press Officer Ted Harris had the task of finding six Asiatic local actors and a middle aged woman, who had to be found dead in bed during the first two episodes.

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The Man Who Finally Died (ATV 1959)
Script: Lewis Greifer. Sets designed by Vic Symonds (eps 1-3), Tom Lingwood (4-7)
Producer: Quentin Lawrence. Shown on Saturdays 7.30-8pm.
The stars were:
Richard Pasco as Joe Newman, and
Delphi Lawrence as Lisa Deutsch
With Eric Pohlmann as Insp Hoffmeister (episodes 2 to 7) and
Ralph Michael as Dr von Brecht (episodes 3 to 7).

The story was based on a true story set in West Germany. Richard Pasco said of his role, "I enjoy playing Joe. He is intelligent and genuine, but rather bewildered by the scrapes he finds himself in." Of her part as Joe's alluring stepmother, Delphi Lawrence said, "Lisa is very smooth, very sophisticated."
The serial had a good critical reception, "excellent," was the verdict of one. It was made into a film starring Stanley Baker, released in 1962.

Episode details:
1 The Call
September 12th 1959
Synopsis: The phone rings in a London garage; 'Your father must see you urgently.' But Joe Newman's father was killed officially 17 years before. Twenty four hours later, Joe knows that, whether or not he will ever see his father again, one thing is certain- he himself will never be the same man. His stepmother warns him his father actually died only two days ago, yet on returning to his hotel he receives a message from his father saying he's in trouble.
Also in the cast:
Edward Judd... Rahn
Harold Goldblatt... Brenner
Harold G Robert... Williams
Peter Hughes... Frank Robb
Myrtle Reed... Madge Robb
Rosemary Frankau... Hotel receptionist
Martin Stondale... Todd
Frank Sieman... Hotel manager
Ruth Lodge... Marta

2 The Grave
September 19th 1959
Synopsis: "'Why should I become involved with criminals I don't know, for reasons I don't understand?' The plot is to trick Joe Newman is obvious, but Joe has no alternative, for the bait is his father."
Also in the cast:
Anne Carroll... Sylvia
Nigel Green... Carl Heinrich
Edward Judd... Rahn
Frank Sieman... Hotel manager
Ruth Lodge... Martha Gellmann
Hilary Bamberger... Mina
Victor Platt... Cemetery superintendent
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch

3 The Gloves
September 26th 1959
Synopsis: A widow grives; loyal friends mourn; the headstones in the cemetery reads: 'Kurt Deutsch. Died 6th September 1959.' But this man Deutsch has died once before. Could two mistakes have been made?
Also in the cast:
Nigel Green... Carl Heinrich
Edward Judd... Rahn
Ruth Lodge... Martha Gellmann
Hilary Bamberger... Mina
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch
James Ottaway... Shop assistant
Dorothy White... Maria

4 The Switch
October 3rd 1959
Synopsis: A gravestone in Stuttgart carries the name of Joe's father. His stepmother mourns a devoted husband. But Kurt Deutsch is no ordinary man, he has 'died' once before. Could it be that he has yet another 'life?'
Also in the cast:
Nigel Green... Carl Heinrich
Edward Judd... Rahn
Harold Goldblatt... Brenner
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch
Anne Carroll... Sylvia
Dorothy White... Maria

5 The Hunt
October 10th 1959
Synopsis: Voices on the phone span 20 years of Joe's life. One is the voice of his 'dead' father. Or is it a trick? What motives are there for misleading a boy about his own father?
Also in the cast:
Edward Judd... Rahn
Harold Goldblatt... Brenner
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch
Dorothy White... Maria
Junia Crawford... Waitress
Hilda Fenemore... Mrs Schneider
Ruth Lodge... Martha Gellmann

6 The Clinic
October 17th 1959
Synopsis: At last Joe knows his father is alive. But why should the authorities, his stepmother, the doctors and the police insist to the contrary? One murders for gain or revenge or for hate. Why should anyone keep 'dead' men alive?
Also in the cast:
Edward Judd... Rahn
Harold Goldblatt... Brenner
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch
Dorothy White... Maria
Ruth Lodge... Martha Gellmann
Hilary Bamberger... Mina

7 The Final Death
October 24th 1959
Synopsis: The search for Joe's father ends; or perhaps it is just the beginning.
Also in the cast:
Edward Judd... Rahn
Harold Goldblatt... Brenner
John van Eyssen...Sgt Hirsch
Dorothy White... Maria
Ruth Lodge... Martha Gellmann

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Five Names for Johnny (ATV)
A seven part serial shown autumn 1957 Saturdays 9.30-10pm
starring Conrad Phillips as David Haigue, and
Norman Wooland as Dr Mark Willoughby
Script: Lewis Greifer
Sets: Tom Lingwood
Director: Quentin Lawrence
"There are more terrors in a man's dreams than in all the police files," said Greifer of this 7 part serial.

1 The Victoria Cross
September 14th 1957
Also in this episode were
David Langford... Peter Haigue
Victor Platt... Insp Walter Mason
Anthony Doonan... Det Constable Bill Wright
Synopsis of opening story: A man has a dream of death and then awakes to the reassuring comfort of his home and family. The horror has faded with the night. But has it? What if the dream should cling to his waking hours? What then is the nightmare and what the reality? And what if the reality proves more nightmarish than the dream?

2 The Accusation
September 21st 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont as Carol Haigue
Also in this episode were David Langford, Victor Platt and Anthony Doonan, plus
AJ Brown... Coroner
Henry Longhurst... Dr Meld
Hilda Fenemore... Mrs Sherman
John Carol... Stonehouse
Julie Somers... Diane Sherman
Keith Smith... Joker
Synopsis: A man is dead. A man you haven't seen for eight years. A man you hardly knew. Why then should people hint that you're involved? That you might have been responsible. And why, most of all, should you believe it yourself?

3 Missing Years
September 28th 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont as Carol Haigue
Also in this episode were David Langford, Victor Platt and Anthony Doonan, plus
John Carol... Stonehouse
Diana Lambert... Margot Medina
Vilma La Verne...Cynthia
Charles Stanley... Dewar
Synopsis: Have could you have killed your brother, a man you know for a fact you haven't seen or spoken to for eight years? Why should the police suspect you of an impossible murder? When David Haigue sets out to prove his innocence, he does so to satisfy his own sense of guilt. Unhappily he desn't quite succeed.

5 Revenge
October 12th 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont
Also in this episode were Victor Platt, Anthony Doonan, John Carrol and
Diana Lambert... Margot Medina
Synopsis: David Haigue, investigating the missing years of his brother's life, runs up against a solid wall of crime and intrigue. In a hotel room, lie all the answers to his questions. He goes there- to find a dead man.

7 The Fifth Name
October 26th 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont
Also in this episode were Victor Platt, Anthony Doonan, David Langford, John Carrol, Diana Lambert and
Roger Snowdon... Dr Max Mannerjee
Charles Stapley... Striker
Synopsis: 'So this is the meaning of a nightmare! This is the murderer of Johnny!' Slowly, inevitably, David Haigue is driven to commit the act he has feared for months, perhaps for all his life- to kill a man he never knew.

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Web (1957/8, ATV)
A serial in six parts. Script: Lewis Greifer
Sets: Richard Lake. Film cameraman: Warwick Ashton, film edited by George Clark
Producer: Quentin Lawrence.
Stars: Lyndon Brook as Harry Warren, and Betty McDowall as Rose Warren.

Episode 1: December 21st 1957

2 The Alibi
December 28th 1957 9.30-10pm
Synopsis: 'I am sititng on a bus on my way home from work when the police enter and accuse me of a fantastic crime against someone I do not know, at a place I have never been, under circumstances I do not understand. it is frightening...' For Harry Warren, quiet, inoffensive, respectable, the real horror begins when the police produce proof, conclusive and damning.
Also in the cast:
Walter Horsbrugh... Assistant Commissioner
Bill Nagy... John Wilder
Victor Platt... Insp Mason
Patrick Newell... Fat man
Heather Lloyd-Jones... Waitress
Trader Faulkner... Jack Warren
Richard Burrell... Det Sgt Prebble
James Ottaway... Bill
Mary Werbster... Lena Jennings
Philip Holles... Manning
Norman Scace... JB Grune
Henry Webb... Carr

Episode 3: January 4th 1958 (no episode shown Jan 11th)

4 The Painting
January 18th 1958, 7-7.30pm
with Jean Kent as Rita Carpenter
Synopsis: The coat worn by the man who strangled the widow is the coat you were wearing. The love letter in the dead woman's hand is the letter you signed. Your close friends and workmates testify on oath that you killed her. But you have never seen or met her in your life, knew nothing about her until the police called- and the web is spun.
Also in the cast:
Victor Platt... Insp Mason
Patrick Newell... Fat man
Trader Faulkner... Jack Warren
Richard Burrell... Det Sgt Prebble
Norman Scace... JB Grune
Edwina Carrol... Ella
Michael Golden... Van
Paul Hardwick... George

5 The Other Warren
January 25th 1958, 7-7.30pm
with Jean Kent as Rita Carpenter
Synopsis: Who is plotting to kill me? Who is producing incredible, conclusive proof that I brutally murdered a woman I have never seen in my life? Who is at the centre of this web that inevitably will strangle me? My wife? My brother? A friend? Or an enemy I have never heard of?
Also in cast:
Victor Platt... Insp Mason
Patrick Newell... Fat man
Trader Faulkner... Jack Warren
Richard Burrell... Det Sgt Prebble
Norman Scace... JB Grune
Paul Hardwick... George
Bill Nagy... John Wilder
Patricia Heneghan... Connie Rohan

6 The Gallery
February 1st 1958, 7-7.30pm
with Jean Kent as Rita Carpenter
Synopsis: 'So this is the answer. This is the reason for the web that has trapped me finally and inescapably.' Harry Warren, bewildered, on the run for a murder of a woman he has never seen, learns that he and his family are just pawns in a £10,000,000 game of chess.
Also in cast:
Victor Platt... Insp Mason
Trader Faulkner... Jack Warren
Richard Burrell... Det Sgt Prebble
Norman Scace... JB Grune
Paul Hardwick... George

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Five Names for Johnny
A seven part serial shown autumn 1957 Saturdays 9.30-10pm
starring Conrad Phillips as David Haigue, and
Norman Wolland as Dr Mark Willoughby
Script: Lewis Greifer
Sets: Tom Lingwood
Director: Quentin Lawrence
"There are more terrors in a man's dreams than in all the police files," said Greifer of this 7 part serial.

1 The Victoria Cross
September 14th 1957
Also in this episode were
David Langford... Peter Haigue
Victor Platt... Insp Walter Mason
Anthony Doonan... Det Constable Bill Wright
Synopsis of opening story: A man has a dream of death and then awakes to the reassuring comfort of his home and family. The horror has faded with the night. But has it? What if the dream should cling to his waking hours? What then is the nightmare and what the reality? And what if the reality proves more nightmarish than the dream?

2 The Accusation
September 21st 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont as Carol Haigue
Also in this episode were David Langford, Victor Platt and Anthony Doonan, plus
AJ Brown... Coroner
Henry Longhurst... Dr Meld
Hilda Fenemore... Mrs Sherman
John Carrol... Stonehouse
Julie Somers... Diane Sherman
Keith Smith... Joker
Synopsis: A man is dead. A man you haven't seen for eight years. A man you hardly knew. Why then should people hint that you're involved? That you might have been responsible. And why, most of all, should you believe it yourself?

5 Revenge
October 12th 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont
Also in this episode were Victor Platt, Anthony Doonan, John Carrol and
Diana Lambert... Margot Medina
Synopsis: David Haigue, investigating the missing years of his brother's life, runs up against a solid wall of crime and intrigue. In a hotel room, lie all the answers to his questions. He goes- to find a dead man.

7 The Fifth Name
October 26th 1957
co-starring Patricia Marmont
Also in this episode were Victor Platt, Anthony Doonan, David Langford, John Carrol, Diana Lambert and
Roger Snowdon... Dr Max Mannerjee
Charles Stapley... Striker
Synopsis: 'So this is the meaning of a nightmare! This is the murderer of Johnny!' Slowly, inevitably, David Haigue is driven to commit the act he has feared for months, perhpas for all his life- to kill a man he never knew.

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Joyous Errand (BBC, 1957)
A serial in six parts.
Script: Ian Dallas from the novel by Denis Wylie.
Designer: Lawrence Broadhouse. Producer: Peter Lambert.
The stars were Ursula Howells as Ruth Blair
and Peter Arne as Richard Kendal.
Others regulars were Jacqueline Hill (Carrie Dean), and Michael Warre (Max Parrott).

Details of some episodes:
Episode 1: Saturday April 6th 1957
Also in the cast was Ernest Thesiger.
Episode 4: Saturday April 27th 1957, 7.30pm
Also in the cast: Henry Longhurst (Doorman), Horace Sequeira (Old Man), Geoffrey Tyrrell (Barman), Jose Richard (Ruby), Marriott Watson (Glad), Mark Daly (Eddy Toddy), David Lander (Spayer).
Episode 5: Saturday May 4th 1957
Also in the cast: Geoffrey Wearing (Adrian Millom).
Episode 6: Saturday May 11th 1957
Also in the cast: Geoffrey Wearing, and Kevin Stoney now as Richard Kendal (Peter Arne was ill so not in this final story- the perils of live telly!).

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Motive for Murder (ATV)
A six part serial shown on summer Saturdays in 1957, 9-9.30pm.
Script: Jimmy Sangster
Director: Leonard Brett
Starring Vincent Ball as John Blackmoor
with Gene Anderson as Jean Blackmoor.

The author described his hero thus, "he's young, reasonably well off and has a charming and attractive wife."
Critic D Hoddinott wrote of this serial, "ATV are proud of the fact that they are tv's serial kings, and although they have presented some pretty grim ones in the past, this looks like being one of the best they have ever done. Enough mystery, plenty of suspense and good taut dialogue... I am, for one, waiting anxiously for Saturday to know how Mr Ball will get himself out of his present predicament."

Episode details:
1 The Homecoming
Saturday June 15th 1957
Rest of cast:
Ian Ainsley... Hotel under manager
Peter Hughes... Man in phone booth
Barbara Lott... Miss Douglas
Geoffrey Chater... Harry Manners
Victor Brooks... Det Insp Wrigley
Humphrey Morton...Sgt Martin
Synopsis: John Blackmoor and his wife Jean return to London after two years abroad. In two days' time, John is due to collect a large sum of money. What happens provides the Motive.

2 The Man Named Jacques
Saturday June 22nd 1957
Rest of cast:
Barbara Lott... Miss Douglas
Geoffrey Chater... Harry Manners
Victor Brooks... Det Insp Wrigley
Humphrey Morton...Sgt Martin
Ed Powell... Joe Marks
George Street... Porter
Betty Bascombe... Miss Gosling
Margot McMenemy... Airport hostess
Peter Allenby... Frenchman
Peter Hughes... Furneaux
Synopsis: John Blackmoor, in an effort to clear himself of a charge of murdering his twin sister, sets out to trace the whereabouts of a man named Jacques.

3 The Clay Pigeon
Saturday June 29th 1957
Rest of cast:
Barbara Lott... Miss Douglas
Geoffrey Chater... Harry Manners
Victor Brooks... Det Insp Wrigley
Humphrey Morton...Sgt Martin
Ian Ainsley... Hotel under manager
Timothy Grey... Valet
Synopsis: John Blackmoor, returning from Paris, learns there was a great deal about his sister that he didn't know.

4 The Doctor
Saturday July 6th 1957
Rest of cast:
Geoffrey Chater... Harry Manners
Victor Brooks... Det Insp Wrigley
Humphrey Morton...Sgt Martin
Dennis Edwards... Doctor
Pearl Catlin... Policewoman
John Harvey... Frimley
John East... Carl
Michael Ashwin... Dr Meinster
Synopsis: John Blackmoor decides that Dr Meinster is a man to be watched.

5 The Face on the Photograph
Saturday July 13th 1957
Rest of cast:
Geoffrey Chater... Harry Manners
Victor Brooks... Det Insp Wrigley
Pearl Catlin... Policewoman
John Harvey... Frimley
Patrick Connor... Dave Acton
Frank Williams... Photographer
Synopsis: John Blackmoor receives a visitor and decides to pay a visit to the photographers.

Final episode: Saturday July 20th 1957
Anyone with a very long memory say how the serial ended?

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The Man Who Was Two (ABC)

was a serial in six episodes written by Lester Powell and directed by John Nelson Burton. It was the first drama production to come out of ABC's Birmingham studios.
It was shown starting on Saturday January 26th 1957 at 8pm, then weekly.
The stars were
Ronald Howard- whose name was mysteriously not revealed by ABC before the first episode was screened- he played David Metcalf,
William Devlin, who played John Fairburn,
Maxwell Shaw as Willi Bloch, and
Alan Cuthbertson as Brigadier Dickerson, a career minded British officer,
plus the Sinister Man.
The story was set in the Berlin of the present. A refugee to all appearances, David Metcalf, is repatriated by the Russians. But Bloch threatens to expose his true identity.

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Electrode 93
was a 6 part ABC serial shown in April and May 1957 on Saturdays from 9.45-10.15pm, the second Saturday night thriller to be broadcast live from ABC's Aston Studios.
It starred George Pravda as Dr Quorum and Greta Gynt as his wife Carol. David Langton co-starred as Hugo Canning, Carol's lover. Other regular cast members included Jennifer Wilson and Richard Bebb.
The plot concerned a distinguished scientist who experiments behind the locked doors of his Harley Street psychiatric clinic.

An interesting account is extant of the stages in pre-production. The script was by Donald Riley, and was approved by Dennis Vance in March 1957. John Knight was assigned to produce the serial, and he consulted ABC's Casting Director Dodo Watts to draw up a shortlist of suitable actors. With rehearsals now underway in London, Chief Designer Rex Spencer drew up plans for the sets. Thus the first episode required six sets plus a long corridor, and all with enough space to allow camera movement. One of the biggest props was an elaborate encephalograph, which became nicknamed by staff in the Television Theatre workshops as The Brain Washing Machine!
Friday night before production the sets are erected, the cast arriving 10.30am on Saturday morning. Camera rehearsals go on all day until, with 30 minutes to live transmission, the cast go off for last minute touches to their make-up. Finally at 9.45pm prompt the serial begins, the culmination of months of work by the team of 150.

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Epilogue to Capricorn (ATV, 1959)
Script: John Roddick. Sets designed by Eric Shedden. Producer: John Nelson Burton. Shown on Saturdays 7.30-8pm.
The stars were:
Peter Wyngarde as Peter Vauxhall, Adrienne Corri as Jill Howard, Alan Cuthbertson as Lewis Osborne, Maxwell Shaw as Maxie Lehmann (not in final story), George Murcell as Laurie Jackson, Pauline Yates as Pamela Warren, and Richard Johnson as Robert Faulkner, with Jean Kent as Lady Kerwin (episodes 2-6).

Episode details:

1 All On Tape
October 31st 1959
Also in cast: Robert Adams as Ben
Synopsis: Robert Faulkner, a foreign correspondent is called in by the War Office to compile a dossier on a disastrously unsuccessful top secret wartime opartion called Operation Capricorn. it becomes evident that the operation was not a failure because of bad luck, but because of somebody's treachery. The question is- whose?

2 Manhunt
November 7th 1959
Also in the cast:
Alan Rowe, and Robert Adams.
Synopsis: Top secret information about Operation Capricorn is recorded on tape, and is highly compromising to several people. Stolen, it becomes dynamite.

3 Point of No Return
November 14th 1959
Also in the cast:
Alan Rowe, Michael Collins, Patrick Boxill and Robert Adams.
Synopsis: The secret of Operation capricorn is in the hands of a charming blackmailer. Several people he has visited, others are awaiting their turn...

4 Child's Play
November 21st 1959
Also in the cast:
Alan Rowe, Robert Adams, Karen Lea, Michael Collins, Patrick Boxill, Richard Shaw, Jerold Wells, and Ruth Purcher.
Synopsis: The blackmailer still has the top secret tape recordings, but the heat is on, and it is no longer 'Child's Play.'

5 Time Factor
November 28th 1959
Also in the cast:
Alan Rowe, Robert Adams, Michael Collins, and Jerold Wells.
Synopsis: An appointment is changed as a result of a telephone call. This has strange and ominous consequences, and at least one person is intrigued by the time factor.

6
December 5th 1959
Also in the cast:
Alan Rowe, Patrick Boxill, Michael Collins, and Jerold Wells.
Synopsis: The epilogue is finally completed, but the postscript is even more unexpected than anything that went before.

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The Schirmer Inheritance (ABC)
Shown on summer Saturdays 1957 9-9.30pm
Script: Kenneth Hyde based on the novel by Eric Ambler
Sets: Rex Spencer, Director: Philip Dale
Producer: Stuart Latham.
The stars in each story were
William Sylvester as George Carey, and
Vera Fusek as Kolin
with Jefferson Clifford as Robert L Moreton.
The story of a New York lawyer's search for the rightful heir to the fortune of an old woman who has died intestate. Eight thousand false claimants apply, before Carey finds his quarry in the bandit infested mountains of Greece.

Episode 1 August 3rd 1957
Rest of cast:
Errol John... Charlie
Manning Wilson... Mr Lange
James Dyrenforth... John J Sistrom
Roger Winton... Harry Budd
David Cargill... Doctor
Laurie Garner... Kathy Moreton
Colin Croft... Hacker
Sherry Winton... Hacker's secretary
James Lloyd... Waiter
Richard Dunn... Judge
Synopsis: The Schirmer inheritance, worth $4,000,000 was a lawyer's headache. George Carey sets out to find a claimant, and receives advice but a sinister lack of help.

Episode 2 August 10th 1957
Guest star: Irene Handl as Frau Gresser
Rest of cast:
John G Heller... Barman
Otto Diamant... Heingst
Gerard Heinz... Father Weichs
Synopsis: George and Kolin start their search in Bonn. A clue in the regimental archives leads them to Father Weichs and Frau Gresser.

Episode 3 August 17th 1957
Guest star: Elwyn Brook-Jones as Col Chrysantos
Rest of cast:
Gerik Schjelderup... Monsieur Hagen
Andreas Antonious... Greek lieutenant
Harry Tardios... Greek barman
Alan Tilvern... Arthur
Frederick Schiller... Barfly
Oliver Burt... Phengaros
Ernst Ullman... Sweet pedlar
Synopsis: Colonel Chrysantos introduces George and Kolin to his prisoner, who is not much help in the search. They are involved in a holdup, and with the aid of an unexpected ally, find an important clue.

Episode 4 August 24th 1957
Rest of cast:
Alan Tilvern... Arthur
Paul Stassino... Captain Streftaris
Andreas Malandrinos... Cafe proprietor
Golda Casimir... Mme Vassiotis
Synopsis: The smooth Captain Streftaris interferes in the search. George's most valuable piece of evidence mysteriously disappears- and he walks straight into danger.

Final Episode, September 7th 1957
with Alan Tilvern
Rest of cast:
Steve Plytas... Truck driver
Richard Shaw... Sgt Franz Schirmer
Edmund Assalay... Sentry
Synopsis: George has a narrow escape, but it brings him to the end of the trail, and finally disposes of The Schirmer Inheritance.
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THE SWORD IN THE WEB
This very interesting but forgotten 1962 ABC drama series recounted true stories of the French Resistance. The tales were based on the memoirs of Philippe Vomecourt.
This series was produced by Michael Mills.
Scripts were by Arthur Swinson. Sets designed by Patrick Downing. Incidental music composed by Jean Wiener and played by the Orchestra of the Garde Republicaine de Paris. French TV expressed an interest in buying at least some of the stories, anyone know if they ever did so? Certainly other British TV companies spurned the series, though Anglia did screen it on Friday nights.
Inexplicably it was screened in ABC's own tv area late on Saturday nights, later moving to Sunday afternoons, and was not networked.
The star was Alex Scott, with other regulars appearing in most stories- Roddy McMillan, Paul Curran, David Kelsey, and Maxine Holden.

Details of the 12 stories. I am most grateful to Des Martin for some of the episode titles.

1 A Foot in the Door (September 29th 1962, 11pm-11.45)

2 The First Air Drop (October 6th 1962, 11pm)

3 The British Pilot (October 13th 1962, 11.15pm-midnight)
Synopsis: A man in the uniform of an RAF pilot walks into a little town in unoccupied France in the summer of 1941. Has he really been shot down by the Luftwaffe, or is he a Gestapo stooge? The local Resistance group needs time and obscurity to organise resistance to the Germans; nevertheless they try to save him from internment, but are nearly destroyed by the English pilot.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), Roddy McMillan (Antoine Roche), Paul Curran (Henri Morin), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Angela Halley (Pat Vyner), Miriam Raymond (Madelaine Roche), Joseph Tomelty (Drunk), George Curtis (Redon), Eric Dodson (Station sergeant), Leon Peers (Flt-Lt Dickson), Michael Collins (Policeman), Ralph Nossek (Vibraye), Paul Dawkins (Police sergeant), Edward Cast (Longue), Nellie Hanham (Mme Rubin). Note- this episode is still extant

4 The Priest of St Quentin (October 20th 1962, 11pm)

5 The Senegalese (October 27th 1962, 11pm-11.45, shown on TWW Sat Nov 21st 1962 at 11.05pm)
Synopsis: The Germans in occupied France hunt down and execute French colonial troops without trial. When four Senegalese soldiers, hiding in woods near Choleau, begin murdering the Germans in the town, the Mayor, the German Commandant and the Resistance face a situation which can only end in tragedy.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), Roddy McMillan (Antoine Roche), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Angela Halley (Pat Vyner), Maxine Holden (Alix de la Cour), Michael Mellinger (Pierre Durrand), Ruth Kettlewell (Mme Matours), Yemi Ajibade (Jean), Louis Mahoney/ Alaba Peters/ Alien Bahow (Senegalese), George Carter/ Brian Sheehy (German Soldiers), Robert Sansom (Mayor), Graeme Bruce (Connard), Carl Duering (German Commandant), Carl Conway (German Adjutant), Philip Madoc (Sgt Wassner).

6 The Informer (November 3rd 1962, 11pm)
Synopsis: The greatest danger to the men and women of the Resistance is not the Gestapo, the police, or the Milice. It is the ordinary Frenchman who will sell them to the enemy for money. The greatest enemy is the informer.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), Roddy McMillan (Antoine Roche), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Paul Curran (Henri Morin), Maxine Holden (Alix de la Cour), Jane Eccles (Old lady), Blaise Wyndham (Touvois), Donald Morley (Alphonse Chavrier), Ian Macnaughton (Perichon), Louis Haslar/ Peter Mason (Vichy Policemen), Cyril Shaps (Claude Garnier), Max Brimmel (Troppot), Diana Davies (Waitress), Robert Hunter (Dupont), Jerry Jardin (Contact).

7 The Alibi (Sunday November 11th 1962, 2.40-3.25pm)
Synopsis: To new members of the resistance dropped in from Britain, it is the first few hours in occupied territory which are the most dangerous. Alix's first assignment is to provide two new agents with their alibi.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), Roddy McMillan (Antoine Roche), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Maxine Holden (Alix de la Cour), Angela Halley (Pat Vyner), Jeremy Ure (Pierre), Barry Keegan (Marcel Auray), Robin Parkinson (Felix), Ann Tirard (Mme Felix), Aubrey Morris (Hedges), Patrick Troughton (Tournay), Clifford Earl/ Paul Stockman/ Royston Tickner (Policemen), Reginald Jessup (Gestapo Officer), Norman Pitt (Railway porter), William Buck (Jean-Marc). Note- this episode is one of two of this series still extant

8 The Railway Job (Sunday November 18th 1962, 2.40pm)
Synopsis: When one man of a Railway Resistance group is caught by the German field security, the whole organisation is endangered.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Maxine Holden (Alix de la Cour), Simone Lovell (Marie Morelle), Thomas Heathcote (Guy Morelle), Bernard Horsfall (Jean Thillot), Cyril Cross (First Feldgendarme), David Beale (Second Feldgendarme), Alison Frazer (Janine Thillot), Frank Gatliff (Hauptmann Fieber), Judith Nelms (Madame Grisson), Arnold Locke (Brugnon), Roy Pattison (Archet), Kenneth Watson (Lannes), Nancy Manningham (Viki Thillot), Richard Wharton (Roux), Colin Cresswell (Mortagne).

9 The Double Agent (Sunday November 25th 1962, 2.40pm)
Synopsis: The leader of a Resistance group needs a sixth sense if he and the group are to survive. This sense arouses the suspicions of Jacques St Martin when he meets a new agent.
Cast: Alex Scott (Jacques St Martin), Roddy McMillan (Antoine Roche), Paul Curran (Henri Morin), David Kelsey (Marc Fielding), Maxine Holden (Alix de la Cour), Angela Halley (Pat Vyner), David Cargill (Yves), Robert James (Roland), David Lodge (Lasalle), Joan Pethers (Louise), Dallas Cavall (Margnet), John Boyd Brent (Otille), George Galsworthy (Gaston).

10 The Munition Factory (Sunday December 2nd 1962, 2.40pm)

11 The Hazard (Sunday December 9th 1962, 2.40pm)

12 The Tunnel (Sunday December 16th 1962, 2.40pm) - final story

Appearing in one of the stories for which I have not got cast lists were: Laurie Leigh, Ronald Radd, Jeffrey Segal, and Tony Thawnton.
If you can add any information on The Sword in the Web, I would be pleased to hear from you.
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Fire Crackers (ATV)
I really enjoyed this 1964/5 Saturday night comedy series that starred the incompetent firemen, Alfred Marks as Charlie, Cardew Robinson as Hairpin, and Joe Baker as Jumbo
with Sidney Bromley as Willie, Ronnie Brody as Loverboy.
From the Town Brigade, we met John Arnatt as Station Officer Blazer and Norman Chappell as Leading Fireman Piggott.
From the Cropper's Arms there were Colin Douglas as George, and Maureen Toal as Rosie.
The second series saw Cardew Robinson replaced by Clive Elliott as Tadpole. Blazer was now played by Martin Boddey. All these were regulars throughout the second series.
Scripts were, except where indicated, by Fred Robinson, the director Josephine Douglas. Both series were produced by Alan Tarrant.
These slumbering adventures of the Cropper's End Fire Brigade had echoes of that Will Hay Film Where's That Fire. Their long-in-the-tooth 1898 fire engine was loaned from the Beaulieu Motor Museum, where also many exterior scenes were filmed.

1.1 Semi Detached (Saturday August 29th 1964, 9.35-10.5pm, or 9.50-10.20pm, depending on ITV region).
With Joan Pickering (Mildred) and Desmond Cullum-Jones (Postman).
1.2 Wanted: One Fire (September 5th 1964). Note- Maureen Toal not in this story.
1.3 Objective Case (September 12th 1964)
With Harry Landis (Mousie), Ted Carson (Barney), and Patrick Durkin (Cruncher), the villains.
1.4 Fire Belle for Five (September 19th 1964)
With guest star Liz Fraser as Mary Medway.
1.5 Blue-Blooded Buddy (September 26th 1964)
With Leslie Dwyer (Gus, Lord Tarrington), and Duncan Lewis (Benson), at Tarrington Grange. John Arnatt, Norman Chappell, Colin Douglas and Maureen Toal not in this story.
1.6 Power Crazy (October 3rd 1964).
2.1 The Business as Usual (January 9th 1965, 8.25-9pm)
With Avice Landon as Lady Frogmore.
2.2 Strictly for the Birds (January 16th 1965)
With Rosalind Knight as Doris, Dilys Laye as Cynthia, and Carole Shelley as Alice.
2.3 Pie in the Sky (January 23rd 1965)
With, from Much Mouldering, Peter Hughes (Ted), John Baskcomb (Nosher), Helen Cotterill (Lavinia), and Jeffrey Gardiner (Reporter).
2.4 Slap on the Map (January 30th 1965)
With, as tourists, Warren Stanhope (Harvey), Ann Lancaster (Elaine), Clive Endersby (Orville), and Josephine Bell (Jane).
2.5 The Willie Waghorn Story (February 6th 1965)
(Note- this script written by John Warren and John Singer) With Godfrey Quigley as Chief Officer, and John Henderson (Mr Clitheroe).
2.6 Beautiful Dreamer (February 13th 1965)
(Note- this script written by John Warren and John Singer) With, at the museum, Billy Milton (Mr Waygood).
2.7 Saved by the Bell (February 20th 1965).
This final story was scripted by Fred Robinson. With Robert Webber (Vicar), and John Bay (Rory).
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The Odd Man
The main character, Steve Gardiner, was played by Geoffrey Toone in the first Odd Man serial from Granada in autumn 1960. Other regulars in this half hour serial written by Eddie Boyd were Steve's wife Judy (Jan Holden), with the police represented by Chief-Insp Gordon (Moultrie Kelsall) and Det-Sgt MacBride (Alan Tilvern). Others in the cast included Judith Furse, Jemma Hyde and Geoffrey Palmer. In this first serial, music was by Bill le Sage, the producer was Jack Williams and the director Gordon Flemyng.
Synopsis of this serial: "whoever attacked Dorothy Berridge in her flat is now a murderer, following her death in hospital. The two main suspects are Dorothy's financier husband Bernard and Charles Ormiston (Richard Vernon), a petty crook who is also suspected of having poisoned his wife. Steve Gardiner traces Ormiston to his hideout and hears Ormiston practically confess to both crimes before pulling a gun and making his escape."

A second serial of 8 episodes of 55 minutes duration began in May 1962 now with Edwin Richfield as the theatrical agent Steve Gardiner and Sarah Lawson as Judy. Lawson described her part as a terribly unhappy person whose marriage is falling to pieces. In the final story she is murdered. Moultrie Kelsall continued as the chief inspector, but with a new assistant, a young Keith Barron as Det-Sgt Swift. Stuart Latham was the producer with Derek Bennett directing. Others appearing in this serial were a mute multi-assassin called South (Christopher Guinee), who some decided was The Odd Man, though Granada always insisted this was Steve. Another regular was South's unnamed landlord (Patrick Newell). Other one off roles in series two included the double barrelled Hugesson-Vachell (Anton Rodgers), Sarasin (Philip Latham), Dickinson (Godfrey Quigley) and Goodson (John Abineri).
The third series was again produced by Stuart Latham, but the director was now Richard Everitt. Granada's Derek Hilton supplied the music. These were more self-contained stories lasting 55 minutes beginning on 5th April 1963. Richfield continued as Steve, while Sarah Lawson made an amazing return as the double of Steve's late wife, the sophisticated Anne Braithwaite. Keith Barron also continued as Swift, though now under Chief-Insp Rose, played by William Mervyn. Anna Cropper was another regular as Ruth Jenkins. Guest stars included Lynne Furlong (12 April) in the title role of The Last Bright Hours of Georgia Snow. On April 26th John Stratton and Joan Newell, who had appeared in the first series, played a married couple in Yesterday is for Psychiatrists. This Stuff's Thicker than Water on 10th May featured James Bolam as the "very determined" Juke Justice, with Alfred Drake as Brother Paul. Ingrid Hafner co-starred the following week in The Betrayal of Ambrose Fleech (Aubrey Morris), whilst Kay Callard and Peter Butterworth were the guests on 24th May in the final story Prince on a White Horse. A fourth and final series of eight stories came in the summer of 1963. This was a hugely popular series, and, unusually, was repeated in peak viewing time.

It seems the whole of the 1960 serial is still in existence, thankfully, a couple of the second series, and all of the third and fourth series.

It's Dark Outside was a 1964 sequel to The Odd Man, with William Mervyn and Keith Baron reprising their police roles. Steve Gardiner had gone but new characters starring were Anthony and Alice Brand (John Carson and June Tobin). The scripts were now mostly by Marc Brandel, with the production in the hands of Derek Bennett. The start of a second series was celebrated on the cover of TV Times for 20th Feb 1965.
William Mervyn had one final outing for his character in his own series Mr Rose.

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Tracey and Me
(Associated Rediffusion, 1956)

A situation comedy starring
Joan Heal as Tracey and
Leslie Phillips as Me, that is husband Wally.
He is a successful architect, easy going, always a little mystified by his exuberant wife. She was described as "a dizzy scatterbrained girl, always in trouble." The show centred on her, "I knew a lot of other actresses (twenty apparently) had been tested for the same role," Joan Heal said, "so I thought the only thing to do was to bash at it like a fiend- give them too much rather than too little." Her test was relayed to executives and won her the part.
"As Tracey's husband," Leslie Phillips explained, "I have to be an ordinary patient sort of chap."
Other regulars in the series were George Benson, playing Wally's best client, and Nicolette Roeg as a close friend of Tracey's.
The script was by John Crilley and the director Peter Croft.

The first of this series was shown on ITV London (but not, I think, in the Midlands/North) on Tuesday July 17th 1956 at 10pm. The episode was titled The Personal Secretary, with Sandra Dorne as Hyacinth in the title role, far too glamorous Tracey feels, to be Wally's new secretary. Also appearing were George Benson as Mr Crudnick, Robert Webber as Albert, Edna Fryer as Wally's personal secretary Miss Peabody, and Nicolette Roeg as Dorothy.

If you can add any details of this rare forgotten series, I would be very pleased to hear from you, and acknowledge your help

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Top Secret
"The public is ready for a new setting," claimed producer Jordan Lawrence, and A-R provided just that in this 1961 series set in Argentina. But even I watching at the time, realised that most of the action took place in the studio! But A-R did get some location filming done in the country by director Ian Fordyce, and the picture here is a still from this visit, with star William Franklyn.
He played Peter Dallas, on leave from British Intelligence to work for extremely rich local businessman Miguel Garetta (Patrick Cargill). Garetta's nephew Mike (Alan Rothwell) usually assisted Dallas, when that is, he did not get in the way. One other regular was Tina, played by Frieda Knorr.
The opening story on August 11th, Destination Buenos Aires, introduced Dallas to his native Argentina, and included Honor Blackman high up the cast list. Further down were stalwarts Reginald Marsh and Geoffrey Bayldon.
The following week, with guest stars William Devlin, Barry Keegan, Basil Dignam and Bill Nagy, Dallas was searching Buenos Aires for a potential assassin, whilst future stories saw him destroying a drug pedalling gang, preventing a revolution (8th September) and exposing a traitor. Among well known faces appearing in one-off stories were Hazel Court, Paul Eddington, Janette Sterke (tv comeback May 30th 1962), Adrienne Poster (then aged 13), and Robert James.
26 episodes were planned, but a long Equity strike interrupted production, so that the series went off-air in November 1961, but unlike some other series, did return to complete the run, starting in May 1962. The stories were exciting, and with writers the calibre of Roger Marshall, that's no surprise, though the biggest hit was that memorable theme tune by Laurie Johnson, Sucu Sucu.
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Biggles
This series had been announced as being issued by Network on dvd in 2099!! I shall be up in heaven by then and able to see it before that time.

In 1960 Granada produced a series of 30 minute stories of WE Johns' famous hero. Regulars in the cast were Nevil Whiting as Biggles, David Drummond as Bertie and John Leyton as Ginger, with Martin Boddey as Inspector Gaskin. Carl Duering played arch enemy Von Stalhein, with John Gabriel as his henchman Laxter. "It's giving me a big thrill to play the part on tv," declared Nevil Whiting, "it will be an action packed series after the first episode that will be an introduction to the characters."
Stories were produced by Harry Elton. First scripts were adapted for tv by HV Kershaw, with the programme directed by Stuart Latham. Here are the 1960 dates of transmission. Granada also repeated the stories 9 to 29 in their own region the following year at 5.25pm. The good news is that all the stories seem to have survived!
The critics were none too kind. Those brought up on the books were severely disappointed. GT wrote: "Stuart Latham directs with as much verve as he can but, judging the first episode, he doesn't look as if he will solve his main problem, that of creating even the minutest modicum of excitement."

Episode 1 on Friday April 1st 1960 Biggles at the Home Front: Biggles goes into action against jewel thieves.
The second story on 8th April continued investigations into the £100,000 robbery, leading to an old country manor in Hertfordshire.
Episode 3- April 15th: Biggles comes face to face with Von Stalhein.
4- A new story began on April 22nd, Biggles Flies North, directed by Christopher McMaster. Biggles Ginger and Bertie fly North to help an old friend.
5- April 29th: Biggles & Co walk into a trap and are wanted for murder.
6- May 6th: Ginger is sheltering in a trappers' hunt whilst Biggles and Bertie make a forced landing. Alick Hayes now writing the scripts.
7- May 13th: Angus shoots at a plane landing on Eskimo Island, not realising his daughter is on board.
8- May 20th: A showdown with McBain.
9- A new adventure began on May 27th, Biggles Follows On, written by HV Kershaw and directed by Stuart Latham. Wreckage of an aircraft is picked up in the North Sea. Cast included Peter Vaughan, Garfield Morgan.
10- June 3rd: a hard fought duel with Von Stalhein.
11- June 10th (repeated May 25th 1961): Von Stalhein is the mastermind behind an international plot.
12- June 17th (repeated May 26th 1961): Biggles and his friends fly to Hamburg. Cast included Edwin Richfield.
13- June 24th (repeated June 1st 1961): Police are led on a wild goose chase as Biggles comes face to face with Von Stalhein.
14- Wed June 29th (repeated June 2nd 1961): 2,000 miles up the Amazon our heroes stop Von Stalhein. Series now bi-weekly.
15- Fri July 1st (repeated June 8th 1961) Biggles Takes Charge: Thomas Clarke now writing this new story, with Douglas Hurn producing. On holiday in Monte Carlo, Bertie and Ginger get involved in the disappearance of a Crown Prince. Note: Billy Milton appeared in at least one of this batch as Monsieur Victor, owner of Chez Victor, a smart Monte Carlo restuarant.
16- July 6th (repeated June 9th 1961): Von Stalhein strikes a bargain with Count Prutski, the Moldavian Minister of the Interior.
17- July 8th (repeated June 15th 1961): Bertie and Ginger are still carrying on alone fighting Von Stalhein.
18- July 13th (repeated June 16th 1961): Biggles helps Count Prutski against Prince Boris and Prince Karl.
19- July 15th (repeated June 22nd 1961): Count Prutski is on the trail of the Moldavian bullion. Biggles is trapped on a yacht.
20- July 20th (repeated June 23rd 1961): final episode. Biggles and Prince Boris are on their own. Von Stalhein is in complete control. Have the enemies of freedom triumphed in Moldova?
21- July 22nd (repeated June 29th 1961) A new story written by Tony Warren and directed by Eric Price. Could the Germans have developed a foolproof anti-radar device at the end of the war? MI5 think they did, and Biggles must find the plans.
22- July 27th (repeated June 30th 1961) Biggles on Mystery Island: The mystery of the island of Orotavia is discovered by our heroes as their retreat is cut off. George Mikell appeared in this story.
23- July 29th (rpt July 6th 1961): Prisoners on Mystery Island, our heroes are prevented from escaping by Hara's vicious dogs.
24- Aug 3rd (rpt July 7th 1961) Biggles Baits the Trap: Now written by Harry Kershaw, this new adventure directed by Christopher McMaster. Biggles looks for the plans of a German anti-radar device.
25- Aug 5th (rpt July 13th 1961): Biggles gets an old friend to get Von Stalhein to lead them to the missing blueprints. With Alan Rolfe as Abel, Ian Colin as Rawlinson, Arthur Lovegrove as Pybus and Marianne Hesketh, Geoffrey Frederick.
26- Aug 10th (rpt July 14th 1961): A mysterious lady from America is the link to finding the top secret plans. With Alan Rolfe, Ian Colin, Steve Plytas as Keller, Arthur Lovegrove, and Philip Carr, Nancy Manningham, James Cheshire.
27- Aug 12th (rpt July 20th 1961): Von Stalhein races with Biggles to find the blueprints.
28- Aug 17th (rpt July 21st 1961): Von Stalhein makes a desperate bid to keep his slight lead in the race for the vital anti-radar blueprints.
29- Aug 19th (rpt July 27th 1961), the end of this adventure. Biggles faces an impossible decision. He must choose wither the life of his friend Ernie Pybus or defeat at the hands of his enemy Von Stalhein.
30 Aug 24th, 31 Aug 26th, 32 Aug 31st. Biggles at World's End. Directed by Derek Bennett, produced by Kitty Black. (Reginald Marsh one of the cast.) Two botanists are lost in Tierra del Fuego. When Biggles arrives to look for them he finds a strange atmosphere of suspicion and distrust. When the botanists are found, along with a vast hoard of treasure, Biggles is arrested on a charge of spying.
33 Sept 2nd Biggles Turns the Scale, 34 Sept 4th, 35 Sept 9th. Script: Harry Kershaw. Director: Christopher McMaster. With Carl Duerring, Stratford Johns (Warren), Christopher Rhodes (Wing Cmdr Blair), Terence Soall (Henry Wing), Arnold Diamond (Valdez), Barry Shawzin (Cordera), Derek Sydney (Andrew), James Mellor (Martinez) and Kevin Brennan (Dr Pardo). Biggles' plane is shot down in South America, caught up in the Dos Rios revolution. Von Stalhein captures the country's president.
36 Sept 14th Biggles Springs the Lock, 37 Sept 16th, 38 Sept 21st. Cast included Lloyd Lamble, Robert Ayres, Charles Carson
39 Sept 23rd Biggles in the East, 40 Sept 28th, 41 Sept 30th. With William Mervyn.
42 Oct 5th Biggles on the Nile, 43 Oct 7th, 44 Oct 12th. Story: Harry Kershaw. Director: Christopher McMaster. All with Carl Duering, Richard Shaw (Kurt Johannis), Francis Matthews (Captain Haziri). The final part of this serial definitely also included Raymond Young (Leo Franks), Roger Delgado (Dr Ahmed Zakar), Ann Wakefield (Jasmine Day), Henry Reynaud (Yusef), Arthur Lovegrove (Ernie Pybus again), andGeorge Howe (Prof Maitland Dent). In this last episode ever, Biggles has reached the excavations in the tomb where von Stalhein has already found the treasure. However the roof of the tomb is collapsing!
Note: Apart from actors listed above, the following have stated they appeared in Biggles:
Robert Henderson, Oliver Reed, Andre Muller, and Ernst Ulman.

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8 The Gay Cavalier

was a very rare foray by Associated-Rediffusion into film series, though in reality it was made by veteran independent producer George King. Directors were Terence Fisher, Lance Comofrt, and George King himself. Scripts were supervised by Katherine Strueby. Filmed in 1956 at Shepperton Studios, and shown on Associated Rediffusion starting May 13th 1957, it was based on the real character of Captain Duval, a French officer turned highwayman in the cause of the exiled Charles II. "England is locked in civil war. From this struggle emerged men like Cpt Duval, who loved and laughed at danger. He is known to every secret Royalist in the land- and sought by every Roundhead, for he is in touch with his friend, the exiled king, who trusts Duval above all others."
Christian Marquand was the star. Other semi regulars in this series were: Larry Burns as Dinny O'Toole, Duval's faithful and wily henchman, and Sydney Bromley as Purdy. The obligatory 'villain' was Major Mould, chief of Intelligence under Cromwell, played by Ivan Craig.
That fine star Greta Gynt who played Julia Peckstaff, wife of the Mayor of Brixham, was in three stories, #1, #6 and #11.
The only others to appear in the same character more than once were Joyce Linden as Katie (stories #2 and #13), Simone Silva as Clo in #5 and #10, and Charles Farrell as The Deacon, also in #5 and #10. In #3 appeared Christopher Lee.
Charles Stuart does eventally appear in the final story, played by Richard Bebb, but it's a shame the action never got beyond the year 1651, for the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 would have made a grand story!

The thirteen films made were: 1 Springtime for Julia, 2 Dragon's Heart, 3 The Lady's Dilemma, 4 The Masked Lady, 5 Angel Unawares, 6 Flight of the Nightingale, 7 The Sealed Knot, 8 The Lost is Found, 9 Girl of Quality, 10 The Little Cavalier, 11 Return of the Nightingale, 12 Forsaking All Others, 13 A Throne at Stake. Script supervisor was Katherine Strueby, and directors of the films were Terence Fisher, Lance Comfort and George King himself.

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SEEING SPORT

This long running children's programme began in June 1956 replacing an earlier sports magazine called Sportspot. It was produced by ATV, always on Mondays, normally from 5pm to 5.25/5.30pm.
The first host was no less than Billy Wright, though the regular presenter Peter Lloyd was soon in charge, certainly from September that year. He was the usual commentator, though others also introduced the programmes in the early years, and again starting in 1964 and more particularly 1965.
Ned Sherrin directed some 1956 programmes though the show's chief claim to fame seems to be that sometime in the late 1950's a young Mick Jagger appeared, uncredited of course, in one of the programmes with his father Joe. If you remember appearing in any of these Seeing Sport, I'd be pleased to receive your memories.
One of the programme's most popular features was the Deliberate Mistake, which children had to spot and normally attracted an average of 3,000 responses each week. One soccer programme had as many as 10,000! The first correct answer opened at random, won a prize suitable for the particular sport.
In 1965 the regional companies produced their own rival programme called
'Go!' (click for details) which lead to the eventual demise of this long running show which must have run to about 450 programmes.
To restore regional compliance, ATV started a new programme in Seeing Sport's slot in 1966, it was titled Action, in which Pete Murray hosted a show on fashion, pops, offbeat etc. It was a sign of the times. Maybe it signalled the start of that generation of overweight children.

Mal Jones tells me that also in the photo above, left is William Collier who was the secretary of the Aberaman ymca, and the person on the far right is Terry Jones.

Here are details of some of the many Seeing Sport programmes. There are many gaps, if you can fill any, please email me.
(Note- where personnel were exactly the same, this is indicated, though TV Times did not state they were repeats, and it is most likely that these were new programmes.)

The earliest programmes simply described the programmes as having "items of interest to all younger sports enthusiasts."
The first specific programme devoted to one theme was:
Oct 15th 1956 - Boxing, principles of self defence
Oct 22nd 1956 - Fencing (director- Ned Sherrin)
Nov 19th 1956 - Football, with the England team
Dec 3rd 1956 - Cricket from Alf Gover Indoor Cricket School
Dec 10th 1956 - Riding from Windmill Hill Academy, Stratford-on-Avon
Dec 24th 1956 - Christmas Party (last programme produced by Sherrin)
Dec 31st 1956 - Judo
Jan 7th 1957 - Table Tennis
Jan 14th 1957 - Roller Skating
Jan 21st 1957 - Swimming from Ironmonger Row Baths
Jan 28th 1957 - Cricket, from a "famous indoor cricket school"
Feb 25th 1957 - Table Tennis, with Emlyn Jones and including Johnny Leach and Victor Barna
Mar 4th 1957 - Roller Skating from Brixton Rink
Mar 11th 1957 - Swimming, from Ironmonger Row Baths, including life saving
Apr 8th 1957 - Skating, return visit to Richmond Ice Rink
Apr 15th 1957 - Judo
Apr 29th 1957 - Chelsea Football Club with Walter Winterbottom at a coaching session
May 13th 1957 - Sailing with Charles Currey at Tamesis Club Teddington
May 27th 1957 - Archery at London Archers Club Regents Park with Joyce Warner, George Brown, Howard Wiseman, Robin Seymour, Bill Ward
June 3rd 1957 - Golf, from Wentworth with Tom Haliburton. This was announced as the first birthday of the programme.
June 10th 1957 - Riding at Stanmore Riding School with Jimmy Younghusband
June 17th 1957 - Tennis with Tony Mottram
Note a two week break on June 24th and July 1st 1957, to make way from Tennis at Wimbledon.
July 8th 1957 - Table Tennis from Butlin's Metropole Hotel Blackpool with Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach
July 15th 1957 - Camping from Stanley Park Blackpool with Peter Lloyd and Ann Craig
July 29th 1957 - Riding from Bispham Court Riding School Blackpool, with Emlyn Jones and Pat Bebbington
August 5th 1957 - Archery with Emlyn Jones and Howard Wiseman and the Lancashire Archery Association
August 12th 1957 (Peter Lloyd returns to host from this show)- Sailing from Tamesis Club Teddington
August 19th 1957 - with Emlyn Jones (who hosts as indicated) as July 8th 1957
Sept 2nd 1957 - Judo, from Metropole Hoel, Blackpool
Sept 9th 1957 - with Emlyn Jones as July 8th 1957
Sept 16th 1957 - Soccer from Arsenal Football Club, with Walter Winterbottom
Sept 23rd 1957 (4.45-5.30pm) - Roller Skating as Mar 4th 1957
Oct 7th 1957 - Swimming from Thimblemill Baths Smethwick, with AH Owen
Oct 21st 1957 - Table Tennis with Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach
Oct 28th 1957 - Ice Skating with Peggy Tomlins and Bernard Spencer from Streatham Ice Rink Dec 23rd 1957 (4.45pm to 5.30pm) - Christmas Party, comperes Peter Lloyd and Emlyn Jones. With Alf Gover and children from Barnardo's homes.
Jan 6th 1958 - Fencing/Weight Lifting - Emlyn Jones with Ann Craig, Gillian Sheen and Shirley Bloomer
Jan 13th 1958 - Roller Skating at Brixton Roller Skating Rink with Vera Tadman, Sheila Wilkinson, Howarth Hargreaves and Mr and Mrs Sydney Cooper
Jan 20th 1958 - Judo with John Dresler and members of the Budokwai
Jan 27th 1958 - Table Tennis, as Oct 21st 1957
Feb 3rd 1958 - Gymnastics. Emlyn Jones with Ann Craig
Feb 10th 1958 - Cricket from Gover's Indoor Cricket School with guest star Brian Close
Feb 17th 1958 - Boxing with Lawrie Higgins and AJP Martin
Feb 24th 1958 - Table Tennis with Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach and junior players from Scotland as well as Helen Elliott
Mar 3rd 1958 - Fencing, Emlyn Jones with Charles de Beaumont and Prof RJG Anderson
Mar 10th 1958 - Ice Skating from Streatham Ice Rink with Peggy Tomlins
Mar 17th 1958 - Netball from RAF Sports Stadium Stanmore with Ann Craig and Rena Stratford
Mar 24th 1958 - Weight-Lifting Emlyn Jones with Al Murray, Sylvia Needham and Brian Shenton, and a ladies' weight lifting class from the Spur Club
Mar 31st 1958 - Table Tennis with Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach
Apr 7th 1958 - Judo with John Dresler and members of The Budokwai
Apr 21st 1958 - Soccer as April 29th 1957
May 5th 1958 - Boxing with Lawrie Higgins and AJP Martin at the ringside for several schoolboy bouts
May 12th 1958 - Swimming from Pear Tree School Stevenage with George Fryer and Margaret Edwards. (This was the 100th programme). The opening of the new school pool
May 19th 1958 - Table Tennis. Emlyn Jones and Johnny Leach with leading Welsh player Shirley Jones.
No programme on May 26th 1958 (Whit Monday) as live Cricket Yorkshire v Lancashire was screened
June 9th 1958 - Gymnastics as Feb 3rd 1958
No programmes on June 23rd/30th due to Wimbledon tennis coverage
July 7th 1958 - Equitation from the Fulmer School of Equitation. Shaw Taylor introduces Robert Hull
Aug 4th 1958 - Peter Lloyd at the Tamesis Club Teddington, instructor Peter Callcott Reilly
Aug 11th 1958 - Golf as June 3rd 1957
Aug 18th 1958 - Tennis from Guiness Sports Club Park Royal. Emlyn Jones introduces Tony Mottram
The programme had a break during September, Emlyn Jones Peter Lloyd and others introduced 5 programmes 'Sky High,' on flying.
Oct 13th 1958 - Cricket at Alf Gover's Cricket School. Peter Lloyd now the sole host except as stated.
Oct 20th 1958 - Ice Skating from Richmond Ice Rink
Oct 27th 1958 - Swimming at Ironmonger Row Baths with G Fryer and A Price (British Team Manager)
Nov 3rd 1958 - Fencing with Charles de Beaumont
Nov 10th 1958 - Soccer from RAF Stanmore with Walter Winterbottom
Nov 17th 1958 - Cricket as Oct 13th 1958
Nov 24th 1958 - Equitation as July 7th 1958
Dec 1st 1958 - Boxing with Pat Martin and Lawrie Higgins and beginners from St Luke's School Maidenhead for their second boxing lesson
Dec 22nd 1958 - Swimming, second in a new series from Ironmonger Row Baths, with Alf Price. The breast stroke. (Note- no Christmas Party as in previous years)
Dec 29th 1958 - Soccer with Walter Winterbottom and Jimmy Greaves (second of this series)
Jan 5th 1959 - Badminton with Warwick Shute and Nancy Horner
Jan 19th 1959 - Ice Skating from Queen's Ice Club Bayswater London with Gladys Hogg
Jan 26th 1959 - Boxing with Pat Martin and Lawrie Higgins, third lesson is on ringcraft with pupils from St Luke's Boys' School Maidenhead
Feb 2nd 1959 - Soccer from RAF Stanmore with Walter Winterbottom assisted by Tony Macedo the Fulham goalie
Feb 23rd 1959 - Swimming from Ironmonger Row Baths, third in series, this on backstroke with George Fryer and his "star pupils" Sylvia Lewis and Margaret Edwards
Mar 2nd 1959 - Boxing with Pat Martin and Lawrie Higgins and boys of St Luke's School Maidenhead. Fourth and last of boxing lessons.
Mar 9th 1959 - Soccer with Walter Winterbottom and Bobby Moore
Mar 16th 1959 - Equitation from the Fulmer School of Equitation as July 7th 1958 except hosted by Peter Lloyd
Easter Monday Mar 30th 1959 - Golf: Playing up to the Pin with Tom Haliburton
Apr 20th 1959 - Cricket with Alf Gover and pupils from Battersea Grammar School
May 4th 1959 - Athletics from Motspur Park. Geoff Dyson in the first of a series, this on sprinting and relay racing, with Dave Segal, Peter Radford, John Young, and Adrian Breaker
May 11th 1959 - Tennis from Guinness' Sports Ground Park Royal. Tony Mottram with a first lesson in a new series
Whit Monday May 18th 1959 - Canoeing from Shepperton Lock with Harry Littlewood and Joe Jagger
May 25th 1959 - Cricket from Battersea Grammar School with Alf Gover - this edition: attacking strokes and bowling swingers
June 8th 1959 - Athletics from Motspur Park, second in series with Geoff Dyson, Peter Hildreth, Vic Matthews and Heather Young
June 15th 1959 - third birthday party. Peter Lloyd is joined by Geoff Dyson, George Fryer, Alf Gover, Johnny Leach, Pat Martin, and Tony Mottram
As in the previous year, the programme had another short break, for starting on July 6th 1959 again appeared 'Sky High,' on flying, but Peter Lloyd was still busy for he provided the commentary.
Aug 17th 1959 - Cricket general details as May 25th 1959, final lesson of series
Aug 24th 1959 - Baseball from Bushey Park with Major Joseph Tyndall and Hank Drammis
Aug 31st 1959 - Judo with John Dresler
Sept 7th 1959 - Junior Wimbledon Tennis Championships with Tony Mottram
Sept 14th 1959 - Rock Climbing from High Rocks with John Disley
Sept 21st 1959 - Table Tennis with Johnny Leach
Sept 28th 1959 - Roller Skating from Brixton Skating Rink with Mrs Harvey. Commentatior: Lawrie Higgins
Oct 12th 1959 - Ice Skating as Jan 19th 1959
Oct 19th 1959 - Rugby from Whitgift School with Gerwyn Williams
Oct 26th 1959 - Swimming from Ironmonger Row Baths, with Roger Burrell. Eight year old Albert Furse challenged anyone in Britain of his age to beat him in a swimming race
Nov 2nd 1959 - Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Diana Rowe. A new proficiency competition
Nov 9th 1959 - Boxing with boys from St Luke's Maidenhead, with Pat Martin, commentator Lawrie Higgins
Nov 16th 1959 - Netball with Rena Stratford
Nov 23rd 1959 - Soccer with Walter Winterbottom
Nov 30th 1959 - Badminton as Jan 5th 1959
Dec 7th 1959 - Cricket with Alf Gover from his indoor school at Wandsworth
Dec 14th 1959 - Ice Skating with Gladys Hogg. Intermediate steps in figure and free-skating, preliminary movements in dancing
Dec 21st 1959 - Swimming with Roger Burrell. Also under-10 year olds attempt to beat Bertie Furze over one length
Dec 28th 1959 - Table Tennis with Johnny Leach, Diana Rowe and Bobby Stevens
Jan 4th 1960 - Boxing with Pat Martin
Jan 11th 1960 - Rugby as Oct 19th 1959
Jan 18th 1960 - Judo with Geoffrey Gleeson at The Budokwai, London
Jan 25th 1960 - Basketball with Joe Jagger
Feb 1st 1960 - Soccer with Walter Winterbottom and Tommy Docherty
Feb 8th 1960 - Ski-ing with Robin Brock-Hollinshead from Hanwell Community Centre
Feb 15th 1960 - Horse Riding with Robert Hall at the Fulmer School of Equitation Bucks
Feb 22nd 1960 - Cricket with Alf Gover and Willie Watson at Wandsworth
Feb 29th 1960- Swimming as Oct 26th 1959
Mar 7th 1960- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach from Tottenham Town Hall
Mar 14th 1960- Fencing with Charles de Beaumont and Gillian Sheen
Mar 21st 1960- Hockey with Miss G Flew at Mayfield School London
Mar 28th 1960- Rowing with Derek Drury at Barn Elms Putney
Apr 4th 1960- Athletics with Geoff Dyson, John Disley
Apr 11th 1960- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams as Oct 19th 1959
Apr 18th 1960 (Easter)- Camping with H Littlewood from St Mary's College Twickenham
Apr 25th 1960- Life Saving with Supt F Fenn. Allan Wakefield stated that the canoe of his friend capsized. "I gave him artificial respiration when we reached the bank. I'd seen it demonstrated in a Seeing Sport programme in April." Allan earned a certificate of bravery from the Liverpool Humane Society
May 2nd 1960- Tennis with Tony Mottram
May 9th 1960- Boxing (as Jan 4th 1960)
May 16th 1960- Cricket with Alf Gover
May 23rd 1960- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Diane Rowe
May 30th 1960- Athletics with Geoff Dyson, John Disley and Chris Brasher
June 6th 1960- Trophy. The second annual final of the Seeing Sport competition to encourage initiative
There was a short break as in previous years. Peter Lloyd and others introduced the four part Out With The Services
July 11th 1960: The programme returned after a 4 week break with Tennis with Tony Mottram. Second of series on volleying with David Potter and Paul Douglas
July 18th 1960- Athletics with Geoff Dyson at Motspur Park
July 25th 1960- Cricket with Alf Gover- lesson 3
Aug 1st 1960 (Bank Holiday)- Canoeing with Joe Jagger at Ham Dock
Aug 8th 1960- (200th edition) Golf with Tom Haliburton from Wentworth
Aug 15th 1960: Cycling. Leslie Warner on buying, maintaining and riding a cycle, and Brigadier Ralph Stoney on safe cycling
Aug 22nd 1960: Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram, David Potter and Paul Douglas. Back hand volley and service
Sept 5th 1960: Football with Walter Winterbottom and "youthful" members of Tottenham Hotspur FC, from the Spurs Training Ground in Cheshunt
Sept 12th 1960: Angling with Harvey Torbett at Ham Dock
Sept 19th 1960: Volley Ball with Chuck Roney and a match between an American team and Wimbledon College
Sept 26th 1960: Rugby (as Oct 19th 1959)
Oct 10th 1960: Ice Skating with Peggy Tomlins at the Streatham Ice Rink. Peter Lloyd, who hosted the programme as ever, admitted he couldn't skate, so he explained that his wife "kindly sewed a cushion into the seat of my pants!"
Nov 7th 1960- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach from Ebbisham Sports Centre Epsom. With Britain's "most promising" young players, England's no2 Junior Leslie Bell aged 14 from Romford, Chester Barnes aged 13 from Forest Gate, and the Holes twins Pauline and Christine aged 15 from Southampton
Nov 28th 1960- Netball with Rena Stratford at Bedford College London
Dec 5th 1960- Gymnastics from Ebbisham Sports Centre Epsom
Dec 12th 1960- Football from Lilleshall with Walter Winterbottom and the England team in training
Dec 19th 1960- Ice Skating with Peggy Tomlins at Streatham Ice Rink, also with Diana Clifton-French. Peter Lloyd was on the ice dressed as Santa Claus
Jan 23rd 1961: Fencing with Charles de Beaumont, a programme for the beginner
Jan 30th 1961: Riding from the Fulmer School with the principal Robert Hall, first in a new series, this on basic arts and skills
Feb 6th 1961: Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Stan Jacobson
Mar 13th 1961- Goalkeeping with Walter Winterbottom and Ron Springett
Mar 20th 1961: Cricket with special guest Peter May, and Don Bennett at the Alf Gover Indoor Cricket School
Apr 3rd 1961 (Easter)- Life Saving (as Apr 25th 1960)
Apr 17th 1961- Canoeing (as Aug 1st 1960)
May 8th 1961- Tennis with Tony Mottram and David Potter from Ebbisham Sports Club. Forehand and backhand drive.
May 22nd 1961 (Whit Monday)- Athletics with Geoff Dyson Michael Leary and David Wilson. High jumping.
May 29th 1961- Sailing with Charles Currey at Tamesis Club Teddington
June 5th 1961- Cricket with Alf Gover at Battersea Grammar School
June 12th 1961- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
June 19th 1961- Trophy- final. Over 100 groups entered this year's competition. Winner Aberaman YMCA
June 26th 1961- Lawn Tennis - introduced by Emlyn Jones who shows play from Wimbledon
July 3rd 1961- Lawn Tennis (continued from last week)
July 10th 1961- Middle Distance Running with Geoff Dyson Joy Jordan and John Disley at Mostpur Park
July 17th 1961- Golf (as Aug 8th 1960)
July 24th 1961- Angling with Harvey Torbett at Ham Dock
July 31st 1961- visit to National Spinal Injury Centre at Stoke Mandeville
Aug 7th 1961 (Bank Holiday)- Sailing (as May 29th)
Aug 14th 1961- Lawn Tennis (same as May 8th 1961)
Aug 28th 1961- Archery with W Howard Wiseman at Duke of York's Headquarters London
Sept 4th 1961- Diving with Wally Orner and Brian Phelps
Sept 11th 1961- Badminton with Nancy Horner John Havers Iris Rogers Warwick Shute and Audrey Stone at Ebbisham Sports Club
Sept 18th 1961- Rugby (as Jan 11th 1960)
Sept 25th 1961- Hockey with Gladys Flew. Goalkeeping
Oct 16th 1961: Football with Walter Winterbottom at the Tottenham Hotspur Training Ground
Oct 30th 1961- Boxing with Pat Martin
Nov 6th 1961: Hockey (2nd of series) with Gladys Flew and Brenda Coleshill, demonstrating play and tactics of backs and half backs.
Nov 13th 1961: Swimming with Roger Burrell from Ironmonger-row Baths
Nov 20th 1961- Ice Skating with Diana Clifton French and Gladys Hogg
Nov 27th 1961- Rugby (as Jan 11th 1960) 3rd of series
Dec 4th 1961- Netball (as Nov 28th 1960)
Dec 18th 1961- Hockey with Gladys Flew and Melvin Hickey. Forwards.
Jan 1st 1962- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams. Fourth of series English Public Schoolboys v Scottish Public Schoolboys from Richmond Athletic Ground.
Jan 15th 1962- Fencing (as 14 March 1960)
Jan 29th 1962- Judo, third programme
Feb 5th 1962- Hockey, last of series, with Gladys Flew analysing South v East at Park Royal
Feb 12th 1962- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams. Last of series analysing Wimbledon College v St Benedict's Ealing
Feb 19th 1962- Ice Skating with Betty Callaway at Richmond Ice Rink
Feb 26th 1962- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach
Mar 5th 1962- Boxing (as Jan 4th 1960)
March 12th 1962: Gymnastics with Nick Stuart
Apr 2nd 1962- Swimming with Roger Burrell- 1st of series from Beginners to Swimmers
No programme on April 9th 1962 because of the Budget
Apr 16th 1962- Gymnastics with Nick Stuart
Apr 23rd 1962- Life Saving (as 25th Apr 1960) from Hounslow Swimming Club
Apr 30th 1962- Sailing from Ichenor with Charles Currey, first of a series of four
May 7th 1962- Athletics introduced by Emlyn Jones from Royal Masonic School Bushey with John Le Masurier, and David Jones and Pat Nutting
May 14th 1962- Swimming with Roger Burrell (second programme in this series- see Apr 2nd 62): breaststroke
May 21st 1962- Cricket (as June 5th 1961) from Battersea Grammar School
May 28th 1962- Sailing with Charles Currey from Ichenor Sailing Club
June 4th 1962- Tennis with Tony Mottram- Forehand and backhand drive (as May 8th 1961)
June 11th 1962 (Whit Monday)- Diving (as Sept 4th 1961) from Ironmonger Row Baths London
June 18th 1962- Athletics with Emlyn Jones and John le Masurier at the Royal Masonic School Bushey
June 25th 1962- Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram, explaining play from Wimbledon
July 16th 1962- Cricket with Alf Gover
July 23rd 1962: Swimming: the backstroke with Roger Burrell. Also expected to appear were Linda Ludgrove and Barbara Flewitt
July 30th 1962- Camping from a site near Chalfont St Giles
Aug 6th 1962 (Holiday Monday)- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
Aug 20th 1962- Golf with Dai Rees at the South Herts Club Totteridge
Aug 27th 1962- Sailing (as May 28th 1962)
Sept 3rd 1962- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960) lesson 2
Sept 10th 1962- Boxing (as Jan 4th 1960)
Sept 17th 1962- Badminton (as Sept 11th 1961) with Nancy Horner. "It is hoped" these will also appear: John Havers Warwick Shute
Oct 8th 1962- Judo at Renshuden Judo Club
Oct 15th 1962- Table Tennis (as Feb 26th 1962)
Oct 22nd 1962- Soccer with Walter Winterbottom and pupils from Hillside School Boreham Wood
Oct 29th 1962- Trophy- finals. Littlegreen School Chichester, Havant Trasnant Junior School and Churchdown Secondary School.
Nov 12th 1962- Ice Skating with Arnold Herschwiler and Sjouke Dijkstra from Richmond Ice Rink
Nov 26th 1962- Basketball from USAF Gymnasium South Ruislip
Dec 17th 1962: Judo with Charles Palmer and boys of the Renshudin Club. One member, Alan Hunter, now of Edinburgh, former British Team member and winner of the European Under-21 Bronze in Lyon in 1966, appeared in the series about this time. He wrote to me in 2011, "It was filmed live from Elstree Studios at Borehamwood, I can't remember too much about it, I was 16 at the time. What I do recall is eating in the television canteen and seeing stars from the then popular Emergency Ward 10!"
Dec 24th 1962- Ice Skating with Roy Lee and Ann Palmer at Richmond Ice Rink
Dec 31st 1962- Boxing with Pat Martin and boys of St Bernard's School Stepney
Feb 11th 1963- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Mary Shannon and Diane Rowe
Feb 18th 1963- Swimming with Roger Burrell and Barbara Flewitt at Ironmonger Row Baths
Mar 11th 1963- Archery with Howard Wiseman and Ann Brien, Derek Ashcroft and Michael Crook at RAF Sports Centre Stanmore
Mar 18th 1963- Ice Skating with Arnold Herschwiler and Roy and Betty Calloway from Richmond Ice Rink. Ice dancing.
Mar 25th 1963- Boxing (as Jan 4th 1960)
Apr 8th 1963- Golf (as Aug 20th 1962)
Apr 22nd 1963- Horse Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
Apr 29th 1963: Basketball from USAF Gymnasium Ruislip. Joe Jagger instructs players from Lyndhurst School Boreham Wood
May 6th 1963- Athletics with John le Masurier (AAA coach) with children from Royal Masonic School Bushey and Watford Technical School: sprinting and javelin throwing with David Jones, Robbie Brightwell, Colin Smith, Sue Platt.
May 13th 1963- Cricket with Alf Gover and Godfrey Evans from Royal Masonic School. Wicket keeping.
May 20th 1963- Lawn Tennis (as June 4th 1962) from RAF Station Stanmore
May 27th 1963- Riding with Robert Hall
June 3rd 1963- Life Saving (as 25th Apr 1960) from Hounslow Swimming Club
June 10th 1963- Athletics with John le Masurier Vic Matthews and Mary Bignal-Rand. Hurdling and discus throwing
June 17th 1963- Cricket with Alf Gover and Willy Watson
June 24th 1963- Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram who explains play from Wimbledon
July 1st 1963- Sailing with Calcott Reilly
July 8th 1963- Riding with Robert Hall- trotting cantering and jumping
July 15th 1963- Swimming with Roger Burrell and Judy Gegan at Ironmonger Row Baths
July 22nd 1963- Athletics with John le Masurier (AAA coach) and with Ron Jones Fred Alsop and children from Royal Masonic School Bushey and Watford Technical School
July 29th 1963- Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram from RAF Station Stanmore- forehand and backhand volley
Aug 5th 1963 (Holiday)- Sailing with Callcott Reilly at Tamesis Club Teddington
Aug 12th 1963- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
Aug 19th 1963- Cricket with Alf Gover and Richie Benaud at Battersea Grammar School
Aug 26th 1963- Golf (as Aug 20th 1962)
Sept 9th 1963- Judo with John Newman
Sept 16th 1963- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams- first of series. Fitness training
Sept 23rd 1963- Basketball from RAF Sports Arena Stanmore with Joe Jagger
Sept 30th 1963- Badminton with Nancy Horner at RAF Sports Arena Stanmore
Oct 14th 1963: Table Tennis, first of new series with Johnny Leach and Diane Rowe from Hillside Secondary Modern School, Boreham Wood
Oct 21st 1963- Tenpin Bowling with Lee Kates
Oct 28th 1963- Rugby (as Jan 11th 1960). Kicking
Nov 4th 1963- Trophy finals
Nov 11th 1963- Judo with John Newman at Renshuden Judo Club
Dec 2nd 1963- Swimming with Roger Burrell and Elizabeth Long at Ironmonger Row Baths> Front crawel, first of new series
Dec 16th 1963- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams- third of series. Scrummaging and line out play
Dec 23rd 1963- Ice Skating with Arnold Herschwiler from Richmond Ice Rink
Programme now hosted by Liam Nolan.
Jan 13th 1964- Swimming, (as July 15th 1963)
Jan 20th 1964- Skating with Roy Callaway
Programme again hosted by Peter Lloyd.
Jan 27th 1964- Basketball with Joe Jagger from RAF Stanmore
Feb 10th 1964: Judo introduced by Liam Nolan, with John Newman
Feb 17th 1964- Swimming with Roger Burrell, Steela Mitchell, Judy Gegan and Linda Ludgrove
Mar 2nd 1964: Table Tennis, fourth of series, from Hillside Secondary Modern, Borehamwood. With Johnny Leach and Diane Rowe
Mar 16th 1964- Swimming with Roger Burrell, from Ironmonger Row Baths. Diving
Apr 6th 1964- Clay Pigeon Shooting with Clarrie Wilson. Gun safety
Apr 13th 1964- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Diane Rowe from Hillside School Borehamwood
Apr 20th 1964- Tenpin Bowling (as Oct 21st 1963)
Apr 27th 1964- Cricket with Alf Gover and Freddie Titmus (Introduced by Martin Locke)
May 11th 1964- Camping with Cliff Harris
May 18th 1964 (Whitsun)- Lawn Tennis with Tony and Joy Mottram
May 25th 1964- Athletics with John le Masurier Robbie Brightwell and Mary Rand
June 1st 1964- Cricket with Alf Gover (Introduced by Martin Locke)
June 8th 1964: Riding with Robert Hall from the Fulmer School, first in a new series
June 15th 1964- Sailing with Charles Currey. Dinghy sailing
June 22nd 1964- Golf with Dai Rees from South Hertfordshire Club (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
June 29th 1964- Athletics with John le Masurier Mary Rand Gordon Miller and Michael Parker at Welwyn Garden City Stadium
July 6th 1964- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
July 13th 1964: Cricket introduced by Martin Locke. Guest Garfield Sobers, from Royal Masonic School Bushey
July 27th 1964- Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram from RAF Stanmore, third of series. Volleying
Aug 3rd 1964 (Holiday)- Life Saving (cp Apr 25th 1960) at Hounslow School of Life Saving
Aug 10th 1964: Riding from the Fulmer School, today: trotting
Aug 17th 1964: Clay Pigeon Shooting with Clarrie Wilson from Waltham Abbey Gun Club. Further instruction on safe gun handling with emphasis on skeet and sporting shooting
Aug 24th 1964- Rugby. Gerwyn Williams at Crystal Palace National Recreation Centre instructs boys from Whitgift School
Aug 31st 1964- Riding (as Feb 15th 1960)
Sept 7th 1964- Golf (as June 22nd 1964)
Sept 14th 1964- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach and Chester Barnes from Hillside School Borehamwood
Sept 21st 1964- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams and boys from Whitgift School at Crystal Palace Centre
Sept 28th 1964- Trophy for sporting initiative- annual awards. Bradley Rowe Junior Boys Exeter (built own swimming pool), St Joseph's Secondary Coleraine (raised funds for team kits and a minbus), Shipley Cof E nr Horsham (a 36ft x 16ft swimming pool, funds raised by selling "toffee apples, sweets and wooden toys"). Judges: Olive Newsome, John Disley, Joe Jagger.
Oct 5th 1964- Boxing (as Jan 4th 1960)
Oct 19th 1964- Swimming with Roger Burrell, from Ironmonger Row Baths (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Oct 26th 1964- Basketball with Joe Jagger at RAF Stanmore, with boys from Lyndhurst School Boreham Wood (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Nov 2nd 1964- Rugby (as Jan 11th 1960)
Nov 9th 1964- Judo with John Newman (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Nov 16th 1964- (no programme)
Nov 23rd 1964- Volleyball with Peter Wardale at RAF Stanmore (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Nov 30th 1964- Archery with Howard Wiseman
Dec 7th 1964- Tenpin Bowling (as Oct 21st 1963, Introduced by Martin Locke)
Dec 14th 1964- Basketball with Joe Jagger (as Jan 27th 1964). Shooting and dribbling
Dec 21st 1964- Ice Skating (as Dec 24th 1962)
Dec 28th 1964- Fencing introduced by Athole Still with Charles de Beaumont, Janet Bewley-Cathie and Shirley Netherway
Jan 4th 1965- Boxing with Pat Martin at Woodside School Slough (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Jan 11th 1965- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach Chester Barnes Dennis Neale Mary Shannon Di Rowe at Crystal Palace. Commentator Athole Still
Jan 18th 1965- Ski-ing with Anni Maurer
Jan 25th 1965- Sailing with Charles Currey
Feb 1st 1965- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach. (With Martin Locke)
Feb 15th 1965- Boxing with Pat Martin (Introduced by Liam Nolan)
Feb 22nd 1965- Snooker and Billiards with Sydney Lee
Mar 1st 1965- Badminton with Jack Warwick at RAF Stanmore, (With Martin Locke)
Mar 8th 1965- Basketball with Joe Jagger (With Martin Locke)
Mar 15th 1965- Soccer with Alan Wade Johnny Byrne and boys of Tulse Hill School
Mar 22nd 1965- Golf (as June 22nd 1964)
Mar 29th 1965- Rugby with Gerwyn Williams analysing England Schoolboys v Wales (no host)
Apr 5th 1965- Skin Diving with Blue Sea divers at Crystal Palace
Apr 12th 1965- Soccer with Alan Wade George Eastham and boys of Tulse Hill School
Apr 19th 1965- Pony Club with Raymond Brooks-Ward at Ferney Hill Farm Barnet
Apr 26th 1965- Boating with Ian Dow and Wendy Smith
May 10th 1965- Table Tennis (as Feb 26th 1962)
May 17th 1965- Lawn Tennis with Tony and Joy Mottram from RAF Stanmore. First of four programmes (with Liam Nolan)
May 24th 1965- Cricket with Mike Smith. (With Peter Carver)
June 7th 1965 (Whitsun)- Table Tennis with Johnny Leach, Mary Shannon, Di Rowe
June 14th 1965 - Swimming with Roger Burrell and Darryl Jones, from Ironmonger Row Baths. First of three
June 21st 1965 - Lawn Tennis with Tony Mottram who analyses play from Wimbledon
July 5th 1965 - Cricket, host: Peter Carver, with Alf Gover and guest Colin Cowdrey at Royal Masonic School Bushey
July 12th 1965 - Athletics, host: Peter Carver, with John le Masurier, Mary Rand and Mike Parker at Royal Masonic School Bushey
July 26th 1965 - Swimming with Roger Burrell, from Ironmonger Row Baths. Crawl. Second of three
Aug 2nd 1965 - Cricket with Alf Gover from Royal Masonic School Bushey (with Peter Lorenzo)
Aug 23rd 1965 - Table Tennis (as Apr 13th 1964)
Aug 30th 1965 (Holiday) - Horse Riding with Robert Hall and Joanna Hall at the Fulmer School of Equitation
Sept 27th 1965 - Horse Riding (as Aug 30th 1965) Fourth of series. I think this may have been the final edition.

GO!
ATV's Seeing Sport enjoyed a regular spot on children's tv on Mondays from 1956 until 1965. But in this latter year, the regional companies took the unique step of rejecting the network en masse and producing their own regional alternative which was shown in all the regions except the Big Four.
The idea proved such a success that eventually, just for once, the Big Four actually had to capitulate and show it, starting in October 1965.
Was this the high spot of regional anarchy??
The weekly programmes contain a fascinating variety of regional enterprise, on a wide variety of children's activities.
Below is a sample selection to give you the flavour of the series, with all the eleven regional companies contributing, listed in brackets.

April 19th 1965- Gliding at Sutton Bank nr Thirsk (Tyne Tees TV)
May 3rd 1965- Fitness with Ron Pickering. Power in Sport with Tony Clemo and pupils of Waterhall School Cardiff (TWW)
May 31st 1965- Canoe Building with George Glasgow (Ulster TV)
June 21st 1965 - Golfing at Gleneagles, introduced by Arthur Montford. Roy Castle v Eric Brown (Scottish TV)
June 28th 1965 - Sea-fishing with Major Moore, Christopher Glover and Richard Carter, introduced by Stuart Hutchison (Westward TV)
July 5th 1965 - Pony Trekking with Hugh MacGregor, introduced by David Webster (Border TV)
July 12th 1965 - Hydroplaning with Dick Graham at Oulton Broad (Anglia TV)
July 19th 1965 - Off-Shore Cruising with Jock Kerr-Hunter (Scottish TV)
Aug 9th/16th 1965 - Water Ski-ing with Bob Panton and Fred Dinenage (Southern TV)
Aug 30th/Sept 6th 1965 - Freshwater Fishing with Arthur Oglesby and James Lloyd at Pauperhaugh Bridge Rothbury (TTTV)
Sept 13th 1965 - Aeromodelling with James Spankie (Grampian TV)
Sept 20th 1965 - Archery with Hector Simpson and Kevin Flanagan (Ulster TV)
One of the smaller company's
contributions- from Westward TV,
introduced by Stuart Hutchison
(June 28th 1965)
Oct 4th 1965 - Parachuting with Ron Pickering and John Scriminger at RAF Abingdon (TWW)
Oct 11th 1965 - Surf Riding with Bob Armstrong (Channel TV)
Oct 18th 1965 - Shotgun Shooting with Percy Stanbury and Major Baillie, introduced by Jack Hargreaves (Southern TV)
Oct 25th 1965 - Diving with Norman Scarsfield and Brian Phelps, introduced by James Lloyd from Felling Baths (TTTV)
Nov 1st/8th 1965 - Golfing with Eric Brown and Bruce Forsyth and Ronnie Carroll at Gleneagles (Scottish TV)
Nov 22nd 1965 - Sand Yachting with Ted Benson, introduced by James Lloyd from Felling Baths (TTTV)
Dec 6th 1965 - Railway Modelling with Stuart Hutchison and Kenneth Macleod (Westward TV)
Dec 13th 1965 - Ski-ing with James Spankie (Grampian TV)
Dec 20th 1965 - Boat Building with Frank Dye and Chris Kelly (Anglia TV)
Dec 27th 1965 - Learning to Fish with Jack Hargreaves on the River Stour, and Fred Dinenage (Southern TV)
The series finished at the end of 1965
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King of Diamonds

Starring John Lupton as Johnny King
Director: Robert Lynn
Devised and produced by Harry Alan Towers.
A ZIV production.
Date: 1960.
39 stories presold to A-R in London, ABC in the Midlands and Granada in the North.
A half hour series shot in Hollywood, but with location scenes in London and Europe. The plan had been to make half the series in Britain, the remainder in America.
One of several pilots shot in early 1960 and finished by March, was
Appointment in Pelikan Straat
Co-star was Audrey Dalton. Others in the cast: Bill Owen, Douglas Wilmer, Claire Gordon, John van Eyssen, Jean Long.
Scenes were shot in the Criterion Restaurant and Festival Hall London as well as abroad in Antwerp, and at Brussels, Orly and Le Bouget Airports.

My guess is that this pilot was rejected in favour of the American-made series which was to have as its star Broderick Crawford as John King. I'd be pleased if you can add anything, about this particular story.

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The Locked Book (working title)
At the height of the 'pilot craze' in 1959, this pilot was made for a possible series of 13 half hour films based on the writings of Harry Price.
The Hon Derek E Winn and Bill Luckwell formed Winwell productions and made

"The Case of the Devil Girl" at St John's Wood Studios.
That fine actress Ann Todd was the linking narrator and the film starred Dennis Price as Harry Price.
Others in the cast included Ellen Pollock and Jean Dawnay. Co-producer and scriptwriter was Paul Tabori.

The plan was to make the remaining twelve films (The Locked Door was the finally agreed title for the series) at Walton Studios - directors Henry Katz and Laurence Huntingdon were named as probable directors.
So what happened to that filmed pilot? An American TV network is alleged to have bought the series for £130,000 in August 1959- was anything ever shown there?

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DICK TURPIN
I'd be extemely pleased to hear from anyone who has a print of this 1959 pilot film, or even remembers ever seeing it. The stars were Alan Browning - as the celebrated highwayman and Jane Hylton who played Lady Elizabeth. With a script by Alan Reeve-Jones from a story by Jimmy Liggatt, it was directed by Max Varnel. The theme music was written by Frank Cordell (1918-1980).
Producer was Bert Page an enterprising bookie (yes really), who was younger brother of the singer Jill Day (real name Yvonne Page). He was an amateur jockey, riding his sister's horse Christella for a while. With Denton de Gray as associate producer, Page formed Four Seasons Productions Ltd (National House, Wardour Street) and splashed out £15,000 for this film, which was sent to America with six further scripts. However there do not seem to have been any takers.
Alan Browning "took over the lead at a day's notice" when an accident on the first day of shooting befell the original star David Davenport.... Alan had been due to play the second lead, Turpin's friend 'Tom King'.
Filming commenced on August 10th 1959 with "the full cooperation of the Brighton Council". I doubt whether Brighton Studios were used at all, but certainly since Jill Day's horse was stabled near Lewes, this explains why much of the filming was done on location near here, in particular at East Chiltington. Perhaps it was Jill Day's horse that was used in the film? Though I haven't seen the film, it is fortunate that contemporary fan and tv journalist Margaret Cowan watched the pilot in December 1959 and gave her brief appraisal of the story:
"There are some obvious and glaring weaknesses in the film (which will be number 3 or 4 in the series), all of which can be easily corrected if the series is made. But Max Varnel has succeeded in capturing breadth and space in his outdoor scenes among real parks and forests, and the photography of historical English buildings has come over very well. The action scenes have pace and excitement, much helped by the original Dick Turpin music, which is a mixture of stirring modern music set into a period piece. Alan Browning... is quite capable of developing the character into the devil-may-care laughing-cavalier type, which should go down well, and upon which interpretation, I think, the success of the series will depend. I wish it luck, as something just that little bit different from the usual studio job." Alas, it seems these hopes were never fulfilled
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All Aboard
The story of the Adriana cruise ship. During the run of 26 episodes there were several crossings of the Atlantic plus a tour of the Med- in the studio at least!

This series started on 6th December 1958 in the ABC region only, but was networked from 24th January 1959, replacing Southern TV's Mary Britten MD.
The regular stars were Susan Shaw as assistant purser Janet Fraser, Avril Angers as stewardess Joan Harrison, Richard Coleman as radio operator Mark Rogers, and the then little known Arthur Lowe as a steward, Sydney Barker. Included in familiar faces on the passenger list was Susannah Yorke (see picture) who falls in love with a violinist (seated next to her). Others on board for some stories were Gordon Jackson, Gerald Flood/ Annette Karel (Feb 28th 1959), Richard O'Sullivan, and Terence Alexander/ Julie Stevens (on May 23rd 1959).
The script was by Gerald Kelsey and Dick Sharples, and directors included ABC's regular, Guy Verney, and, later stories, Anthony Finnigan who had been floor manager at the commencement of the series.
Seen on the left is an ad in a trade paper by the producer- who applied, and who got the part?

Sat Jan 3rd 1969: Full cast: Avril Angers, Richard Thorpe, Arthur Lowe, Susan Shaw, Richard Coleman, John Gale, Marion Mathie (Betty Masters), June Jago (Gwen Wilson), Richard O'Sullivan, Gordon Jackson, Dulcie Bowman (Mrs Atherstone), George Coulouris (Grey), Charles Mortgan (Bill Stafford), Margaret Anderson (Pauline Webster) and John Carson (Fred).
Details of the first fully networked story:
Saturday January 24th 1959, 6.30-7pm. The ship's company prepare to cross the Atlantic from New York. Steward Syd Barker is in trouble already. Peter Norton has had more adventures ashore than he bargained for. Full cast: Avril Angers, Arthur Lowe, Susan Shaw, Richard Coleman, John Gale (Third Officer Peter Norton), Charles Morgan (Bill Stafford), Marion Mathie (Betty Masters), Richard Thorp (John Caldwell), Peter Greenspan (Bell Boy), Leslie Sands (Austin Carter), Elizabeth Wallace (Penelope Smith), and David Kelly (Terry O'Brien).
Sat May 16th 1969: While the SS Adriana is in Gibraltar, some passengers go ashore, at least one of them for a sinister purpose. On board, Joan Harrison and Syd Barker find themselves involved with Sir Jack and Lady Gilbert. Full cast: Avril Angers, Arthur Lowe, Susan Shaw, Richard Coleman, John Gale, Charles Morgan, with passengers Julian Somers (Sir Jack Gilbert), Georgina Cookson (Lady Gilbert), Mary Webster (Imogen Gilbert), Terence Alexander (Alan Rogers) and Igor Tamarin (Johnny Cimarosa)
To
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Jezebel ex U.K.

The byline of this forgotten 1963 ABC series was: "A Ship- the Sea... and People." This followed a similar concept to ABC's earlier All Aboard.
It was only partially networked, but must have been quite a success as other regions showed recordings later in 1963.
Regulars in the series were
Ernest Hare as the ship's Captain,
Alan Browning the Chief Officer Steve Rettar,
Emrys Jones as the purser Lawton, with
Cavan Kendall his assistant Carr and
Patrick Bedford the barman Pomeroy.
Guy Verney was producer and directors included Jonathan Alwyn.
Theme music was by ABC's Robert Earley

In all there were thirteen stories, the good news being that all survive in the ABC archive.
First story was transmitted on Saturday 30th March 1963 at 6.30pm (ABC Midlands/ The North) and was Sea of Doubt starring Heather Sears and Pete Murray. The series started in Sydney with the Jezebel returning to England, with newlyweds Larry and Maxine (the two stars), others in this opening story being Mark Dignam, Patrick Holt and John Bonney. others in the cast were Margaret Courtenay, Reg Lye, Keith Anderson, David Webb, Fredric Abbott, Walter Sparrow (a semi regular as a sailor), and Jeffrey Ashby (semi-regular as a dining steward). Problems arise when Larry starts to suspect his wife has murdered a child back in Australia.
Send a Telegram was story no 2, with Guy Doleman, Jennifer Wright, Mark Eden and Shirley Lawrence. Also with John Trenaman, Roy Stephens, Haydn Jones, Terence Brook, Morris Perry, Timothy Parkes. An everyday story of a live nuclear warhead getting lost in the Pacific.
Story no 3 on April 13th was Sister Ship about ex- racing driver Robert Steele (Terence Alexander) and his wife (Miranda Connell). Also starring were John Turner and George Coulouris, with in smaller roles, Garfield Morgan, John Forbes-Robertson, Dudley Jones, Morris Perry, and Jeffrey Ashby. Things go mysteriously wrong with the Jezebel's new radar system. The problem is no unconnected with Robert Steele. others in the cast were Gordon Sterne, Job Stewart, Philippa Gail, Robert MacLeod, Gillian Raine, Roberta Huby and Mavis Villiers.
Story number 4 was The Unforgotten Country (20 April), Jezebel en route from Port Said to Aden. With Jeremy Spenser as Naresh Patel and Georgina Ward as Christine Roberts, among the cast were also Hylda Baker, Patrick Mower and David Lander. script by Martin Worth.
The fifth story (27 April) was Slow Boat to Nineveh, the ship was entering the Atlantic, when a mysterious Frenchman causes "strange things" to happen. The story starred George Pravda, Neil Hallett, Richard Carpenter, Margaretta Scott and Noel Howlett. Also appearing were Linda Marlowe, Sheila Brennan, Frederick Piper, Anthony Viccars, Maurice Durant, Walter Sparrow, and Bill Nagy.
Sanderson and the Sea was the sixth story, and starred Maurice Good in the title role, with Hugh Paddick and Juliet Cooke. Amanda Barrie also appeared, along with Michael Wynne, Ian Clark, Stephen Thorne, Margo Croan, Peter Hager, and David Webb.
Story 7, now shown at 9.10pm on 11th May was Return to Look Behind, with Charles Hyatt as Gabriel Thompson, on his way home to Trinidad. However his warm overcoat hides something.... Also starring were Margaret Anderson and Jacqui Chan.
The eighth story on 18th May was probably The Stand In.
Next week, the ninth story was The Long Cool Drop (25th May) which starred William Sylvester and Helen Lindsay. With Gordon Sterne, Phillipa Gail, Robert MacLeod, Gillian Raine, Roberta Huby, Mavis Villiers, and Job Stewart (as Dr Stannard the ship's doctor, a semi-regular character). One of two Canadian Air Force Officers returning home on the Jezebel, falls mysteriously ill.
On June 1st the tenth story Bitter Lemon in Biscay written by Hugh Leonard had a strong cast of Gwen Watford as Miss Beecher and Maurice Denham. Others appearing were Maitland Moss, Ewan Roberts, Betty Hare, Anthony Verner, Bridget Wood, and Job Stewart. Mr Appleby is a difficult passenger with a bulging briefcase.
The last few programmes of the series were not shown as stated in TV Times.
Story No 11 on 22nd June had been scheduled for 8th June originally. It was Love and Let Love with Richard O'Sullivan as Paul Brooks and Kika Markham as Ruth who fall in love on board. Ernest Clark and Georgina Cookson as Paul's parents are not too keen. Also in the cast were Lisa Daniely, Alan MacNaughtan, Anna Wing and Geoffrey Palmer.
On 15th June the story advertised was The Long Voyage, the ship now docking at Gibraltar where a high pressure businessman, Byrne (Brian Nissen), comes on board. He seems obsessed with retired architect George Gladstone (Kynaston Reeves). Other stars in this story are Joan Haythorne and Elizabeth Shepherd. Also in this story were Brian Nissen, Victor Platt, June Ellis, and Bart Allison.
The last story was The Four-Legged Stowaway, which also had in the cast Jane Asher, Alan Browning, Gwen Cherrell, Leonard Rossiter and Robert Urquhart.

Others to appear in one of the stories, not sure which, were Donald Hewlett, and Muriel Pavlow.
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Dick and the Duchess (1957)
It's scarcely possible to imagine this comedy series, filmed at MGM Elstree Studios, hasn't survived.
With Hazel Court as the star, here's one seriously neglected series. Maybe this was producer Sheldon Reynolds' best filmed series, for with a supporting cast that included Richard Wattis, Michael Shepley and Beatrice Varley it must be worth another look today! Another character who made occasional appearances was the police sergeant played by the fine Peter Butterworth.
OK, so the star was more forgettable, Patrick O'Neal playing an insurance investigator, Dick Starrett, married to Jane, The Duchess of the title, the daughter of a real live English earl. Dick's work takes him among the shady characters of London's underworld, and The Duchess, who has a taste for adventure, won't be left out. But unfortunately, she has a unique talent for doing the wrong thing at the right time!
Surely any series that could attract Margaret Rutherford as a guest star, must be due for resurrection. Margaret Rutherford appeared in The Kissing Bandit as a much married widow. Amongst others appearing in one of the stories were Sydney Tafler, William Mervyn, Irene Handl, Michael Medwin, Kenneth Williams and William Franklyn. Behind the scenes was the only rival to top female tv executive Hannah Weinstein- executive producer Nicole Milinaire.
Michael Winner in his own entry in a 1960's Film and TV Year Book states he was "director" on this series, but probably this means of the second unit?
There were 26 twenty five minute films made. Where are they all hiding? Hazel Court went to New York in late 1957 for a four day "exposure and promotional trip." Let's expose this series again!

Picture- On the left is Patrick O'Neal, with Hazel Court on the right, while caught as the middleman is Richard Wattis
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Discs a Gogo (first opened in 1961)
"The gayest coffee bar in town," created by Harry Hargreaves.

A lot of independent tv stations attempted to cash in on the pop music bandwagon. In Wales and the West, TWW persuaded Kent Walton, better known for his wrestling commentaries, to compere their weekly swinging show. Some famous names appeared on the half hour show, and it became so popular that it was taken by a number of the lesser ITV companies (TTT, Anglia and Westward periodically), but as far as I can check, it was never screened by the Big Four companies.

Opal Louis Nations, aka Martin Hummingbird of The Frays, tells me of an appearance alongside The Who and Dusty Springfield. He writes, "our segments of Go-Go were pre-recorded during the afternoon of the telecast. I sung Turn on your Love Light with the group, and Take the Easy Way Out, with a female as a love ballad duet. I seem to recall that the female was a regular stand-in on the program. All I remember is we came on before The Who, I chatted with all of the members. They thought The Frays were really good. I saw the whole show from the windows of the studio."

Geoff Leonard explained that Starfire by The John Barry Seven & Orchestra was the signature tune for the programme. He added, "the cartoon was a fox called Gogo, animated by Harry Hargreaves, which accompanied a different record each week. One I remember was I won't Go Hunting With You Jake, But I'll Go Chasing Women, by Jimmy Dean."
On many of the episodes they would show a sequence of cartoons, almost like an early pop video. David Hoey can recall some of these cartoons, "one of which was The Girl from Wolverton Mountain by Jo Ann Campbell (1962), another was Do you hear what I hear? by Bing Crosby (1963), this one being shown for two consecutive weeks. Three other songs I remember were Starfire by the John Barry Seven (1961), Bambino by the Springfields and Sound of Silence by Simon and Garfunkel (1965)."
A Discs a Gogo bonus if you came to dance on the show was the gift of a badge. They are quite common today, so they must have been dished out fairly liberally! There was also a dance troupe, The Gojo's, the brainchild of choreographer Jo Cook. Two of the regular dancers were Carol Rogers and Dudley Canvin. Their daughter Kate told me, "dad had fan mail for his 'oversized' jumpers requesting patterns, my nan knitted them!" Geoff Leonard remembers the girl who looked after the coffee bar with Frank (Harding) was "a dumb blonde called Connie (Greengrove). She literally never spoke, it was a kind of gimmick."

Tana Burdon danced on the show, and writes, "I regularly went to the TWW studios in Arnos Vale Bristol to dance in the show (mainly because as poor young cash strapped thing I had little money and the studio provided a free meal for participating extras.) I worked in Bristol and had a half day on a Wednesday when I rushed to get my hair brushed up before charging to Arnos Vale. Normally there were two takes in one week and then two weeks later we returned to record the following two episodes. Claudette Llewellyn was the make up artist, and Chris Mercer was the producer. My sole claim to fame was to be selected to sit on the rostrum with Screaming Lord Sutch. I had to scream my head off when he lunged at me singing, “I’m a hep for you baby I can’t get enough of your love…." etc. I did enjoy dancing with my partner from London a guy called Adrian we often had smooches and close ups especially to Marie Elena. We were supposed to be dead serious but Adrian kept tickling me and I had the excruciating desire to giggle - what fun… I had auburn red hair and nearly always wore Helenka stretch leggings the fashion at the time- I guess the show went out in black and white in those days . Adrian and I used to stand on the third spot on the opening rostrum after a couple from Cardiff. Well those were fun days."
Thank you to Opal Louis Nations, Tana Burdon (nee Shackell), David Hoey and Geoff Leonard, also to Oliver Tooley for details below of 21st Dec 64. If you can supply more information, I'd be
pleased to hear from you, and acknowledge your help here.

Details of a few of the shows:
Please note that transmission dates varied in the regions that even showed Gogos. TWW were showing it on Mondays at 7pm, but in 1964 for example Anglia screened it on Tuesdays. In Autumn 1965 it moved to Wednesdays on TWW /Thursdays is some other areas.

KENT WALTON introduced the shows, except where stated otherwise. (For later programmes, he was joined by Tony Prince, a DJ at The Top Rank in Bristol.)
Thursday January 4th 1962 (6.15pm) with Nero and the Gladiators, Joy and Dave. Script: Ker Robertson. Arranger: Jim Douglas Henry. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday October 16th 1962 with Mike Cotton and His Jazzmen, Russ Sainty, Christine Quaite (singing Your Nose is Gonna Grow). Plus Frank Harding, Connie Greengrove. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday December 31st 1962 with Gerry Brown's Jazzmen, Simone Jackson, Neil Christian and Jimmy Powell. Plus Frank Harding, Connie Greengrove. Script: Ker Robertson. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Monday April 22nd 1963 with Patsy Ann Noble, Chris Barber's Jazz Band, Mike Preston and Vince Hill
Monday July 29th 1963 with Patsy Ann Noble, Neil Christian, Alex Welsh and His Band. Director: Terence de Lacey. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
100th show: Monday September 23rd 1963 with Frank Ifield, Susan Maughan, Johnny Dankworth Quintet. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Monday March 30th 1964 with Alma Cogan, Ian McCulloch, The Mojos, Jackie and Jill. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday July 6th 1964 with The Mojos, Freddie and The Dreamers. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday August 24th 1964 with The Dave Clark Five, Mose Allison, The T-Bones. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Ned Kelly.
Monday September 7th 1964 with Yardbirds. Producer- Ned Kelly
Monday October 5th 1964 with The Dave Clark Five, Anita Harris, Tommy Quickly, The Chants. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday October 27th 1964 with Marianne Faithfull, The Plebs, Lorne Gibson, Spencer Davis Group. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday December 14th 1964 with Lulu, The Four Pennies, The Barron Knights. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Monday December 21st 1964 with Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, Jackie Trent, Des and Dave
Tuesday January 26th 1965 with Cilla Black, Cliff Bennett, Dev Douglas, The Syndicats. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday February 2nd 1965 with Milly, Billy J Kramer and ther Dakotas, The Riot Squad. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday February 23rd 1965 with Kenny Rankin, The Nashville Teens, Herman's Hermits. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday March 2nd 1965 with Long John Baldry, The Pretty Things, Just Four Men.
Monday March 8th 1965 with The Dave Clark Five, Anita Harris, The Messengers, Rick and Sandy.
Monday March 29th 1965- the main guest was PJ Proby
Monday April 19th 1965 with Sounds Incorporated, Cliff Bennett, Donovan. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday June 1st 1965 with Donovan, Anita Harris, The Frays. Script- Ker Robertson. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday June 29th 1965 with The Fortunes, The Moody Blues, Solomon Burke. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday July 6th 1965 with Dave Berry, Millie, Eden Kane, Spencer Davis Group. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday July 20th 1965 with Tom Jones, Vikki Carr, Terry Butler, Simon and Garfunkel, The Quiet Five, The Fourmost. Producer- Christopher Mercer.
Tuesday August 10th 1965 with The Moody Blues, The Pretty Things. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Tuesday September 7th 1965 hosts Tony Blackburn and Tony Prince: with Cliff Bennett, The Hollies, The Measles. Director- Terence Lacey. Producer- CM.
Wednesday October 13th 1965 with Jackie Trent, The Fortunes, Bo Diddley, The Pack, The Candy Dates. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Wednesday October 20th 1965 with Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames, Barry McGuire, Millie, PF Sloan, The Hedgehoppers Anonymous, The Yardbirds. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Wednesday November 3rd 1965 with The Animals, Susan Maughan, Ben E King, Paul & Barry Ryan, Anita Harris, The Moody Blues. Producer- Chris Mercer.
Thursday November 25th 1965 with Sir Douglas Quintet, Russ Sainty, The Keys. Producer- Chris Mercer.
I have been unable to trace the date the series ended, but it was very soon after this last listed show.
However, to mark the channel TWW's demise, Gogos, with host Tony Blackburn, was reopened for one special show on Saturday March 2nd 1968. With The Symbols, Paul & Barry Ryan, Tomorrow & Keith West, Solomon King, Samantha Lee, accompanied by Bob Miller and the Millermen. Plus an interview with Englebert Humperdinck. Producer- Peter Dulay. Director- John Scriminger.
TWW stopped broadcasting that Sunday, and Gogos sadly closed its doors for good. It would appear probable this final show is the only Gogos to survive, unless you know better...

Note: among the many other artists who appeared on the show were: Karl Denver, Billy Fury, and Jet Harris- these featured on a 1963 record of the programme.
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BBC Children's Serials
Click, where highlighted, for details:
1953:
Robin Hood
1956: Rex Milligan, Potts
1957: Sara Crewe, The Railway Children
1958: Captain Moonlight Man of Mystery
1959: The Golden Spur, Redgauntlet , Three Golden Nobles, The Young Lady From London,
1960: The Adventures of St Ives
1963: No Cloak- No Dagger

Most people would agree that 'Auntie' BBC lead the way in Children's serials in the 1950's and 1960's. At one stage Studio E at the BBC were making three children's serials each week. Despite a lot of effort, and a bit of money, ITV never quite managed to wrest the laurels from their rival.
For the BBC had a long experience of producing quality children's drama, admittedly mostly of the rather superior classical genre adapting not only Dickens but more ethereal classics by John Buchan, E Nesbitt and the like also.
However they did attempt some lower brow material, if I can call it that, though always to high production values (by the standards of those days).
If you have memories of any other serials, if you, like me, hid behind the sofa when the bagpipes skirled in Huntingtower, I would be pleased to hear from you, and acknowledge any contribution you make (not Dr Who, please).

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Captain Moonlight, Man of Mystery

A 1958 BBC children's serial, its dashing hero created by Terry Sheldon.
"When the British Government are worried... when MI5 is baffled... whom do they send for?" He was the childhood hero par excellence, I was enthralled.
The first series starred Jeremy White as Captain Moonlight.
In the 1960 six part serial, Bernard Horsfall played our hero, whose alter ego is actor Stephen Sycamore. For a hundred episodes he has played the gallant Captain, who, aided by his faithful assistants Lofty and Taffy, defeats the machinations of his arch enemies who plan to rule the world. In his immaculate evening dress, sword stick and mask, Moonlight travels the world in his private helicopter, though Stephen's real life transport is more prosaic- a bubble car (see picture). Heron Carvic was his inscrutable opponent. Young and pretty reporter Maggie Hart of the Daily News, who accompanies Stephen on his adventures, was played by Pamela Buck, with Denise Coffey playing one of Moonlight's devoted fans. John Brooking also appeared in this series.
The script was by EJ Bell and music composed by Lawrence Leonard. First episode was shown on Saturday March 12th 1960 at 5.25pm.
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The Golden Spur
A six part BBC serial set at the time of the Wars of The Roses. Part one was shown on Sunday July 5th 1959. It was written by Constance Cox and produced by Kevin Sheldon. Declared critic G Taylor, "this was one of the best children's serials ever seen on television."
The story of young Tom Fenton (Edward Vaughan-Scott) and how he helps King Edward IV (Michael Kilgariff) and Richard of Gloucester (Oliver Reed) win back the crown for England, defeating the villainous Duke of Clarence. Others in the cast included Jill Tracey as the heroine Gillian, John Brooking as Sir Edmund Fenton, Ronald Fraser as Simon Chandler, Wilfred Grantham, Haron Varvie, and Alan Judd.
Scenes from The Battle of Barnet were filmed on Hadley Common, the medieval roads on the army manoeuvring grounds near Aldershot provided sequences on the road, while Maxstoke Castle in Warwickshire was used for shots of a castle

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Three Golden Nobles
A seven part serial screened on Saturdays starting November 7th 1959 (BBC).
Script by David Goddard, who also produced the serial, based on the novel by Christine Price.
Set in the Middle Ages, the story of a serf called Stephen Bellinger (Cavan Kendall), who dreams of becoming a painter. But his lot in life means there is little chance. However an artist painting a mural in his local church inspires the lad to dare to run away to London. This is risky because the penalty for running away is death, and the cruel baliff (Colin Douglas) who runs the manor is after Stephen! With the aid of Marian, the lady of the manor (Victoria Watts), Stephen does reach London, where he is fortunate to be apprenticed to a master painter. But back in his village Marian and Stephen's dad (Nigel Arkwright) are involved in a rebellion by the serfs.
Elton Hayes appeared as a minstrel, and wrote music for the story. Among others appearing during the serial were Frazer Hines as Tom, Michael Crawford as Harry, and John Woodnutt as Master Hugh of St Albans.

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Redgauntlet
Script by EJ Bell. Settings by Fanny Taylor. Music composed by Lawrence Leonard. Producer: Kevin Sheldon.
A six part serial, with part one shown on Sunday October 11th 1959 at 5pm (BBC).

The cast included Tom Fleming in the title role, John Cairney as Alan Fairford and Donald Douglas as his friend Darsie Latimer. Others appearing included James Copeland as the Quaker Joshua Geddes, Claire Ibister as Lilias, Bryden Murdoch as Poor Peter Peebles, and Roddy McMillan as smuggling Captain Nanty Ewart.
The final part on November 16th 1959 also included in the cast Terry Baker (Cristal Nixon), Brown Derby (Prince Charles Edward), Michael Logan (Tom Crackenthorpe), John Grieve (General Campbell), Alan Judd (Sir Richard Glendale), John Brooking (Dr Grumbell), Wilfred Fletcher (Mr Pengwinion), and Edward Vaughan-Scott (Young Nobleman).

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The Adventures of St Ives (BBC)

Robert Louis Stevenson's novel had previously been adapted for children's tv in 1955 by Rex Tucker.

This new version was serialised in 1960, and shown on Sundays at 5.5pm commencing on June 12th 1960. William Russell again starred as St Ives, with other parts taken by Audrey Nicholson as La Belle Flora, and Denis Goacher as the evil Alain.

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Robin Hood

Before ever ITV introduced us to Richard Greene, in 1953 the BBC serialised the legend of Robin Hood in 6 parts, Max Kester writing the script, and Joy Harington producer.
The main cast were Patrick Troughton in the title role, Wensley Pithey as Friar Tuck, Kenneth Mackintosh as Little John, John Breslin as Alan-A-Dale, Philip Guard as Will Scarlett, and Dudley Jones as Much the miller's son.
It began on Tuesday March 17th 1953 with Episode 1: Gathering the Band.
Episode 2: The Abbot of St Mary's (March 24th 1953) also had in the cast Raymond Rollett as the Abbot of St Mary's, Guy Verney as Sir Richard at the Lee, Maurice Jones as Sir Guy of Gisborne, and Mark Daly as Prior. Also appearing were Miles Brown, Peter Doughty, Eric Evans, and David Askey.
Episode 3: Who is Robin? (March 31st 1953) also included David Kossoff, rather improbably cast as the Sheriff of Nottingham, with Christopher Hodge as Cook, Jimmy Vernor as Kitchen boy, Ronald Marriott, Anthony Marriott, and David Askey.
Episode 4: The Silver Arrow was shown on April 7th 1953,
Episode 5: A King Comes to Greenwood on April 14th with
the final episode called The Secret shown on April 21st 1953.

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Rex Milligan (April/ May 1956)
The scripts by author Anthony Buckeridge were produced by Pharic Maclaren.
The opening theme music by Bob Farnon was called Playtime.
The regular cast included Paul Streather as Rex Milligan, Anthony Bryant as Jigger Johnson, Anthony Valentine as JO Stagg, William Simons as Alfie Cutforth, The Tech Juniors: Wilfrid Downing as Spikey Andrews, Melvyn Hayes as Bubblegum Tucker, with Anthony Sharp as Mr Hunter, Headmaster of Sheldrake Grammar School (in #1, 5).

Programme 1: Introducing Rex Milligan.
Also in this cast: Anthony Marlowe as Mr Milligan and Margaret Ward as Mrs Milligan.
Programme 4: Rex Milligan Keeps The Flag Flying (May 6th 1956).
Also in this cast: Maud Long (Mrs Tucker), Lane Meddick (Builder), Douglas Chapman, Graham Larkin, Roger Page, Kenneth Tyllsen, Andrew Vale, and James Warren.
5: The Bogus Formula (May 13th 1956).
Also in this cast: Philip Ray (Dr Stallybone), Reginald Barratt (Mr Pavlowski), Joan Sanderson (Mrs Pinkney), Tom Bowan (Policeman), Jack Bond, Barry Knight, Larry Dann, Maurice Lane, David Higson, and Derek Hodgson.
6: Rex Milligan Raises the Roof (May 20th 1956).
Also appearing: Jefferson Clifford (Mr Birkinshaw), Philip Ray, Jack Bond, Derek Hodgson, Larry Dann, Barry Knight, David Higson, Maurice Lane, Colin Wall, and John Rhodes.

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Sara Crewe (BBC)

A 6 part serial starting on Tuesday April 30th 1957.
Adapted by Penelope Knox. Produced by Naomi Capon.
Frances Hodgson Burnett's story was originally adapted for tv in 1951, the tale of Sara who lives with her father in India until she is sent to Miss Minchin's Select Seminary for Young Ladies.
In the title role as The Little Princess was Carol Wolveridge, with Peggy Livesey as Miss Minchin and Rosamund Greenwood as Miss Amelia.
Other parts were taken by David Aylmer as Captain Crewe, Julie Desmond as Lavinia, Susan Lyall Grant as Ermengarde, Andre Maranne as M Dufarge, and Hamlyn Benson as Mr Barrow.

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The Young Lady From London (BBC)
Sundays commencing November 22nd 1959.

Anne Castaldini starred as the London girl Jane, who wins a trip to Paris, and there discovers she has a double, Anna Jortzeroth, a young pianist with a brilliant reputation. Anna is madly in love with Prince Laszlo (Sandor Eles), son of the exiled King of Soldania, Anna's father has taken over as dictator in Soldania. Others in the cast included Hugh David as Klipel and Steve Plytas as Otto, two disreputable journalists. Some location shooting was done in Paris with Anne Castaldini and Sandor Eles.

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The Railway Children (1957)

The BBC produced several successful adaptations of this memorable E Nesbit novel, this 1957 version was given the honour of appearing on the cover of Radio Times at the beginning of March 1957.
Jean Anderson reprised her role of Mother from the earlier 1951 BBC version, whilst Norman Shelley made a fine Old Gentleman. The children, seen here, were: Anneke Willys as Bobbie, Cavan Kendall as Peter and Sandra Michaels as Phyl. Clive Dunn appeared in 5 Saviours of the Train as the District Railway Supervisor. The music perfectly fitted the mood of the story, Grieg's Norwegian Dance No.2.
Producer was Dorothea Brooking, who wrote in Radio Times about some of the production difficulties: "filming in 1957 for the period of 1906 means finding a station and a bit of line that is not electrified. After quite a long search.... we have found a country station and a line that winds through a tunnel between high wooded hills." In the tradition of the time, she does not of course reveal that location. Edwin Laming Macadam kindly informs me that the line was the Horsham to Guildford line, and that the tunnel was probably Baynards Tunnel. Edwin is fairly certain that the station in this photo is thus Baynards.

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For my review of the 1968 BBC Railway Children serial

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No Cloak- No Dagger

A six part serial starting Sunday September 1st 1963,
script by Duncan Ross, produced by Christopher Barry.

Synopsis: Ian Lambert (William Franklyn) and Emma Cresswell (Lana Morris) help Pat Penmore (Caroline Blakiston) clear her father's name. Their quest takes them to Cornwall and those mysterious man-made caves, the fogous. At an old Cornish hotel, the Trevone Arms, they encounter Donald Fraser (Jack Stewart), a former friend of the imprisoned Prof Penmore (Keith Pyott). But more informative still is an old miner, now a handyman at the hotel, named Trev (Patrick Troughton): "that's the man who knew the professor better than anybody."
The serial also starred Cyril Luckham as Det Chief Supt Gage.

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Potts (1956-7)
My favourite ever BBC children's serial starred ex-Whirlygig stalwart Humphrey Lestocq as ex-Flight Lieutenant Peter Potts. He enjoyed four serial adventures in a total of 19 episodes: Potts in Parovia (1956), Potts Gangbuster (1956), Potts and the Phantom Piper (1957), and Potts and The Night Whistlers (1957).
Sadly none of the episodes survive in the BBC archive.

Potts in Parovia
Script by Ingram D'Abbes. Producer: Desmond O'Donovan.
Regular cast in each episode: Humprehrey Lestocq as Peter Potts, George Tovey as Mike, Walter Gotell as General Schmidt, Raymond Rollett as Don Miguel Perrera y Quiva, Barrie Martin as Tony Quiva, Trefor Jones as Pedro, and Lynette Mills as Laura Mendavo,.
1 Send for Potts! (Oct 6th 1956) Also in the cast: Andreas Malandrinos as Don Julio Alonzo Mendavo, Niki Iveria as Donna Isabella, John H Watson as Claude Eaton-Smythe,Jay Denyer as Marsh, Douglas Storm as Henry, Ross Pendeleton as Tino, Kenneth Thornett as Pat, Patricia Lehan, and Ian Wilson.
2 The Warning Note (Oct 13th 1956) Also in the cast: Andreas Malandrinos, Raymond Rollett, John H Watson, Douglas Storm, Ross Pendeleton, Kenneth Thornett, and Max Faulkner
3 Out of Action (Oct 20th 1956) Also with: Arthur Goullet as Don Julio Alonso Mendavo, and Harry Lane as Captain Marius.
4 Enter the Condors (Oct 27th 1956) Also with: John H Watson, Arthur Bentley as Pilot, Innes Hirson as Carlos, Arthur Goullet, Niki Iveria, Harry Lane, and Edmund Warwick as Jose.
5 The Leaflet Raid (Nov 3rd 1956) Also with: Edmund Warwick as Jose, Arthur Goullet, John H Watson,and Innes Hirson.
6 Potts to the Rescue (Nov 10th 1956) Also with: John H Watson, Arthur Goullet, Niki Iveria, Harry Lane, and Edmund Warwick.

Potts Gangbuster: written by Ingram D'Abbes. Producer: Desmond O'Donovan.
1 Double Identity (Dec 8th 1956)
2 Miss Travers' Secret (Dec 15th 1956)
3 Face to Face (Dec 22nd 1956)

Potts and the Phantom Piper: written by Lane Meddick. Producer: Desmond O'Donovan. As a young lad, I recall being thoroughly absorbed by this gripping adventure.
1 The Castle on the Crag (Feb 2nd 1957)
2 The Secret Formula (Feb 9th 1957)
3 Under Suspicion (Feb 16th 1957)
4 The Secret Agent (Feb 23rd 1957)
5 Potts Sets a Trap (Mar 2nd 1957)
6 The Stranger in the Dungeon (March 9th 1957) The cast comprised George Tovey as Mike Moroney, John Rae as Angus McDrew, Hilary Mason as Mrs Flint, Mac Picton as James McWhissle, Oliver Burt as Prof Spenser, Maureen Beck as Terry Spenser, Maurice Durant as Herr Spitzbauer, John Saunders as Lloyd, Neil Hallett as Mulaney, Peter Vaughan as Stannard and John Dunbar as PC Buchanan.

Potts and The Night Whistlers:
1 Diamonds in the Rough (May 4th 1957). The cast included Alastair Hunter as Inspector Power, John H Watson as Sgt Rogers, Yah Ming as Ho Lim, Ellen Pollock as Captain Tempest, Geoffrey Denton as Fairweather, Michael Corcoran as Sprig, Frederick Schiller as Van Mallen, Richard Shaw as Helder, Ronald Wilson as Dick Hamilton, Patrick Connor as Brennan, Roger Winton as Capricorn Jones, and George Tovey as Mike Maroney.
2 The Mystery of Black Lodge Creek (May 11th). The cast: Yah Ming, Ellen Pollock, Pauline Olsen as Anne Fisher, Geoffrey Denton, Michael Corcoran, Frederick Schiller, Guy Deghy as a Dutch Skipper, John Law as Evans, Alastair Hunter, John Watson, Roger Winton and Richard Shaw.
3 Captain Tempest (May 18th)
4 The Riddle Unravelled (May 25th)

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ITV Children's Serials and Plays
Below are all serials covered in a fair amount of detail.

Colour code in the chart below only: A-R ATV ABC Granada SOUTHERN

WRITE IT YOURSELF DEAD GIVEAWAY TARGET LUNA THE SECRET OF THE NUBIAN TOMB EMERALD SOUP SEND FOSTER
CALLING ALL BOYS SACRED SEEDS OF TANGLA TUCK FRANCIS STORM INVESTIGATES THE SKEWBALD BADGER'S BEND THE MASTER
OVER TO WILLIAM SECRET OF CARRICK HOUSE MILL OF SECRETS SUGGESTION OF SABOTAGE THE BARNSTORMERS DANGER ISLAND
PERIL IN THE AIR THE DIAMOND BIRD THE ROVING REASONS THE HANDY GANG MIKE MYSTERY HALL
SCHOOL OF SECRETS THE LITTLE SHIP ROMANO THE PEASANT THE CHEQUERED FLAG SIERRA NINE FLOWER OF GLOSTER
DAVID FLAME FORMULA FOR DANGER THE OLD PULL N PUSH SMUGGLERS' COVE THE NEW FOREST RUSTLERS DEVIL-IN-THE-FOG

See also for my own reviews of some serials that have survived:
COUNTER ATTACK (ABC 1960), CITY BENEATH THE SEA (ABC 1962), SECRET BENEATH THE SEA (ABC 1963), OBJECT Z , ORLANDO , SEXTON BLAKE, FREEWHEELERS (Southern 1968)


Brief details of numerous A-R children's plays for which I have only got scant details.

A little about four ATV children's serials.

Westward TV Drama


In this section are serials shown at weekends, as well as many in the Tuesday children's serial slot. In the 1950's a lot of the Associated Rediffusion plays were not fully networked.
If you can add your own reminiscences, I would be very pleased to hear from you, especially if you appeared in any of the series, or worked behind the scenes.

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Other ATV Children's Serials
Dangerous Holiday (ATV)
Saturdays 5pm commencing November 10th 1956
Script David Carr. Director: Antony Keary. With the boys, Warren Hearnden as Mitch, James Doran as Tracker, and Vernon Morris as Andy. Also Richard Burrell as Baxter, AJ Brown as Mr Hinks, Peter Bathurst as Colonel Gregory, and Sidney Vivian as Wilson.

No Man's Island (ATV)
in seven parts, shown October to December 1960 on Sunday afternoons.
Script: Alan Reeve-Jones
Producer: Cecil Petty.
Stars: Vincent Ball as Denis Barker, AJ Brown as Captain Cork, Rosemary Miller as Miss Ellis, Dan Meaden as Mr Dyson, and Douglas Livingstone as Leo.
Also appearing Frazer Hines as Tim.

Strange Concealments (ATV)
Subtitled: An Adventure in 7 clues.
Script: Barbara Clegg. Producer: Cecil Petty.
Starring: Barbara Clegg as Kate George, Frederick Jaegar as David Stimpson, Victor Platt as John Harmer, Henry Soskin as Ambrose Lemmon, Clare Asher as Victoria Lemmon, Robin Walker as Boyd George.
1 The Clue in the Lockets - Saturday September 29th 1962 5.15pm, 2 A Precious Jewel- October 6th 1962, 3 Tongues in Trees, - October 13th 1962, 4 October 20th 1962, 5 Sermons in Stones - October 27th 1962, 6 The Uses of Adversity- November 3rd 1962, 7 November 10th 1962

Once Aboard the Lugger- A Modern Tale of Smuggling (ATV)
Episode 1: Saturday January 5th 1963, 5.15pm
Script by Barbara Clegg and Henry Soskin. Producer: Cecil Petty.
Starring Vincent Ball as Dennis Barker, AJ Brown as Captain Cork, Jane Griffiths as Tinou and John Hurt as Jobey Todd.
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Children's drama began with no little enthusiasm, Associated Rediffusion producing several one-off children's plays in their formative weeks, made on film in the months leading up to their opening day, since TV Times was unusually able to include pictures from some of them.
During the first week this one-off drama was shown in the 5.30pm slot:
Hand in Glove
Monday September 26th 1955, written by Mary Cathcart Borer.
The tale of some village schoolchildren who become involved with a gang of crooks on the run. But the children eventually help police round up the criminals.
Cast: Janet Harrison as Jean, Diana Beavers as Ann, Fella Edmonds as Peter, Ross Goodall as John, Huw Evans as Lance, with Sylvia Marriott as Mrs Harris, Olga Dickie as Miss Talbot, Lloyd Pearson as PC Summers, Arthur Lovegrove as Bert, Len Sharp as Joe, Betty Wolfe as Mrs Anderson, Margaret Sawyers as Margaret, Pamela Lagg as Janet and Doreen Season as Miss Bennett.
The Night River (Tues Sept 27th 1955, rpt Apr 2nd 1957)
Script: Bill Wellings. Director: Cyril Coke. Starring Bruce Beeby as Uncle Jim, and Rachel Gurney as Betty Crane. The picture shows Ewen Solon as Skipper Rose (left), with David Tilley as Peter Crane, and Rosemary Berridge as Sheila Crane.
Set in a remote part of Australia, two English children make friends with an old prawn fisher. They help him overcome a gang of rival fishers to re-establish his claims.
High Flying Head (Tues Oct 18th 1955, rpt Mar 14th 1962)
Script: William Harris. Director: Tania Lieven.
With Joan Young, Freda Bamford and Walter Horsbrugh.
Two ordinary schoolgirls, Philippa (Marcia Ashton) and Desiree (Helen de Crespo), stumble across an old book of magic recipes and decide to test one or two, with extraordinary results.
Passage of Arms
(Mon Oct 3rd 1955, 5.30-6pm, A-R)- This story by Gwendoline Courtney was set in the time of the wars against Napoleon. The cast in order of appearance:
Robert Alalouf as Sous-lieutenant Andre Saurinb, Kerry Gardner as Louis de Chamborde, Pat Garwood as Jane Worthing, Anneke Willys as Henriette de Chamborde, Gerald Andersen as Sir Thomas Worthing, Richard Warner as Sir Humphrey Travers, Renee Bourne Webb as Lady Worthing, Arthur Lowe as Servant, and Frederick Hall as Soldier
Flying Visit (1955, rpt Wed Feb 28th 1962)
Script: Sheila Hodgson. Director: Cyril Coke.
A mysterious and naughty little girl lands on the seashore from a flying saucer, where she is found by two children. They smuggle her home, but she escapes, back to her flying saucer.
The Seventh Dungeon (Dec 30th 1955, repeated Mar 28th 1962, 5.25pm)
starring Alfred Burke, script: John Redman Walshaw, directed by Cliff Owen.
The mysterious prisoner in the seventh dungeon does not want to be set free, so what is Lord Falsgrave (Guy Verney) to do when Warwick the King Maker demands his release?

The first ever A-R serial was in the Friday slot at 5.45pm, aimed at the five to nine age group. It was the fifteen minute
The Little Round House, adapted for tv by Peter Ling.
Episode 1 was on 30th September 1955.
It was about Robin (Michael Bryant) who gets a big surprise when he is posting his letter, for the pillar box turns into a little house. Mr Papingay (Toke Townley) lives in this strange home, and he invites Robin to meet the strange people there.
June Kirkham played Penny, others in the cast included Jocelyn Britton as The Home-made Fairy, Jack Howard as the Farmer, Catherine George as the Little Girl, Robert Bardwell as the Fat Boy, Vi Stevens was Mrs Tupp with Charles Rea as the Narrator.
Episode 7 on Nov 11th 1955 had this cast: Charles Rea, Michael Bryant, June Kirkham, Toke Townley, Michael Hitchman as The Lodger, Patience Collier as Aunt Boffin, Robert Bardwell, George Howell as Cuthbert and Vi Stevens.
A sequel to THE LITTLE ROUND HOUSE was
Mr Papinjay's Ship
This seven part sequel started on 7th February 1956
Robin is looking wistfully at the pillar box remembering his enjoyable adventures, and it is only when he goes to the seaside that he meets all his friends again. The narrator and main parts were the same though John Douglas now played Fat Boy. Beatrice Varley appeared as The Baker's Grandmother and Patience Collier continued as Aunt Boffin.
The Feb 21st episode (A Barrel of Herrings) included Charles Rea, Wolfe Morris (Buttery Dick), Michael Briant, Toke Townley, June Kirkham, Patience Collier, Bunny May (Cuthbert), Beatrice Varley, Ronald Radd (Rudolph), and Norman Mitchell (The Baron). Robin meets a band of pirates.

Steve Hunter, Trouble Merchant (1955/6)
Shown Mondays at 5.30pm. Script by Gerald Kelsey and Stefan Ricardo.
Produced and Directed by Hugh Rennie
Alan Edwards starred in the title role. Other regulars were Harry Towb as Wally Smith and Carl Duering as Carlo.
There were several adventures, the first shown from October to December 1955.
A second serial began in January 1956, entitled The Mystery of the Marshes.
In this, the formula of a secret fuel and a special fuel adaptor have been stolen from Dr Badel the inventor. The Admiralty commissions Steve and the crew of Sea Wolf to recover the formula.

The second serial in A-R's Friday 5.45pm slot was
The Snow Queen, written by Suria Magito and Rudolph Weil, based on the well known fairy tale.
The Storyteller was Tony Sympson, with Sheila Ward as Klara and A-R announcer Redvers Kyle as Karl.
Maureen Davies played Princess Christina, Bruce Sharman appeared as Prince Klaus and Hugh Manning was The King.
Episode 1 November 18th 1955 Others in this cast included Dorothy Marks (Gerda), and Carl Bernard (The Chancellor).

A serial for older children screened in seven parts from October to December 1955 on Tuesdays at 5.30pm was Barbie
written by Diana Noel from the book by Kitty Barne. The great veteran star Zena Dare played Miss Fothergill, with Marcia Manolescue in the title role.
The story was about the daughter of a famous conductor who has to go on a world tour, so sends Barbie to stay in the country with her uncle (David Markham) and her two cousins Simon (Jonathan Swift) and Laurel (Erika Markham). A wealthy neighbour and music lover, Miss Fothergill, befriends the child and pays for Barbie's violin lessons with Vascoletti a famous teacher.

The Ambermere Treasure by Malcolm Saville, adapted in six parts by Derek Hoddinott. Director: David Eady. December 1955- January 1956.
Afternoon Post (February 10th 1956, 5.40-6pm, A-R)
Script: Frederick H Wiseman.
Cast: Robert Sansom (Rev Stuart Austin), Gwynne Whitby (Mrs Austin), Cavan Malone (Noel), Wendy Adams (Joanna), Michael Caridia (Colin) and Lane Meddick (Policeman).
Noel is the eldest of the Austin family, and he makes a film of the family preparations for his sister Joanna's birthday. However the postman has strong views on amateur film makers, but when a local crime comes to light, the secret of The Afternoon Post is revealed

Running Jimmy (March/April 1956)
Shown Tuesdays, 5.40-5.55pm only in the London area.
Cast included: John Hall as Jimmy, Judy Raymond as Laura, with Percy Herbert, Harold Kasket, and Betty Romaine. Script: CE Webber. Director: Julia Bull.
In this serial, Jimmy is pursued by two villains who have stolen a stamp album.

Top Secret shown in July/ August 1956 was a six part serial by Peter Hayes.
The children were Malcolm (Christopher Sandford) and Dicky (Tony Ford) with Nicholas Selby as Inspector Maclean. Liz Fraser had a small part as Linda Hanssen.
Note- not to be confused with A-R's 1961/2 series with William Franklyn

Passport to Danger was a seven part serial beginning on Friday 28th September 1956 and shown fortnightly.
It was written by Peter Ling and Jonathan Alwyn, who also directed the stories.
Michael Pelham (Paul Streather) is travelling on the Orient Express to join his parents in Belgrade. An adventure for any boy to dream of. But no sooner has he left Paris, than there follows a mysterious train of events. A spy ring! He meets a Romanian travel courier who tells Michael he's working for British Intelligence, and interrogates a suspect in Michael's compartment. But when Michael returns he finds the suspect dead, and the courier nowhere to be seen.

The File on Voronov was a half hour play shown on Christmas Day 1956.
Peter Ling wrote it with his wife Sheilah Ward, and David Eady was the director.
Synopsis: Russian military attache Maxim Voronov (George Murcell) leaves his embassy to attend a hush-hush international conference. What begins as a practical joke by three small boys, Joe (Glyn Dearman), Charlie (Anthony Green) and Steven (Ian Hobbs) has Scotland Yard, MI5 and the security forces involved...
Jim Whittington and His Sealion (see picture, right)
(December 26th 1956 5.00-5.55pm, Associated Rediffusion)
Described as a "super colossal extravaganza" written "by mistake" by Peter Ling with music "by accident" by Eric Spear. The programme was "misdirected" by Roger Jenkins.
"Miscast" in order of appearance were:
Dorothy Smith as The Fairy Queen, Rolf Harris as The Demon King, Muriel Young as Alice Fitzwarren, Jack Edwardes as Michaela the Cook, Charlie Drake as Idle Montmorency, Jimmy Hanley as Jim Whittington, Peter Ling as The Sea Captain and Eric Spear as The Sultan of Morocco
Into the Net (A-R, May-June 1958)
A serial in 6 parts shown on Tuesdays at 5.25pm.
Script: Tony Peters. Director: John Rhodes.
The main cast, pictured, were
Susan Farmer as Liz Gray and
Ian Keill as Gerry Somers.
Leonard Rossiter played Dennis in at least some of the episodes.

The Red Dragon (September 14th 1958)
This was the starting date for this A-R serial which was not fully networked.
It was written and directed by John Rhodes.
Some of the cast were Ann Castaldini as Ann Rogers, Scot Finch as Michael Rogers, Louise Howard as Del Hager and John Bloomfield as Tod Hager. With Janet Joye as Mrs Williams and Edward Rees as Mr Williams.

The Silver Coin (A-R, Tues Nov 4th 1958)
Script: Mary Plumbly. Director: Penny Wootton.
Cast: Paul Taylor as Nickie Smith, Francesca Annis as Ann-Marie Clare, Sylvia Vaughan as Jenny Wilson, Fred McNaughton as PC Bob Harris, Barbara Ogilvie as Med Cooper, and Malcolm Knight as Sparks Pearson.
Synopsis: When someone tries to steal a valuable picture from Mrs Cooper, young Nickie Smith is suspected. But Nickie has more friends than he realises, and they help find the real culprit.
Note this seems to be Francesca Annis' television debut, aged 13, unless you can tell me otherwise
The House of Carols (December 23rd 1958, 5.25-5.55pm)
A Christmas fantasy devised by Margot Grainer, with music by Ron Grainer. Script by Diana Noel. Director: Penny Wootton.
With Keith Pyott as the Old Man, Janet Miller as Sue, Kevin Kelly as Bob, and Ron Grainer as Ron. Soloists: Michael Garson and Ricky Vaughan. Choristers: Frank Olegario, Howard Short and Christopher Keyte.
Two young carol singers are invited into a house and are shown with the aid of a globe, other parts of the world where carols are sung. Places visited included Vienna, Naples, Venezuela, the American prairies, the Australian bush, Mexico and Russia.

The Money Mountain (from Tues Mar 3rd 1959, 5.25pm, A-R)
Set in Austria, where two English children are on holiday in the Alps. They discover the innkeeper is forging Swiss money and smuggling it into Switzerland with the aid of an accomplice who is the chief operator of a cable lift. (A set of a cable car was built in the studio.)
Directors: Grahame Turner/John Rhodes. Script: Hugh Pitt, who said, "A-R want to put on plays set in other countries to give children an idea of local customs, costumes and languages."
Cast: Valerie Smith as Anne Thomas, Michael Briant as Simon Thomas, Mary Barclay as Mrs James, Frederick Schiller as Otto Hoffmann, John G Heller as Franz Amstetten, Sydonie Platt as Gretchen.

The serial McFarlane's Way was set in Scotland and began on April 28th 1959. The stars were Peter Furnell and Gay Gordon who were later to appear in different roles in The Diamond Bird. Peter Furnell starred as Andrew McFarlane, Gay Gordon as Flora Donald. Others who were in at least one episode included Alex Scott, Mavis Walker, Dorothy Smith, Barry Ingham, Douglas Muir, Barrie Ingham and Ralph Nossek. The story was written by Elisabeth Beresford and directed by Marion Radclyffe.
The Sword and the Lute (A-R serial commencing July 1959)
Script Joy Thwaites. Director: John Rhodes.
Episode 1 (July 7th 1959, 5.45pm) Cast: Richard Greenford (Simon), William Young (Sir Richard Brockhurst), Margaret McCourt (Lady Philippa), Neville Jason (Sir John Matrevis), Anthony Sheppard (Lord Cudham), Hestor Paton-Brown (Aunt Isabel), John Wentworth (King Henry IV), Richard Carpenter (Prince Henry), Kenneth Adams (Wilkin) and Hugh Cross (Captain of the Guard).
The Highwayman
was a one-off musical adventure set in the 18th century. It was shown on August 25th 1959 from 5.45pm to 6.15pm.
This was a bold attempt at a musical play for children written by Elisabeth Paine with lyrics by David Dearlove and music by Ron Grainer. Marion Radclyffe directed.
Denis Martin starred in the title role with Miriam Karlin as Lady Sedgewick.
Also in the cast were Pat Laurence as Sarah Grey, Nevil Whiting as Lord Sedgewick, Brian Alexis (who also arranged the choreography) as Peter Potts and Doris Littel as Martha.
The Missing Mercury
written by Anthony Sheppard, directed by Marion Radclyffe.
Tues Oct 20th 1959 5.25pm.
A one-off story about two children and a mysterious stranger who join in the search for an aircraft which vanishes on a trial flight over the Bristol Channel.
Cast: Ruth Kettlewell as Mrs Green, Peter Collingwood as Mr Jones, Michael Logan as Bill Cotton, June Ellis as June Cotton, Gay Gordon as Penny, Sam Jephcott as Jim, Ross Hutchinson as Mr Thorpe, Anthony Parker as Flt Lt James, Edmond Bennett as Police sgt, Bill Cartwright as RAF sgt, and Paul Streather as Aircraftman.
The Cornet Player
Tuesday 22nd December 1959, 5.25-5.55pm
Written by SL Hastings, directed by Rollo Gamble.
A boy named Graham (Michael Caridia) finds himself in difficulties but there's an unexpected way out.
Others in the cast of this one-off story:
Edward Dewsbury... Mr Knight
Barbara Ogilvie... Mrs Knight
Sylvia Davies... Susie
Anthony Valentine... The Cornet Player

Fact and Fiction
Ex-teacher Redvers Kyle introduced a magazine about new books for children, each week the programme included an excerpt from a 'Star Book of the Week.'
Drum and Trumpet Sound (November 11th 1960)
Book by Sutherland Ross, adapted by Joy Thwaytes. Directed by Jim Pople.
Cast: Colin Spaull as Simon Aycliffe, Edward Higgins as Peter Thake, Sharon Sharp as Barbara Tempest, Roy Spencer as Sir Richard Clifton, Hal Dyer as Elizabeth Clifton and Neville Jason as Nigel Ashford.
The Birds of Thimblepins (December 2nd 1960). Book by Margaret J Baker, adapted and introduced by Eric Leyland. Directed by Sheila Gregg. Cast: Peter Sanders as David, Wendy Turner as Elisabeth, John Stirling as Jason, Jacqueline Brodin as Jemima, and Michael Lewis as Jonathan.
Seraphina (December 9th 1960).
Book by Mary K Harris. Adapted by Joy Thwaytes. Directed by Tig Roe.
Cast: Sandra Michaels as Seraphina, Valerie Fletcher as Stephanie, Sally Murrell as Jenny, Lynda Evry as Lydia, and Lee Rowe as Miss Jason.
Thunder of Valmy (December 16th 1960)
Book by Geoffrey Trease. Adapted and introduced by Eric Leyland. Director: Sheila Gregg.
Cast: Michael Crawford as Pierre Mercier, Anna Castaldini as Pauline, Nicholas Selby as Marquis de Morsac, and Edwin Brown as Jacques.
In the Window Seat (December 23rd 1960).
Edited by Gillian Avery. Adapted by Joy Thwaytes. Directed by Tig Roe.
Cast: David Lott as Auguste, Eithne Milne as Porcelain figure, Paul Whitsun-Jones as Dealer, Raymond Mason as Father, Edward Malin as Old Man, and Sandra Michaels as Dorothea.

The Blackness
This six part serial that started on January 17th 1961.
Script by Howard Williams and Barry Pevan.
Director: Jim Pople.
With Rosalie Westwater as Anne Owens, Diarmid Cammell as Donald Owens and Shandra Walden as Mary Owens (the latter two pictured). With Ralph Nossek as Mr McGhee.

A Brother For Joe
Script: Eric Allen. Director: Vladek Sheybal.
The search by 15 year old Joe May (William Victor) for his missing brother Francesco takes a dramatic turn when he joins an international school in Rome.
With Colin Spaull as Roddy, Penny Watts as Susanne Monnier, Joanna Craig as Miss Wisdom, John Gardiner as Lawrence Shapiro, Anthony Morton as Bruno Pugi and Edina Rona as Gina.
Six episodes on Tuesdays at 5.25pm running from episode 1 The Knife (14th March 1961) to episode 6 The Morning After (18th April 1961)

Frontier Drums (1961)
Script: Peter Hayes. Director: Jim Pople, Fridays 5pm-5.25pm.
Set in the north west frontier of India in 1879. Kardar Khan the Maharajah of Ghurkistan (Derek Sydney) is plotting against the British Raj. Starring Bernard Brown as Major Neville Chrichton and Edmond Bennett as Sgt Ramdass.
Others in the cast were Ronnie Raymond as Nigel Chrichton, Daphne Johnson as Lucy Chrichton, Kika Markham as Helena Chrichton, Peter Bathurst as Major-Gen Anderson, Roy Purcell as Col Courtenay, Norman Claridge as Henry Marchbanks, William Lyon Brown as Sultan Ahmed, Joseph Cuby as Abu, David Spenser as Azim Khan, Bill Burridge as Akbar and Ivan Craig as Sayid Lal.
The serial began with episode 1, Soldier of the Queen, on September 22nd 1961
Episode 5: The Night of the Flame (Oct 20th) showed the success of Kardar Khan's plot in luring the army out of The Garrison.

Due to the Equity strike, production of A-R children's serials ceased before the end of 1961. During 1962 A-R concentrated on quality schools drama, and their next dramatic production for children's tv was not screened until near the end of 1962.

It was the mini series
Mr Toby's Christmas (A-R, Friday December 14th, 21st and 28th 1962 at 5pm)
starring Andrew Sachs as Mr Toby, a toymaker, with Carol Dilworth as Sarah, Gareth Robinson as Jeremy. The children visit the toymaker who shows them things they can do for themselves instead of getting their parents to do everything for them. The stories included carols sung by the Orpington Junior Singers, and dances by Ronnie Curran and Greta Hanby. Also in the cast were Raymond Mason as Sam Bundy, Sid Daniels as Simon, Will Stampe as Oliver Gilding, Derek Roye as Tom and Johnny Lamonte as a Juggler. The three 25 minute stories were directed by Marc Miller.
In the first programme, Sarah visits the village baker where she learns how to make mince pies. The second programme showed how to make a non-intoxicant punch to drink, and the children visit the shop of a picture framer who shows them old paintings of the Christmas story. In the final story, the children watch a puppet show titled The Three Wishes performed by John Wright's Marionettes. It ends with Mr Toby unveiling his elephant a present for the village children.

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Dead Giveaway (A-R)
was another Peter Ling serial, from an idea by Jonathan Alwyn, a comedy thriller. Daphne Shadwell directed the six stories.
The star was a young Donald Hewlett who played Larry Haines host of the popular tv quiz Good Fortune.
Other regular members of the cast were Christine Pollon as blonde tv hostess Jane Kimball, Michael Walker as Alexander Kimball, Jane's 15 year old bumptious brother, and Robert Cartland as Det Insp Forbes of Scotland Yard.
The setting is a tv quiz show, and viewers were promised a look behind the scenes at A-R's Wembley studios. Usually it's the contestants who get the surprises, but in this particular programme things go fatally wrong. For one contestant, Maffin, is murdered in the soundproof box before he could answer the £1,000 question. The jackpot question now is- who murdered him? Larry is the prime suspect, but to clear himself, Larry breaks into Maffin's house looking for clues, but is knocked unconscious. When he comes round, there is Inspector Forbes to ask him what he's up to! Larry suspects the dead man's housekeeper, the sinister Mrs Bowling, but then she is done in. Maffan turns out to be Mafalda, and Alexander finds a picture of the tv producer Paul Anderson talking to this man, but then in walks Anderson catching him looking at the photo.

Part 1: The Rules of the Game (Wednesday 7th August 1957, 5pm-5.30pm). - with Otto Diamant as Arthur Maffin, Jeffrey Segal as stage manager Billy Archer and Philip Ashley as the producer, Paul Anderson.
Part 2: The First of the Questions (14th August)- With Ruth Kettlewell as Mrs Bowling.
Part 3: The Middle of the Night (21st August) with Jeffrey Segal and Ruth Kettlewell.
Part 4 (28th August)
Part 5: The Facts of the Matter (4th September) with Jeffrey Segal, Philip Ashley, and Patrick Connor as Police sgt.
Final Part: The End of the Trail (11th September) with Jeffrey Segal and Philip Ashley. Even the cast, apparently, did not know the identity of the murderer until this final story. Peter Ling explained, "the artist who plays the murderer won't be inclined to be too sinister during the plot or to exaggerate a casual air of innocence."

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The Secret of Carrick House (A-R)
Tuesdays during September/October 1959.

Written by John Rhodes, directed by Marion Radclyffe.
The star was Barry MacGregor as Ken Brodie,
and also appearing were Judy Bloom as Pilar Cortella, Lilian Grassom as Peggy Myers, David Waller as Richard Adams, Roderick Lovell as Uncle Manuel, Hugh Evans as Simon Greeb, Gordon Whiting as Carlos, and Brenda Saunders as a waitress (stories 1-4), and with Michael Browning as a policeman (stories 4-6).
Ken takes up his first job as a reporter on the South Cornish Echo. Always on the lookout for a scrap, he is soon in hot water...

Episode 1: Hot Water- 1st September 1959, 5.45-6.15pm, Also with Nicholas Light as Brian Field.
Episode 2: The Intruder- 8th September 1959
3: The Hostage- 15th September 1959 (now at 5.25-5.55pm).
4: The Boss- 22nd September 1959
5: Marooned- 29th September 1959
6: The Scoop- 6th October 1959 (final episode).

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The Flower of Gloster (Granada, 1967)
Originally planned in 10 parts but shown in 13.
Network dvd had announced the reissue of the series, but to great disappointment, the project was called off. It transpires that maybe only two episodes actually survive. However all the episodes are listed as in existence in the ITV archive!

In the title role is a 72ft canal barge, that starts its journey in Wales, making its way by 220 miles of canal to the Pool of London. It is supposed to be delivered there by a boatyard owner, who falls ill, so his children Michael aged 10 and Elizabeth aged 12 with the help of old friends Richard and Annette, deliver it for him. Deadline date is July 14th.
The children were: Richard O'Callaghan (Richard), Annette Robertson (Annette), Elizabeth Doherty (Elizabeth) and Michael Doherty (Michael).
Script: Chris McMaster. Director: Mike Beckham. Producer: Bill Grundy

Story details:
1 The Accident (Wednesday September 27th 1967 5.25pm)
Jim Doherty and his eldest son Dick are to sail a converted narrowboat from his boatyard in North Wales when Jim falls ill.
2 The Cut- October 4th 1967
3 The Boy- October 11th 1967
4 The Girl- October 18th 1967
5 Betton Woods (October 25th 1967)
The evening of the third day, and to make up for lost time, Dick decides to sail until dark. All goes well until the boat breaks down at Bretton Woods near Market Drayton. The wood is notorious for "its shrieking ghost, where no regular boatman will tie up for the night."
6 The Dog (November 1st 1967)
Somehow the kids have got to earn some money. The opportunity comes at Market Drayton. It also brings one more passenger. There's only just over a week left to deadline day.
7 Lost (November 8th 1967)
Mike had gone off after Baskerville the dog. The Flower followed Anne's navigation and ended up being bombarded by a gang of Birmingham boys. But the boat was supposed to be in the Gas Street basin, in the centre of Brum. It wasn't- they were lost!
8 The City (November 15th 1967)
In which The Flower sees in Birmingham a boat rally, a band, and the Bull Ring.
9 Life and Death (November 22nd 1967)
On the seventh day of their trip, the crew are made aware that canals are dying, as they come face to face with a matter of life and death.
10 The Tunnel (November 29th 1967)
It's hard work for Dick and Ann in the Blisworth Tunnel, but afterwards compensation at the fascinating museum at Stoke Bruerne.
11 The Deadline- December 6th 1967
12 The Hitch (December 13th 1967)
Some night work, some dirty work, some repair work. The Evans gang make a fleeting but not very friendly reappearance.
13 Late (December 20th 1967)
The Flower of Gloster finally reaches the Pool of London- late.
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The New Forest Rustlers (Southern TV, in 6 parts)
Script: Stephen Mogridge, consultant: John Gray
Director: John Brayburn (also producer), Ian Curteis for later stories.
The main cast: Ronan O'Casey starred as Chief, and
Anita Harris as Maureen, an ice-skater (story 1 and 6)
Reginald Marsh as Inspector Foster (stories 2 to 6)
Plus the children, two brothers and two sisters:
Daphne Foreman as Patricia Deverill
Paul Guess as Bill Deverill
Gina Clow as Fiona Guise
Michael Sarson as Freddy Guise.
The children who live near Lymington, are on their school holidays, when they become involved with a gang of international crooks who are planning the theft of a valuable painting.

1 The House in the Trees
Thursday September 29th 1966 5.25pm
Odd happenings in a disused airfield- is it smuggling or rustling?
Rest of cast:
Stephen Moore... Jack
Malcolm Taylor... Joe
Neville Barber... Pierre
Tom de Ville... Ginger

3 Enter the Law
Thursday October 13th 1966
The gang in Ridgeway House is definitely smuggling, so the children contact the police.
also with Patrick Westwood... Mr Guise
and Malcolm Taylor, Neville Barber, Tom de Ville

5 Operation Stampede
Thursday October 27th 1966
The children rescue Star the foal, but look like losing him again.
also with Malcolm Taylor, Neville Barber, Tom de Ville, Patrick Westwood

6 The Round Up
Thursday November 3rd 1966
Dt Insp Foster gets his men, but will Patricia get her foal?
also with Kenneth Thornett... Insp Maskell
Monica Stewart... Mrs Guise
and Malcolm Taylor, Neville Barber, Tom de Ville, Patrick Westwood.
Also appearing: John Holmes, David Watson, Marcel Boyd, Alan Stuart, Elvin Hood.
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The Sacred Seeds of Tangla Tuk (a serial in 6 parts starting Thursday September 19th 1957 5-5.30pm, ATV)
Script: Howard Jones. Director: first Jack Barton, later Michael Redington.
Cast: Reginald Hearne (David Halliday, Uncle David, a well-known explorer and botanist), Jonathan Bailey (Jack Ellis), Margaret Sawyer (Peggy Ellis), Everley Gregg (Mrs Gibbings) - later Bertha Russell played Mrs Gibbings., Jerry Verno (Professor Sigmund), Michael Golden (Dan Quirk), Jan Muzurus (Tsao Lak). Also from episode 2 Freddie Vale (Nick Patch), and Bernard Spear (Joe Martini).
Peggy and Jack's Uncle David is a botanist and explorer, and he brings from Tibet the seeds of an unknown giant black poppy. These valuable seeds disappear mysteriously, so Jack and Peggy try to find clues to lead to their recovery.

Some episode details:
1 The Gentleman from Tibet (Sep 19th).
2 A Date with Danger (Sep 26th). The sacred poppy seeds have mysteriously disappeared. Peggy and Jack, who are staying with their Uncle David, are already half way to finding strange and valuable clues.
4 In The Spider's Web (Oct 10th). By now Jack has recovered four of the seeds, and three more turn up in the shop of a shady character called Joe Martini. Jack had worked here as a delivery boy, but Tsao Lak kidnaps him, as he regards the seeds as sacred.
6 The Journey is Ended (Oct 24th). Jack and Peggy have traced the ten sacred seeds, now in the possession of the mysterious Tsao Lak. The children compete with two crooks Dan Quirk and Nick Patch who are also trying to regain the seeds.

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David Flame Secret Agent (6 part serial starting on February 21st 1957, 4.45-5.15pm, ATV)
Script: Derek Hoddinott, from a thriller by Eric Leyland. Director: Jack Barton.
Starring John Fabian in the title role. "Flame's playground is the world," said Hoddinott, "his diet- adventure. His main aim in life? To bring to justice all those who abuse it."
Also in the cast were Shaun O'Riordan and Charles Laurence.

Synopsis: An MI5 agent is sent to Exminster to uncover the hq of a foreign spy ring. When he unaccountably disappears, Scotland Yard call in David Flame to unravel the mystery.
Part 2 (Feb 28th 1957) The Cottage. The trail leads David to a cottage on the moors.
Part 3 (March 7th 1957) Tor Castle. An MI5 agent is sent to Exminster to uncover the headquarters of a foreign spy ring. He unaccountably disappears, and David Flame is called in by Scotland Yard to unravel the mystery. He is soon involved in a chain of suspicious events. Who is Mr X?
Part 4 (March 14th 1957) Allies. David has recovered the top secret atom papers but X is lurking in the house which is the gang's hq.
Part 6 (March 28th 1957) Double Bluff. Trapped in desolate Tor Castle by the gang working for X, David Flame and Co are surely defeated.
A second 6 part serial commenced on April 4th 1957
Episode 2 (Apr 11th 1957) Flashpoint. Tony Ginger and Hoffman are prisoners of Hiraz, the dreaded terrorist movement operating in Jemel, and in their bid for escape they do not realise that one of them will die.
Episode 3 (Apr 18th 1957) Flight into Danger. David Tony and Ginger leave Jidda to fly to the troubled island of jemel. Their journey is uneventful until a fighter with strange markings emerges out of the darkness with terrifying results.
Episode 5 (May 2nd 1957) Lone Hand. David, Ginger and Tony are in Jemel to capture the island's terrorist leader The Ghost. They get mixed up in an anti-British riot, but Flame works out a daring plan to get information.
A third and final serial of 5 parts with a story and screenplay by Eric Leyland, began on May 16th 1957: episode 1 King's Ransom. On holiday in Spain, David Flame and Co find themselves up against Korski, an international crook, who is prepared to risk everything in his search for the King's Ransom, worth haf a million pounds. What is this mysterious King's Ransom and why is Korski so anxious to liquidate Flame and his friends?
Episode 3 (May 30th 1957) Danger Ahead. Where is the King's Ransom hidden? The only man who knew its hiding place is dead, but David Flame has a clue.
Episode 4 (June 6th 1957) The Trap. David now knows where the fabulous King's Ransom is hidden, but his arch enemy Korski has also discovered the secret. It's a matter of bluff and counter-bluff.
Episode 5 (June 13th 1957) Treasure Trove. The last round is fought. Flame and Co edge towards victory, but then Korski plays his master card.
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The Secret of the Nubian Tomb (ATV, 1961, in 5 parts)
Script from a story by Mary Cathcart Borer.
Producer: Cecil Petty.
Stars: John Carson as Sheikh Ahmed,
Jerry Stovin as Jud Blackwell
Shirley Lawrence as Ann Newman,
with Mark Burns as Mike Newman, Henry Soskin as The Omda, Peter Hempson as Tony Newman, Aleksander Browne as Policeman.

1 The Unexpected Visitors
Sunday April 30th 1961

2 Plot and Counter-Plot
Sunday May 7th 1961
There are two days left to finish the dig and find the sepulchre of Lady Nefermaat. Then the tomb will be flooded. The diggers have got unexpected help from Mike's friend, Sheikh Ahmed, but suddenly a policeman arrives and arrests Mike.

3 Sunday May 14th 1961

4 The Tomb and the Cellar
Sunday May 21st 1961
Sheikh Ahmed has seen Mike in prison without rousing the Omda's suspicions. But he and Jud still think the Sheikh is hiding somewhere, and decide to interrogate Ann and Tony. This time the Omda seems to make them all talk.

5 The Sheikh and the Omda
Sunday May 28th 1961
Jud has found the store of engine oil for which Sheikh Ahmed has been searching. The oil is in the Omda's cellar, where he has trapped Jud. But Sheikh Ahmed, Tony and Ann, who have found Lady Nefermaat's burial chamber, have discovered another entrance to the cellar.
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The Master
A Southern TV children's serial from 1966.
Written by TH White, adapted for tv by Rosemary Hill.
Directed by John Frankau and John Braybon.
Set on tiny Rockall, headquarters of The Master who plans to dominate the world. He is alleged to be aged 150, and his nightmarish scheme would have been undiscovered, except for two children who land on the island while on a sailing expedition.
The regular stars were John Laurie as McTurk in stories 1 to 4, and Olaf Pooley as The Master. Children were Adrienne Poster as Judy, and Paul Guess as Nicky, with Fruchan as Jokey their dog. Richard Vernon also starred in stories 1 and 6 as Father.
George Baker also starred from story 2 to story 6 as Squadron Leader Frinton.
1 The Yellow Hands (Tuesday January 11th 1966, 5.25pm)
Rockall... deserted, 500 miles out in the Atlantic. But is it? Two children, Judy and Nicky, with their dog discover otherwise.
Also with semi-regulars Terence Soall as Chinaman, and John Woodnut as Jim, and another regular Thomas Baptiste as Pinkie. Plus: Roy Patrick as Skipper, John Bown as Pierrepoint, and Anthony Eady as Mate (also in 2 and 6).
2 Totty McTurk (January 18th 1966)
Nicky and Judy meet the secret inhabitants of Rockall. Some seem friendly, but others...?
Remainder of cast: Morris Perry as Jo, Anthony Eady as Bert.
4 The Squadron Leader (February 1st 1966)
Judy and Nicky are now without ther help of Totty McTurk, but find a new ally in Frinton
Remainder of cast: Terence Soall as Chinaman, Thomas Baptiste as Pinkie.
5 World of Disbelief (February 8th 1966)
The Master's plan for world domination has been revealed. Can Frinton and the children stop him? With Patrick Moore as Himself,
remainder of cast: Terence Soall as Chinaman, Thomas Baptiste as Pinkie, John Woodnut as Jim, Leonard Woodrow as Sub Editor, Frank Jarvis as Reporter, Lewis Jones as TV Man, Margaret Ashcroft as Fish Fryer, and Jennifer Stuart as Customer.
6 Death by Misadventure (February 15th 1966)
The world is the the grip of an unknown terror. Can Judy and Nicky, with Jokey save it?
Remainder of cast: John McGavin as Newcaster, Joe Gibbons as Newsagent, Yvonne Wlash as Customer, Anthony Eady as Bert, John Woodnut as Jim, Alex MacIntosh as TV Reporter, Zena Blake as Woman, Rowena Torrance as Teacher, Ian Lindsay as Office Worker, and Thomas Baptiste as Pinkie.
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The Diamond Bird
Shown live on Tuesdays 5.25pm (30 minutes) during Nov/Dec 1959. Some filmed sequences on an East Anglian beach.
Script: Elisabeth Beresford. Director: Prudence Nesbitt.
Cast in most stories: Peter Furnell as Nicky Wheeler, Gay Gordon as Isobel, Edward Dentith as Cedric Harper, Paul Hardtmuth as Peter Schmidt, Ronald Ibbs as Hans de Witt, Robert James as Norris Hardwick, Harry Littlewood as Willy the Weasel, Arthur Lowe as George Goodman (billed for one episode in TV Times as Harry Lowe!), June Monkhouse as Gladys Johns.
Synopsis: Isobel meets Nicky, "a born romancer" according to Mr Goodman who runs a jewellery shop. But Nicky claims he's on the track of some smugglers, though his guardian Mr Hardwick, who edits the local paper doesn't believe him. But what does the sinister stranger Schmidt mean by his announcement in the personal column, The Bird Is Returning? 'The Bird' proves to be a precious diamond brooch saved from treasure looted by the Nazis in Amsterdam.

1 The Warning (Nov 3rd 1959) - Isobel Ross and her aunt, Miss Gladys Johns, go to Ludborough, a small seaside town in East Anglia for 15 year old Isobel to recover from whooping cough. They have no idea that they are about to get involved in a strange mystery.
2 Willy the Weasel (Nov 10th 1959) - Isobel, mystified by Nicky's stories about being involved in the Mystery of the Diamond Bird, is unsure whether to believe him.
3 (Nov 17th 1959)
4 A Small Brown Parcel (Nov 24th 1959) - Nicky receives a ticket by post: with it Isobel collects a small parcel from the Yacht Club. They agree to hide it and substitute a faked one, which causes strange reactions.
5 Willy in Danger (Dec 1st 1959) - Isobel meets Hans de Witt, Nicky's dad, who is anxious for his son's safety. Norris Hardwick and Hans at last come face to face, with far-reaching results.
6 (Dec 8th 1959)

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Calling All Boys
(episode 1: Monday April 9th 1956, 5-5.30pm, ATV)

A serial written by Pamela and Newton Branch. Director: Stephen Joseph.
Cast: Alan Robinson (Inspector Hawke), Ralph Nossek (Inspector Blake), Ronald Wood (Constable Smith), Fella Edmonds (Bill), Glyn Dearman (Dan), Jonathan Swift (Mike), Michael Maguire (Phil), Leo Phillips (Bash). In addition on May 14th and 21st 1956, episodes 6 and 7 included Michael Corcoran (Paddy) and John Sherlock (The Kid), while Ian Hendry (Mr X) was definitely in eps 1, 4, 6 and 7.

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Target Luna (ABC 1960)
Script: Malcolm Hulke and Eric Paice.
Director: Adrian Brown. Producer: Sydney Newman
Set on a rocket isle off Scotland (filmed sequences actually made off the Essex coast), Professor Wedgewood (David Markham) is preparing to send the first man (William Ingram) into space. The professor's three children, Valerie (Sylvia Davies), Geoff (Michael Craze), and Jimmy (Michael Hammond) share the adventure when Jimmy accidentally sets off the alarm in the control room. His pet hamster Hamlet also gets involved. Also starring John Cairney as radio engineer Ian Murray and Frank Finlay as Henderson. With Deborah Stanford as Jean Cary.
With a mostly different cast, Professor Wedgewood and family resurfaced in the serial
Pathfinders in Space etc.

Episode details:
1 The Rocket Station
Sunday April 24th 1960 5.15pm
Also in the cast are Roger Ostime, Annette Kerr, Robert Stuart, Michael Verney, Phyllis Kenny, and William Ingram
When Professor Wedgewood's children spend their Easter holiday at his rocket station, they become involved in a daring experiment.

2 Count Down
Sunday May 1st 1960
Also in the cast are Michael Verney, Phyllis Kenny, and William Ingram
The first manned flight round the moon. Jimmy is too young, but his chance comes when the great experiment seems about to fail.

3 The Strange Illness
Sunday May 8th 1960
Also in the cast are Michael Verney, Robert Stuart, Phyllis Kenny, and William Ingram
The pilot had been too ill and Jimmy secretly takes his place. The rocket is about to be launched.

4 Storm in Space
Sunday May 15th 1960
Also in the cast is Robert Stuart
Electrical storms cut the radio link from rocket to Earth. But Jimmy must operate the heating system, otherwise he will freeze to detah.

5 Solar Flare
Sunday May 22nd 1960
Also in the cast are Annette Kerr, and Robert Stuart
Jimmy has circled the moon and is returning to earth. He faces more danger from a bombardment of particles. if he increases his speed, he could overshoot earth and become lost in space.

6 The Falling Star
Sunday May 29th 1960
Jimmy, first 'man' round the mood is about to re-enter the earth's atmosphere. But only a trained pilot could possibly handle the rocket's instruments.

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Mystery Hall
(A Southern TV children's serial in 6 parts)
Script: Donald Tosh
Music: Wout Steenhuis
Directed by John Braybon
Jimmy is spending a holiday at a remote hotel on the Dorset coast. He sees a guest shoot the hotel owner, but this person returns unharmed. The adventure turns into a search for treasure hidden under the 15th century mansion.
Starring: Alan Wheatley as Alex Ramsey, a writer,
with Philip Newman as Zebediah Gast, odd job man at the hotel and
Mark Colleano as Jimmy Brent.

1 Jimmy Brent
Thursday September 28th 1967 5.25pm
Jimmy saw a man- or did he?
Also in cast:
Hilary Mason... Mrs Thompson
Michael Lynch... Mr Berridge
Bernard Davies... Mr Fothergill
Anthony Woodruff... Mr Blake-Clanton
Paddy Glynn... Jane
Neville Barber... Constable Jeffrys
Ken Haward... Police driver

5 False Bait
Thursday October 25th 1967
Jimmy finds the treasure but loses his liberty.
Also in this cast:
Hilary Mason... Mrs Thompson
Michael Lynch... Mr Berridge
Paddy Glynn... Jane

6 Spring Trap
Thursday November 2nd 1967
Zebediah Gast does his bit.
Also starring
Shelagh Fraser... Mrs Blake-Clanton
Rest of this cast:
Neville Barber... Constable Jeffrys
Hilary Mason... Mrs Thompson
Paddy Glynn... Jane

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Send Foster (Rediffusion)
starred Hayward Morse (son of Barry) as Johnny Foster, a junior reporter on the Redstone Chronicle. He is sent out on all the routine jobs, that invariably turn into big stories, travelling there in his 1932 Morris, the love of his life.
The series also starred Patrick Newell as the crusty chief reporter Harding, and Polly James as Susan the office girl. The series was produced by Geoffrey Hughes.
One viewer (TV Times, 4th Aug 1967) declared it was the best children's tv programme for years. However there was a complaint concerning Johnny Foster's "bizarre clothing." he is said to have worn "white jeans and a flowered shirt." Susan Maughan, who wrote a fashion article in the magazine, responded: "Hayward Morse and Polly James are two of the snappiest dressers I know... both raid the Chelsea boutiques and wear a lot of their own fashions in the series."

Here are details of the eleven stories:
1: Hole in the Road (July 6th 1967 5.00-5.25pm). Johnny thought a reporter's life would be full of excitement and glamour. A hole in the road isn't very glamorous, but it nearly proved a bit too exciting. Also in the cast: Garfield Morgan as Security Man, Frank Tregear as Mr Smith, Peter Macann as Alfie, and Michael Lees as Det Sgt Riley. Script: George Markstein. Director: Geoffrey Hughes.
2: Once a Thief (July 14th 1967). When a boy is expelled from school from stealing, his colleagues stage a strike. Also in the cast: Raymond Platt, Andre Van Gyseghem, Marianne Stone, Roger Hammond and Peter Hempson. Script: Victor Pemberton. Director: William G Stewart.
3: Family Likeness (July 21st 1967). Elaine Morris won every race in the school sports and Johnny has unearthed a good story. But it left him with a problem- should a newspaperman have a cosncience? Also in the cast: Renny Lister and Michael Turner. Script by Ann de Gale. Directed by Fred Sadoff.
4: Henry Wasn't There (July 28th 1967). Johnny wants to write about the experiences of two old soldiers, but Mr Harding thinks they're just a couple of nutcases. Also in the cast: William Corderoy, Clive Dunn as Perce, Clive Elliott, Robert Raglan as Colonel Regan, and Eric Dodson. Script: Mike Watts. Directed by Ronald Marriott.
5: Henry Wasn't There (August 4th 1967). When Johnny finds that a colour bar is operating in Redstone, he goes to work to expose it. And to do this he has to go to work- as a waiter. Also in the cast: Linbert Spencer, Vic Wise, Peter Welch and Brian Wilde. Script: Mike Watts. Directed by Adrian Cooper.
6: The Peg (August 11th 1967). When Johnny's story isn't strong enough to make the front page, he starts making the news instead of reporting it. And that spells trouble. Also in the cast: Christine Hargreaves, Michael Hall and Bernard Brown. Script: George Markstein. Directed by Nicholas Ferguson.
7: The Drama Critic (August 18th 1967). A visit to the amateur dramatic club seems a pretty boring assignment but when drama critic Johnny wields his savage pen, trouble follows. Also in the cast: Geoffrey Hibbert, Rosamunde Burne, Helena de Crespo, Alan Bennion and Peter Mackriel. Script: Geoffrey Hughes. Directed by William G Stewart.
8: Which Wedding Were You At? (August 25th 1967). It's a happy wedding for Sandy and Anne Potter (Roger Rowland and Gay Cameron), but for reporter Johnny Foster it's the start of a story that is 'too hot to handle.' Also in the cast: John Franklyn Robbins. Script: Mike Watts.
9: The Accident (September 1st 1967). Johnny discovers a damsel in distress and is offered a bribe to forget about it. Also in the cast: Liz Gebhardt as Liz Ellis, Gerald Sim as Dr Ellis and John Franklyn Robbins as Sgt Thomas. Script: Mike Watts. Directed by William G Stewart.
10: Off The Record (September 8th 1967). Johnny gets caught up in the Redstone pop scene, and a competition for the best group. Also in the cast: Clive Colin-Bowler, Michael Craze, Harry Littlewood and Eric Francis. Script: George Markstein. Directed by Hugh Munro.
11 (final story): Just Read That Back to me, Young Man (September 15th 1967). Johnny's shorthand was never his strong point and when a great actor and a lady councillor start slanging each other, Johnny gets caught in the middle. Also in the cast: Anthony Newlands, Charles Lamb, Patsy Rowlands, Peter Bartlett and Liz Ashley. Script: Max Oberman. Directed by Nicholas Ferguson.
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SIERRA NINE (A-R)
with David Sumner as Dr Peter Chance, Deborah Stanford as Anna Parsons, and Max Kirby as Sir Willoughby Dodd.
Script: Peter Hayes. Director: Marc Miller. There were four stories lasting a total of 13 programmes- The Brain Machine, The Man Who Shook the World, The Elixir of Life, and The Q-Radiation.

Episode 1 The Brain Machine (May 7th 1963). Also in cast: Ronald Ibbs as Prof Howard Portman, Ann Rye as Jane Brightside, Robert Mill as Beamish and Robin Chapman as an Arab spy. Having successfully completed a research project into self-homing missiles, Peter Chance is astounded when told by his chief, Prof Portman, to scrap all his work and start again. Later, chance sees Portman taking micro-photographs of the apparently useless data.
Episode 2 The Brain Machine (May 14th 1963). With Harold Kasket as The Baron, and Henry Soskin, Julian Sherrier, Raymond Mason, and Oswald Laurence. On arrival in El Arish, capital of Mirzan, Chance and Anna seem no nearer to solving the mystery of the Brain machine until their attention focuses on the Medical Centre.
Episode 3 The Brain Machine (May 21st 1963). With Harold Kasket, Henry Soskin and Julian Sherrier. Now fully aware of the Brain machine's location and potential, Chance attempts to warn Sierra Nine in London. To complicate matters further, King Sharifa (Henry Soskin) asks Sierrna Nine for help in squashing an attempted revolution.
Episode 4 The Brain Machine (May 28th 1963). With Harold Kasket, Henry Soskin, Julian Sherrier, and John Trenaman. Selim's revolution begins- and Chance, Anna and King Sharifa are in grave danger.
Episode 1 The Man Who Shook the World (June 4th 1963). Also in cast David Garth, George Roubicek, Norman Mitchell, Timothy Bateson, Peter Thomas, Gordon Tanner. Sir Hugo Petersham (David Garth), an eminent nuclear scientist invents a minute atomic warhead which is to be tested in the USA. On its way to London Airport, the device is stolen- and Chance and Anna Parsons are called in to investigate.
Episode 2 The Man Who Shook the World (June 11th 1963). Also in cast David Garth, George Roubicek, Timothy Bateson, Peter Thomas. With the bomb still missing, Chance's attention suddenly centres on the mysterious small island called Dantosa.
Episode 3 The Man Who Shook the World (June 18th 1963). Also in cast David Garth, George Roubicek, Timothy Bateson, Peter Thomas. Unaware that the detonator circuit of the bomb has gone into action, Ernie and Scowse escape to the country, taking the bomb with them. Can Sierra Nine get to the bomb before it explodes?
Episode 1 The Elixir of Life (June 25th 1963). With Brian Poiser and Blake Butler. Sir Willoughby has an unexpected visitor and as a result, Chance and Anna Parsons are trying to solve a mystery in a French monastery.
Episode 2 The Elixir of Life (July 2nd 1963). With Brian Poiser, Blake Butler and Charles Laurence. Who is trying to steal Brother Victor's formula? Chance and Anna begin to tighten the net...
Episode 1 The Q-Radiation (July 9th 1963). With Peter Halliday as Dr John Quendon, Rodney Bewes as Tom Batley, John Gabriel and Ivor Salter. What has Dr Quendon invented? Why did Professor Tudor Owen resign?
Episode 2 The Q-Radiation (July 16th 1963). With Harold Kasket as The Baron, Peter Halliday, John Gabriel, Ivor Salter and Alan White. Unaware of the Baron's reappearance, the Government decide to develop Quendon's invention. In order to keep Prof )wen's machine in the race, the vital acceleration unit must be stolen from Quendon's machine.
Episode 3 The Q-Radiation (July 23rd 1963). With Harold Kasket as The Baron, Peter Halliday, Rodney Bewes, and Ivor Salter as Prof Tudor Owen. Despite elaborate precautions, Owen has stolen the vital unit... Chance and Anna visit Llanmaris.
Episode 4 The Q-Radiation (July 30th 1963- final story). With Harold Kasket as The Baron, Robert Brown as Galliver, Peter Halliday and Ivor Salter. Trapped on Llanmaris by the Baron, Chance and Anna face Owen's deadly ray.
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The Barnstormers

Cast: That most interesting child star Dennis Waterman appeared as Mike, Gerald Rowland as Rusty, Peter Hempson as Philip, Patricia Wilson as Sarah, and John Pike (late of 'Ivanhoe' and 'The Old Pull n Push') as Alan. Tina Martin as Miranda, Susan Purdie as Elizabeth and Jeffrey Shankley as Peter appeared after the first story.
Joy Thwaites wrote the scripts, and the director was Marc Miller.
The five children, their leader Mike, decide to form their own dramatic society and write and produce their own play. But they need to find a suitable venue and hit on a deserted 18th century water mill that stands in a stream outside their village. As the production takes shape they discover interesting facts about the mill. One rumour claims a pirate once lived here and hid his treasure within its walls. Secret passages and a concealed trapdoor confirm the tale. A property speculator hears about the treasure and attempts to buy the mill for redevelopment.

The first episode was screened March 3rd 1964. It was 'Mystery at the Mill' in which the children, wanting to make the most of their holidays, try to join The Tudor Players. They are also intrigued by a strange light in an old mill. Also in this story were Gillian Webb as Miss Brentford and Peggy Ann Wood as Mrs Smith.
Episode 2 (Mar 10th)- also appearing were Gillian Webb, and Nadine Hanwell.
Episode 3 was 'The Lost Treasure' (Mar 17th) and introduced Henry Soskin as Mr Selbourne, whom Sarah and Rusty meet as they start rehearsals for their play.
Episode 4 was 'Enter a Stranger' (Mar 24th) in which the future of the Mill is threatened.
Episode 5 (Mar 31st)
Episode 6 was 'Camberley's Quest' (April 7th) in which the mystery of the casket grows deeper. (Note- no story on April 14th due to Budget.)
Episode 7 was 'The Spanish Casket' (April 21st) in which the casket is stolen.
Episode 8 was 'A Door to Nowhere' (April 28th) featured AJ Brown as Alderman Purbeck.
Episode 9 'Rusty in Danger,' again included AJ Brown and told how Rusty did some exploring.
The tenth and final episode was on May 12th and titled 'Old Alexander's Secret.' Nora Nicholson played Mrs Herriard, and the story showed The Barnstormers thoroughly exploring the tunnel.
A finale titled Playmaking with the Barnstormers was shown on May 19th.

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The Secret of Carrick House (A-R)

shown on Tuesdays in September/October 1959.
Written by John Rhodes, directed by Marion Radclyffe.

The star was Barry MacGregor who played Ken Brodie,
and also appearing were Judy Bloom as Pilar Cortella, Lilian Grassom as Peggy Myers, David Waller as Richard Adams, Roderick Lovell as Uncle Manuel, Hugh Evans as Simon Greeb, Gordon Whiting as Carlos, and Brenda Saunders as a waitress (stories 1 to 4), and with Michael Browning as a policeman (stories 4 to 6).
Ken takes up his first job as a reporter on the South Cornish Echo. Always on the lookout for a scrap, he is soon in hot water...

Episode 1: Hot Water- 1st Sept 1959 5.45-6.15pm, With Nicholas Light as Brian Field.
Episode 2: The Intruder- 8th September 1959
3: The Hostage- 15th September 1959 (now at 5.25-5.55pm).
4: The Boss- 22nd September 1959
5: Marooned- 29th September 1959
6: The Scoop- 6th October 1959 (final episode).

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Over to William (ATV, 1956)

Keith Crane starred as Richmal Crompton's hero, with the other outlaws played by Meurig Wyn-Jones (Ginger), John Symonds (Henry) and Michael Saunders (Douglas). Other semi regulars were Frank Sieman as Mr Brown, and Sylvia Marriott as Mrs Brown. Cavan Malone played Robert and Shirley Lawrence played Ethel in a few stories. Ditto Jeanette Phillips as Violet Elizabeth.
Donald Wilson adapted the tales for tv. The producer was Cecil Petty.

Programmes included:
Episode 1: September 16th 1956.
Episode 2: Claude Finds a Companion (September 23rd 1956). William and the Outlaws make the first sardine toffee ever. With Howard Vaughan as Claude. Also Oliver Johnston as Gardener.
Episode 5: Aunt Louie's Birthday Present (October 18th 1956). William goes shopping for Mrs Brown. With Hedi Schnabel as Aunt Louie.
Episode 6: William and the Three-Forty (October 25th 1956). William's good deed for the day has some very unexpected results.
Episode 10: Cats and White Elephants (November 22nd 1956). Where once again one learns never to rely on William. With Kenneth Gilbert as Archie.
Episode 12: The Begging Letter (December 6th 1956). In which William tries to turn an honest penny. Also with J Trevor-Davis as Colonel Pomeroy, Ann Poole as Phillipa Pomeroy and John Myer as Mr Peters.
Final Episode: William Meets a Professor (December 13th 1956). In which William gets away with it. With Charles Houston as Professor Golightly.

Note: This was child actor Keith Crane's finest hour. He had little acting opportunity after this, perhaps his biggest part was as a wronged boy in The New Adventures of Charlie Chan (1957), #21 Three Men on a Raft

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Rediffusion's children's serials ended with a bang, as the company was making two serials per week when their contract expired.

Devil-in-the-Fog was a six part serial made in the summer of 1968.
Stanley Miller dramatised the story by Leon Garfield. Michael Currer-Briggs was producer. The star was Nicholas Evans who appeared in each story playing George Treet. He is sixteen years old (even though Nicholas who portrayed him was aged 28!), when he learns he is heir to Lord Dexter's estate at Ightham Mote. He has to put aside his former life as a rough strolling player, to pretend to be a man-of-the-world, all dressed up in lace and fine clothes.

1 Some Are Born to Greatness... (Friday 21st June 1968)
In the beginning this tale tells how I, George, the eldest born son of Master Salathiel Treet, strolling player and man of genius, came to have greatness thrust upon me.
With Valentine Dyall... The Stranger, Martin Dempsey... Salathiel Treet, Diana Simpson... Jane Treet, Keith Skinner... Edward Treet, John Moulder-Brown... Hotspur Treet, Verina Greenlaw... Ross Treet, Jeremy Longhurst... Breath, a highwayman, Kenneth Thornett... Manager, a tavern keeper, Richard Shaw... Rummage, a beadle, George Desmond... Camber, a gate keeper, and Milton Johns... Joseph.
2 Some Have Greatness Thrust Upon Them... (28th June 1968).
From a night of fog and mystery to a future of promise and prosperity, and yet at what price.
With Martin Dempsey... Salathiel Treet, Milton Johns... Joseph, Diana Simpson... Jane Treet, Keith Skinner... Edward Treet, John Moulder-Brown... Hotspur Treet, Verina Greenlaw... Ross Treet, John Baskcomb... Dr Newby, Stephanie Bidmead... Lady Dexter, Peggyann Clifford... Mrs Goater, Richard Leech... Sir John Dexter, Donald Eccles... Rev Mr Rumbold, and Henry Moxon... Mr Bennett.
3 O My Prophetic Soul: My Uncle! (5th July 1968).
Fog darkness and mystery follow me still. All my questions however natural, have met with no real answer.
With Gary Watson... Captain Richard Dexter, Peggyann Clifford... Mrs Goater, Stephanie Bidmead... Lady Dexter, and Richard Leech... Sir John Dexter.
4 That One May Smile, and Smile, And Be a Villain... (12th July 1968).
A miasma of fog and skullduggery attended my birth and abduction, and now I find myself deep in a midnight wood and face to face with a murder.
With Gary Watson... Captain Richard Dexter, Peggyann Clifford... Mrs Goater, Martin Dempsey... Salathiel Treet, Diana Simpson... Jane Treet, Keith Skinner... Edward Treet, John Moulder-Brown... Hotspur Treet, Verina Greenlaw... Ross Treet, Milton Johns... Joseph, Stephanie Bidmead... Lady Dexter, and Richard Leech... Sir John Dexter.
5 Fair is Foul, and Foul is Fair... (19th July 1968).
Why should I,the accepted son and heir of a noble baronet, listen to my ruffianly uncle and whey-faced old witch, known liars both? With Patsy Rowands... Mrs Dexter, Denis Gilmore... Bertram Dexter, and Gary Watson, Peggyann Clifford, Martin Dempsey, Diana Simpson, Keith Skinner, John Moulder-Brown, Verina Greenlaw, Milton Johns, Stephanie Bidmead, and Richard Leech.
6 ... This Fell Serjeant, Death... (26th July 1968, Rediffusion's final month of broadcasting).
With the immediate departure of my foster family, leaving me alone to face the unknown enemy, I came near despair. With Valentine Dyall (as in story 1), Jeremy Longhurst (as in 1) Patsy Rowands, Denis Gilmore, Gary Watson, Peggyann Clifford, Martin Dempsey, Diana Simpson, Keith Skinner, John Moulder-Brown, Verina Greenlaw, Milton Johns, Stephanie Bidmead, Richard Leech, and John Baskcomb as Dr Newby.
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The Chequered Flag (A-R)
A serial in six parts written by Ivan Berg (his only tv script). Director: Jim Pople.
Synopsis: World racing champion Tony Gregory (Geoffrey Frederick) discovers a possible future star in 17 year old Mike Brown (Jeremy Bulloch) and persuades his parents to allow Mike to join him as an apprentice.
Other regular characters included Joan, Gregory's attractive wife (Sheila Robins), Mike's parents (Irene Richmond and Anthony Woodruff) and two argumentative mechanics Tim (Larry Burns) and Charlie (Tony Hilton).
Episode 1: Mike Goes Karting (Tuesday September 6th 1960). The tale opens at Brands Hatch where the mad about racing Mike is hanging around just avoiding getting in everyone's way. After the Formula Junior race he is spotted by Tony who is looking for a replacement for a school's demonstration as one lad hasn't turned up. Though Mike has never driven a kart before, he sets off like a rocket. Also in this story as Commentator was James Grout.
One episode showed Mike having to assemble a kart kit. Later Mike enters the Round Britain car rally.
Final episode: International Event (October 11th 1960), this was set at the Formula Junior Monaco Grand Prix. Though Tony Gregory and his team make an all-out effort to win, when they arrive in Monte Carlo things don't quite go according to plan. Also appearing: Peter Zander as Foreign Radio Announcer, and Robert Mill and Robert Perceval as Race Commentators.
Michael Crawford appeared in three of the six episodes.

Described as the first motor racing series on British TV, this was "a career-documentary-cum-adventure series." An A-R spokesman added "if the first six episodes are a success, the series may be continued."
Note- originally Mike's name and that of the series was to have been 'Elroy Brown'

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Westward Television
only very rarely contributed drama to the network.
Some local amateur talent was on show in these half hour offerings for children produced by John Bartlett:

Jamaica Inn (26th January/ 3rd February 1967) from Westhill County Secondary School St Austell. Cast: Penny Wilton (Mary Yellan), Laurence Martyn (Jass Merlyn), Peter Barker (Harry the Pedlar), Geoffrey Honeywell (Jem Merlyn), Helen Plowman (Aunt Patience) and Martyn Crowle (Francis Davey).
The Deterrent by Charles Mander (14th June 1967) from Millfield School Somerset.
Henry IV (21st/28th June 1967) from Wellington School Somerset. "Freely adapted" by Joe Storr. Clive Turpin who was in the title role, tells me that the cast "went to the Westward studios in Plymouth. I think we performed the play in November or December 1966 at the school, and it was recorded by Westward a few months later, perhaps March 1967. The director adapted Shakespeare to fit a First World War theme."

If you have details of any other Westward originated drama, or can throw more light on the above, I'd be very pleased to hear from you.

Westward Television page

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School of Secrets
(5 part serial starting January 17th 1957, 5-5.30pm, ATV)
Script: David Carr. Director: Cecil Petty.

Set in a small private Cornish school. The new headmaster introduces changes to the running of the school which look normal enough only on the surface.
Cast: Charles Morgan (Mr Maxwell, the headmaster), Louise Grant (Mrs Maxwell), Maurice Lane (Mike Williams), Vernon Maurice (Peter Blackett), Barry Knight (John Hodges), Christopher Sandford (Phillip Scott), Kenneth Gilbert (Mr Fellows), and Mark Bellamy (Sam Rappaport).

Jan 17th: Episode 1 The New Headmaster
Jan 24th: Episode 2 The Gold Cigarette Case
Jan 31st: Episode 3 The Draycott Diamonds

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Associated Rediffusion tried to encourage new young writers to contribute to various children's serials. Budding authors were invited to 'write the next episode.' No doubt it was a cheap way to produce programmes, but there seemed no shortage of entrants!
Write It Yourself began a fortnightly run in October 1955 and was the story The Tale of Two Halves. The director was Clare Ash. Apparently the author of the winning submission was made a member of the Flickwiz Playwrights' Guild, and runners up received "certificates." (Flickwiz was the umbrella name for the children's programmes on Thursdays.) Presumably some talent was uncovered because the idea continued over the years.
The format was modified during the next serial, which commenced on April 5th 1956, Peter in the Air.
This time viewers were invited to send "ideas and suggestions" how the story could continue. Prizes were again offered for the best. The story was shown fortnightly. Director: Daphne Shadwell.
The idea was revived in 1957 starting on September 24th, when Daphne Shadwell directed a fortnightly thriller serial Dangerous Cargo. This time A-R opted for a mixture of the two previous formats, for viewers were offered prizes for "the best scripts or ideas showing how the story should be continued." Keith Faulkner played the hero Dick Davidson, and Anthony Ford was Greg. Lawrence James played Toby and John Martin was Jacob.
World of Darkness began a fortnightly run on 10th January 1958 again directed by Daphne Shadwell with Peter Ling introducing the story. This was a space serial with prizes offered as before with the invitation to Write it Yourself. Robert Cartland starred as Dr Mark Starr with Anneke Willys as Susan Carpenter and Robin Willett as Chip Carpenter. There were about 8 or 9 episodes before a new story began on May 2nd 1958
Trouble at Northbrook was again introduced by Peter Ling, but directed by Prudence Nesbitt. It was 'a 3 J's adventure' with John Allen (Pearson Dodd), Jacko Eccles (Keith Davis) and Jimmy 'Specs' Davis (Peter Soule). The three lads lasted 5 fortnightly episodes and then began another 6 part adventure on 11th July 1958 called Northbrook Holiday.
October 3rd 1958 saw the final programme of the "successful" Write It Yourself introduced by Peter Ling and directed by Prudence Nesbitt. This was a New Play "full of surprises" written by young viewers. Unfortunately TV Times was unable to give more up to the minute details.

The Write a Play idea was resurrected by Rediffusion after a gap of six years, in a new series of this name that began at the end of 1964. It was a competition for the under 15's. "Out of the hundreds of plays written by you and sent to us," each week Rediffusion chose two. In fact around 200 plays were submitted. Long time children's favourite Jimmy Hanley introduced the rather distinguished resident cast of Peter Halliday, Geraldine Newman, Kenneth Nash, Jonathan Collins, Gerald Rowland and Carla Challoner. Script editor was Denis Butler- it's not stated how much editing was needed- and Michael Segal produced.
If you were a winner, or even a loser, and can tell us more about this competition, please email me

These are the plays that were screened:
December 29th 1964: The Fall of Saebras by Robert Mills and The Truth about Cinderella by Angela Hughes. Also in this cast: Lally Bowers, Barbara Mitchell and David Dodimead. Marc Miller directed.
January 5th 1965: The Golden Feather by Lesley Dear, and Treasure Hunt by Stephen Batty.
January 12th 1965: The Witch of the New Forest by Susan Ames, and The Basnji by Kenneth Lingford. Henry Soskin also starred.
January 19th 1965: Four minutes To... by Derek Webb and Christopher Gillings, and The Frog Ling by Janet Mitchell.
January 16th 1965: The Changing World by Jill Povall, and The Compartment by Nicholas Gray and Frances Allan.
February 2nd /9th 1965: Hail to the Queen by Carol Waite, and The Blue Flower by Jayne Brownsword. (possibly the first transmission postponed?)
February 16th 1965: Time and Time Again by Philip Egner, and So You're the Leader Now by Susan Lees. Now directed by Hugh Munro.
February 23rd 1965: The Deadly Stage Coach by Brian Lead, and It's Funny After All by Christopher Ellis.
March 2nd 1965: Mr Timbrel's Reckoning by Margaret Whiteley, and Freedom Railway (unknown author).
March 9th 1965: The Waiting Room by Marilyn Ford, and The Messengers by Annabel Burbrook. Daphne Shadwell now directed.
March 16th 1965: Here We Go Round by Godfrey Smith, and Poetic Justice by Anthony Suggitt.
March 23rd 1965: A Rebellion by Gerald O'Hagan, and The Box by David Thompson.
March 30th 1965 was the last in the series and Lord Willis presented the prizes to the winners. The final play was The Beat Caterpillar by Gabrielle and Maeve O'Mahoney.

Stage One "for Older Children" followed during summer 1965, and this series, introduced by Gwyneth Surdivall, gave children "all the facilities of a television studio" so they could improvise their own productions. After a break in October, on 30th November 1965 Stage One Contest began, "an inter-city contest in play making." Ronald Marriott directed, as he had done many of the earlier programmes, and five stories came from
Birmingham (programme 1- The Sound Mixer by Dorien Argent, with guest Heinz),
Glasgow (Dec 7th- Caroline by Jennifer James with Eric Burden of The Animals),
Manchester (Dec 14th- The Party by Beverley Williams with Graham Nash of The Hollies),
Bristol (Dec 21st- The Monster by Bradley Nicholas with Billie Hutton of The Fourmost) and
London (Dec 28th- The Sad King by Jean Mageean with special guest Donovan).
I would like to thank Peter Kelly, who writes:
"As a member of the Glasgow Team which appeared, I am proud to confirm that the Glasgow Team won the contest. Their prize was a return trip to London to improvise another play, ‘One Man Four Shadows’ which, unlike ‘Caroline’, was broadcast live (probably January 4th 1966 -ed). The guest pop star was Paul Jones of Manfred Mann.
‘Caroline’ not only won Stage One; it also went on to win an international children’s television award.
At 13, I was the youngest member of the team. The oldest was David Hayman, 17 at the time, who has gone on to have a successful television and stage career (including the Series ‘Trial and Retribution’). Others included Caroline McGregor (the ‘Caroline’ of the play’s title) and Joe MacDonald."

Write a Play returned after a year's break in 1967 now introduced by Clive Goodwin. Ronald Marriott produced. This series did not have a resident cast, but instead some famous names appeared. The plays included:
April 4th 1967: 1 The Prehistoric Man by Laurence G Dion. 2 Thrice Upon a Night-time by Jane Harwood. Directed by Fred Sadoff. Casts: Patrick Barr, John Cater, Jimmy Gardner, David Rowlands, Judith Smith, and Elizabeth Weaver.
April 18th 1967: 1 Johnny Dies at War by Elizabeth Logsdon. 2 The Legend by Janice Chegwin. Directed by Adrian Cooper. Casts: Simon Prebble, Anne Stallybrass, Karin MacCarthy, Clive Merrison, and Roger Rowland.
April 25th 1967: 1 Revenge is Not So Sweet by Peter Oxendale. 2 Shoplifting by Anthony Bash. Directed by Adrian Cooper. Casts: 1 with Basil Moss, Jonathan Elsom, John Carlin and Bill Meilen. 2 With Carolyn Moody, John Carlin and Peter MacKriel.
May 2nd 1967: 1 I Say James by Gordon Hay. 2 The Geranium Boy by Lynn Martin. Directed by Fred Sadoff. Casts: James Cossins, Ann Castle and Alan Wade. In story 1 only, also appearing were Pamela Strong, Anthony Howard and Julian Orchard.
May 9th 1967: 1 A Question of Moral Values by Form 4L1 Plant Hill Comprehensive School Blackley. 2 To Sleep, perchance to Dream by Theresa Flynn. Directed by Fred Sadoff. Cast: Jessie Evans, David Kelsey, Dorothy Reynolds, Annette Robertson, John Garrie (story 1 only), Darryl Read (2 only).
May 16th 1967: 1 The Escape by John O'Hannon. 2 Death Sentence by Christopher Morray-Jones. Directed by Vic Hughes. Casts: 1 Ken Parry (Mumsey), Larry Noble (Weasel), William Kendall (Head warder), Michael Balfour (Warder), and Peter Bayliss (Visitor). 2 Richard O'Callaghan as Youth, William Kendall as Judge.
May 23rd 1967: 1 The White Christ by Angela Simmons. 2 The Freeze Man by Richard Wood Smith. Directed by Fred Sadoff. Cast: Donald Eccles, Paul Williamson, Derren Nesbitt, Bruce Purchase, Michael Ripper. Also Christopher Matthews (story 1 only).
May 30th 1967: 1 The Mind of Man by Margaret Eldridge and Jacqueline Pragnell. 2 Poetic Justice. Directed by Vic Hughes. With Tim Brooke-Taylor (as 1 Mr Hogarth, 2 Fred), Beatty Walters, Aubrey Morris, John Blythe, Hazel Hughes and Dudley Jones.
June 13th 1967: 1 The Dim by Janet Ward. 2 Eight Minutes to Go by JS White. Directed by Fred Sadoff. Cast: Peter Eyre, Allan Cuthbertson, Jack Smethurst, Valerie Taylor, Frances Cuka, also Pippa Lowe (1) and Clifford Earl (2).
June 20th 1967: 1 The Masterpiece by David Hardie. 2 To an Audience of Cork-Lined Ears by Robert Mason. Directed by Peter Croft. Cast: Sydney Tafler, Kynaston Reeves, Rosamund Greenwood and Henry Soskin. Also Aimi MacDonald (in 1) and Michael Rothwell (2).

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THE HANDY GANG (A-R) ('Odd Men for Odd Jobs')
Written by David Edwards and Johnny Hutch. Norman Murray also helped on some stories. Directed by Pat Baker (nos 1-3), Harry Sloan (4-9), J Murray Ashford (10-13). The stars were: Johnny Hutch as Johnny, Dave Jackley as Dave and Bob Bryan as Tiny. Co-starring Freddie Foss as Mr Arkingshaw (stories 1-7) or Reginald Marsh as The Colonel (8-13).
1 May 3rd 1963 The Inspection. Dave and Johnny prepare for an inspection by the manager, Arkingshaw, of their work at the block of flats. Their friend Tiny doesn't help matters.
2- May 10th 1963 The Distempered Soprano. With Dorothea Phillips as Madame Coloratura. The Handy Gang, in an effort to please Mr Arkingshaw, take on an unusual decorating job.
3- May 17th 1963 In the Soup. Arkingshaw is short of staff and the Handy gang manage to talk him into letting them run the restaurant in his block of flats.
4- May 24th 1963 Window Cleaners. The Handy Gang are involved in a crash programme to get the windows cleaned for Arkingshaw.
5- May 31st 1963 Clean Sweep. Mr Arkingshaw soon realises his mistake when he asks the Gang to make a clean sweep.
6- June 7th 1963 Too Many Cooks. The Gang discover that many hands do not always make light work.
7- June 14th 1963 Danger Gang at Work. The Gang attempts a simple repair job with riotous results.
8- June 21st 1963 A Close Shave. The Gang take over the hairdressing salon- and the Colonel has great difficulty keeping his hair on.
9- June 28th 1963 Green Gingers- Red Faces. Everything in the garden is not quite so rosy when the Gang help the Colonel to weed his prize blooms.
10- July 5th 1963 Fire! Fire! The Gang practise their fire drill and first aid, but in the end it is they who need rescuing from the Colonel.
11- July 12th 1963 Old Crocks. The Gang have a smashing time when the Colonel orders them to help with stock-taking.
12- July 19th 1963 Danger! Gang at Work. The Gang try their hand at building and manage to drop quite a few bricks.
13- July 26th 1963 (final story) Uncertain Curtain. The Gang volunteers to put on a show for some Very Important Persons, but soon discover that practice does not always make perfect.

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. SMUGGLERS' COVE (A-R)
An adventure set in Cornwall written by Jean McConnell and directed by Richard West.
Location filming was done in Looe. The story was about robberies from lobster pots.
The children, pictured here, were Ingrid Sylvester as Patricia and Billy Hamon as Beetle. Frazer Hines also starred as Tim.
Others in the stories were: John Dearth, Annette Kerr, Nigel Jenkins and Anthony Sagar.
Episode 1 Sailors' Warning (August 6th 1963). Patricia and Beetle arrive at the Cove for their summer holiday, but the place doesn't seem the same somehow as when they came last year. There is an air of uneasiness and tension in the village.
Episode 2 The Moonlight Folk (August 13th 1963). There is a mystery about Uncle Jem's missing lobsters. Why should he be so unlucky when Tregellet's pots are always full? Tim is determined to find out.
Episode 3 Frog in Deep Water (August 20th 1963). Beetle sets a trap for the lobster thief and makes an unsatisfactory catch. Tim is more than ever determined to solve the mystery of Uncle Jem's lobsters and before long success seems to be at hand.
Episode 4 A Sign of the Hand (August 27th 1963). The lobster mystery is cleared up in part, but Tim and his friends find themselves facing something bigger and more dangerous.
Episode 5 (September 3rd 1963).
Episode 6 (September 10th 1963). With John Horsley as Blanchard, and Richard Dare as Customs Officer. With the smugglers on the run and things moving quickly to a climax, Beetle finds himself playing an unexpected part in proceedings.
Children's Menu

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Emerald Soup

A serial for children from ABC TV.
Script: Martin Woodhouse. Director: Bill Bain
Starring: Jessica Spencer as Jessica Maxwell, and William Dexter as John Maxwell, with
Janina Faye as Jo Maxwell, Karl Lanchbury as Gally Lloyd, and Gregory Philips as Tim Maxwell.

I think this was the last of ABC's children's serials.
Details of some of the stories
Episode 1 (Sat Nov 9th 1963 5.15pm.)
In the Maxwell laboratory an exciting experiment is under way, but unexpected results occur. The children discover that mysterious parties are interested. Also with Annette Andre... Penny Dalton, Michael Bangerter... Poynter, Ethel Gabriel... Mrs Evans, Allan McClelland... Gaunt, Fredric Abbott... Lee, Blake Butler... Pascoe
Episode 3 (Sat Nov 23rd 1963) - on the 'other side' at 5.15 a new series began.... Dr Who!
Episode 5 (Sat Dec 7th 1963)
The Gaunt gang make final preparations for leaving the country with stolen samples. Their plans are unexpectedly upset. Also with Allan McClelland, Fredric Abbott, Blake Butler, Michael Bangerter, Annette Andre, Ethel Gabriel and Robert Sansom... Chorley
Final Episode (Dec 21st 1963)
John sets out to discover what caused the explosion in his laboratory. What can the children do to recover the stolen samples, or is this the end of project Emerald Soup? Also with Michael Bangerter, Annette Andre, Ethel Gabriel, Allan McClelland, Fredric Abbott, Blake Butler.

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The Old Pull 'N' Push (A-R)
Tuesdays 5.25pm. 6 episodes in November and December 1960.
Script: Elisabeth Beresford. Director: Bimbi Harris. Theme music played by Terry Lightfoot's New Orleans Jazzmen.
The children: John Pike as Andrew, Waveney Lee as Judith. Joe Gibbons played kindly stationmaster Uncle Joe, and Ann Wrigg Miss Bunch the village postmistress. Nicholas Amer played the Italian villain Perelli.
Set on a fictional branch line at Coudhurst (actually Goudhurst in Kent), the train runs to the fictional Mill End.

1 Confusion at Coudhurst (Nov 1st 1960)
5 The Race (Dec 6th 1960, postponed from Nov 29th) Others in this cast: Melvyn Baker (Simon Hearst), Leon Sinden (Reginald Hearst), Michael Collins (Percy Miller), Philip Stone (Sid Martin), and Douglas Bradley-Smith (Mr Lambkin). Perelli has the brilliant idea of a race between the Old Pull 'n' Push and a lorry. Which will get to Mill End and back to Coudhurst station in the shortest time?
6 Danger Signal (Dec 13th 1960) Others in this cast: Melvyn Baker, Leon Sinden, Michael Collins, Philip Stone, and Douglas Bradley-Smith. The result of the race, and the discovery of who was behind the leaflets advocating closing the railway.
The Return Of The Old Pull 'N' Push
6 episodes, May-June 1961. Same personnel, Perelli however was now a reformed character.
Ironically the real life railway through Goudhurst seen in the series was closed on June 12th 1961, the day before the final episode was screened! Bimbi Harris said, "the new series is being recorded and I expect it will be shown in many children's programmes overseas." So maybe this series exists somewhere, but where?
Episode 1 (May 9th 1961) Others in this cast: Rosemary Dorken (Miss Spinks), and Peter Hughes (Neale). The little engine is ready to bring Judith and Andrew diwn for another holiday. The village postmistress and Mr Perelli are waiting to greet them in Coudhurst.
Episode 2 (May 16th 1961).
Episode 3 (May 23rd 1961) Others in this cast: George Tovey (Porty), Rosemary Dorken, Peter Hughes, and Gerald Harper (Gerrard) (no Ann Wrigg). In an attempt tyo avoid Miss Spinks, Judith and ANdrew take a trip to Mill End. On the way they meet a suspicious character called Porty.
Episode 4 (May 30th 1961). Others in this cast: George Tovey, Rosemary Dorken, Peter Hughes, and Gerald Harper (no Ann Wrigg). There is a big jewel robbery in Coudhurst. Is Porty as innocent as he pretends to be, and why does Miss Spinks want to avoid the police?
Episode 5 (June 6th 1961). Others in this cast: George Tovey, Rosemary Dorken, Peter Hughes, Gerald Harper and Anthony Sheppard (Policeman). The police investigate the jewel theft. Is Miss Spinks a fraud? Who kidnaps the Old Pull 'n' Push, and why?
Episode 6 (June 13th 1961). Others in this cast: George Tovey, Rosemary Dorken, Peter Hughes, and Gerald Harper. Perelli loses Miss Spinks. Is she on the runaway train? Who is driving it, and where?
To
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THE LITTLE SHIP (1960)
The Little Ship is the name of a model made in 1600 by Giles Kendall (Jimmy Ray) of his dad's ship The Phoenix.
The serial is about this boy, who is searching in Southwark for news of his father when he meets the wily Dr Pietro, an alchemist (Peter Collingwood). Giles rescues the tough Sam Gilburne (Colin Wall) in a fight and Sam, a young actor, takes a liking for Giles, showing him round The Globe Theatre. There he meets actor Richard Burbage (Nicholas Brady), and Robin Goffe (John Forrest) a handsome actor in love with Pietro's stepdaughter Elizabeth (Shan Lawson). Stagekeeper Jenkin (Martin Wyldeck) engages the lad to help with the props.
Script: Joy Thwaytes, Director: John Rhodes.
Others in each week's cast: Kenneth Adams and Neville Jason.
1 The Alchemist, January 5th 1960 also with Steven Scott.
2 The Rivals, January 12th 1960.
3 Secret of the Phoenix, January 19th 1960, plus Eric Dodson as Master Will.
4 Conspiracy, Jan 26th 1960, plus Eric Dodson and Edward Harvey.
5 Trapped! Feb 2nd 1960.
6 The Phoenix, Feb 9th 1960, same cast plus Edward Rees and John Kidd.

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Peril in the Air
(ATV, Thursdays 5pm, commencing December 20th 1956).

A serial in four parts with Maurice Lane as Michael Williams, Malcolm Kirby as Roger Williams, Vernon Morris as Peter Blackett, Betty Henderson as Mrs Makenzie (not #4), John Brooking as Wing-Cdr Marten, Geoffrey Lewis as Flt-Sgt Bradshaw, and Paul Hardtmuth as Franz Schulter.
Script: David Carr. Director: Antony Keary.

Episode 1 (Dec 20th 1956)
2: Discovery (Dec 27th 1956). Mike Roger and Peter discover that the airfield is not deserted but is being used for secret tests.
3 (Jan 3rd 1957). The boys are certain that Schulter, the missing rocket scientist, is somehow involved in the events at the airfield, but they fail to convince the authorities and so decide to take a hand themselves.
4: Flight into Danger (Jan 10th 1957). In a desperate attempt to prevent Franz Schulter from leaving the country, the boys are caught and taken off in the plane with him on a flight into danger.

Children's Menu of Lost Dinosaur TV

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THE SKEWBALD (A-R)
Script: Jean McConnell. Director David Gardiner. Tuesdays 5.25pm.
The story of Penny (16 year old Maris Tant) who has always been afraid of horses. She befriends a horse (real name Sixpence) nervous as it had been mistreated. She feels an outsider among other riders, but soon she finds herself competing with her nemesis Eva (Jenny Russell). Other regulars were Derek Needs as Timothy and Margaret Denyer as Mrs Anderson.
1 Odd One Out June 27th 1961. This year, Penny's holidays are to be spent with strangers whose lives revolve around horses. But though she is scared of these terrifying animals, she makes an unexpected friend.
2 First Foot Wrong July 4th 1961. Penny meets a new friend Yvonne (Maureen Davis) at a gymkhana. There's trouble when she causes Eva to miss a major event.
3 Penny and Sixpence July 11th 1961. Penny takes drastic steps not to lose the Skewbald, but Eva ruins her plans. Rosemary Nicols appears as Wendy.
4 A Strange Success July 18th 1961. Penny faces a strange accusation.
5 Surprise Encounters July 25th 1961. Penny finds there might be some truth in Eva's tale of ghosts at Brattles Grange. With Dermot Kelly as Phizachaly.
6 Sevenpenny Victory Aug 1st 1961. With Dermot Kelly. With the help of Sixpence, Penny finally challenges Eva on her own ground.

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FRANCIS STORM INVESTIGATES
A-R Tuesdays 5.25pm (30 minutes)
starring Brian Worth as Francis Storm, a 'Professional Investigator of the Unusual.' His office is in a mews flat in cobbled Kensington Palace Close. He has three helpers- his personal assistant, 17 year old Robin (William Simons), 18 year old Penelope 'Penny' Worth (Sarah Long), and handyman 04129 Sgt Pilcher (Robin Wentworth).
Scripts were by Peter Elliott Hayes. The Director was Grahame Turner for all stories except for story 2, which was Jim Pople.

There were only six stories, which were:
1 The Black Mermaid, March 1st 1960. Cast also included: Robert Raglan, Richard Vernon, Bruce Seton.
2 The Clock That Struck Thirteen, March 8th 1960, with Bartlett Mullins, Peter Swanwick, Elsie Wagstaff, Carmel McSherry, Anthony Sagar.
3 The House in the Fog, March 15th 1960, with John Laurie as Colonel Monckton.
4 The Trail of the Spaniard, March 22nd 1960, with Charles Carson.
5 The Vengeance of Colonel Sartory, March 29th 1960, with Ian Fleming, Kynaston Reeves as Col Sartory.
6 The Sealed Room, April 5th 1960, with Ronald Ibbs.

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A Rediffusion children's serial from 1964:

MIKE
In the title role was Denis Gilmore (the former star of the William tv series). Script: Dickens Crouch. Director: Bob Gray.
Regulars in the cast: Laurie Heath as Pete, Leslie Hart as Alfie, Billy Hamon (earlier in A-R's Smugglers' Cave) as Joey, Deborah Cranston as Kate. With Sheila Shand Gibbs as mum (Edna), Geoffrey Matthews as dad (Jim Willis) and John Barrard (Ron Coggins).

Part 1: A Black Wash-Out, Sept 29th 1964. With Edward Evans as Mr Godfrey. Mike decides to help his dad by inventing something new for the building trade.
Part 2: A Night to Remember, Oct 6th 1964. In spite of Mike's efforts to help, mum and dad eventually get to go out for the evening.
Part 3: Oct 13th 1964.
Part 4: The Spirit of Flung Tu Lo, Oct 20th 1964. With Damaris Hayman as Aunt Jemima. Mike ventures into the realms of hynoptism, and brings a taste of the Mysterious East into Stilton Street.
Part 5: Oil... Black Gold! Oct 27th 1964. With Archie Duncan as Mr Paterson. Mike trains Joey for athletic laurels, leading to trouble with a different plant.
Part 6: One Swallow Does Not a Summer Make, Nov 3rd 1964. An artistic and cultured peace descends on Stilton Street- for a while
Part 7: The Return of Stockpot Johnson, Nov 10th 1964. With Geoffrey Hibbert as Stockpot. There is a hint of magic in the disappearance of the entries for the local baking contest.
Part 8: The Quiet Little Restaurant, Nov 17th 1964. With Peter Swanwick as Jocelyn Waterberry. In order to help Kate, the boys enter the world of good food and ladies' fashions.
Part 9: What a Motley Lot, Nov 24th 1964. With John Wentworth. In which the gang prove the play's the thing with a vengeance.
Part 10: It's a Good Job Dummies Can't Speak, Dec 1st 1964. With Barbara Hicks as Lady Springup. The gang goes to Ron's rescue with some very strange allies.
Part 11: From Berlin with Love, Dec 8th 1964. With Brian Hawksley. Mike and his friends set out to prove that the age of chivalry is not past.
Part 12: How to Get in a Pickle Without Really Trying, Dec 15th 1964. With Michael Balfour as Squeaky Jenkins, and Stewart Guidotti. A monetary misfortune leads Mike and his friends into a misguided commercial enterprise.
Part 13: The Big Beat Contest, Dec 22nd 1964. With Stewart Guidotti as Billy Elkes. Alfie, aided by the rest, discovers that it takes more than music to soothe a savage beast.

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The first children's serial proper from A-R for over a year was

BADGER'S BEND (subtitle: The Animal Hotel)
screened Fridays 5pm to 5.25pm starting at the beginning of 1963 (A-R)
Script: Suzanne Gibbs from a story by John Rhodes. Director: Adrian Brown.
The regular members of the cast were: Malcolm Patton as Tim Cordon, Gay Emma as Betsy Alder, Geoffrey Russell and Pamela Pitchford as Mr and Mrs Cordon, James Ward as Mr Francis, a vet, and Rosemary Nicols as Sheila Dicken.

I only have details of these stories (if you can add any information your help will be gratefully received):
1: Jan 4th 1963. Because of his father's illness, Tim moves from London to the country, where he first meets his next door neighbour Betsy who has a smallholding with lots of small animals. He invites her to tea and meets the local vet. (No Rosemary Nichols).
2: Jan 11th 1963. Tim pays his first visit to the vet and is given some abandoned hamsters to keep. He gets the idea of forming an animal hotel. Also with Philip Newman as Mr Alder (later played by a different actor) and Amy Dalby as Mrs Brack.
6: Feb 8th 1963. The Animal Hotel's first guests leave rather abruptly but Tim finds something to take their place when he goes to Lapton. While he is helping at Mr Francis' surgery there is an emergency call for the vet who also asks Tim to go with him and assist. With Kenneth Nash as Joe, Stephen Hancock as Mr Price.
7: Feb 15th 1963. Tim goes on a rescue mission with Mr Francis and Sheila and helps to bring a casualty back to the surgery. Later, the vet brings some sad news but also a wonderful present for Tim.
8: Feb 22nd 1963. Two new guests arrive at the Animal Hotel. One is quiet and looks likely to settle down without trouble, but the other gives the impression of being spoiled and temperamental.
11: Mar 15th 1963. Betsy's Uncle Fred (Anthony Howard) is giving her a pony for her birthday and Mr Francis inspects it carefully before the purchase is made. Tim decides on his present for Betsy and an unexpected guest arrives at his hotel.
12: Mar 22nd 1963. Tim makes a new acquaintance at the vet's surgery, and learns some interesting things about monkeys. He hears that a new pet is on its way to him from Yorkshire, but on arrival it turns out to be an unwelcome guest.
13: Mar 29th 1963. Tim poodle-sits and has a more exciting evening than he expects.
15: Apr 12th 1963 (Good Friday). Stories now directed by Eric Croall. Tim makes the acquaintance of a conjuror called Manverdi (Rick Jones) and gets the chance of taking his parents to the theatre. He and Betsy go for a picnic and find themselves involved in an unexpected adventure.
17: Apr 26th 1963. In the last story, Mr Francis investigates the injuries in Badger's paw and Tim and Betsy visit Lapton Cattle Market. Tim finds his hotel so prosperous that he has no room for further guests.

The series proved so popular it returned in the autumn:
Badger's Bend (The Animal Hotel)
screened Tuesdays 5.25pm to 5.55pm.
Script: Jeremy Kingston from a story by John Rhodes. Director: Marc Miller. (Except 2:10, directed by Bob Gray.)
Gay Emma returned as Betsy Alder.
With Kenneth Nash as Oliver Crossley, plus Margaret John as Aunt Madge and Philip Stone as Uncle Steve.
2:1 October 1st 1963. Betsy goes to stay with her aunt and uncle by the sea and meets a new friend.
2.3 Ocrober 15th 1963. With Geraldine Moffat and George Roubicek.
2:4 October 22nd 1963. With Geraldine Moffat and George Roubicek
2:5 October 29th 1963. With Geraldine Moffat, George Roubicek, Frank Williams and Roy Holder.
2:6 November 5th 1963. Same cast plus Betty Huntley-Wright as Mrs Bravington.
2:7 November 12th 1963. With Geraldine Moffat, George Roubicek, Betty Huntley-Wright, Peter Bayliss, Peggy Thorpe-Bates.
2:10 December 3rd 1963. With Geraldine Moffat, George Roubicek, Mary Kenton, Caroline Sheldon and Ivor Salter.
2:12 (final story) December 17th 1963. With Geraldine Moffat, George Roubicek, Jonathan Collins, and Archie Duncan as Capt Cusack.

Badger's Bend (The Animal Hotel)
screened Tuesdays 5.25pm to 5.55pm. Script now by Suzanne Gibbs again, directed by Bob Gray. With Gay Emma and Kenneth Nash. and Hugh Janes as Dave Banks. Also: James Ward as John Francis, Michael Beint as Mr Alder, and Jean Alexander as Mrs Alder
3:3 January 14th 1964. With David Garth as Lord Willshaw. Ocky returns to Alemouth- Betsy and Dave prepare for new adventures.
3:4 January 21st 1964. With Margaret McCourt as Irene Palmer, Richard Wilding as Mr Ramsden. Betsy meets the new vet assistant. A mystery meeting and a case of mistaken identity almost have unfortunate results.
3:5 January 28th 1964. With Margaret McCourt, Pip Rolls as Neal Brody, Amy Dalby as Mrs Russell. Betsy and David have an eventful picnic on the river bank and David receives an unexpected present.
3:7 February 11th 1964. With Margaret McCourt, Brian Hewlett as Charles Holmes and John Scott as Henry Maxwell. David and Betsy find a stray alsatian, and when nobody claims the dog, David has high hopes of being able to keep him.
3:8 February 18th 1964. With Margaret McCourt, Hugh Cross as Insp Todd and Doris Hare as Mrs Hayden. David has a big surprise, and Mr Francis helps to investigate a suspected case of cruelty to an animal.
3:9 (final story) February 25th 1964.
After 38 stories, the series with Gay Emma finally ended. It was the second longest running children's drama series the Associated Rediffusion company made.
To ITV
Children's Menu

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Danger Island (A 1967 Southern TV children's serial in 6 parts)
The tale of a twelve year old boy, holidaying on a Mediteranean island, who overhears two sinister men plotting to assasinate their country's ruler.
Script: John Gray Music: Ron Grainer Director: John Brayburn
The regular cast were
Mervyn Joseph as Nicholas
Robert Gillespie... Jose Sirena
Garard Green... Father
Pearl Hackney... Mother
Norman Mitchell... Augustus Jones
Araby Lockhart... Mrs Ridout
Nicholas Smith... Sgt Marena
Linda Marlowe... Helga (not episode 4)
Bruno Barnabe... Insp Molina
Neville Barber... Major Herve de Sang
and Eric Barker as The President (stories 2 to 6)

Here are details of the individual episodes of Danger Island :
1 The Conspirators
Thursday July 6th 1967 5.25pm
Nicholas hears more than is good for him.
also with Antonia Pemberton... Anna

2 The Holiday Continues
Thursday July 13th 1967
Nicholas is on the run, not only from his parents, but the police.
Also in this cast:
Ian Ricketts... Garage owner
Jean Marlow... Margaret Gonzales
Steve Arneil... Miguel
Hugh Futcher... Porter
Christopher Wray... 'Maria' engineer
and Antonia Pemberton.

3 Help Wanted
Thursday July 20th 1967
At last Nicholas has found an ally, but is he much help?
with Jean Marlow, Steve Arneil, Antonia Pemberton and Anthony Eady as a soldier.

4 Captured
Thursday July 27th 1967
The President has arrived. Can Nicholas and Augustus do anything to save him?
with Jean Marlow.

5 The Assassin
Thursday August 3rd 1967
Father is asked to use his imagination and pretend he is wrong!
with Jean Marlow.

6 All at Sea
Thursday August 10th 1967
Augustus finds himself in deep water.
with Jean Marlow and Robin Fletcher as a messenger.

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Suggestion of Sabotage
(an ATV serial in in three parts)
Script: Michael Bancroft. Producer: Cecil Petty.
Cast: Oliver Johnston as Sir Edward Rigby, Larry Burns as McCabe, Geoffrey Matthews as Jim Granville, Audrey Nicholson as Carol Stokes, Mavis Ranson as Penny, and Hennie Scott as Peter.

1 Start of Suspicion
Sunday June 4th 1961 4.50pm
Jim Granville's trials of his pilotless aircraft are meeting with disaster. The first two flights have ended with the planes crashing in the air. Then his son Peter suggests it might have been sabotage.
2 The Trap Closes
Sunday June 11th 1961
Jim Granville, with his children Penny and Peter, and his technical assistant Carol are visiting his old chief Sir Edward Rigby, at Borhurst Castle. Jim's invention of radio controlled aircraft is being sabotaged, and he asks Sir Edward's advice, not knowing that his old chief is the saboteur.
3 Failure or Success?
Sunday June 18th 1961
Sir Edward and McCabe are preparing to crash Jim Granville's third plane. Carol Peter and Penny have been locked up by McCabe and must escape to tell Jim what Sir Edward is doing.

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Formula for Danger (ATV)
March-April 1960.
Script: Vivian Milroy. Producer: Cecil Petty.
Stars: John Carson as Landauer (stories 1, 2, and 4 only) and
Gene Anderson as Nina Sjapary (stories 2 to 7)
with the three kids, Joseph Cuby, David Langford and Jeanette Bradbury.
A boy escapes from Ostonia with the secret formula developed by his scientist father. This formula enables ordinary water to burn! He goes to school, then one day sees a lecturer on Eastern Europe is a man named Landauer, who had been a member of the police back in his homeland. Can he be trusted? Then there's the shady Malovicz, obviously not to be trusted.
The authoress produced a new language called Ostonian for the programme, a mix, she said, of Russian, Swedish, and German.

Episode details-

1 A Red Dawn Tomorrow
Sunday March 6th 1960 5.15-5.45pm.
Synopsis: It's 1959. Under the shadow of tyranny, leading scientist Otto Stahl is working on his top secret formula, code number 987. Can he and his son prevent it from falling into enemy hands? With Stratford Johns as Otto Stahl, and Janek Smigielski, Irene Sutcliffe, John Abineri as Malovicz, Donald Tandy, John Ringham, Ronald Harwood, Malcolm Ranson as Titch, John Adan as Jonah, and Kenneth Watson as Mr Winston.

2 The Ostonian Lecture
Sunday March 13th 1960
Synopsis: Why has Landauer come to England? Is Nina Sjapary, the Hungarian schoolmistress, anything more than a teacher? Erik's father has said Trust Nobody. With John Abineri, Malcolm Ranson, John Adan, and Kenneth Watson.

3 An Interview with the Press
Sunday March 20th 1960
Synopsis: The formula has now been successfully demonstrated. But how do the Press get to hear of it? With John Adan, Kenneth Watson, William Forbes, Larry Burns and Robert James.

4 Big Business and Shady Business
Sunday March 27th 1960
Synopsis: A message is pinned to the school notice board. Who has put it there, and what does it mean? With John Adan, Kenneth Watson, William Forbes, Larry Burns, Robert James, Peter Stephens, John Abineri, James Donnelly, Irene Sutcliffe, Ronald Harwood, and Malcolm Ranson.

5 A Face At the Window
Sunday April 3rd 1960
Synopsis: Erik has disappeared. Why is Petersen so keen to find him?
With John Adan, Kenneth Watson, William Forbes, Larry Burns, Robert James, Peter Stephens, John Abineri, Irene Sutcliffe, Ronald Harwood, and Malcolm Ranson.

6 Pat the Accuser
Sunday April 10th 1960
Synopsis: How much does Nina know about Erik's disappearance?
With James Donnelly, Kenneth Watson, William Forbes, Larry Burns, Peter Stephens, and Irene Sutcliffe.

7 An Experiment with Danger
Easter Sunday April 17th 1960
Synopsis: Malovicz has followed Roger and Pat to the school. What is waiting for them there?
With John Abineri, James Donnelly Kenneth Watson, William Forbes, Larry Burns, Peter Stephens, and Ronald Harwood.

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Mill of Secrets (ATV) was a 1960 sequel to Formula for Danger,
with David Langford as Simon and Jeanette Bradbury as Amanda, returning. They go on holiday with Aunt Joanne (Gene Anderson again) and meet a boy from down under, Claude 'Snow' Nolan, played by Sean Scully, his first tv role.
The story starts with Aunt Joanne who is writing a history of a manor house, used three hundred years previously as hq for the Royalsists. Tom Briereley (Ken Watson again) starts an archaeological dig in an old barn. Buried underneath it is an old mill. Also after the secret contained in a parchment scroll map, is the mysterious Douglas Wallace (Glyn Houston).
Script: Diana K Watson and Peter Johnston. Producer: Cecil Petty.

Episode details: 1 The Auction
Sunday June 5th 1960 5.15pm
Synopsis: Simon and Amanda's holiday in Kent with their Aunt Jo becomes a thrilling adventure when they make a startling discovery in an old barn. They are digging for the remains of a seventeenth century watermill, but find more than they bargained for.
Also in this cast are
John Ringham... Auctioneer. Nicholas Grimshaw... Farmer
2 The Secret of The Golden Horn
Sunday June 12th 1960
Digging in the old barn, Jo and the children have found a golden horn. They meet Mr Wallace again, and find out what the horn contains.
3 Mr Wallace Shows his Hand
Sunday June 19th 1960
Simon and Mandy, disgruntled by the loss of the map showing the site of the Plague Pit, are photographing the golden horn. Snow and Auntie Jo get trapped by the collapse of the old water wheel. And why is Tom Briereley acting in such a peculiar fashion?
4 A Headache for Mr Briereley
Sunday June 26th 1960
Mandy and Simon have found that map which Mr Briereley had told them had disintegrated, is still in existence. In the underground room that Snow and Auntie Jo have discovered, Snow finds himself alone. Auntie Jo has disappeared.
5 Jo gets Down to Business
Sunday July 3rd 1960
Simon, having found the missing book, returns it to Wallace. But Snow, infuriated that his discovery has been given away so easily, snatches it away and runs. Cornered by Wallace, he throws it into the lion's cage.
with Rex Graham... Percy Clements
6 final episode
Sunday July 10th 1960 anyone know how it finished?
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ROMANO THE PEASANT (A-R, 1960) Tuesdays 5.25pm.
Script: Hugh Pitt. Directed by Bimbi Harris. Film sequences directed by Jim Pople.
Producer John Rhodes arranged for location shooting in Catara, Italy, Acitrezza Sicily, and off the coast near Catania, Sicily. He explained it was "the first play in the New Look-No Violence policy," that somehow Associated Rediffusion promoted. "If it proves successful," claimed Rhodes, "it will pave the way for many more." Episode one coincided with the launch of A-R's Children's Week. Seen in this photo is 15 year old Kenneth Collins who played Romano in all stories. 23 year old Rowena Torrance, a veteran of 40 television roles, played a 17 year old Italian peasant girl.
A serial set in a small Italian fishing village. When his father is badly hurt in a boating accident, young Romano has to get jobs to help his family survive.

1 The Accident May 3rd 1960 with Steve Plytas as Father Giaccomo, Nancy Nevinson as Mother Savio, Rowena Torrance as Francesca Savio, John Barrard as Angelo, David Ludman, Malya Nappi as Maria, Norman Bowler as Cpl Augustini, Frank Shelley.
2 The Donkey and The Boat May 10th 1960 with Steve Plytas, Nancy Nevinson, Rowena Torrance, Malya Nappi, Norman Bowler, Joseph Levine
3 The Storm May 17th 1960 with Steve Plytas, Nancy Nevinson, Rowena Torrance, Malya Nappi, Norman Bowler, Joseph Levine, John Barrard, David Ludman
4 Salvage May 24th 1960 with Steve Plytas, Nancy Nevinson, Rowena Torrance, Malya Nappi, Norman Bowler, Joseph Levine, John Barrard
5 A Loss for Luciano May 31st 1960 with Steve Plytas, Nancy Nevinson, Rowena Torrance, Malya Nappi, Norman Bowler, Joseph Levine
6 Romano's Return June 7th 1960 with Steve Plytas, Nancy Nevinson, Rowena Torrance, Malya Nappi, Norman Bowler, John Barrard, Bruno Barnabe.

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THE ROVING REASONS (1960, Associated Rediffusion)
This 1960 serial written by Peter Ling (the first story is also credited to Allan McLelland) was shown on Fridays at 5pm
Each 25 minute story starred Noelle Middleton as Mary Reason, Charles Morgan as her husband Simon, a roving reporter on The Daily Post, with young Cavan Kendall as 16 year old Jonathan Reason, who has just sat his GCEs. Cavan said that he enjoyed location shooting on "a flying visit" to Italy, Sicily and Malta.
The only other regular in the series was Gerald Andersen as foreign editor John Boult.
The directors were: odd numbered episodes Prudence Nesbitt. Even numbered episodes: Jim Pople.

The stories were:
1 (Friday 1st April) The Dublin Double, with Tony Quinn, Mignon O'Doherty, Sheila Ward, Anthony Wilson, Declan Harvey.
2 (Friday 8th April) with Steve Plytas, Edward Rhodes, Arthur Gross, Jane Lamb, Nicholas Brady. Episode title not stated, but set in Holland.
3 (Good Friday 15th April) The Civil Sevillian with Graydon Gould, Laurence Payne, Jill Booty, Carter Douglas, Michael da Costa.
4 (Friday 22nd April) The Maltese Malefactor.
5 (Friday 29th April) The Oslo Ostler with Olaf Pooley, Milo Sperber, Dixon Adams, Graham Carnow- the family are now in Norway.
6 (Friday 6th May) The Neat Neapolitan with Alexander Archdale, Rashid Karaplet.
7 (Friday 13th May) The Paris Parasol with Terence Soall, Daniel Thorndike, Carlos Douglas.
8 (Friday 20th May) The Catanian Catastrophe with Nicholas Amer, Steven Scott, Amanda Grinting - in Sicily.
9 (Friday 27th May) The Salzburg Salesman with David Lander, Murray Yeo, Gisela Birke, Bernard Kay.
10 (Friday 3rd June) The Gibbering Gibraltarian with Donald Hewlett, Norman Mitchell, Tony Hilton, Arnold Yarrow.
11 (Friday 10th June) The Copenhagen Copperplate with Elizabeth Hart, Tony Bateman, John Gatrell, Miranda Connell.
12 (Friday 17th June) The Athenian Athlete with Andre Charles, David Cole, Jacqueline Henry, Robert James.
13 (Friday 24th June) The London Lunch Basket- The family have completed their roving assignment and find one further adventure on their London doorstep.
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Joan and Leslie
ITV's first home grown domestic situation comedy starred Leslie Randall and his wife Joan Reynolds.
It began on Sunday afternoon, October 2nd 1955 as a fortnightly 15 minute series. It was called Leslie Randall Entertains and was produced by Bill Ward, directed by Dicky Leeman. It ran until April 1956. By this date, ATV had now begun in the Midlands, and the programme was doubled in length that summer, retitled Joan and Leslie, and shown on Tuesdays at 9pm. Theme music: Roll the Carpet Up, by Derek Nelson. Harry Towb and Noel Dyson were regular supporting stars. However, an early networking impasse resulted in London viewers no longer seeing the programme they had helped to popularise! But the husband and wife team just had to return, and were offered a £7,000 annual contract for a new networked series starting in September 1956 on Mondays at 8.30pm. This was scripted alternate weeks by Gerald Kelsey and Dick Sharples, and the next week by John Law and Bill Craig. The producer was Hugh Rennie.
The long run of weekly shows ended on Whit Monday June 10th 1957. But the same cast with Joan and Leslie now on a reported £12,000 annual contract, returned for a final series, again on Mondays at 8.30pm in December 1957, though it moved to Wednesdays for the last few shows in March 1958. Retitled The Randall Touch, Joan and Leslie returned during summer 1958, with the same scriptwriters alternating. That was the end of their tv series, and talk of a film never materialised. It's difficult for us today to realise their popularity, a kind of English version of I Love Lucy, though Joan claimed, "it's unfair to compare us with that show. We're completely different. Wheareas Ricky is a foil for Lucy, I'm a foil for Leslie."

Joan and Leslie returned during the 1960's for the long running Fairy Snow commercials, and made a final series of 13 programmes of Joan and Leslie in Australia at the end of 1969.
Note- regrettably TV Times never mentioned any supporting actors in this show (apart from regulars Harry Towb and Noel Dyson), but in the programme on Jan 21st 1957 were Cameron Hall and Julian Strange, while Feb 25th 1957 did also include Bill Shine and Gerton Klauber. The April 8th 1957 show was "cancelled" as Leslie Randall had contracted mumps (Harry Towb had missed the previous two shows with the same complaint).

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Mary Britten MD
This was a brave bid by a regional company to break into the ITV network. Southern TV soon learned the hard facts of life.
Starring Brenda Bruce in the title role
with Ronald Howard as her husband Stephen Britten.
Also in most of the stories were Henry Vidon (Dr Bishop), Olive Milbourne (Miss Wicker), Jessica Spencer (Miss Jackson), James Raglan (Walter Davis), and Bernard Archard (Councillor Pyke). Gillian Lind (Winnie Bishop) was a regular also, until she fell ill and missed the final programmes.
Script: Peter Kay (a name for the joint writing team of Giles Cooper, Stanley Miller, and Kenneth Hyde). Producer: Hugh Munro.
The fictional setting was the town of Farrant, "seventeen and a half miles south west of Casterbridge." The opening scene was actually shot on the footpath by the river at Winchester.

1 Opening story- Home
Saturday 13th September 1958 6.30pm

2 Like a House on Fire
Sat 20th September 1958. Mary Britten is trying to settle in to domestic life. Stephen her husband finds having two doctors under one roof spells trouble. With Coral Fairweather (Mrs Wigg).

3 A Day's Fishing
Sat 27th September 1958, with Irene Handl as Mrs Levy, plus: George Dudley as 'Bandages,' Humphrey Heathcote as Bar customer, Ruth Kettlewell... First neighbour, Henrietta Russell... Second neighbour, Ronald Cardew... Old soldier, and Basil Beale... Police constable.

4 The Imperfect Secretary
October 4th 1958: Stephen discovers that even the best of intentions can be misconstrued. And Mary shows how medical advice need not be confined to the sick. With Jemma Hyde as Julia Haynes, Violet Gould as Mrs Pink.

5 The Wrecker
October 11th 1958: with Humphery Heath, Peter Vaughan and Margaret Long.

6 The Man from the Sea
Sat 18th October 1958: Although Mary is doing her best not to practise as a doctor, an occasion arises when she has to fight to keep an unexpected patient, and this time Stephen agrees. Also in cast: Murray Hayne... Ian, Alexis Chesnaker... Marinu, Edward Kelsey... Aleko, and Ian Macnaughton... Mr Fraser.

7 The Brothers
Sat 25th October 1958: Mystery surrounds David, one of Stephen's first-term pupils, when he is sent home from school. Mary investigates, but the question is eventually solved by a surprise visitor to Dr Bishop's house. With Richard O'Sullivan as David/ Jimmy, plus John Symonds... Pyke Jr, Elsie Wagstaff... Granny, and Robert Crewdson... Bar customer (also in next story).

8 The Wanderers
1st November 1958: Mary takes a night call, giving Stephen a problem to which there seems no answer. With David Franks as Ben, Nan Marriott-Watson as Ma, Ann Cooke as Lil, Celia Hewitt as Liz, Coral Fairweather as Mrs Wigg, Angela Owen as Miss Edwards, and Robert Crewdson as pub customer.

9 Bonfire Night
8th November 1958: Dr Mary Britten MD, who for reasons of health is helping her husband with his work, unearths a Guy Fawkes plot. Also in the cast: Hal Osmond as Fred.

10 English Without Tears
15th November 1958: In Shakespeare's plays the women often have a knack of getting their own way. Stephen finds that this is true in real life, and Mary takes a hint from the classics. With John Symonds... Pyke Jr, Christopher Hey... John Brand, Cameron Hall... Mr Wilberforce, and Katherine Parr... Mrs Pyke.

11 The Doctor in the Dark
Sat 22nd November 1958: Mary helps Dr Bishop to see things clearly- and he knows what he has to do. With Nancy Roberts... Grannie, Sheelah Wilcocks... Mrs Bates, Frazer Hines... Geoff Bates, Donald Finlay... First chemist, and Geoffrey Goldsmith... Second chemist.

12 A Partner From The Past
This was the final episode to be fully networked, and was shown on Saturday 29th November 1958.
With Neil Hallett... Alex Farrell, Angela Owen... Miss Edwards, Susan Maryott... Mavis.
Mary's partner may be new, but he is by no means a stranger.

ABC replaced the series the following week with their own drama All Aboard, and this really sounded the death knell for the programme. However it did continue on Southern TV and in some other regions including London.

13 Help
Sat 6th December 1958. Mary seeks help in the house, and unexpectedly gets it.

15 No Room for Janet
Sat 20th December 1958. It seems there is 'no room' for Janet this Christmas time, but Mary intends to avert a tragedy

18 The Microscope
Sat 10th January 1959. Mary takes a class, and three people learn something they would rather not have known.

The very last story was number 19, shown on 17th January 1959. A report in the trade press announced that "after nineteen weeks Southern TV is to drop its weekly serial. It was one of the first local stations to network a programme from the beginning of its existence." Maybe it was the last.

Thanks to Keith Campbell for some of this data. If you can add any further details, your help will be acknowledged.
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Abortive Series (1956-61)
Interesting projected series that never made it into production. Can you add any data?

Ali Baba or Arabian Nights, planned as early as 1956 by the Danzigers, was finally scheduled for filming in 1962, but was stillborn when the studios were closed. Rumours suggested Daniel Massey would have been the star. Max Varnel said he directed some sequences, presumably location scenes.

A1 at Lloyds - This troubled project was first mooted in 1957 and finally scheduled for starting filming on 6th July 1959. But delays pushed this date back until September. Producer was James Swan, associate producer: Jesse Corallo, script editor: Doreen Montgomery, script for pilot by Leigh Vance, and it was to be made by Sydney Box Productions, part of the Rank Organisation. When Sydney Box suffered a stroke and had to retire from the business, the writing was on the wall for this projected series in October 1959. As far as I can ascertain, no complete episodes were ever finished.

Continental Patrol - Broderick Crawford, star of the long running and successful Highway Patrol, came to London in the summer of 1959 to drum up support for an international version of his popular American series. John Nasht, an experienced European Producer (Orient Express etc) was booked as the producer, and a provisional starting date for filming at Pinewood was scheduled for 16th November that year. As however this was to be another Sydney Box production, the plan collapsed when Mr Box fell ill.

A Man of the World - Ubangi Film Productions were formed by Dan Jackson and Russell Enoch (aka William Russell) and in January 1959 a report stated "the pilot is being made in Naples now. Balbina, Russell's pretty French actress wife, will be in it too."
It's not known if this pilot was ever completed. Russell stated his idea was to sell it to the BBC.

Staircase 13 - ABC (Midlands/The North) were said to be in discussion with Alastair Sim over a series of this name during the summer of 1959. What a pity that it never came to anything!

Women in Love - Sapphire Films planned to make this series in the autumn of 1959 following on from their ambitious The Four Just Men. This latter series seems to have been less of a financial success than expected. As a result this project, Women in Love, was abandoned. Basil Appleby was casting director. Louis Marks was Script Editor and Marc Brandel definitely wrote a script for the proposed programme. According to a report in August that year, Sapphire had already got "several completed scripts." Production had been tentatively scheduled to start in November 1959 at Walton Studios.
Sapphire had planned sveral other series at this time, which fell through making even less progress than Women in Love. These series were
'Stingaree' to be made on location in Australia with scripts by Raymond Bowers,
'Underground,' the theme being the French Resistance in the last war (Whether these two bore any relation at all to Whiplash and Sword in the Web respectively, anyone know?).
Sapphire's final attempt to make another tv series came in February 1960, when an agreement was announced with the trustee of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's estate (his son) to make a number of feature and tv films based on the great writer's novels and short stories. "The Conan Doyle properties will be filmed by Sapphire at Walton Studios. Mrs Hannah Fisher will act as Executive Producer, and Eugene Gutowski and Henry E Lester will act as Associate Producers."
However The Four Just Men was Sapphire's last film series, and the company eventually decided to cease production in favour of starting a writing school for aspiring writers.

The Monte Carlo Story was a series mooted in summer 1959 by Seymour Dorner, who had recently left Sapphire Films to form Command Films Inc. A series of 39 half hour films were projected.

VC Productions, Dennis Vance and Howard Connell (later they were joined by R Rowson), were hatching plans in early autumn 1959 for numerous series which never came to fruition. These included:
Gentlemen in Retirement a half hour comedy series, which would be part financed by the BBC. In January 1960 it was described as "a suspense series round retired police chiefs!"
Title undecided, a pilot for a series about plastic surgeon Dr Maxwell Maltz. The star would have been Eric Portman, and the pilot was to be made in New York. Their publicity the following January fails to mention this project.
The Company of Four was announced in January 1960, four 90 minute plays: "Peggy Ashcroft, Ralph Richardson, Michael Redgrave and Edith Evans have agreed to act."

Soho - starring Richard Basehart. Following on from the success of his long running series, this was the proposed title for a new series from Douglas Fairbanks Jr. In an interview, he stated he was starting negotiations in January 1960. Unlike his earlier marathon series this never got going.

The Rolling Stones
This 1960 six part ABC series was scheduled to start on Saturday January 23rd 1960. The stars were Barbara Kelly and Bernard Braden, along with their children Chris and Kelly Braden.
The story was based around father Sandy Stone, a maker of film travelogues, his family helping him shoot them in various spots around the world. Based in London, he might be phoned by his New York boss to go anywhere in the world. He takes his family with him, only leaving behind Kim his youngest at school.
The first scripts were by Tom Espie and Stanley Myers. Incidental music was written by Paddy Roberts. The producer was Anthony Finigan.
But the series was never shown, the quiz For Love of Money replaced it. Why? ABC stated the show "was not quite what they expected." Another reason offered was that the programmes had not yet been recorded! Another that Braden had to fly urgently back to his home country of Canada in connection with a television station there. However the truth emerged that summer when ABC admitted the the scripts "were found to be unsatisfactory," although two episodes had been taped. Braden said, "one good thing is that The Rolling Stones will be definitely gathering moss. None of us were happy with the scripts." Anyone seen any mossy tapes of the show???

Women - was the title of a proposed series by Anna Neagle and Herbert Wilcox. They announced a series of six one hour dramas to be shot starting in February 1960. Based on classic women writers (Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Anne Bronte), Doreen Montgomery (again!) definitely wrote three of the proposed scripts, and in January that year, Wilcox claimed four had been written. Anna Neagle planned to read an introduction portraying the author of the story, and speaking as the author in the first person. Herbert Wilcox flew to America in February, when his American backers wanted to turn the stories into half hour ones. Probably an impasse was reached and I don't think the project ever got off the ground. (Note: as early as October 1955, it had been announced that Wilcox had teamed up with Bernard Delfont, "to produce British made films for television," and that "scripts for the first series are already being completed," but whether this was the same project as 'Women' is unknown.)

No. 13 Golden Square was at the planning stage in February 1960. "This will be the first time an American network goes into partnership with a British producing company." The companies in question were the American ABC Network and ATV. The address of the title is a tourist information bureau, and the series was planned as a "light comedy." Clearly the strains of a co-production lead to the abandonment of the idea, though it is said a pilot script had been written, by a Canadian named Alex Guiness.

Hong Kong Harbour - (Cable Dragon-Fly had been the original proposed title for this series)- February 1960 was the starting date for production scheduled by producers Sam Bischoff and Dave Diamond. After planned location shooting in Hong Kong, the series of 13 hour long colour films was to have been made in Britain. Hammer Films' executive producer Michael Carreras announced "at least 12 scripts will be completely cut and dried before beginning production." He added that Gordon Wellesley had already completed the first. Another writer was said to be Joyce Bellack. Visa to Canton starring Richard Basehart and Lisa Gastoni was definitely made, but with the series aborted as early as June that year, it was turned into a 75 minute feature film. Shooting for this story was definitely done during June 1960 both at Bray Studios, and on Monkey Island in the Thames. This is the only physical relic of this aborted series, as I think the 1961 Hammer feature film Terror of the Tongs, was never intended to be part of this project.

Sinbad the Sailor- Charles Schneer Productions announced this half hour series in March 1960, to be shot in colour in England and Spain. Ray Harryhausen's Dynamation system was to have been employed, as used in the 1958 film The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad. Production under Sidney Cole was to have commenced in summer 1960.

The Ambassador's Daughter was a pilot that ITC announced that they would film in May/June 1960. It sounds like part of their ill fated attempt at Anglo-American co-operation for the writers were to be Seeman and Rose

The World is My Beat- Godfrey Grayson confirmed he had done some location shooting in 1960 for Danzigers' 78 episode series about a roving reporter writing syndicated stories from all over the world: see Brian Taylor's reminiscence

Brainwaves (1960) - After Eric Sykes starred in his successful BBC series Sykes and A... in 1960, he made an effort to break into the American market with a pilot to be made by Roxy Films. "The series will be based on Sykes' reactions to the peculiar, crazy, or bizarre inventions of the last century," said B Charles-Dean, head of Roxy. He described it as "intelligent Goonery with a theme. There is already enough material for 26 half hour films," he claimed in July 1960, adding that filming of the pilot would commence very shortly. Dail Ambler provided the outline for this, as well as full scripts for the rest of the series. In September that year it was announced that Paul Merton (not today's comedian) was to write the scripts, and music would be provided by Norrie Paramor. Interesting that Sykes stated that he "won't make another long tv series," this would be his last, he saw the future in feature films. Fortunately, for us, his career with MGM didn't take off and he returned to the BBC, though what became of Brainwaves, who knows? (This photo shows Sykes in costume discussing the project with B Charles-Dean)

Fleet Street (1960)- Apparently unrelated to ATV's Deadline Midnight, the plan was for ITC to make this filmed series, and naturally one of the characters would have been an American correspondent attached to the Fleet Street office. By the middle of the year the proposed title of this hour long series had been altered to London Bureau, and Julian Bond had done some background research for it, and Bob Musel of United Press was brought in to provide authentic story backgrounds, but maybe the idea was just a little too similar to the ATV series

The Man from Monte Carlo- though this was never anything more than an idea, Crestview Productions who made the series The Pursuers had announced this series would be shot at Elstree "back-to-back" with The Pursuers starting December 1960. Nothing seems to have come of it. Crestview directors were Ian Warren (1913-2009) and Tom Donald.
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The Fox

NBC announced in February 1957 that a deal had been struck for ITP (later ITC) to film this series in England starring Anthony Dexter as an eighteenth century French royal.

David Diamond (of Sam Bischoff-David Diamond company) was in charge of production, which never got beyond the pilot, which, it's good to report, has definitely survived.

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Professor Tim
was completed in April 1957 and given a private showing in Dublin that month. It was made for American TV by Dublin Film and Television Productions: "if it is a success the company plan to film short versions of 39 other Abbey plays."
The famous Abbey players were the stars of this film, with Seamus Kavanagh in the title role, others appearing included Ray McAnally. Dialogue director was Ria Mooney from a script by Robert S Baker, with Englishman Henry Cass also brought in to direct.

The same group also made the film
Boyd's Shop with Geoffrey Golden as Boyd. This received a press screening in Dublin on April 7th 1958. A report stated, "the play is one of 13 Abbey successes to be filmed for the American market." Henry Cass again directed, with Ria Mooney as dialogue director.

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Trader Horn -

This 1958 series was first announced in August 1957, when it was stated that Hollywood producer Michel Kraike had acquired the rights to Trader Horn. "Filming is to be done in London and Kenya," he added.
Ronald Kinnock was probably the writer. The company
Gross-Krasne made at least a pilot, and it is mentioned in the 1959 Film Review Annual.
Clifford Evans and John Turner both said that they had appeared in it, and Jane Asher also put in print that she appeared in this "tv film." However no-one has seen it in living memory, to my knowledge... Unless you can tell me otherwise

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Calling All Lovers

Nicholas Parsons made a curious light situation comedy in 1959 in Antwerp, for the Belgian United Continents company.
Lana Morris was his leading lady in this pilot film completed in August that year.
Paul Tabori wrote the script, and also wrote two further stories for the proposed series of 39, which however seems to have not got off the ground. But this pilot was definitely completed, by producer Jacques Verdicjk, a Flemish tv producer.
Several of the technicians were British, including Eric Bast (lighting) and Peter Tabori (camera).
Does Mr Parsons himself recall anything of this abortive project?

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Rogue for Hire
was one of a number of projects by the company Gross-Krasne. In the 1950's Jack J Gross and Philip Krasne made some low budget feature films, and had a string of successful television series behind them, several starring
Thomas Mitchell, another being The Lone Wolf with Louis Hayward. In 1957 they became more ambitious making Adventures of a Jungle Boy and African Patrol both on location in Africa, before a 1958 attempt to film a series Trader Horn, which never got beyond a pilot. Then further problems in 1959 with a series that was to have been titled Fate (the first idea had been to call it Destiny). Gross-Krasne planned to shoot at Elstree two of the planned 39 half hour films, "not bothering with the expensive and often disheartening custom of making pilots," though what else these films were to have been only JG and PK know. However that project also collapsed before this troubled series, Rogue for Hire, set them back still further. Despite this failure Jack Gross did manage to make one further series with Louis Hayward, The Pursuers.

Originally Rogue for Hire was to have been called by the imitative title Have Plane Will Travel. Filming began in 1959 with star Jerome Thor in Hollywood, the plan had been to make this one of those American/British co-productions, with ABP Elstree Studios being used by producer Donald Hyde.
However I do not believe any of the proposed films were ever made in the UK, though the schedule drawn up was to start in November that year. Certainly Philip Levene confirmed that he had written some scripts for this series.
As regards the American episodes of Rogue for Hire, movie stunt pilot Paul Mantz contributed some sequences, about which it was reported in June 1959 that "several episodes have been completed." It does seem six were actually finished. The script for one episode, Operation Jaguar, survives, what else, who knows?
At the end of 1959 G-K axed the project, Thor being summoned back from Japan where he was shooting sequences for Rogue for Hire, in which Beverly Garland stated she was to appear. A statement claimed "the American-made films were not approved, and did not get a sale.".

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Mr Riviera

A 25 minute ITC pilot that was originally titled Sirocco was scheduled for shooting starting June 14th 1960. ITC held screen tests at the start of that month, choosing Charles Drake as the star. It would be interesting to know who else tested for the series, since a female lead could not be found.
As a result, production did not actually start until August 4th 1960. This pilot was made at MGM Studios Elstree, by producer Dennis O'Dell. Location shooting was done that month also, at Monte Carlo "with a cast of 20 people." The script was by Bill Strutton, the film was directed by Peter Graham Scott and produced by Denis O'Dell.
I remember it was actually screened on British television, by ATV. However this projected series never got beyond this pilot. Charles Drake played freelance reporter and photographer Neil McCrea, with guest star for this story Anna Gaylor as Annette Brosse.
Others in the cast were Warren Mitchell as Valgo, Kenneth Griffith as Martin, Harry Locke as Marius and Michael Peake as Sancha.
The storyline:
The Sirocco is a yacht, which sails into the harbour at Monte Carlo. On board is McCrea who receives this message from one of his editors:
'Planning feature on plastic surgeon, Jules Brosse killed in crash over Corniche. Appreciate new piece on him.'

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The Adventures of an Elephant Boy
Three pilot films were made starting late 1958, and finishing early April 1959, for a projected series of 26 starring 14 year old English lad David Wyman, who had lived in Ceylon all his life, who had won the part from, it is said, 120 boys who auditioned.
The scriptwriter and director was Kenneth Hume and the producer John Kennedy. The series was shot on location in Ceylon, but the team encountered problems with their Cingalese extras, who were allegedly paid in beer, but when this ran out, so did the extras! Worse, two cameramen were said to have died during the filming, as a result of snake bites. Less serious was the problem illustrating that old adage, Never Work with Animals or Children, for claimed Hume, "shots relying on the antics of animals took up a lot of time."
John Kennedy claimed that the series had been made in Ceylon because "within the Commonwealth, there is a feast fit for a king of television material." He also wanted to avoid the "vice like grip on British screens held by American productions," a very laudable aim, but one which caused the downfall of the project. For Kennedy himself admitted, "I need to sell this series to America. In Britain I would only get £4,000 for a film from ITV and £2,000 from the BBC. They cost anything from £12,000 to £16,000 each to make." (As manager of Tommy Steele, Kennedy added, "If this series is a success, I will set up another company and bring in Tommy Steele and Larry Parnes, his ex-partner.")
Anyone know if any tv station bought up Elephant Boy, and even more boldly, screened it? They were offered to Lew Grade, but I think he must have said No! Details are on the net of one film shown on US tv in 1971 and repeated in 1972 that did star David Wyman that must be one of these pilots. Plot outline: When David's widowed mother dies, he runs into the jungle with his pet elephant to live off the land. He comes across elephant poachers and tries to set one of the animals free but is shot. His elephant pet saves him
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PILOT PROGRAMMES
Pilot shows were all the rage at the end of the 1950's.
Click titles for details of a few that were definitely made though none made it into a full series. If you have seen any of these, or can add more info, please send the details!

Professor Tim (1957)
The Fox (1958)
The Highwayman (1958)
Trader Horn (1958)
The Adventures of an Elephant Boy (1958/9)
The Locked Door (1959)
Dick Turpin (1959)
Rogue for Hire (1959)
Calling All Lovers (1959)
Rainbow (1960)
Have Jazz- Will Travel (1960)
Mr Riviera (1960)
King of Diamonds (1960)
Though this site is about UK productions, I'm including these next two as they starred British actors:
North of '53 (1959) - made in Vancouver, starring Archie Duncan. He played a bush pilot named Archie McNab, posted at Lost Lake in the present day Yukon.

Jonnie and me (1960) - made in Mexico, with Richard Greene - see my review.

See also my reviews of 2 pilots that have survived:
The Man Who Walks By Night (1949),
The Lives of Frankenstein (1958)
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The Highwayman (1958)
Premiered on ATV London on Saturday June 14th 1958 at 6pm, several repeat showings followed though this 25 minute ITC film never got beyond this pilot, sadly. The storylines were to revolve round an eighteenth century gentleman who assumed the disguise of a highwayman to save victims of injustice.
Synopsis of this pilot titled The Chimneysweep: Luke, a young chimney sweep, is accused of stealing a valuable emerald. James Macdonald does not believe the evidence and sets out along the Brighton Road, in disguise, to find the proof that will save the boy from the gallows.

The cast included several old hands of historical tv series, apart from its swashbuckling film star. These included Richard O'Sullivan (later to be in Dick Turpin), Adrienne Corri (co-star of Sword of Freedom), and Stanley van Beers (the evil Chauvelin in Scarlet Pimpernel).
The complete cast was:
Louis Hayward... James Macdonald
Richard O'Sullivan... Luke
Adrienne Corri... Lady Sylvia
Sam Kydd... Jerry Badger
Peter Coke... Lord Harrington
Anne Blake... Mrs Badger
Thomas Heathcote... Willetts
Carl Bernard... Crouch
Jack May... Cowley
John Dearth... Somers
Michael Peake... Pendleton
Peter Retey... Fletcher
Stanley van Beers... Chief Judge
Directed by Robert Day.

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Rainbow (1960)

This was a film series for which as many as nine pilots were made in colour, intended for showing on television, or even in the cinema. As each story lasted 13 minutes, the British tv slot targetted might well have been A-R's Small Time.
It was the brainchild of Honoria Plesch (1919–1990), a Hungarian born stage designer and producer.
"She has shown both taste and financial courage," critic Margaret Cowan wrote in January 1960.
But did anyone buy up the programmes? Certainly it seems doubtful if the projected series of 39 ever got completed. However one episode, 'The Artist,' was entered in the 1960 Venice Festival.
The central character was a radio controlled doll, and you can find an article by AM Atton on the net about how it operated. A book entitled Eight Rainbow Tales was issued in that year, written by Diana Marr-Johnson who had scripted the films. So the project wasn't entirely wasted.
Most interestingly, the action consisted of humans interacting with the doll. Cyril Chamberlain played "opposite Rainbow" in some of the tales, and others who made appearances included Nick Bond, son of writer Julian Bond, Robin Gannell, and Daphne Forman. Other children were extras, if you know of any, please let me know. Some were no doubt Swiss, since the films seem to have been made there, the Rainbow doll being known there as Monsieur Arc-En-Ciel.
Miss Plesch directed the films and stated, "I have had much help and advice from Frank Launder."
But no buyer?

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Have Jazz- Will Travel (1960)

A pilot for this series was definitely made and is at BFI. Whether any more of the planned 26 or 39 half hour programmes were ever made is uncertain. Completion of this pilot was announced in March 1960, those appearing were Chris Barber's Band and the Tony Kinsey Quartet, with scenes around various locations in London. It was stated that production on the series would commence that June. However at the Marquee Club on April 19th and 20th filming was definitely done of four numbers by Chris Barber and three by Joe Harriot.
Ron Rowson Associates stated that Dick Lester would direct this series, he had already made the pilot. Steve Race was musical director, and Bob Krasker the lighting and camera supervisor.
As the title suggests, it was all about jazz both trad and modern. To go with the jazz, filmed shots of the locations were initially planned to include London, Paris, Rome and Oslo. Later plans were firmed up to have two shows in London, two in Paris, two in Rome, with also two in Rome and two in Stockholm, and more ambitiously one each in Warsaw and Moscow. So, no surprise that Rowson was able to claim there was strong interest for the series not only in USA but also in Germany and Australia. "We are going out to show the working calibre of European music," Rowson claimed, "the camera will be the guide of the series and bandleaders will introduce the numbers.... We will be shooting the series at live sessions so as to capture the atmosphere of a jazz club."

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